Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)                  1 2 3 4 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 203 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 220)
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 153)
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Journal of Child Sexual Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Health Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Journal of Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
American Journal of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Traumatic Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Health and Social Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Social Work in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Exercise Science & Fitness     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Early Childhood Research Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Implementation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Mental Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Health & Place     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Quality in Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Public Health Policy     Partially Free   (Followers: 23)
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Applied Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Mental Health Review Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Psychology, Health & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Social Work in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Tobacco Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Global Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Open Journal of Safety Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Family Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Policy and Practice in Health and Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Healthcare Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Canadian Family Physician     Partially Free   (Followers: 14)
Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Creativity in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Social Work in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Family & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Health Promotion and Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Public Health Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Health Economics and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Spirituality in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Women & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Diversity and Equality in Health and Care     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
School Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Healthcare Risk Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Mental Health Counseling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Healthcare Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Public Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Health Geographics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Public Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Behavioural and Healthcare Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Health Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Workplace Behavioral Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Hastings Center Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal Of Allied Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Revue d'Épidémiologie et de Santé Publique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Epidemics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Rehabilitation Process and Outcome     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of School Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Primary Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Gesundheitsökonomie & Qualitätsmanagement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
EcoHealth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Sexual Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Muslim Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Risk Management and Healthcare Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Developing Areas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Healthcare Information Systems and Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Home Health Care Services Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Infection and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Development Effectiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Public Health Management and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Consumer Health on the Internet     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexual Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Southern African Journal of Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Communication in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Research in Children's Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Health Promotion & Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South African Family Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Theory & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World Health & Population     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Public Health in Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Public Health Genomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
AJOB Empirical Bioethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
NEW SOLUTIONS: A Journal of Environmental and Occupational Health Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Vascular Health and Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health SA Gesondheid     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Institute for Security Studies Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Noise and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ElectronicHealthcare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Atención Primaria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gaceta Sanitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Water Quality, Exposure and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
World Medical & Health Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Environmental Sciences Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Drogues, santé et société     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Biology, Agriculture and Healthcare     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SMAD, Revista Electronica en Salud Mental, Alcohol y Drogas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of E-Health and Medical Communications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Dramatherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
FASEB BioAdvances     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
South African Journal of Child Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Health Services Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Internationale Revue Fur Soziale Sicherheit     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Research Methods in Medicine & Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
médecine/sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of The Egyptian Public Health Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Facultad Nacional de Salud Pública     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Poblacion y Salud en Mesoamerica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Healthcare Delivery Reform Initiatives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Adultspan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tidsskrift for Forskning i Sygdom og Samfund     Open Access  
Giornale Italiano di Health Technology Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Israel Journal of Health Policy Research     Open Access  
Revista de Ciencias Médicas de Pinar del Río     Open Access  
Revista Médica Electrónica     Open Access  
Saúde Coletiva     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias de la Salud     Open Access  
Psicologia, Saúde e Doenças     Open Access  
Portularia     Open Access  
Motricidade     Open Access  
Investigaciones Andina     Open Access  
Ensaios e Ciência : Ciências Biológicas, Agrárias e da Saúde     Open Access  
Salud Colectiva     Open Access  
Revista de la Universidad Industrial de Santander. Salud     Open Access  
Revista U.D.C.A Actualidad & Divulgación Científica     Open Access  
Revista Peruana de Medicina Experimental y Salud Pública     Open Access  
Revista Gerencia y Políticas de Salud     Open Access  
Hacia la Promoción de la Salud     Open Access  
CES Medicina     Open Access  
Annali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità     Open Access  
Face à face     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Health and Environment     Open Access  
Iranian Journal of Public Health     Open Access  
Revista Chilena de Terapia Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Chilena de Salud Pública     Open Access  
Revista de Comunicación y Salud     Open Access  
Prävention und Gesundheitsförderung     Hybrid Journal  
Child's Nervous System     Hybrid Journal  

        1 2 3 4 | Last

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Evaluation & the Health Professions
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.701
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0163-2787 - ISSN (Online) 1552-3918
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Acknowledgement of Reviewers for 2022

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 110 - 111
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Volume 46, Issue 1, Page 110-111, March 2023.

      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-02-10T04:11:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221150827
      Issue No: Vol. 46, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • The Validation of the Kutcher Adolescent Depression 6-Item Scale in a
           Sample of Colombian Preadolescents and Adolescents

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      Authors: Kelly Romero- Acosta, Garth E. Lipps, Gillian A. Lowe, Roger Gibson, Andrés Ramirez-Giraldo
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Against the background of a lack of screening instruments for measuring depressive symptoms in Colombian adolescents and preadolescents, this study aims to establish the internal consistency reliability, component structure and the concurrent and discriminant validity of the Kutcher Adolescent Depression Six-Item Scale (KADS-6) among preadolescent school students in Sincelejo, Colombia. Participated 710 youth (10.8 years of age ± .75 years) divided into two groups to cross-validate analyses that were undertaken to determine the internal consistency reliability, as well as the concurrent and discriminant validity, of the KADS-6 among preadolescents. Results show that over 95% of the sample did not report problems understanding any of the items on the KADS-6. The KADS-6 had acceptable levels of internal consistency reliability, concurrent and discriminant validity and was unidimensional. In conclusion, The KADS-6 is well understood by Colombian preadolescents and has adequate psychometric properties in adolescents, rendering it acceptable for use with Colombian preadolescents.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-05-15T05:16:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231175931
       
  • Measurement Characteristics of the Wraparound Fidelity Index Short Form:
           Results from a Statewide Implementation

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      Authors: Brandon K. Attell, Ashley C. Singleton, Susan A. McLaren, Giselle Moses
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Implementation fidelity has been an important issue in the service provision and associated outcomes of Wraparound, an intensive, individualized care planning process that uses a team-based approach to integrate youth into the community to minimize the need for intensive, institutional services. In response to the growing need to monitor fidelity to the Wraparound process, a variety of instruments have been created and tested. In this study, the authors present the results of several analyses designed to better understand the measurement characteristics of the Wraparound Fidelity Index Short Form (WFI-EZ), a multi-informant fidelity instrument. The results from our analysis of 1027 WFI-EZ responses indicate that the internal consistency of the instrument is very good, although the negatively worded items did not appear to function as well as positively worded items. Results from two confirmatory factor analyses were unable to validate the original domains identified by the instrument developers, but for certain outcomes the WFI-EZ demonstrated deseriable predictive validity. Preliminary evidence is also provided that WFI-EZ responses likely differ by respondent type. We conclude by discussing the implications of using the WFI-EZ in programming, policy, and practice considering the findings of our study.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-05-13T11:39:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231175184
       
  • Beck Hopelessness Scale-20: Dimensionality and Nomological Validity Among
           Colombian School-Age Adolescents

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      Authors: Carlos Alejandro Pineda-Roa, Adalberto Campo-Arias, Ana Mercedes Bello-Villanueva
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      To establish the validity of the BHS-20, a sample of 2064 adolescent students aged 14 and 17 years (M = 15.61, SD = 1.05) were invited to participate in the research. Cronbach’s alpha (α) and McDonald’s omega (ω) were computed to evaluate the internal consistency. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the dimensionality of the BHS-20. The Spearman correlation (rs) with depressive symptoms and risk of suicide scores of the Plutchik Suicide Risk Scale were computed to explore the nomological validity. The BHS-20 showed a high internal consistency (α = .81, ω = .93), an adequate one-dimensional structure with an excellent adjustment [χ2 S-B = 341, df = 170, p < .01, Comparative Fit Index = .99, RMSEA = .03] and acceptable nomological validity with depressive symptoms (rs = .47, p < .01) and scores for suicide risk (rs = .33, p < .01). In conclusion, current results suggest that the BHS-20 demonstrates validity and reliability among Colombian adolescent students.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-05-06T12:25:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231174479
       
  • Mental Health Changes in Healthcare Workers DURING COVID-19 Pandemic: A
           Systematic REVIEW of Longitudinal Studies

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      Authors: Saltanat Umbetkulova, Akbota Kanderzhanova, Faye Foster, Valentina Stolyarova, Deanne Cobb-Zygadlo
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      This study provides an overview of research findings on long-term effects on healthcare workers mental health and factors associated with positive or negative changes. Medline and PubMed databases were searched for observational longitudinal studies and 18 papers were included in the review (PROSPERO: CRD42021260307). 12 articles indicated negative changes over time and six studies revealed a positive trend in a variety of mental health outcomes (anxiety, depression, insomnia, and others). Female sex, younger age, nursing occupation, frontline work, longer working hours and concerns about contracting COVID-19 were identified to be associated with negative changes. Conversely, a supportive environment, access to psychological resources, provision of sufficient personal protective equipment and availability of COVID-19 tests were linked to positive changes. Therefore, our findings can assist governmental and institutional authorities with effective interventions to improve psychological care for healthcare workers.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-05-05T04:27:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231165076
       
  • Psychometric Properties of the Turkish Version of the Abiloco: Factor
           Analysis

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      Authors: Esra Keskin, Ayşe Livanelioğlu
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The ABILOCO is a questionnaire measuring mobility in stroke patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the ABILOCO-Turkish. One hundred forty stroke patients were included. Thirteen items were rated according to 3 levels: difficult, easy, and impossible. The construct validity of the ABILOCO-Turkish was investigated using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. The reliability of the ABILOCO-Turkish was investigated through internal consistency approaches and test–retest reliability. The ABILOCO-Turkish was compared with the Timed Up & Go (TUG) test and the Berg Balance Scale for validity. The scale was repeated 1 week later for test–retest reliability. The Cronbach’s alpha value calculated was 0.96 and item–total score correlations were between 0.464 and 0.899. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) calculated for test–retest reliability was 0.989. According to the results, the ABILOCO-Turkish is highly correlated with the TUG (r: −0.830, p < 0.001) and the Berg Balance Scale (r: 0.919, p < 0.001). The exploratory factor analysis of the ABILOCO-Turkish showed that it is unidimensional, with this factor explaining 66.56% of the variance, and the construct validity was proven by confirmatory factor analysis. The Turkish version of the ABILOCO is a reliable and valid scale for evaluating mobility in stroke patients.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-05-02T05:15:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231172776
       
  • Impact of Multi-point Nursing Strategies Under a Clinical Problem-Solving
           Framework on Adverse Events Associated With Thyroid Nodule Resection

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      Authors: Jian Zhu, Yutao Zhao, Li Huang, Junqiang Ju
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The impact of multi-point nursing strategies drawing on a problem-solving clinical framework to examine adverse events associated with thyroid nodule resection was investigated. Patients (n = 98) who underwent thyroid nodule resection were divided into observation and control groups. Patients in the control group received conventional care, and patients in the observation group received a multi-point care strategy under a clinical problem-solving framework. The length of stay (p < .001), hospitalization cost (p < .001), nursing satisfaction scores (p < .001) of the observation group were longer or higher and statistically significant. The incidence of complications in the observation group (8.16%) was lower than that in the control group (22.45%). The incidence of adverse events in the observation group (2.04%) was lower than that in the control group (14.29%), and statistically significant (p < .05). The multi-point nursing strategy using a clinical problem-solving framework provided evidence that it shortened the length of stay, reduce hospitalization costs, improve psychological status, increase nursing satisfaction, and reduce complications and adverse events in patients undergoing thyroid nodule resection.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-04-24T09:37:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231172277
       
  • Validity and Reliability of Turkish Version of the Munich Wrist
           Questionnaire in Patients With Wrist Problems

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      Authors: Mehmet Yetiş, İsmail Ceylan, Mehmet Canlı, Ömer Alperen Gürses, Mensure Aslan, Levent Horoz, Abdulhamit Tayfur
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Evidence for the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Munich Wrist Questionnaire (MWQ), a patient reported outcome measurement tool (PROM) was evaluated. A total of 80 patients (54.1 ± 1.4 years, 68 females) with wrist problems were recruited. The MWQ was translated into Turkish (MWQ-TR). Criterion validity with Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) was tested by using Pearson’s correlation coefficients. Intraclass correlations coefficient (ICC) was used to analyze the test-retest reliability. There was a moderate correlation (r = −0.49, p < 0.001) between MWQ-TR and DASH, while correlations were strong between MWQ-TR and PRWE (r = 0.69, p < 0.001). Test-retest reliability of MWQ-TR was moderate (ICC = 0.67, 95% CI 0.26–0.84). The MWQ-Turkish version demonstrated evidence for its validity and reliability to evaluate pain, work/daily life activities and function in people with wrist problems in a Turkish population.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-04-20T09:32:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231172276
       
  • Is the Self-Evaluation of Resilience a Valid Assessment to Measure
           Resilience in Healthcare' A Confirmatory validation Study in Italian
           Healthcare Settings

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      Authors: Annalisa Pennini, Rosario Caruso, Gianluca Conte, Maddalena De Maria, Lauren Nirta, Arianna Magon, Giampaolo Armellin
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Although the Self-Evaluation of Resilience (SEOR) scale is a promising tool for assessing resilience in healthcare, its psychometric structure has not yet been confirmed. This study aimed to assess and validate the four-factor psychometric structure of the SEOR. Between September 2020 and January 2021, cross-sectional data were collected from randomly selected healthcare workers, managers, and administrators from a predefined network of 70 healthcare facilities in 12 Italian regions. The sample size was based on a Monte Carlo simulation using estimates from the SEOR developmental study. Two confirmatory factor models (first-order and second-order) were predefined. The responders (n = 199, response rate, 81%) were healthcare workers (n = 99; 49.7%), managers (n = 86; 43.2%), and administrators (n = 14; 7%). The two confirmatory factor models each showed a good fit in explaining sample statistics, corroborating the capacity of the scale to provide a total score of resilience and sub-scores for organizational resilience, network-based resilience, skill-based resilience, and individual-based resilience. The Molenaar-Sijtsma coefficients (internal consistency) ranged between 0.889 and 0.927. The SEOR enables managers and policy-makers to comprehensively screen resilience in healthcare from an epidemiological perspective.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-04-13T07:43:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231170236
       
  • Vaccine Conspiracy Beliefs Scale: Validation and Measurement Invariance in
           a Youth Sample

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      Authors: Veljko Jovanović, Milica Lazić, Vesna Gavrilov-Jerković, Marija Zotović-Kostić, Vojana Obradović
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The Vaccine Conspiracy Beliefs Scale (VCBS) is a widely used measure of conspiracy beliefs about vaccines, but evidence of its validity and measurement invariance, especially in youth samples, is still largely missing. The present study examined VCBS scores’ factor structure, measurement invariance, convergent and discriminant validity, and incremental predictive validity. A sample of 803 Serbian youths (age range 15–24; 59.2% females) was recruited for the study. A modified single-factor model of the VCBS was supported, and showed evidence of full scalar invariance across gender, age, vaccination status, and personal history of COVID-19. Evidence of the VCBS scores’ convergent and discriminant validity was obtained by examining associations with general conspiracy beliefs, vaccination attitudes, vaccination knowledge, intentions to get vaccinated against COVID-19, paranoia worries, fear of injections and blood draws, importance of God, self-rated health, and self-rated family’s financial situation. The VCBS scores predicted a unique variance in the intention to get vaccinated against COVID-19, over and above vaccination attitudes and vaccination knowledge. The results suggest that the VCBS is a valid measure of vaccine conspiracy beliefs in youth.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-04-12T09:12:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231170237
       
  • Researcher Views of Barriers to Clinical and Translational Research in a
           Statewide Program

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      Authors: Judy A. Kimberly, Stephen Kogut, John F. Stevenson, Jacquelyn Fede, Anthony R. Hayward, Meghan E. Tenca
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The Tracking and Evaluation Core of Rhode Island Advance-CTR conducted an online needs assessment survey at the program’s inception in 2016 and again in 2021. Now dealing with well-established support systems provided by the grant, we were particularly interested in how the perceived needs of the research community in Rhode Island might have changed over five years. Specifically, what barriers have been reduced or eliminated and which have persisted or increased' How do those barriers vary by demographic status and what implications do those differences have for the CTR' An online survey was completed by 199 researchers, who reported the extent to which they perceived the lack of access to a range of research supports as a barrier to conducting research at their institution. Overall, researchers indicated statistically significant changes from 2016 to 2021 such that a lack of pilot project funding and proposal development support had decreased as barriers, while space for research, and advice on commercial development, had increased. Statistically significant differences in the salience of particular barriers by some demographic variables were also noted and the results of this study suggest Centers for Clinical and Translational Research can have salutary effects on the research paradigm within their partnering institutions in a relatively short time.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-04-08T03:52:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231167942
       
  • Erratum

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      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-04-03T05:29:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231163901
       
  • Comparability of Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) and
           Written Tests for Assessing Medical School Students’ Competencies: A
           Scoping Review

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      Authors: Oswin Chang, Anne M Holbrook, Simran Lohit, Jiawen Deng, Janice Xu, Munil Lee, Alan Cheng
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) and written tests are commonly used to assess health professional students, but it remains unclear whether the additional human resources and expenses required for OSCEs, both in-person and online, are worthwhile for assessing competencies. This scoping review summarized literature identified by searching MEDLINE and EMBASE comparing 1) OSCEs and written tests and 2) in-person and online OSCEs, for assessing health professional trainees’ competencies. For Q1, 21 studies satisfied inclusion criteria. The most examined health profession was medical trainees (19, 90.5%), the comparison was most frequently OSCEs versus multiple-choice questions (MCQs) (18, 85.7%), and 18 (87.5%) examined the same competency domain. Most (77.5%) total score correlation coefficients between testing methods were weak (r < 0.40). For Q2, 13 articles were included. In-person and online OSCEs were most used for medical trainees (9, 69.2%), checklists were the most prevalent evaluation scheme (7, 63.6%), and 14/17 overall score comparisons were not statistically significantly different. Generally low correlations exist between MCQ and OSCE scores, providing insufficient evidence as to whether OSCEs provide sufficient value to be worth their additional cost. Online OSCEs may be a viable alternative to in-person OSCEs for certain competencies where technical challenges can be met.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-03-24T05:35:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231165797
       
  • Longitudinal Assessment to Evaluate Continued Certification and Lifelong
           Learning in Healthcare Professionals: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Robyn C. Ward, Kathy A. Baker, Dennis Spence, Colleen Leonard, Alysha Sapp, Shahid A. Choudhry
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The balance of lifelong learning with assessment for continued certification is a challenge faced by healthcare professions. The value of single-point-in-time assessments has been questioned, and a shift to longitudinal assessments (LA) has been undertaken to assess lifelong learning over-time. This scoping review was conducted to inform healthcare certifying organizations who are considering LA as an assessment tool of competence and lifelong learning in healthcare professionals. A search of 6 databases and grey literature yielded 957 articles. After screening and removal of duplicates, 14 articles were included. Most articles were background studies informing the underpinnings of LA in the form of progress testing, pilot studies, and process of implementation. Progress testing is used in educational settings. Pilot studies reported satisfaction with LA’s ease of use, online format, and provision of lifelong learning. Implementation processes reveal that key aspects of success include stakeholder participation, phased rollout, and a publicly available content outline. Initial outcomes data affirm that LA addresses knowledge gaps, and results in improved performance on maintenance of certification exams. Future research is needed to substantiate validity evidence of LA and its correlation with high-stakes exam performance when assessing lifelong learning and continued competence of healthcare professionals over time.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-03-24T04:08:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231164381
       
  • Psychometric Properties and Measurement Invariance of the LIVES Daily
           Hassles Scale in Chinese Samples

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      Authors: Kang Liu, Xiaofang Yu, Yan Cai, Dongbo Tu
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Daily hassles have a larger effect on our health and well-being than those major events in daily life. The present study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties and measurement invariance of the LIVES Daily Hassles Scale (LIVES-DHS) in Chinese samples, which consisted of 815 people at work aged between 20 and 60 years old. The results of both Explanatory Factor Analysis and Confirmatory Factor Analysis showed that the five-factor model solution was better than other solutions, which supported the original structure of LIVES-DHS. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficients of the five subdimensions varied between.721 and.818, with the entire scale of.920, and McDonald’s [math] values of the five subdimensions varied between.716 and.821, with the entire scale of.936. The results also showed the support for measurement invariance of the five-factor model across different groups, which is the first to offer evidence for configural, metric, scalar and strict invariance of LIVES-DHS across gender, age and educational groups.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-03-16T09:42:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231164782
       
  • Psychometrics of Job Stress-Related Presenteeism Scale among Turkish
           Nurses

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      Authors: Nihal Beklemis, Arzu K. Harmanci Seren, Brad Gilbreath
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Presenteeism occurs when workers are present at work but with diminished work capacity due to illness, stress, or other causes. Recent studies report that nursing is one of the leading professional groups experiencing presenteeism. Although studies of illness-related presenteeism predominate, fewer studies have investigated stress-related presenteeism. Nurses in Turkey are particularly vulnerable to stress-related presenteeism because of the country’s low nurse-to-patient ratio. A scale for measuring presenteeism from job stress — the Job-Stress-Related-Presenteeism Scale—has been developed but not validated. This study had two objectives: to adapt the Job-Stress-Related-Presenteeism Scale to Turkish to use in measuring of presenteeism from job stress among nurses; and to assess the scale’s validity. We conducted a cross-sectional study to test the content validity, construct validity, reliability, and stability of a Turkish version of the Job-Stress-Related Presenteeism Scale on a sample of 261 nurses. The content validity index of the Job-Stress-Related Presenteeism Scale was .65. Item-total score correlation values varied between .44 and .77. The confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the six-item, one-factor construct. The Cronbach’s alpha internal consistency coefficient was .86. Results indicated that our adapted version of the Job-Stress-Related Presenteeism Scale is valid and suitable for use in Turkey.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-03-15T06:23:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231164377
       
  • Effect of Seclusion on Mental Health Status in Hospitalized Psychiatric
           Populations: A Trial Emulation using Observational Data

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      Authors: Stéphanie Baggio, Stefan Kaiser, Alexandre Wullschleger
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The use of coercive practices, i.e., interventions against a person’s will, is controversial. Recent observational studies highlighted their potential detrimental effects on patients’ mental health, but this topic remains understudied. This study investigated the effect of a common coercive practice, seclusion (i.e., being locked in a closed room), on mental health using a trial emulation of observational data to allow causal inference. We used data from 1200 psychiatric inpatients, classified as being either secluded or non-secluded during their hospital stay. Inverse probability of treatment weighting was used to emulate the random assignment to the intervention. The primary outcome was the Health of the Nations Outcome Scales (HoNOS). The secondary outcome was the first item of the HoNOS, which focuses on overactive, aggressive, disruptive, or agitated behavior. Both outcomes were assessed at hospital discharge. There was a significant effect of seclusion with increases in both total HoNOS score (p = .002) and item 1 of the HoNOS (p = .01). Seclusion may have a negative causal effect of patients’ mental health status and should therefore be avoided in mental health care settings. Training efforts should raise the awareness of the medical staff about potential adverse effects instead of therapeutic benefits.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-03-11T01:11:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231164489
       
  • Seeking Help for Tinnitus and Satisfaction With Healthcare Providers
           Including Diagnosis, Clinical Services, and Treatment: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Natalie Carmody, Robert H. Eikelboom, Susan Tegg-Quinn
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The objective of this scoping review was to describe the extent and type of evidence related to seeking help for tinnitus and satisfaction with healthcare providers including diagnosis, services and treatments along the clinical pathway. The selection criteria were adults aged 18 and over with tinnitus who sought help and where patient satisfaction with healthcare providers was reported. Online databases MEDLINE (OvidSP), Embase (OvidSP), PsycINFO (OvidSP) and CINAHL plus (EBSCO) were searched for original studies in English. The search had no date limit. Twenty-one records were eligible for data extraction. Studies reported that the most common healthcare providers seen were general practitioners, ear, nose and throat specialists and audiologists. Depression and tinnitus severity were related to an increase in the number of times help was sought and the type of healthcare provider seen may also impact patient satisfaction. The majority of participants were unlikely to receive a referral to a specialist at the initial GP consultation. Although there is limited research in this area, help-seekers for tinnitus were generally dissatisfied and reported negative interactions with healthcare providers. However, once in a specialised tinnitus clinical setting, studies reported that most help-seekers were satisfied and had positive interactions with healthcare providers.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-02-28T06:01:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231158402
       
  • Natural Language Processing of Learners’ Evaluations of Attendings to
           Identify Professionalism Lapses

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      Authors: Janae K. Heath, Caitlin B. Clancy, William Pluta, Gary E. Weissman, Ursula Anderson, Jennifer R. Kogan, C. Jessica Dine, Judy A. Shea
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Unprofessional faculty behaviors negatively impact the well-being of trainees yet are infrequently reported through established reporting systems. Manual review of narrative faculty evaluations provides an additional avenue for identifying unprofessional behavior but is time- and resource-intensive, and therefore of limited value for identifying and remediating faculty with professionalism concerns. Natural language processing (NLP) techniques may provide a mechanism for streamlining manual review processes to identify faculty professionalism lapses. In this retrospective cohort study of 15,432 narrative evaluations of medical faculty by medical trainees, we identified professionalism lapses using automated analysis of the text of faculty evaluations. We used multiple NLP approaches to develop and validate several classification models, which were evaluated primarily based on the positive predictive value (PPV) and secondarily by their calibration. A NLP-model using sentiment analysis (quantifying subjectivity of the text) in combination with key words (using the ensemble technique) had the best performance overall with a PPV of 49% (CI 38%-59%). These findings highlight how NLP can be used to screen narrative evaluations of faculty to identify unprofessional faculty behaviors. Incorporation of NLP into faculty review workflows enables a more focused manual review of comments, providing a supplemental mechanism to identify faculty professionalism lapses.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-02-24T04:17:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231158128
       
  • Psychometric Properties of the Access of Older Adults to Outpatient
           Primary-Care Health Services Scale

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      Authors: Gerardo Santoyo-Sánchez, Hortensia Reyes-Morales, Sergio Flores-Hernández, Blanca Estela Pelcastre-Villafuerte, César Merino-Soto
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      This study evaluates the psychometric properties of the Access of Older Adults to Outpatient Primary-Care Health Services Scale (AOAOPHSS), in research conducted among 707 Mexican older adults selected by convenience from 14 rural and one urban locations. The AOAOPHSS explores 10 dimensions of two integrated subscales: Accessibility and Personal Abilities. Data analysis was performed in five phases. First, potentially biased responses were identified. Second, the response efficiency of the items and their association with external variables were evaluated. Third, the basic properties of the scores for the subscales’ dimensions of the AOAOPHSS were identified using non-parametric Mokken Scaling Analysis (MSA). Fourth, the Structural Equation Modeling methodology was used to identify the properties of the internal structure of the latent construct. Finally, reliability and internal consistency were evaluated at both score and item levels. The following findings emerged. 13 items with inefficient response options were removed, and 24 were retained using the MSA. The latent structure of the latter was defined based on 21 items of five Accessibility Subscale dimensions. Its internal consistency reliability ranged between 0.67 and 0.81 (omega coefficients) and between 0.61 and 0.78 (alpha coefficients). Accordingly, this paper discusses the overall implications of using the Accessibility Subscale.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2023-02-23T08:44:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787231158806
       
  • Psychometric Properties of the Turkish Version of the JHand for the
           Patient-Oriented Outcome Measure for Patients with Hand and Elbow
           Disorders

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      Authors: Hasan Atacan Tonak, Yener Aydin, Burc Ozcanyuz, Haluk Ozcanli, Kosuke Uehara, Yutaka Morizaki
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The JHand is an easy-to-understand questionnaire that includes questions that exclude hand dominance. It was developed to evaluate patients with hand and elbow disorders. However, JHand has not been translated and validated in the Turkish language. The aim of this study is to investigate the psychometric properties of the culturally adapted Turkish version of the JHand for Turkish patients. A total of 262 patients were included in the study. JHand, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand Questionnaire, and Hand20 were used to evaluate patients. Internal consistency and test-retest analyses were applied to determine the reliability of the Turkish version of the JHand. Confirmatory factor analysis and similar scale validity were used to determine its validity. The Turkish version of the JHand showed high levels of internal consistency and excellent test-retest reliability (Cronbach α = 0.907, ICC = 0.923). The model fit indices of the Turkish version of the JHand had good and acceptable fit with reference values. Statistically positive and very strong correlations were found between JHand and DASH (r = .825, p < .001) as well as the JHand and Hand20 (r = .846, p < .001). The Turkish version of the JHand had excellent internal consistency and test-retest reliability as well as a high level of validity.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-12-13T03:38:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221146245
       
  • Development and Validation of a Measure to Assess Readiness to Advance
           Health and Equity: The Assessment for Advancing Community Transformation
           (AACT)

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      Authors: Brandon K. Attell, Kate Kingery, Tanisa Adimu, John Butts, Paul Howard, Somava Saha, Karen Minyard
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Multi-sector partnerships are core in efforts to improve population health but are often not as fully developed or positioned to advance health and equity in their communities as believed to be. Therefore, measuring the collaborations multi-sector partnerships undertake is important to document the inputs, processes, and outcomes that evolve as they work together towards achieving their goals, which ultimately creates a greater sense of shared accountability. In this study we present the development and validation of the Assessment for Advancing Community Transformation (AACT), a new tool designed to measure readiness to advance health and health equity. Development of the AACT included initial item pool creation, external evaluation from five subject matter experts, and pilot testing (including user feedback surveys) among 103 individuals. Validation of the AACT was performed using a series of confirmatory factor analyses on an expanded dataset representing 352 individuals from 49 multi-sector collaboratives across the United States. The results of our study indicate the items in the AACT align to six domains created during the scale development process, and that the tool demonstrates desirable measurement characteristics for use in research, evaluation, and practice.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-11-14T01:13:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221139244
       
  • Validity and Reliability of Caregiver Contribution to Self-Care of Chronic
           Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Inventory and Caregiver Self-Efficacy in
           Contributing to Self-Care Scale

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      Authors: Maria Matarese, Roberta Pendoni, Davide Ausili, Ercole Vellone, Maddalena De Maria
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The study tested the construct validity and reliability of the Caregiver Contribution to Self-Care of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Inventory and the Caregiver Self-Efficacy in Contributing to Self-Care of COPD Scale. The two instruments were developed by modifying the Self-Care of COPD Inventory and Self-Care Self-Efficacy Scale in COPD into caregiver versions. The psychometric properties were tested in a convenience sample of 261 informal caregivers of COPD patients recruited in Italy in two cross-sectional studies. Structural validity was tested by confirmatory factor analysis, construct validity by posing several hypotheses, and internal consistency through factor score determinacy and global reliability index for multidimensional scales. In confirmatory factor analysis, the caregiver contribution to self-care maintenance, monitoring and management scales, composing the Caregiver Contribution to Self-Care of COPD Inventory, presented good fit indices. Global reliability indices ranged 0.75–0.88. The caregiver self-efficacy scale presented a comparative fit index of 0.96 and a global reliability index of 0.82. The caregiver contribution to self-care and the caregiver self-efficacy scales correlated moderately among themselves and with the patient versions of the scales, and scores were higher with caregiver-oriented dyadic care types and female caregivers. Our study provides evidence of the two instruments’ construct validity and internal consistency.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-10-21T01:34:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221134712
       
  • Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Validation of the Turkish
           Version of Pain Resilience Scale

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      Authors: Muge Dereli, Turhan Kahraman, Christopher R. France
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The Pain Resilience Scale (PRS) is a useful tool that evaluates behavioral engagement and adaptively regulates cognitions and emotions despite the pain. This study aimed to translate the PRS to Turkish and investigate its psychometric properties. The Turkish version of PRS was completed online by 332 healthy adults, and a subset of 105 respondents was re-assessed after 7–14 days. The reliability of the adapted measure was evaluated in terms of internal consistency, relative, and absolute test-retest reliability. Validity was evaluated in terms of structural, construct, and known-group validity using positive and negative psychological scales. The Turkish version of PRS has a three-factor structure and its cumulative variance is 78.06%. The total PRS score and its subscales correlated positively with pain self-efficacy, general resilience, and quality of life, and negatively with pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia, anxiety, depression, and disability. The PRS scores were significantly higher in those with high general resilience (p < 0.001). The PRS had high internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Standard Error of Measurement (SEM) and Minimum Detectable Difference (MDD) were calculated as 2.9 and 8.0, respectively. The Turkish version of PRS is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring pain resilience in terms of behavioral perseverance and cognitive positivity.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-09-23T10:17:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221127377
       
  • Reliability and Validity of the Turkish Version of the Modified Dynamic
           Gait Index in the Elderly

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      Authors: Emrah Zirek, Rustem Mustafaoglu, Aynur Cicek, Ishtiaq Ahmed, Savvas Mavromoustakos
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The modified Dynamic Gait Index (mDGI) is one of the valid instruments used in the evaluation of gait disorders. This study aimed to translate the mDGI into Turkish and evaluate the evidence for its reliability and validity for use in an elderly population. For test-retest reliability, the mDGI was administered twice, and for inter-rater reliability, the mDGI was administered alone on the same day by two raters. Concurrent validity of the mDGI was assessed using Pearson’s correlation analysis between the Turkish version of the mDGI score and the Timed Up and Go (TUG), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), and 10-m Walk Test (10-MWT), respectively. The internal consistency of the mDGI was found to be excellent (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.97) and test-retest (ICC = 0.95; 95% Cl (0.84–0.95)) and inter-rater reliability (ICC = 0.95; 95% Cl (0.85–0.95)) were excellent. A negative, moderate correlation was found between mDGI and TUG (r = −0.73, p < .0001), and a positive, moderate correlation with BBS (r = 0.71, p < .0001) and 10-MWT (r = 0.72, p < .0001). The Turkish version of the mDGI was found to be a valid and reliable assessment instrument for gait and balance in the elderly.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-09-17T10:58:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221128311
       
  • Evaluation of the Psychometric Properties of a Newly Developed Chinese
           Screening Tool for Speech Disorders in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease
           

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      Authors: Chi-Lin Chen, Ching-Huang Lin, Chen-San Su, Hsiang-Chun Cheng, Li-Mei Chen, Rong-Ju Cherng
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The study aimed to analyze the psychometric properties of a newly developed Chinese screening tool, the Chinese Version of the Speech Disorders in Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire (SDPD-C). The SDPD-C contains a 24-item questionnaire with four assessment domains. Overall, 93 patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) (age 70.1 ± 8.9 years) and 76 healthy older adults (age 67.2 ± 8.1 years) participated in the psychometric analysis study. The internal consistency of the SDPD-C was .91 (four dimensions: .69–.85), and test-retest reliability was .91 (four dimensions: .85–.88). The SDPD-C was highly correlated with the Voice Handicap Index-10 and Movement Disorder Society-Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale II 2.1 (r = .83 and .78, respectively). The SDPD-C scores also differed significantly between stages 1 and 4 of the Hoehn and Yahr Scale (p < .05). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was .955 (95% confidence interval, .927–.983; asymptotic significance p < .001), and the optimal cut-off score of this study was 36, with a sensitivity of .849 and specificity of .947. The results indicate that SDPD-C showed good reliability, validity, accuracy, and discrimination. It can be used as a screening tool for speech disorders in patients with PD.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-06-18T07:21:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221108458
       
  • Psychometric Evaluation of Chronic Patients Using the Persian Version of
           Patient Activation Measure (PAM)

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      Authors: Mohammad Ali Zakeri, Ali Esmaeili Nadimi, Golamreza Bazmandegan, Maryam Zakeri, Mahlagha Dehghan
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The Patient Activation Measure (PAM) is a 13-item questionnaire that assesses patients’ knowledge, skills, and confidence in self-management. The current study aimed to translate the American version of the PAM-13 into Persian and test the psychometric properties of the Persian version among chronic patients. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 438 chronically ill patients in Rafsanjan, Iran from May to November 2019. The American version of the PAM-13 was translated into Persian using a standardized forward–backward translation method. Internal consistency, test-retest reliability, face and content validity, as well as construct validity (structural and convergent validity) were all assessed. The content validity index of the Patient Activation Measure-13 Persian (PAM-13-P) was 0.91. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses showed that the PAM-13-P had a meaningful structural validity. The PAM-13-P scores were negatively correlated with the Partner in Health Measure (PIH) (r = −0.29, p < 0.001). In addition, the PAM13-P scores were positively correlated with the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) (r = 0.31, p < 0.001). The internal consistency was 0.88, and the repeatability was excellent [Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC):0.96 and confidence interval (CI): 0.94–0.98]. This study demonstrates that the PAM-13-P is a reliable and valid measure for assessing activation among chronically ill patients. The PAM-13-P scale assesses the level of self-management of chronic patients and identifies appropriate care strategies to meet their needs.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T11:50:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221096904
       
  • Active Ingredients of Interventions Improving Smoking Cessation Support by
           Dutch Primary Care Providers: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Enrique L. P. Mergelsberg, Dennis de Ruijter, Mathilde R. Crone, Eline S. Smit, Ciska Hoving
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The objective was to assess active ingredients, change mechanisms, and fidelity in interventions aiming to increase the quality of smoking cessation care in the Dutch primary healthcare setting. We conducted a systematic review searching five scientific databases on August 2nd, 2019, updated on October 28th, 2021. We included effect data of behavioural interventions aiming at improving the provision of smoking cessation support by Dutch primary care providers to their patients. We excluded studies published before 2000 and those without a behavioural support intervention for primary care providers targeting smoking cessation in their patients. We found 1939 articles and included 15 distinct interventions in the review. We provided an overview of study characteristics, intervention effects, fidelity, active ingredients and change mechanisms using the Behaviour Change Techniques (BCT) Taxonomy and Mechanisms of Action (MoAs) protocols. Interventions seemed more effective when including a face-to-face component, using active learning strategies and providing a tool to help follow the guidelines in practice (e.g., physical cards with information). BCTs, MoAs, and fidelity were overall poorly reported on. To support the application of smoking cessation practices in Dutch primary care, we recommend implementation of face-to-face training programs incorporating active skill training elements combined with practical tools.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T06:01:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221099941
       
  • Web-based Evidence on the Treatment of Behavioral Addictions in United
           States Model Treatment Centers

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      Authors: Steve Sussman, Artur Galimov, Nayeli Ayala, Deborah Louise Sinclair
      First page: 23
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Behavioral addictions are highly comorbid with substance use disorders, presenting in as many as 54% of service users receiving substance use treatment. Few studies have examined whether treatment centers are attentive to such other addictions, which may undermine treatment. This study examined the mention and treatment of behavioral addictions on United States treatment center websites. The 2021 Newsweek America’s Best Addiction Treatment Centers website was utilized to examine the mention and treatment of behavioral addictions in 300 leading treatment centers across 25 states in the United States. Of 289 active websites, only 61 (21.1%) treatment centers mentioned anything about behavioral addictions. The highest prevalence was for gambling (n = 38), sex (n = 22), food/eating (n = 21), and internet gaming (n = 12). A total of 49 treatment centers reported treating those addictions. The most prevalent treatments involved 12-step programming (n = 18), CBT (n = 16), individual counseling (n = 16), and group therapy (n = 15). Little formalized importance via websites was provided regarding the mention or treatment of behavioral addictions at treatment centers. A greater emphasis on concurrent and substitute behavioral addictions is needed to improve the quality of life and lower the possibility of relapse among those persons in addictions treatment.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-10-03T10:19:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221130543
       
  • An Investigation of Surgical Nurses' Professional Values, Ethical
           Sensitivity and Quality of Care: A Cross-Sectional Study From Northwest
           Turkey

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      Authors: Selda Mert, Özlem Kersu, Aylin Aydin Sayilan, Neriman Akyolcu
      First page: 30
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Nurses’ professional values are closely associated with their ethical sensitivity and the quality of nursing care. The aim of this study was to determine surgical nurses’ perceptions of their professional values, ethical sensitivities and quality of care, the relationship between these variables, and the factors influencing these. The sample of this cross-sectional, descriptive and relational study consisted of 231 nurses working in the surgical units of two university hospitals and a training and research hospital. The study revealed a statistically significant negative relationship between the nurses’ professional values scale median score and the Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire median score, and a positive significant relationship between the Nurses' Professional Values Scale median score and the Care Behaviors Scale median score. Having ethical problems in their professional lives increased the ethical sensitivity of nurses, while having a medical-vocational high school and vocational school of health services degree and participation in training/meetings about professional values and ethics increased the perception of the quality of nursing care. Awareness of professional values is crucial in providing quality nursing care that is in line with ethical principles; therefore, it is recommended that the continuity of surgical nurses’ participation in training/meetings on professional values and ethics be ensured, that they be supported to become members of professional associations, and that supportive working environments be provided to improve the quality of nursing care.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T07:52:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221109968
       
  • Prevalence and Risk Factors for Dangerous Abbreviations in Malaysian
           Electronic Clinical Notes

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      Authors: Ismat Mohd Sulaiman, Awang Bulgiba, Sameem Abdul Kareem
      First page: 41
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Medical abbreviations can be misinterpreted and endanger patients’ lives. This research is the first to investigate the prevalence of abbreviations in Malaysian electronic discharge summaries, where English is widely used, and elicit the risk factors associated with dangerous abbreviations. We randomly sampled and manually annotated 1102 electronic discharge summaries for abbreviations and their senses. Three medical doctors assigned a danger level to ambiguous abbreviations based on their potential to cause patient harm if misinterpreted. The predictors for dangerous abbreviations were determined using binary logistic regression. Abbreviations accounted for 19% (33,824) of total words; 22.6% (7640) of those abbreviations were ambiguous; and 52.3% (115) of the ambiguous abbreviations were labelled dangerous. Increased risk of danger occurs when abbreviations have more than two senses (OR = 2.991; 95% CI 1.586, 5.641), they are medication-related (OR = 6.240; 95% CI 2.674, 14.558), they are disorders (OR = 7.771; 95% CI 2.054, 29.409) and procedures (OR = 3.492; 95% CI 1.376, 8.860). Reduced risk of danger occurs when abbreviations are confined to a single discipline (OR = 0.519; 95% CI 0.278, 0.967). Managing abbreviations through awareness and implementing automated abbreviation detection and expansion would improve the quality of clinical documentation, patient safety, and the information extracted for secondary purposes.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-11-29T08:38:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221142623
       
  • Which Outreach Modes Improve Response Rates to Physician Surveys' Lessons
           from an Experiment at the American Board of Internal Medicine

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      Authors: Brendan J. Barnhart, Siddharta G. Reddy, Jonathan L. Vandergrift
      First page: 48
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Physicians are a notoriously difficult group to survey due to a low propensity to respond. We investigate the relative effectiveness of reminder phone calls, pre-notification postcards, mailed paper surveys, and $1 upfront incentives for boosting survey response rate by embedding a randomized experiment into a mixed-mode operational survey at the American Board of Internal Medicine in 2019. Expected response rates and average marginal effects for each follow-up method were computed from a logistic regression model. The control group which only received email reminders achieved a response rate of 18.2%, 95% CI: (15.0%, 21.9%). The intervention group which included reminder emails, pre-notification postcards, and mailed paper surveys with $1 incentives achieved a response rate of 43.1%, 95% CI: (38.8%, 47.5%). Mailed paper surveys yielded the largest percentage point increase in response rate of 11.2%, 95% CI: (7.3%, 15.2%), while $1 upfront monetary incentives and phone call reminders increased survey response rate by 5.9%, 95% CI: (1.6%, 10.2%) and 5.5%, 95% CI: (2.6%, 8.3%) respectively. Pre-notification postcards are associated with a 2.0%, 95% CI: (−1.7%, 5.6%) increase in survey response rate. Cost-effectiveness for each method is discussed. This research supports optimal decision making for researchers when planning a physician survey study.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-11-29T06:41:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221143151
       
  • Prevalence of Workplace Bullying Among Healthcare Professionals in
           Tertiary Care Hospitals in Pakistan

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      Authors: Usha Kumari, Muhammad Z. Muneer, Muhammad A. Murtaza, Fakhar Abbas, Abdul M. Sahito, Zair Hassan, Keerathana Manjunath
      First page: 54
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Workplace bullying (WPB) in the healthcare system (HCS), whether perpetrated by healthcare professionals (HCPs) or patients, is a serious problem. The goal of this research study was to find out how common WPB is among HCPs. We conducted a questionnaire-based cross-sectional study in the three public tertiary care hospitals of Karachi, Pakistan from May to October 2020. A validated Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R) was used to measure WPB prevalence. The final sample size was 449, out of which 72.4% were females and 27.6% were males. The majority of respondents were house officers or 1st-year trainees who had completed their MBBS (n = 252, 56.1%). Residents (n = 197, 43.9%) who were pursuing specialty training made up the remainder of the respondents. As per NAQ-R cut-offs, the prevalence of bullied, being bullied, and not bullied was 41, 29, and 30%, respectively. WPB prevalence was higher in males (53%) than females (38%), whereas it occurred more often in residents (48%) than house officers (36%). We found similar findings while using the self-reported definition for WPB. Based on our findings, we conclude that WPB is pervasive among HCPs, particularly for males and residents in tertiary care hospitals in Pakistan.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-04-30T08:35:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221098119
       
  • Systematic Review of the Content Validity of Patient Reported Outcome
           Measures of Transition to Parenthood

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      Authors: Elise van Beeck, Laura Van den Branden, Wichor M Bramer, Yvonne Kuipers
      First page: 57
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      This review aims to identify self-report instruments examining aspects of transition to parenthood for use in practice and research. After performing a literature search in Embase, Medline, Web of Science, Cochrane, PsycINFO and Google Scholar, the Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) measuring (aspects of) transition to parenthood during pregnancy or up to 1-year postpartum were identified. Following COSMIN guidelines for systematic reviews on PROMs, the quality of the PROM development and PROM content validity was evaluated. From the 129 included studies, 39 PROMs assessed aspects of transition to parenthood. A total of 32 PROMs were included in the evaluation. The development quality of 30/32 PROMS was mostly rated as inadequate and the quality of 15 content validity studies was mostly rated as doubtful. All PROMs received inadequate or doubtful ratings on content validity. Most of the PROMs measuring aspects of the transition to parenthood didn’t include parents’ points of view when developing them. Many PROMs are being used for a long time without reassessing relevance, comprehensiveness, and comprehensibility among parents and/or practitioners. It is recommended that researchers and healthcare professionals assess content validity of the PROM before use with the target population.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-10-11T04:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221127382
       
  • Development and Assessment of the Personal Emotional Capital Questionnaire
           for Adolescents

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      Authors: Morteza Khazaei, Mark D. Holder, Fuschia M. Sirois, Matthew W. Gallagher
      First page: 69
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Higher emotional capital is associated with enhanced positive emotions, social relationships, social capital and human capital. The present study developed and evaluated a personal emotional capital questionnaire for adolescents (PECQ-A) that assessed 10 components of this capital. The PECQ-A was administrated to two samples of Iranian 15-year-olds from two Iranian cities (N1 = 600, N2 = 300, total N = 900) recruited using multistage random cluster sampling. A confirmatory factor analysis of the first sample confirmed the ten-factor structure of the PECQ-A. The reliability of PECQ-A was acceptable (Cronbach’s α = .90, McDonald’s ω = .88, AVE = .57, Composite reliability CR = .89). Analyses of the second sample revealed that the PECQ-A and its components exhibited convergent validity when compared to the Mental Health Continuum–Short Form (MHC–SF), the students’ GPAs, and the students’ mathematics and natural sciences scores. The PECQ-A demonstrated divergent validity when contrasted with the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS21). Test-retest reliability was acceptable. Invariance measurement was confirmed for the PECQ-A. A MANOVA identified several gender differences. PECQ-A scores were not sensitive to the order that the questionnaires were administered. The results suggest that the PECQ–A is a valid and reliable measure of personal emotional capital suitable for use with adolescents.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-12-15T03:30:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221146564
       
  • The Reliability and Validity of the Turkish Version of Smartphone Impact
           Scale

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      Authors: Tansu Birinci, Pınar Van Der Veer, Caner Mutlu, Ebru Kaya Mutlu
      First page: 84
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The Smartphone Impact Scale (SIS) was originally developed in English to determine the cognitive, affective, social, and behavioral impacts of smartphones. This study aimed to translate and cross-culturally adapt the SIS instrument into Turkish and investigate its psychometric properties. Two hundred and sixty-four young and middle-aged adults (186 females) with a mean age of 36.24 years (SD = 14.93; range, 18–65 years) were included. For cross-cultural adaptation, two bi-lingual translators used the back-translation procedure. Within a 5-to-7-day period after the first assessment, the participants completed the Turkish version of SIS (SIS-T) to evaluate test-retest reliability. Cronbach’s alpha (α) was used to assess internal consistency. The correlation between the Turkish version of the Smartphone Addiction Scale (SAS-T) and the Nottingham Health Profile was determined to check the validity. The SIS-T had a high-level internal consistency (α = 0.86) and test-retest reliability (ICC2,1 = 0.56 to 0.89 for subscales). The SIS-T subscales were correlated with the SAS-T (r = 0.31 to 0.66, p < 0.01), indicating a good concurrent validity. The results show that the SIS-T is semantically and linguistically adequate to determine smartphones' cognitive, affective, social, and behavioral impacts on young and middle-aged adults. Good internal validity and test-retest reliability of the SIS-T were defined to evaluate the impacts of smartphones among Turkish-speaking young and middle-aged adults.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T12:32:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221097703
       
  • A Comparison of Caffeine Intake and Physical Activity According to Fatigue
           Severity in University Students

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      Authors: Musa Güneş, Büşra Demirer
      First page: 92
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to compare caffeine intake and physical activity levels in university students with severe and ineffective fatigue and examine the relationship between them. A total of 647 (F:527; M:120) university students were included in this cross-sectional study. Individuals' socio-demographic information, severity of fatigue (Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS)), amount of caffeine intake and physical activity level (International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form (IPAQ-SF)) were evaluated. It was determined that 56.5% of the university students (age: 21.21 ± 2.57) participating in the study had severe fatigue. Caffeine intake and physical activity level of students with severe fatigue were statistically significantly lower than those with ineffective fatigue (p < 0.05). In addition, there was a weak negative correlation between fatigue and caffeine intake (r = −0.157; p < 0.001) and physical activity level (r = −0.096; p < 0.017). There was a significant positive correlation between caffeine intake and physical activity (r = 0.143; p < 0.001). This study showed that a significant portion of university students have severe fatigue. In addition, individuals with severe fatigue have decreased caffeine intake and lower physical activity levels. To reduce fatigue, caffeine intake in safe doses should be encouraged in accordance with the individual’s metabolic and physiological parameters. In addition, physical activity counseling should be given to encourage physical activity.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-11-22T08:03:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221141504
       
  • Examining the Factor Structure of an Adapted Posttraumatic Growth
           Inventory in a Sample of Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Brief Report

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      Authors: Julia Stal, Cynthia N. Ramirez, Jimi Huh, Jessica Tobin, Yoonji Kim, Kimberly A. Miller, Joel E. Milam
      First page: 100
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Posttraumatic growth (PTG) represents positive changes following a trauma, crisis, and/or psychologically distressing event. Experiencing cancer can serve as a traumatic event for patients, resulting in life changes among survivors. Various PTG measures have been used to assess post-cancer change among childhood cancer survivors (CCS), but few have been evaluated for use in this population. This study examined the factor structure of an adapted, 11-item version of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) among CCS. A randomly selected subgroup of participants (N = 332) was selected from the Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program (mean age of 26.5 years at time of survey, mean age at diagnosis of 12 years, primarily male [53.6%], and Hispanic [51.5%]). Participants indicated the degree to which they experienced positive, negative, or no change in their life because of their cancer experience. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) identified two factors: Appreciation of New Possibilities and Spiritual Change. The adapted, 11-item PTGI was deemed appropriate for use among CCS. Additional research is needed to confirm the use of the two-factor model with confirmatory factor analysis in an independent sample. Future research on PTG among CCS can consider spiritual change as a potential independent factor.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T02:04:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221109309
       
  • Anxiety among College Students Who Self-Isolated During the Omicron
           Variant of SARS-CoV-2 in China

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      Authors: Zhiqiang Hao, Wanhong Zhang
      First page: 105
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      We investigated the prevalence of anxiety and its associated risk factors among college students who self-isolated for 30 days during the emergence of the Omicron variant in China. We sampled college students specializing in four academic majors by cluster sampling and conducted questionnaires separately on days 1, 10, 20, and 30 after self-isolation. Anxiety was assessed using the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS). An odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to estimate the strength of associations. A total of 10231 college students responded to the questionnaire 4 times. More students reported experiencing anxiety as the period of self-isolation approached 30 days. Among the students from four different major disciplines, medical students reported the highest rate of anxiety after 30 days of self-isolation, whereas humanities students exhibited the lowest rate of anxiety. Factor analysis indicated that the main reason for anxiety among all participating students was a delay in course completion. For engineering and medical students, there was an association between anxiety and research project delay. This study reveals the level of anxiety associated with COVID-19 pandemic-related self-isolation in college students and finds that it was aggravated by long-term isolation.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-12-20T08:05:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221147619
       
 
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