Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)

We no longer collect new content from this publisher because the publisher has forbidden systematic access to its RSS feeds.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
South African Journal of Communication Disorders
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.131
Number of Followers: 1  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0379-8046 - ISSN (Online) 2225-4765
Published by AOSIS Publishing Homepage  [32 journals]
  • Table of Contents Vol 70, No 1 (2023)

    • Authors: Editorial Office
      First page: 1
      PubDate: 2024-06-27
      DOI: 10.4102/sajcd.v70i1.1034
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Erratum: Why do people who stutter attend stuttering support groups'

    • Authors: Nicola E. Bloye, Shabnam S. Abdoola, Casey J. Eslick
      First page: 1
      Abstract: No abstract available.
      PubDate: 2024-03-22
      DOI: 10.4102/sajcd.v71i1.1046
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • A call for linguistic and culturally congruent family-centred early
           hearing detection and intervention programmes in South Africa

    • Authors: Ntsako P. Maluleke
      First page: 4
      Abstract: Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) programmes are recognised as the standard of care for newborns and infants presenting with hearing impairment, globally. However, widespread implementation of these programmes is far from being realised and faces numerous challenges within the South African context. The United Nations’ sustainable development goal 3.8 and South Africa’s national development plan seek to achieve equitable access to healthcare service, including EHDI. However, healthcare access is a complex concept which encompasses the dimensions: availability, affordability, acceptability and accommodation in healthcare. South Africa has made great progress towards universal implementation of EHDI programmes. Despite this progress, availability and affordability of these programmes are limited and their acceptability has received limited research focus in this context. Furthermore, accommodation of caregivers, as co-drivers of EHDI programmes and ensuring that EHDI programmes are linguistically and culturally congruent have also been overlooked within the South African context.Contribution: Increased robust efforts in improving access through availability and affordability of EHDI programmes are warranted in South Africa. However, improving access to these programmes through availability and affordability initiatives alone will not result in a pragmatic improvement in their accessibility. Acceptability of these programmes and accommodations such as involving caregivers and family members of children with hearing impairment as equal partners in EHDI programmes and being cognisant of their linguistic and cultural needs must be considered.
      PubDate: 2024-03-19
      DOI: 10.4102/sajcd.v71i1.992
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Help-seeking journey to accessing audiology services in a peri-urban
           community in South Africa

    • Authors: Thobekile K. Mtimkulu, Katijah Khoza-Shangase
      First page: 9
      Abstract: Background: Hearing impairment is an invisible disability affecting one in five people globally. Its ability to affect participation in activities of daily living means that it requires prompt identification and intervention.Objective: This article aims to define the process of accessing audiologists from the onset of symptoms for adults with hearing impairment in a peri-urban community in South Africa.Method: Twenty-three participants were recruited through purposive sampling from an audiology department of a public hospital. Semi-structured interviews were conducted using an interview guide, and data were mapped according to the participants’ responses from the onset of ear and hearing symptoms to the point of audiologist consultation for analysis.Results: Seventeen (74%) participants had long journeys to accessing the audiologist after seeking help from multiple providers, with those with short journeys (26%) being referred mostly by public healthcare providers. Despite participants being from one peri-urban community, their journeys were influenced by socio-economics, health illiteracy and other structural factors. Finally, Ear-Nose-Throat specialists linked participants with audiology services.Conclusion: Accessing audiology services is a complex process in some contexts. The disparities in the social environment, lifestyle factors and pluralistic healthcare models influence access to audiologists. Healthcare providers must take cognisance of the journeys of adults with hearing impairment in their clinical interventions. Universal health coverage, in the form of the planned National Health Insurance (NHI) for all South African citizens, will play an important role in addressing the societal inequalities in accessing healthcare. Factors leading to long journeys should be addressed to facilitate early intervention.Contribution: The study raises implications for the planned NHI in South Africa, suggesting that universal health coverage could play a vital role in addressing societal inequalities in accessing healthcare, including audiology services.
      PubDate: 2024-03-20
      DOI: 10.4102/sajcd.v71i1.1002
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Awareness, attitudes and perceptions of students towards leisure noise in
           Durban, South Africa

    • Authors: Husna Mahomed, Seema Panday
      First page: 10
      Abstract: Background: Young adults are exposed to high noise levels in leisure venues, which increases their risk of hearing loss, and can affect their quality of life.Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe the young adults’ awareness, attitudes and perceptions towards leisure noise at a university in South Africa.Method: A descriptive cross-sectional study design with quantitative methods of data was considered for this study. Students from first to fourth years in the Education Department of a local university in Durban, South Africa, who were aged 18 years old – 25 years old were invited to participate in an online survey.Results: Of the 462 participants, most had a general awareness on noise and hearing loss but lacked knowledge on the negative effect of loud noise, with 95.2% using personal listening devices, followed by visiting restaurants and gyms, and 48.3% being unsure if noise can damage hearing permanently. They were unaware of methods to reduce their exposure to noise. A significant relationship between awareness of noise and attitudes (p = 0.029) indicated that the higher the level of awareness regarding leisure noise, the better their attitude and behaviour, thus the lower the risk of hearing loss.Conclusion: The results highlight the need for implementing the World Health Organization (WHO) noise regulations and providing education for this age group to prevent irreversible hearing loss through exposure to leisure noise.Contribution: A national study is recommended to increase research evidence.
      PubDate: 2024-06-28
      DOI: 10.4102/sajcd.v71i1.1040
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Awareness of audiology and speech-language pathology services among
           healthcare professionals in Saudi Arabia

    • Authors: Ahmad A. Alanazi, Mohammed F. ALHarbi, Abrar M. AlMutairi, Maryam A. AlRashied, Reham Abed
      First page: 10
      Abstract: Background: Healthcare professionals are required to work effectively together to deliver the best healthcare services. Without awareness of other healthcare professionals’ roles and responsibilities, interprofessional practice (IPP) cannot be optimally achieved.Objectives: This study aimed to investigate healthcare professionals’ awareness of audiology and speech-language pathology (SLP) services in Saudi Arabia.Method: This cross-sectional descriptive study consisted of two parts. The content of a 20-item paper questionnaire was firstly validated. The full-scale study addressed the aim through distributing questionnaire items among potential participants. Descriptive statistics and chi-square test were used.Results: A total of 403 participants completed the questionnaires for the main study. Most of the participants were Saudi citizens (84.1%), aged 18 years – 40 years (84.8%) years, and lived in Riyadh region (76.2%). Allied health professionals (40.2%), physicians (22.6%), nursing (15.4%) and dentistry (11.2%) were the main group of participants working mainly at governmental hospitals (69.2%). Of the total participants, 92.6% and 95.3% reported being fully aware of the services provided by audiologists and SLPs, respectively. No statistically significant association between the specialty of participants and their familiarity with the scope of practice for SLPs and audiologists was determined.Conclusion: Our study examined healthcare professionals’ awareness of audiology and SLP services and revealed a high level of awareness.Contribution: The existed level of awareness is expected to facilitate IPP and enhance the quality of care. Still, awareness campaigns about audiology and SLP services are needed to address the existing lack of knowledge among some healthcare professionals.
      PubDate: 2024-06-07
      DOI: 10.4102/sajcd.v71i1.1043
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • ‘[M]y own pace and space, without the pressures’: Online learning
           experiences of audiology students

    • Authors: Liepollo Ntlhakana, Aadilah Alli
      First page: 10
      Abstract: Background: Online learning has been used to improve students’ learning experiences and to allow students to engage with their own learning in various spaces. However, there is a dearth of literature on students’ experiences with online learning in the field of audiology.Objectives: This study aimed to describe the conditions of online learning, explore the challenges and benefits of online learning and determine strategies that students employ while engaging with online learning.Method: An exploratory qualitative research design was employed. Audiology students from the second to the fourth year participated in the study. Qualitative data were collected online via MS Teams using a semi-structured interview schedule with the participants. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the participants’ interviews.Results: Most of our participants were females in their fourth year of study. The students accessed the online learning platforms procured by the university from their homes, with reported benefits such as the flexibility and independence of learning, and time and cost-effectiveness. However, challenges such as limited internet connectivity, issues with time management and inconsistent power supply restricted positive experiences with online learning.Conclusion: The online learning benefits that were reported by the students and the compensatory strategies they employed facilitated self-regulated learning. The study’s findings highlighted the need for continuous checking-in with students regarding their experiences with the learning approaches intended to improve engagement with their courses. These results could be used as a guide for curriculum planning that is student-focused.Contribution: Students’ experiences explored in our study provided a guide for online learning approaches that were suitable for audiology students. Student-centred and self-regulated learning practices were highlighted and future studies may further explore these frameworks and theories.
      PubDate: 2024-05-22
      DOI: 10.4102/sajcd.v71i1.1012
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Cultural adaptation and Sepedi translation of the Activities-specific
           Balance Confidence scale

    • Authors: Tammy L. Prinsloo, Karin Joubert
      First page: 11
      Abstract: Background: The Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale is a widely used measure to identify older adults with balance difficulties. However, its applicability in the diverse South African context is hindered by cross-cultural and linguistic differences. Limited research exists on the use of the ABC scale in native South African languages.Objectives: This study aimed to translate and culturally adapt the ABC scale into Sepedi, evaluate its reliability and determine self-perceived balance confidence among elderly individuals in a rural community.Method: The ABC scale was translated and culturally adapted into Sepedi. Two trained raters administered the Sepedi version of the ABC (ABC-S) scale to 32 individuals aged between 60 and 88 years. Test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability were determined, with one rater re-administering the scale 2 weeks later.Results: Ten items from the original ABC scale were modified because of cultural, semantic or contextual inappropriateness. The ABC-S scale demonstrated very good intra- and inter-rater reproducibility, with an average intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.85 and 0.81, respectively. The self-perceived balance confidence among elderly Sepedi individuals, as evaluated by the ABC-S scale, was high, with an average score of 81.3 and a range of 58.1 to 95.9.Conclusion: The ABC-S scale is a reliable measurement tool to investigate balance confidence in Sepedi-speaking older adults.Contribution: The ABC-S scale is a valuable screening tool for the identification of balance difficulties in Sepedi-speaking older adults as well as research settings.
      PubDate: 2024-05-21
      DOI: 10.4102/sajcd.v71i1.1004
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Communicative practices and perceptions towards stuttering people in South
           Africa

    • Authors: Rockie Sibanda, Tlou C. Mothapo
      First page: 11
      Abstract: Background: A few studies have explored the life experiences of people who stutter. Research has shown that stuttering affects a significant number of people in the population.Objectives: The study was designed to explore the experiences of people who stutter and the perception of stuttering in South Africa.Method: Four people who identified as South Africans who stutter participated in this study. The primary investigator conducted semi-structured interviews with each of the participants. In addition, a questionnaire was administered to 20 acquaintances of all the participants. Transcriptions of interviews and results of questionnaires were analysed for major and minor themes.Results: Results of this study suggest different perceptions by those who stutter and those acquainted with them. The findings of the study show that people who stutter experience communication barriers, so they adopt certain strategies to manage and cope with their speech disorder. The findings showed that stuttering has a pervasive impact on the lives of people who stutter and how they view themselves, considering negative societal views.Conclusion: Evaluation of the results from the study reveals that although stuttering is a common speech disorder, many people who are less informed about it harbour various stereotypes and myths that stigmatise stuttering. This study concludes by outlining recommendations for creating awareness of stuttering. It suggests vigorous campaigns aiming at promoting a multilevel approach that extends beyond the mere social and professional understanding of stuttering but addresses the inherent perceptions, myths, and stereotypes around stuttering.Contribution: Experiences of people who stutter and perceptions towards stuttering can help to better understand the speech disorder and overcome myths and stereotyping of stuttering.
      PubDate: 2024-03-22
      DOI: 10.4102/sajcd.v71i1.1008
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Who really decides' Feeding decisions ‘made’ by caregivers of children
           with cerebral palsy

    • Authors: Lavanya Naidoo, Mershen Pillay, Urisha Naidoo
      First page: 14
      Abstract: Background: There are no definitive guidelines for clinical decisions for children with cerebral palsy (CP) requiring enteral feeds. Traditionally, medical doctors made enteral feeding decisions, while patients were essentially treated passively within a paternalistic ‘doctor knows best’ approach. Although a more collaborative approach to decision-making has been promoted globally as the favoured model among healthcare professionals, little is known about how these decisions are currently made practically.Objectives: This study aimed to identify the significant individuals, factors and views involved in the enteral feeding decision-making process for caregivers of children with CP within the South African public healthcare sector.Method: A single-case research design was used in this qualitative explorative study. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and analysed using reflexive thematic analysis.Results: Four primary individuals were identified by the caregivers in the decision-making process: doctors, speech therapists, caregivers’ families and God. Four factors were identified as extrinsically motivating: (1) physiological factors, (2) nutritional factors, (3) financial factors and (4) environmental factors. Two views were identified as intrinsically motivating: personal beliefs regarding enteral feeding tubes, and feelings of fear and isolation.Conclusion: Enteral feeding decision-making within the South African public healthcare sector is currently still dominated by a paternalistic approach, endorsed by a lack of caregiver knowledge, distinct patient-healthcare provider power imbalances and prescriptive multidisciplinary healthcare dialogues.Contribution: This study has implications for clinical practice, curriculum development at higher education training facilities, and institutional policy changes and development, thereby contributing to the current knowledge and clinical gap(s) in the area.
      PubDate: 2024-03-18
      DOI: 10.4102/sajcd.v71i1.1001
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2024)
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 35.172.230.21
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-
JournalTOCs
 
 
  Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)

We no longer collect new content from this publisher because the publisher has forbidden systematic access to its RSS feeds.
Similar Journals
Similar Journals
HOME > Browse the 73 Subjects covered by JournalTOCs  
SubjectTotal Journals
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 35.172.230.21
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-