Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)                  1 2 3 4 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 203 Journals sorted alphabetically
16 de Abril     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ACM Transactions on Computing for Healthcare     Hybrid Journal  
Acta Scientiarum. Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adultspan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Adversity and Resilience Science : Journal of Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
African Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Afrimedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Aging and Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
AJOB Empirical Bioethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Akademika     Open Access  
American Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Health Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
American Journal of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Health Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
American Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 224)
American Journal of Public Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Annali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità     Open Access  
Annals of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of Health Law     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Applied Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Apuntes Universitarios     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Community Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archivos de Prevención de Riesgos Laborales     Open Access  
ASA Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia Pacific Journal of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Journal of Gambling Issues and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of Medicine and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Population Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Social Health and Behavior     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atención Primaria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atención Primaria Práctica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin     Free   (Followers: 5)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Bijzijn XL     Hybrid Journal  
Biograph-I : Journal of Biostatistics and Demographic Dynamic     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Biomedical Safety & Standards     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Biosafety and Health     Open Access  
Biosalud     Open Access  
Birat Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access  
BLDE University Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Brazilian Journal of Medicine and Human Health     Open Access  
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Buletin Penelitian Kesehatan     Open Access  
Buletin Penelitian Sistem Kesehatan     Open Access  
Cadernos de Educação, Saúde e Fisioterapia     Open Access  
Cadernos de Saúde     Open Access  
Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Family Physician     Partially Free   (Followers: 14)
Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Carta Comunitaria     Open Access  
Case Reports in Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Central Asian Journal of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CES Medicina     Open Access  
CES Salud Pública     Open Access  
Child and Adolescent Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Child's Nervous System     Hybrid Journal  
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Children     Open Access  
Chinese Journal of Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED Journal of Health and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Christian Journal for Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia & Salud     Open Access  
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Ciencia e Innovación en Salud     Open Access  
Ciencia y Cuidado     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia y Salud     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Tecnología y Salud     Open Access  
Cities & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cleaner and Responsible Consumption     Open Access  
Clinical and Experimental Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CME     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Contact (CTC)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Contraception and Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuaderno de investigaciones: semilleros andina     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Current Opinion in Environmental Science & Health     Hybrid Journal  
D Y Patil Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Das österreichische Gesundheitswesen ÖKZ     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Design for Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Digital Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Discover Social Science and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Diversity and Equality in Health and Care     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Diversity of Research in Health Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dramatherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Drogues, santé et société     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Düzce Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Enstitüsü Dergisi / Journal of Duzce University Health Sciences Institute     Open Access  
Early Childhood Research Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
East African Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
EcoHealth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Egyptian Journal of Nutrition and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Egyptian Journal of Occupational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
electronic Journal of Health Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
ElectronicHealthcare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Emerging Trends in Drugs, Addictions, and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ensaios e Ciência : Ciências Biológicas, Agrárias e da Saúde     Open Access  
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Sciences Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Epidemics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
EsSEX : Revista Científica     Open Access  
Estudios sociales : Revista de alimentación contemporánea y desarrollo regional     Open Access  
Ethics & Human Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ethics, Medicine and Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Eurasian Journal of Health Technology Assessment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EUREKA : Health Sciences     Open Access  
European Journal of Health Communication     Open Access  
European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
European Medical, Health and Pharmaceutical Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Evidência - Ciência e Biotecnologia - Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Exploratory Research in Clinical and Social Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Expressa Extensão     Open Access  
F&S Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Face à face     Open Access  
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Family & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Family Medicine and Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
FASEB BioAdvances     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Fatigue : Biomedicine, Health & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Food and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Food Hydrocolloids for Health     Open Access  
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Frontiers in Digital Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Frontiers in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers of Health Services Management     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Gaceta Sanitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Galen Medical Journal     Open Access  
Ganesha Journal     Open Access  
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Geospatial Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gestão e Desenvolvimento     Open Access  
Gesundheitsökonomie & Qualitätsmanagement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Giornale Italiano di Health Technology Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Advances in Health and Medicine     Open Access  
Global Challenges     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Health : Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Global Health Annual Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Health Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Global Health Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Global Journal of Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Global Journal of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Global Medical & Health Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Global Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Security : Health, Science and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Transitions     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Transitions Proceedings     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Hacia la Promoción de la Salud     Open Access  
Hastane Öncesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Hastings Center Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
HCU Journal     Open Access  
HEADline     Hybrid Journal  
Health & Place     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Health and Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Health Behavior and Policy Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Health Behavior Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Health Equity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)

        1 2 3 4 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
American Journal of Health Promotion
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.807
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 23  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0890-1171 - ISSN (Online) 2168-6602
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • In Briefs

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 295 - 301
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 38, Issue 3, Page 295-301, March 2024.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-29T03:51:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241234146
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • The Urgent Need to Advance Health Equity: Past and Present

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sara S. Johnson
      Pages: 427 - 431
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 38, Issue 3, Page 427-431, March 2024.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-29T03:51:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241232057a
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • The Urgent Need to Advance Health Equity: Past and Present

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sara S. Johnson
      Pages: 427 - 447
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 38, Issue 3, Page 427-447, March 2024.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-29T03:51:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241232057
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Breaking Down Silos to Accelerate Innovation in LGBTQ+ Health

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      Authors: José Bauermeister, Jessica Halem
      Pages: 431 - 435
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 38, Issue 3, Page 431-435, March 2024.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-29T03:51:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241232057b
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • The eGFR Equation

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      Authors: Joel Bervell
      Pages: 435 - 436
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 38, Issue 3, Page 435-436, March 2024.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-29T03:51:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241232057c
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Promoting Health Equity in the U.S. Workforce – A Moral and Economic
           Imperative

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      Authors: Chris Calitz, Drew Mills, Nicole Kelm, Brittani Spaulding, Wendi Safstrom, Jay Bhatt, Eduardo Sanchez
      Pages: 436 - 440
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 38, Issue 3, Page 436-440, March 2024.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-29T03:51:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241232057d
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Metro Nashville Public School Promotes Health Equity Through Employee
           Benefits Plans

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      Authors: Martha E. Shepherd, David Hines
      Pages: 440 - 443
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 38, Issue 3, Page 440-443, March 2024.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-29T03:51:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241232057e
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • The Importance of Human-centered Design in Equitable Health Promotion
           Initiatives

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      Authors: Bruce W. Sherman, Emily Stiehl, Rukshana Gupta, Preethi Lakshmi Pratap
      Pages: 443 - 447
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 38, Issue 3, Page 443-447, March 2024.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-29T03:51:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241232057f
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Lifestyle Behavioral Interventions and Health-Related Outcomes Among
           People with Epilepsy: A Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

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      Authors: Rachel M. Sauls, Acadia W. Buro, Russell S. Kirby
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo gather and assess current literature on the prevalence and efficacy of lifestyle behavioral interventions (sleep, nutrition, physical activity) for health outcomes, including QOL, psychological well-being, behavioral changes, and seizure frequency, among PWE.Data SourceA review was conducted of English-language articles identified from PubMed, Scopus, and Embase between January 2013 to January 2023.Study Inclusion and Exclusion CriteriaInclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials (RCT) with human subjects diagnosed with epilepsy who participated in a lifestyle behavioral intervention.Data ExtractionTwo researchers independently completed the title, abstract, and full-text reviews. Information extracted includes study population, duration, type of intervention, findings, and outcomes.Data SynthesisData was narratively synthesized to show level of evidence and degree of consistency in findings. Results: 4001 studies identified, 66 full texts reviewed, and 24 included. A majority (n = 16) of studies utilized diet specific RCTs, and some focused on physical activity (n = 7) and sleep (n = 1). Diet-specific RCTs (eg, ketogenic, Modified Atkins) reported reduced seizure frequency with adverse effects, such as gastrointestinal complications. Physical activity-based interventions found that maintained levels of exercise improved QOL and psychological well-being. However, physical activity and diet-based interventions did not have lasting effects after study conclusion. Only the behavioral sleep intervention reported that sleep quality improved significantly and was maintained post-intervention.ConclusionFuture research is needed to establish the relationship between lifestyle behavioral interventions on QOL and other health outcomes (eg, seizure frequency).
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-28T05:38:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241235731
       
  • Burnout and Perceived Workload Among Behavioral Health Providers During
           the COVID-19 Pandemic: Importance of Supervisory, Leadership, and
           Organizational Support

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      Authors: Jennifer Burgess, Hyungjin Myra Kim, Brittany R. Porath, Kara Zivin
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo assess the relationship between behavioral health provider (BHP) perceptions of support during COVID-19 and burnout and self-reported workload.DesignWe conducted a cross-sectional analysis of provider-level data collected from the 2020 and 2021 All Employee Survey (AES).SettingThe Veterans Health Administration.Subjects36,541 (10,332 [28.28%] with missing data) respondents in 2020 and 2021 combined.MeasuresMain outcomes were self-reported burnout and self-reported workload. Main predictors were 6 COVID-19-related provider-perceived support domains. Covariates were 11 AES demographic predictors.AnalysisWe conducted mixed-effects logistic regression modeling for each domain and outcome pairing. We summarized our results using average marginal effects (AMEs) and odds ratios (ORs).ResultsAll 6 domains of feeling prepared, heard, protected, cared for, honored, and having flexible policies were significantly negatively associated with burnout (AMEs −.20 to −.10, ORs .38-.63, P < .001) and positively associated with reasonable workload (AMEs .11-.20, ORs 1.63-2.59, P < .001). Feeling prepared had the largest associations with burnout (OR .38) and reasonable workload (OR 2.59).ConclusionCreating a work environment with flexible policies and where staff feel prepared, heard, protected, cared for, and honored could support BHPs in feeling less burned out and that their workload is reasonable.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-28T03:24:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241236240
       
  • Aligning Employee Health and Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Initiatives
           in the Workplace: A Call for Synchronization

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      Authors: Monica L. Wang, Olivia Poulin, Hannah McKinney
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Reports of burnout and poor mental health are at all-time highs among working U.S. adults.  Simultaneously, failure to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) is among the top characteristics of an unhealthy work culture and has contributed to high rates of employee attrition. Though many organizations across multiple sectors have made pledges to prioritize employee health and invest in DEI in recent years, few have explicitly addressed these two issues as interconnected. The link between the workplace as a determinant of mental and physical health is well-established. Several studies demonstrate that experiencing discrimination in the workplace is associated with detrimental physical and mental health outcomes. Additionally, the way work is structured directly and indirectly contributes to employee health inequities. In this commentary, we make the connection between employee health and organizational DEI and propose guiding principles to synchronize DEI and employee health initiatives in the workplace. These include: investing in DEI as a cornerstone for developing a healthy workforce for all; recognizing differences in employee experiences, needs, and their connection to health; prioritizing systemic approaches to promote employee health and organizational DEI. Embedding employee health and DEI efforts into broader organizational strategy is a crucial step towards fostering equitable practices that promote inclusive work environments andpositive employee well-being.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-27T02:32:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241233398
       
  • Don’t Say “Beans” When Promoting Plant Protein to Family
           Meal Planners

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      Authors: Thomas E. Kottke, Jennifer M. Dinh, Maren S. G. Henderson, Laura Zibley, Rachael L. Rivard, Jeanette Y. Ziegenfuss, Katherine J. Ellefson, Hikaru Peterson, Marna Canterbury
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo identify “headlines” that would engage recipients to consider plant protein over red meat.DesignMail and web survey.SettingUrban Minnesota community.Subjects144 survey respondents from our health plan and community program distribution lists who live with at least 1 other person and eat meat.InterventionWe asked respondents how likely they would be to click on each of 24 headlines with a motivator (eating plant protein for health vs for environmental reasons) and a barrier (family preferences, knowledge about plant proteins, or cooking skills). 16 headlines contained the word “beans”.MeasuresWe created categorical variables for each headline construct: (1) motivator, (2) barrier, and (3) reference to beans. Using a mixed model with random effects, we compared, for each construct, respondents’ self-reported likelihood to click on a headline.ResultsHealth-related headlines performed significantly better than environmental headlines (P = .0019, 95% CI .01, .11). Family-oriented headlines performed slightly better than skills-oriented (P = .0927, 95% CI -.01, .11) and knowledge-oriented (P = .0960, 95% CI -.01, .11) headlines. Headlines containing the word “beans” performed significantly worse than those not containing “beans” (P < .0001, 95% CI -.22, -.12).ConclusionsThe population represented by our survey respondents report being most likely to click on headlines that emphasize health and family. They report they are significantly less likely to click on headlines that promote beans.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-26T10:39:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241237017
       
  • Associations Between Sociodemographic Variables, Social Determinants of
           Health, and Diabetes: Findings From a Congregational Health Needs
           Assessment

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      Authors: Emily Rose N. San Diego, Nathan T. West, Latrice C. Pichon, Yu Jiang, Terrinieka W. Powell, Fedoria Rugless, Jonathan Lewis, Bettina Campbell, Lauren McCann, Sterling McNeals, Brook E. Harmon
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo examine associations between sociodemographic variables, social determinants of health (SDOHs) and diabetes using health needs assessment data.DesignCross-sectional study.SettingFaith-based communities in the Mid-South U.S.SampleOf the 378 churches, 92 participated in the study (24% response rate); N = 828 church leaders and members completed the survey.MeasureThe Mid-South Congregational Health Survey assessed perceived health-related needs of congregations and the communities they serve.AnalysisGeneralized linear mixed modeling examined the associations between sociodemographic variables (age, sex, race/ethnicity, educational level), SDOHs (affordable healthcare, healthy food, employment), and diabetes.ResultsIndividuals with less education had lower odds of reporting all SDOHs as health needs compared to individuals with more education (ORrange = .59-.63). Men had lower odds of reporting diabetes as a health need or concern compared to women (OR = .70; 95% CI = .50, .97). African Americans had greater odds of reporting diabetes as a health need compared to individuals in the ‘Other’ race/ethnicity category (OR = 3.91; 95% CI = 2.20, 6.94). Individuals who reported affordable healthcare (OR = 2.54; 95% CI = 1.73, 3.72), healthy food (OR = 2.24; 95% CI = 1.55, 3.24), and employment (OR = 3.33; 95% CI = 2.29, 4.84) as health needs had greater odds of reporting diabetes as a health need compared to those who did not report these SDOHs as needs.ConclusionsFuture studies should evaluate strategies to merge healthcare and faith-based organizations’ efforts to address SDOHs impacting diabetes.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-24T12:15:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241234662
       
  • Gamification as a Tool for Promoting Physical Exercise and Healthy Eating
           Habits in Healthcare Worker Women: Effects on Cardiometabolic Health and
           Physical Fitness at Workplace

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      Authors: Lucas B. Gimenez, Vanessa Teixeira do Amaral, Gabriel Locato, Isabela R. Marçal, Artur J. T. Ferron, Emmanuel G. Ciolac
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo evaluate the effectiveness of gamified versus nongamified health promotion interventions on cardiometabolic health and fitness parameters in healthcare worker women.DesignRandomized parallel group trial.SettingA public outpatient health center in Brazil.SubjectsWomen employees (included: n = 29; lost to follow-up: n = 1; analyzed: n = 28).Interventions8 weeks of gamified (n = 15) or nongamified (n = 13) interventions, consisting of health lectures, nutritional counseling, and supervised exercise training. The gamified group was divided into teams that received points based on completion of health goals/tasks.MeasuresAnthropometric, cardiometabolic and physical fitness parameters.AnalysisTwo-way ANOVA with repeated measures (group vs. time), and Bonferroni post hoc tests.ResultsBody mass (-1.5 ± 1.5 kg), waist circumference (-1.6 ± 3.0 cm), HbA1C (-.2 ± .3%), triglycerides (-21.5 ± 48.2 mg/dl), systolic (-11.1 ± 7.9 mmHg) and diastolic (-7.1 ± 5.8 mmHg) blood pressure, as well as sit and reach (3.9 ± 3.0 cm) and six-minute walking (56 ± 37 m) performance improved (P < .05) only after the gamified intervention. Sit-to-stand performance improved after both the gamified (-1.18 ± 1.24 s) and nongamified (-1.49 ± 1.87 s) interventions.ConclusionThe gamified intervention was more effective than the nongamified intervention for improving cardiometabolic and physical fitness parameters, suggesting that gamification may be an effective tool for promoting health in healthcare worker women.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T10:38:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241234664
       
  • Effects of the Omaha System- and HeartScore®-Based Impaired-Risk
           Perception Reduction Program on the Risk Perception of Individuals Aged
           50–65 Years: A One-Group Pre-Test–Post-Test Study

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      Authors: Ayşe Dağıstan Akgöz, Sebahat Gözüm
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study evaluates the impact of interventions in the Omaha System and HeartScore®-based program to reduce impaired-risk perception.Designand setting: This study utilized a one-group pre-test–post-test design.SubjectsThe program was conducted among participants aged over 50 years from different social settings.InterventionThe program had three parts: a briefing on HeartScore® recommendations, Omaha System interventions, and referral to a doctor.MeasuresHeartScore® determined cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, body mass index (BMI) was calculated from height and weight, and the International PA Questionnaire evaluated physical activity (PA) levels. Self-assessment was used to perceived CVD risk, BMI, and PA.AnalysisWe used the Wilcoxon signed-rank test to compare the pre-test and post-test scores of the Omaha System, the problem rating scale (PRS) subscales and McNemar test to measure changes in CVD risk perception, BMI, and PA level.Results310 high-risk individuals out of 522 had impaired perception of their CVD risk. Only 201 responded to follow-up phone calls. Interventions based on HeartScore® and Omaha System improved CVD risk and PA perceptions (P < .001) but not BMI. The program significantly increased knowledge, status, and behavior scores (P < .001). After participating, 39% saw a cardiologist, and 57.2% saw a family physician within six months to reduce impaired risk perception. CVD risk perception increased to the actual level after the intervention, mostly in the group with low education level.ConclusionsThe program using the Omaha System and HeartScore® can help middle-aged individuals better understand their risk of cardiovascular disease.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T06:50:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241235733
       
  • Impact of Weight Concern on Post-Cessation Weight Management, Smoking
           Cessation, and Program Engagement

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      Authors: Anjola Toyon, Zoran Bursac, Nicole Werner, Rebecca A. Krukowski
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeWeight concern is a barrier to smoking cessation. We examined the impact of weight concern on post-cessation weight gain, abstinence and program engagement.DesignRandomized-controlled trial.SettingTelephone-based and group-based intervention sessions.Subjects305 participants were randomized and analyzed.InterventionParticipants were randomized to receive a self-guided intervention, a weight loss intervention, or a weight stability intervention prior to all receiving the same smoking cessation intervention.MeasuresLevel of weight concern on three measures, point-prevalence abstinence, weight change, and session attendance at 12 months.AnalysisContinuous and discrete outcomes were compared between weight-concerned and non-weight-concerned participants using two-sample t-tests and chi-square tests respectively.ResultsThere were no significant differences in weight change (range: +1.77, −1.91 kg) when comparing weight-concerned and non-weight-concerned participants. Point-prevalence abstinence ranged from 36% to 64%, with no differences by condition based on level of weight concern. There were no significant differences in session attendance by weight concern (Weight sessions: 50–70%, Smoking cessation sessions: 41–56%, Booster sessions: 28–45%). Weight concern, on all measures, significantly decreased between screening and 2 months (after the weight management intervention), for most of the comparisons made overall and by condition.ConclusionIt may not be necessary to screen for weight concerns in smoking cessation and/or post-cessation weight management programs, as the trial interventions were beneficial regardless of weight concern.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-15T07:21:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241234136
       
  • Isotemporal Substitution of Sedentary Time With Physical Activity Among
           Middle-Aged and Older Latinos: Effects on Episodic Memory

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      Authors: Imani Canton, Jacqueline Guzman, Yuliana Soto, Ana Laura Selzer Ninomiya, Diana Morales, Susan Aguiñaga
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo examine the estimated effects of substituting 30 min of sedentary time with low-light physical activity (LLPA) and high-light physical activity (HLPA) on episodic memory, executive functioning, and working memory among middle-aged and older Latinos.DesignA cross-sectional study.SettingChicago and Chicagoland suburbs.SubjectsMiddle-aged and older Latinos (n = 61).MeasuresAccelerometer-assessed physical activity. A cognitive battery was administered to assess episodic memory, executive function, and working memory.AnalysisIsotemporal substitution analyses were conducted, where unstandardized coefficients from linear regression models were used to examine the substitution effect of replacing sedentary time with LLPA and HLPA.ResultsSubstitution of sedentary time with LLPA was associated with better episodic memory (Immediate recall, B = .947, P = .008; Delayed recall, B = .857, P = .013). No other significant substitution effects were present.ConclusionMiddle-aged and older Latinos who replace sedentary time with LLPA may have better episodic memory. Future studies may target light physical activity to address cognition disparities and can inform the development of physical activity interventions that are appealing and accessible for Latinos.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-14T08:44:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241233404
       
  • Barriers and Facilitators Impacting Disease and Symptom Management Among
           College Students With Type 1 Diabetes: A Qualitative Study

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      Authors: Ny’Nika T. McFadden, Amanda H. Wilkerson, Jessica Jaiswal, Beth H. Chaney, Michael L. Stellefson, Heather J. Carmack, Kylie Lovett
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study aimed to explore barriers and facilitators impacting disease and symptom management among college students living with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D).DesignA qualitative, phenomenological approach using semi-structured, one-on-one interviews.SettingInterviews conducted on Zoom (n = 28) and in-person (n = 3).ParticipantsPurposive sample of 31 college students living with T1D for at least 2 years who attended large, 4-year public universities in the Southeastern United States.MethodThis study was theoretically informed using the Middle-Range Theory of Self-Care of Chronic Illness Integration of Symptoms to develop interview questions. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and uploaded in NVivo. Data were analyzed thematically using a codebook developed by the research team using the theory as a framework. Trustworthiness was established using an audit trail, memos, and negative case analysis.ResultsFour themes described barriers: diabetes burnout, challenges adjusting to a college lifestyle, difficulty receiving medical supplies, and insurance limitations. Five themes explained facilitators: years of experience managing T1D, tangible support with medical supplies, informational support for disease management, and emotional/technological support for disease and symptom management.ConclusionBarriers and facilitators in this study should be addressed in future T1D interventions for college students. Findings can also guide healthcare professionals, health promotion practitioners, family, friends, and significant others on how to better support college students as they manage T1D.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T12:51:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241233407
       
  • Engagement With Remote Delivery Channels in a Physical Activity
           Intervention for Senior Women in the US

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      Authors: Andrea S. Mendoza-Vasconez, Abby C. King, Gabriel Chandler, Sally Mackey, Shawna Follis, Marcia L. Stefanick
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeIdentify the effects of engagement with different intervention delivery channels on physical activity (PA), and the participant subgroups engaging with the different channels, among Women’s Health Initiative Strong and Healthy (WHISH) PA trial participants.DesignSecondary analysis of data from WHISH, a pragmatic trial that used passive randomized consent.SettingUnited States (remote intervention in all 50 states).Sample18,080 U.S. women, aged 68-99 years, assigned to the WHISH PA intervention arm.Measures6 dichotomous variables operationalized engagement: Engagement with Targeted Inserts, Email (opened), Email (clicked links), Website (logging in), Website (tracking), Interactive Voice Response (IVR). PA was measured using the CHAMPS PA questionnaire.AnalysisLinear regressions evaluated effects of engagement on PA. Conditional Inference Trees identified subgroups of participants engaging with different channels based on demographic and psychosocial variables.ResultsEngagement with each channel, except IVR, was associated with significantly more hours/week of PA (square root coefficients .29 - .13, P values
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T09:19:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241229537
       
  • Factors Associated With Racially and Ethnically Diverse Sample of
           Adolescents, Young Adults, and Parents’ Intention to Receive a COVID-19
           Vaccine

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      Authors: Brittany L. Rosen, Andrea Meisman, Quin Sun, Francis J. Real, Alyssa Steller, Emmanuel Chandler, Lori Crosby, Robert Frenck, Melissa Klein, Jessica A. Kahn
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeIdentify variables, including moderating variables, associated with adolescents, young adults, and parents’ intention to receive a COVID-19 vaccine in January 2021.DesignCross-sectional survey.SettingUnited States Midwestern academic medical center.SampleAdolescents (n = 242); young adults (n = 333); parents (n = 563).MeasuresAssociations between predictors—participant characteristics, general vaccine hesitancy, COVID-19 and vaccine knowledge, perceptions, and normative beliefs—and intention to receive a COVID-19 vaccine (outcome) were assessed. To determine variables impacting the strength of the relationship between predictors and outcome, moderators included 2020/2021 influenza vaccine receipt, having experienced discrimination, and primary sources of information for COVID-19.AnalysisMultivariable logistic regression examined associations, including moderating effects, for adolescents, young adults, parents, and parents for child.ResultsWith 20,231 email addresses receiving the survey, 1138 participants were included in the analysis. Intention to receive a COVID-19 vaccine was reported by 60.7% adolescents (n = 147), 65.2% young adults (n = 217), and 38.5% parents (n = 217) and 38.2% parents (n = 215) intended to vaccinate their child. Intention was associated with lower general vaccine hesitancy for adolescents (AOR = 1.50), young adults (AOR = 1.39), parents (AOR = 1.18), and parents’ intention for their child (AOR = 1.17). Parents citing reputable medical experts as primary source of COVID-19 information positively moderated vaccine perceptions and intention for self (AOR = 8.25) and child (AOR = 6.37).ConclusionClinician training to address vaccine hesitancy may be effective at promoting positive COVID-19 vaccine perceptions.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T05:58:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241233397
       
  • Changes in Obesity Prevalence Among U.S. Adults After the COVID-19
           Pandemic by State and Territorial Stay-at-Home Order Level and
           Sociodemographic Characteristics

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      Authors: Beomyoung Cho, Yining Pan, McKinley Chapman, Aaron Spaulding, Sericea Stallings-Smith
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo examine changes in obesity prevalence among US adults after the COVID-19 pandemic by level of stay-at-home order and sociodemographic characteristics.DesignQuasi-experimental study using repeated cross-sectional data.SettingBehavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).SamplePooled data for US adults ages ≥26 years (n = 1,107,673) from BRFSS (2018-2021).MeasuresStates/territories were classified into three levels of stay-at-home order: none, advisory/only for persons at risk, or mandatory for all. Individual-level sociodemographic characteristics were self-reported.AnalysisThe difference-in-differences method was conducted with weighted multiple logistic regression analysis to examine obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2) prevalence by stay-at-home order level and sociodemographic characteristics before/after the COVID-19 pandemic (January 2018-February 2020 vs March 2020-February 2022).ResultsAfter adjusting for a secular trend and multiple covariates, adults in states/territories with mandatory stay-at-home orders experienced a larger increase in obesity prevalence (adjusted odds ratio: 1.05; 95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.11) than adults in states/territories with no stay-at-home order. Younger adults (vs ≥65 years) and individuals with
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T05:23:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241233399
       
  • Participants’ Experiences With a Community Based Participatory Research
           Produce Prescription Program: Findings From a Qualitative Study

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      Authors: Courtney Kimi Suh, Abigail Huliganga, Jeriann Collymore, Naomi Desai, Mary Mora, Lena Hatchett
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThe purpose of this study was to explore a food-insecure, low income, predominantly African American community’s experiences with a produce prescription program (PPP).DesignResearchers conducted 3 focus groups and 4 individual interviews with Maywood Veggie Rx (VRxM) participants asking questions about the logistics of the program while also exploring ideas around health, food, and community.SettingThis produce prescription program took place in Maywood, Illinois which is an urban underserved community with 23.5 K people, most of whom are Black/African American (61%) and Hispanic (32%).ParticipantsThe 24 participants interviewed through focus groups and individual interviews were enrolled in the 2021-2022 VRxM program. Participants were mainly female, with only three participants being males. Ages ranged between 34 and 74 years of age with a mean age of 56.3.MethodQualitative data from transcripts were then coded via a grounded theory approach to identify common themes.ResultsA research team of seven including the two Co-PIs, three medical students and two dietetic interns identified 278 codes which were then condensed into 117 codes and then placed into 9 categories. Researchers identified three recurrent themes among the experiences of VRxM participants: (1) trust building, (2) culturally relevant and adaptive nutrition education, and (3) bidirectional feedback. These three themes mirror many of the principles of Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR).ConclusionThe study findings identify common themes among the experiences of VRxM which are in line with the collaborative approach of CBPR principles. Produce Prescription Programs should utilize CBPR principles in the creation and implementation of programming to improve the participant experience. Future research should include additional focus groups on new iterations of VRxM and should also include those people who chose not to participate in VRxM to explore barriers to participation.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T03:53:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241233094
       
  • The Relationship of Exercise, Psychosocial Factors, and Social
           Participation Among Adults Aging With Long-Term Physical Disability: A
           Cross-Sectional Study

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      Authors: Kerri A. Morgan, Rachel Heeb Desai, Courtney Weber Trocinski, Holly Hollingsworth, Jessica Dashner, Michelle Putnam, Susan L. Stark
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study investigated the relationships among exercise engagement, psychosocial factors, and social participation for adults aging with physical disabilities (AAwPD).DesignA cross-sectional study within a community-based cohort study of participation among AAwPD was conducted.SettingA comprehensive survey was administered online or via telephone.ParticipantsParticipants were 474 individuals between the ages of 45-65, primarily living in the Midwestern United States, who reported living with a physical disability for at least 5 years.MethodSurvey questions created based on prior consolidation of activity domains assessed exercise engagement. Psychosocial health and social participation were measured using the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System. Chi-square tests, t-tests, and a general linear model were used to examine differences between exercisers and non-exercisers.ResultsParticipants who exercised reported less pain (P < .001), fatigue (P < .001), and depression (P < .001) and greater self-efficacy for management of chronic conditions (P = .002), satisfaction with participation in social roles and activities (P < .001), and ability to participate in social roles and activities (P < .001) compared with non-exercising participants.ConclusionsAAwPD who exercised reported fewer secondary conditions and greater social participation. Although causal relationships cannot be drawn, and the frequency, duration, and intensity of exercise were not examined, this study lays important groundwork for future research to determine the health and participation benefits of exercise for AAwPD. Future studies should also focus on the development of exercise interventions to support successful aging with disability.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-10T02:39:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241233087
       
  • Families Benefit After Utilization of a Clinic-Based Food Pantry
           Irrespective of Food Insecurity Experiences in a Pediatric Obesity
           Treatment Program

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      Authors: Lilianna Suarez, Sarah Armstrong, Rachel Fleming, Janna Howard, Rushina Cholera
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo evaluate the congruence between food insecurity screening outcome and clinic-based food pantry utilization and to examine caregiver reported comfort, motivation, and benefits of utilization.DesignMixed-methods study.SettingAcademic pediatric obesity treatment clinic.SubjectsConvenience sample of caregivers.InterventionClinic-based food pantry offered irrespective of food insecurity screening outcome.MeasuresFood insecurity screening (Hunger Vital Sign) and severity, self-rated caregiver health, willingness to disclose food insecurity and receive food, and food-related stress.AnalysisChi-square and t-tests were utilized to examine associations and descriptive analysis explored benefits. Rapid qualitative analysis was utilized to identify themes.ResultsCaregivers of 120 children were included (child mean age 11.8; 56.7% female, 67.6% Non-Hispanic Black), with 47 of 59 eligible completing follow-up surveys and 14 completing in-depth interviews. Approximately half (N = 30/59, 50.8%) of families utilizing the food pantry screened negative for food insecurity. Families utilizing the food pantry were more likely to report severe food insecurity (N = 23/59; 38.9%) compared to those declining (N = 3/61; 4.9%, P < .001). Caregivers accepting food were able to meet a child health goal (N = 30/47, 63.8%). Caregivers reported feeling comfortable receiving food (N = 13/14) and felt utilizing the food pantry led to consumption of healthier foods (N = 7/14).ConclusionsFamilies who screened both positive and negative for food insecurity utilized and benefited from a clinic-based food pantry. Clinics should consider strategies offering food resources to all families irrespective of screening outcome.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T04:30:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241229828
       
  • COVID-19 Diagnosis, Severity, and Long COVID Among U.S. Adolescents,
           National Health Interview Survey, 2022

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      Authors: Kimberly H. Nguyen, Siyu Chen, Yingjun Bao, Yang Lu, Robert A. Bednarczyk, Lavanya Vasudevan
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeUnderstanding disparities in COVID-19 outcomes, overall and stratified by vaccination status, is important for developing targeted strategies to increase vaccination coverage and protect adolescents from COVID-19.DesignThe 2022 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is a cross-sectional nationally representative household survey of U.S. adults.SettingA probability sample of households in the U.S.SampleOne child aged 12-17 years is randomly selected from each family in the household. A knowledgeable adult (eg, parent or guardian), responds on behalf of the child through an in-person interview (response rate = 49.9%).MeasuresInput measures-sociodemographic characteristics and COVID-19 vaccination status; output measures-ever had COVID-19, moderate/severe COVID-19, long COVIDAnalysisPrevalence of COVID-19 outcomes was assessed for adolescents aged 12-17 years. Factors associated with each COVID-19 outcome were assessed with multivariable logistic regression analyses.ResultsAmong 2758 adolescents aged 12-17 years in 2022, 60.5% had received ≥1 dose of COVID-19 vaccine, 30.2% had ever been diagnosed by a doctor that they had COVID-19, 29.5% had moderate/severe COVID-19, and 6.2% had long COVID. Adolescents who were vaccinated with ≥1 dose were less likely to be diagnosed with COVID-19 (aOR = .79) and less likely to have long COVID (aOR = .30).ConclusionTargeted messaging to highlight the importance of early treatment, the harms of long COVID-19, and the benefits of vaccination in protecting against long-term effects may be necessary to ensure that all adolescents and their families are adequately protected.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T07:08:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241231642
       
  • High Intensity Functional Training for People with Parkinson’s & Their
           Care Partners: A Feasibility Study

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      Authors: Reed Handlery, Kaci Handlery, Dana Kahl, Lyndsie Koon, Samuel Leyton Cabe, Elizabeth Wherley Regan
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeVarious forms of exercise have proven health benefits for people with Parkinson’s (pwPD) yet high intensity functional training (HIFT) has yet to be studied. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility, physical and psychosocial impacts of a HIFT program for pwPD and their care partners (CPs).DesignA single group, pre-post design with assessments before, in the middle (13 weeks), and after the 25-week intervention.SettingCommunity fitness facilityParticipantsFourteen pwPD (10 at Hoehn Yahr Stage ≤2, 4 females) and 10 CPs (5 females) were included (mean age = 71.5 (6.1)).InterventionA 25-week HIFT program (≤49 exercise sessions, ≤75 min long)MeasuresRecruitment, retention, attendance, safety and exercise intensity (measured via session-Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE)) was assessed in addition to cardiovascular endurance, lower extremity strength, walking speed, balance, exercise self-efficacy, balance confidence, social support for exercise and health-related quality of life.AnalysisDescriptive data was used to describe feasibility measures. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare pre- and post-program data. Effect size, r, was calculated.ResultsRecruitment rates were ≥40% for pwPD and CPs and retention rates were 80% for pwPD and 62.5% for CPs. Average session attendance was 71.2% with 15 adverse events reported, including 7 non-injurious falls. Median session-RPE was 5 (IQR = 1) out of 10. PwPD demonstrated significant improvements in cardiovascular endurance, self-selected and fast walking speeds, balance and social support for exercise. CPs demonstrated significant improvements in cardiovascular endurance and lower extremity strength. Exercise self-efficacy, balance confidence and health-related quality of life did not significantly change for pwPD or CPs.ConclusionHigh intensity functional training appears feasible for pwPD and their CPs and may lead to health benefits. Healthcare providers should consider HIFT as another option to engage pwPD in community-based exercise.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T01:35:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241231085
       
  • Research Findings Journalists Cannot Resist: A Tale of Three Mental Health
           and Well-Being Studies

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      Authors: Paul E. Terry
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Addressing employee mental health needs and fostering organizations that enable thriving has become a priority for most workplace health and well-being initiatives. While mental health issues for the nation were of growing concern before COVID-19, the pandemic amplified concerns about loneliness, burnout and deaths of despair. A recent study that garnered attention from the popular press found that participants of individual-level mental health interventions were no better off than non-participants. This editorial reviews that study, summarizes limitations and beneficial learnings from the research, and argues that organizational factors have been shown to mitigate or amplify the effectiveness of mental health services. Tenets of ‘patient-centered care’ and the principles behind Total Worker Health® will need to be more broadly embraced so that the voice of employees can better inform workplace well-being strategies and strategic plans.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-02-01T06:56:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241232248
       
  • The Relation Between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Health Behaviors in
           Adult Women

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      Authors: Karina L. Tavares, Cindy E. Tsotsoros
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study aims to identify whether adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) influence health lifestyles throughout adulthood and examine how ACEs influence dimensions of health lifestyles.DesignThe data was collected cross-sectionally through an online questionnaire.SettingIndividuals were invited to participate in an online survey for a larger brain health study as a pre-screening measure.SubjectsWomen in the Midwest between 18-25 and 65-85 who reported either no ACEs or 3 or more ACEs completed the survey, with 233 women answering all questionnaires.MeasuresDemographic indicators, the 10-item ACEs questionnaire, and the Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile (HPLP-II).AnalysisIndependent sample t-tests revealed significantly lower scores for ACEs group on the HPLP-II and the 6 subcategories (heath responsibility, interpersonal relationships, nutrition, physical activity, spiritual growth, and stress management). A structural equation model using the 3 ACE categories (abuse, neglect, and household dysfunction) and 6 health domains showed substantial differences in the variance captured for each health behavior.ResultsFindings indicate that abuse predicts physical activity, stress management, and spiritual growth (β = −.21, −.23, −.20); neglect predicts interpersonal relationships and spiritual growth (β = −.17, −.18); and household dysfunction predicts health responsibility, nutrition, stress management, and interpersonal relations (β = −.20, −.22, −.10, −.17).ConclusionThe present investigation extends research in displaying that ACEs play a significant role in future health behaviors, with household dysfunction being the greatest predictor.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T06:23:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241229829
       
  • The 8 Rights of Organizational Health Equity Work

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      Authors: Maria Milagros Kneusel-Rivera
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Health inequities are costing the US health care system an estimated $320 billion annually. Those costs are predicted to increase if inequitable care is not addressed. As a Health Equity Consultant for small community-based organizations and a large healthcare system I observe and advise on a variety of organizational attempts at advancing health equity. Over many years of doing this work I have developed what I call The 8 Rights of Organizational Health Equity Work. This well-organized approach outlines the most important things an organization must get right if they want to create meaningful and sustainable movement towards heath equity. Unless healthcare organizations are intentional and strategic about reducing health disparities, any progress we have made in recent years will lag and given the costs of disparities, the industry may find itself in a financial crisis that it may not recover from. The 8 Rights of Organizational Health Equity Work provides the structure that is needed to reduce health inequities in a concerted way.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T08:26:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241227706
       
  • Predictors of Adolescents’ Transition Through the Stages of Change for
           Quitting E-Cigarettes: Findings From the Population Assessment of Tobacco
           and Health Study

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      Authors: Nikhil Ahuja, Satish Kedia, Kenneth D. Ward, Yu Jiang, Patrick J. Dillon
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo identify predictive factors associated with US adolescents’ transition through the stages of change for potentially quitting e-cigarettes using the Trans-theoretical model of behavior change.DesignProspective cohort study.SettingUnited States.SubjectsWe utilized data from adolescents (12-17 years) in Wave 3 of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health study who used e-cigarettes exclusively over the past 30 days (n = 177) and were followed up with in Wave 4.MeasuresOutcome variables were 3 transition categories: those who remained stagnant, those who progressed, and those who regressed in their stage of quitting e-cigarettes. Predictor variables were socio-demographics, e-cigarette harm perception, e-cigarette use at home or by important people, social norms, e-cigarette and anti-tobacco advertisements, and e-cigarette health warnings.AnalysisWeighted-adjusted multinomial regression analysis was performed to determine the association between predictor and outcome variables.ResultsFrom Wave 3 to Wave 4, 19% of adolescents remained stagnant; 73.3% progressed; and 7.7% regressed. Adolescents were less likely to progress in their stage of change if they perceived nicotine in e-cigarettes to be “not at all/slightly harmful” (AOR = .26 [95% CI: .25, .27], P < .001); reported important people’s use of e-cigarettes (AOR = .18 [95% CI: .05, .65, P = .009); and “rarely” noticed e-cigarette health warnings (AOR = .28 [95% CI: .08, .98, P = .054).ConclusionIntervention efforts must target specific predictive factors that may help adolescents quit e-cigarettes.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T01:05:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231222077
       
  • Long-term Impacts of Civic Engagement during Emerging Adulthood: A
           Nationally-representative Study

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      Authors: Martie P. Thompson, Matthew Hudson-Flege, Kayla Hancock
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeWe examined if civic engagement during emerging adulthood positively impacted a broad array of outcomes in middle adulthood, and if associations varied based on race, gender, age, and urban-rural status.DesignProspective design used to determine if civic engagement during emerging adulthood (M age = 21.81) predicted outcomes 15 years later.SettingRestricted data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health.SubjectsWave 1 participants who completed surveys 7 years (77% follow-up rate), 14 years (80% follow-up rate), and 22 years later (follow-up rate 72%) and who had valid sampling weight to ensure national representativeness (n = 9349).MeasuresPredictor - civic engagement; Outcomes-mental health, substance use, criminal behaviors, and healthy behavior.AnalysisLinear regression using MPLUS 7.2.ResultsCivic engagement predicted lower levels of depressive symptoms (b = −1.05, SE = .28), criminal behaviors (b = −.47, SE = .12), and substance use (b = −.66, SE = .13), and higher levels of healthy behaviors (b = 1.26, SE = .19), after controlling for demographics, family, peer, neighborhood, and school-related background variables. Moderation analyses revealed that civic engagement benefited females and white participants more.ConclusionCivic engagement during emerging adulthood has a positive impact on a broad array of outcomes in middle adulthood. Implications and future research recommendations will be discussed.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-01-18T03:20:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241227298
       
  • Location Matters: The Role of the Neighborhood Environment for Incident
           Cardiometabolic Disease in Adults Aging With Physical Disability

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      Authors: Anam M. Khan, Paul Lin, Neil Kamdar, Elham Mahmoudi, Kenzie Latham-Mintus, Lindsay Kobayashi, Philippa Clarke
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposePeople aging with disability may be limited in their ability to engage in healthy behaviors to maintain cardiometabolic health. We investigated the role of health promoting features in the neighborhood environment for incident cardiometabolic disease in adults aging with physical disability in the United States.DesignRetrospective cohort study.SettingOptum’s Clinformatics® Data Mart Database (2007-2018) of administrative health claims.SubjectsICD-9-CM codes were used to identify 15 467 individuals with a diagnosis of Cerebral Palsy, Spina Bifida, Multiple Sclerosis, or Spinal Cord Injury.MeasuresCardiometabolic disease was identified using ICD-9-CM/ICD-10-CM codes over 3 years of follow-up. Measures of the neighborhood environment came from the National Neighborhood Data Archive and linked to individual residential ZIP codes over time. Covariates included age, sex, and comorbid health conditions.AnalysisCox regression models estimated hazard ratios (HR) for incident cardiometabolic disease. Using a 1-year lookback period, individuals with pre-existing cardiometabolic disease were excluded from the analysis.ResultsNet of individual risk factors, residing in neighborhoods with a greater density of broadband Internet connections (HR = .88, 95% CI: .81, .97), public transit stops (HR = .89, 95% CI: .83, .95), recreational establishments (HR = .89, 95% CI: .83, .96), and parks (HR = .88, 95% CI: .82, .94), was associated with reduced risk of 3-year incident cardiometabolic disease.ConclusionFindings identify health-promoting resources that may mitigate health disparities in adults aging with disability.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-01-18T02:36:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241228017
       
  • Climate Change Harm Perception Among U.S. Adults in the NCI Health
           Information National Trends Survey, 2022

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      Authors: Abigail Muro, Susan Czajkowski, Kara L. Hall, Gila Neta, Sallie J. Weaver, Heather D’Angelo
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo examine associations between 1) sociodemographics and 2) trust in health information sources with climate change harm perception.MethodsWeighted adjusted logistic regression models examined correlates of climate change harm perception (harm vs no harm/don’t know) among a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults (2022, n = 5585).ResultsSixty-four percent of U.S. adults believed climate change will harm their health. College education (vs high school or less) (AOR 1.7, 95% CI 1.3, 2.2) and having greater trust in doctors (AOR 1.4, 95% CI 1.2, 1.7), scientists (aOR 1.8, 95% CI 1.6, 2.0), and government health agencies (AOR 1.7, 95% CI 1.5, 1.9) for health information were associated with believing climate change harms health. Conversely, greater trust in religious organizations was associated with 16% lower odds of believing climate change harms health (95% CI .74, .94).ConclusionsClimate change harm perception varied by sociodemographics and trust in health information source. Health communication delivered via alternative and diverse channels could expand the reach of climate and health messaging and ultimately increase public awareness and support for measures to mitigate the health impacts of climate change.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-01-18T01:49:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241228339
       
  • Association Between Subjective Cognitive Decline and Twice-Weekly
           Muscle-Strengthening Activities in Middle-Aged and Older US Adults: An
           Analysis of the 2019 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

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      Authors: Matthew W. Schroeder, Molly E. Waring, Nicole R. Fowler, Ryan A. Mace, Sherry L. Pagoto
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeAdults with subjective cognitive decline (SCD), the self-reported concern of reduced cognitive function, are recommended to do physical activity for its brain health benefits. US adults aged ≥45 with SCD are less likely to meet the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) aerobic activity recommendations. Their engagement in muscle-strengthening activities is unknown. We aimed to identify if US adults aged ≥45 with SCD are less likely to do twice-weekly muscle-strengthening activities compared to those without SCD.DesignSecondary analysis of the 2019 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data.Sample114 164 respondents, representing approximately 59 million US adults aged ≥45.MeasuresSCD was indicated if the respondent reported confusion or memory loss during the past 12 months (yes/no). Respondents reported the frequency of muscle-strengthening activities, which we categorized as meeting the ACSM’s recommendations (2+ times per week) or not (
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-01-16T09:47:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231224517
       
  • Correlates of COVID-19 Information Overload and Information Seeking:
           Evidence from a Community Survey

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      Authors: Masahiro Yamamoto, Archana Krishnan, Annis Golden, Gregory Owen, Lawrence M. Schell, Olivia Mata, Elizabeth A. Holdsworth
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo examine the relationships among health literacy, risk perceptions, COVID-19 information overload, health information seeking, and race/ethnicity.DesignA cross-sectional non-probability community survey conducted between December 2020 and January 2021. A questionnaire was developed in collaboration with a local minority health task force.SettingAlbany, New York, USA.Sample331 adults residing in Albany, NY and neighboring areas (80.3% completion rate).MeasuresMulti-item scales were used to measure health literacy, perceived severity, perceived susceptibility, information overload, and health information seeking frequency and types.AnalysisWe conducted multivariate regression analysis.ResultsHealth literacy (standardized β = −.33, P < .001) and perceived severity (β = −.23, P < .001) were negatively associated with information overload. Information overload was negatively associated with health information seeking frequency (β = −.16, P < .05) and types (β = −.19, P < .01). A further analysis shows several factors, including information overload and race (African Americans), were negatively related to seeking specific types of information.ConclusionWe find that low health literacy and perceived severity contribute to information overload and that information overload adversely affects health information seeking. Black individuals are less likely to search for certain types of information. The cross-sectional study design limits our ability to determine causality. Future research should employ panel data to determine the directionality of the observed relationships.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-01-13T11:00:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241227302
       
  • Mindfulness-based Interventions Across the Cancer Continuum in the United
           States: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Brent Emerson, Menaka Reddy, Paul L. Reiter, Abigail B. Shoben, Maryanna Klatt, Subhankar Chakraborty, Mira L. Katz
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo review mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) tested in randomized controlled trials (RCT) across the cancer continuum.Data SourceArticles identified in PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, PsycINFO, and Embase.Study Inclusion and Exclusion CriteriaTwo independent reviewers screened articles for: (1) topic relevance; (2) RCT study design; (3) mindfulness activity; (4) text availability; (5) country (United States); and (6) mindfulness as the primary intervention component.Data ExtractionTwenty-eight RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Data was extracted on the following variables: publication year, population, study arms, cancer site, stage of cancer continuum, participant demographic characteristics, mindfulness definition, mindfulness measures, mindfulness delivery, and behavioral theory.Data SynthesisWe used descriptive statistics and preliminary content analysis to characterize the data and identify emerging themes.ResultsA definition of mindfulness was reported in 46% of studies and 43% measured mindfulness. Almost all MBIs were tested in survivorship (50%) or treatment (46%) stages of the cancer continuum. Breast cancer was the focus of 73% of cancer-site specific studies, and most participants were non-Hispanic white females.ConclusionThe scoping review identified 5 themes: (1) inconsistency in defining mindfulness; (2) differences in measuring mindfulness; (3) underrepresentation of racial/ethnic minorities; (4) underrepresentation of males and cancer sites other than breast; and (5) the lack of behavioral theory in the design, implementation, and evaluation of the MBI.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-01-11T12:01:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241227316
       
  • The Relationship Between Obesity and Internet Addiction in University
           Students: A Cross-Sectional Study

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      Authors: Ülkü Yıldız, Emel Kuruoğlu, Tolga Günvar, Oğulcan Çöme, Vildan Mevsim
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThe purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between obesity and internet addiction in first-year university students (aged 18-25 years).DesignThe study was designed using a cross-sectional analytic model.SettingData collection took place at Dokuz Eylul University, involving a diverse group of first-year students from different faculties.SubjectsThe study population comprised 12,365 students, with 2890 individuals selected using cluster sampling.MeasuresInternet addiction was evaluated using the Online Cognition Scale (OCS). Data on obesity-related variables and demographic details were collected through a questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, chi-square analysis, t test, and ANOVA were applied for statistical evaluation.ResultsThe study included 2105 participants, with 43.8% males and 56.2% females. A significant positive correlation was found between body mass index (BMI) and OCS scores (P = .000), indicating a higher prevalence of internet addiction among individuals with higher BMI. Males had higher mean OCS scores (91.19 ± 35.14) than females (80.21 ± 30.51) (P = .00). Overweight and obese individuals exhibited higher scores on OCS sub-dimensions (P < .005). Notably, individuals with a BMI over 25 were categorized as overweight, and those with a BMI over 30 were classified as obese.ConclusionsThe findings demonstrate a noteworthy relationship between internet addiction and obesity among university students. The study emphasizes the necessity of increased attention to this issue in Turkey for the implementation of effective interventions and preventive measures.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2024-01-11T09:23:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171241227036
       
  • Sleep Duration Is Associated with Household Food Insecurity and
           Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Among Women, Infants and Children
           Participating Children Ages 0-5

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      Authors: Catherine E. Yepez, Christopher E. Anderson, Erin Frost, Shannon E. Whaley, Maria Koleilat
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo determine associations between child and household characteristics and sleep duration among low-income children in Los Angeles County.DesignCross-sectional study.SettingSurvey data collected in 2017 and 2020 in Los Angeles County, California.SampleSpecial Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) households with children ages 4-60 months.MeasuresSleep duration for children 4-60 months old (less than recommended (LTR), recommended range, more than recommended (MTR)), household food insecurity (HFI), sociodemographics, and daily servings of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB).AnalysisMultinomial logistic regression, stratified by child age, was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for associations between household/child characteristics and LTR or MTR sleep compared to recommended duration among WIC participating children 4-60 months old.ResultsThe final sample included 3512 children ages 4-23 months and 6035 children ages 24-60 months. In the study population, 32% (3-5 years old) to 44% (4-11months) of children under 5 did not meet the recommended hours of sleep per night. HFI was associated with higher odds of LTR (OR 1.27, CI 1.12-1.45) and MTR (OR 1.46, CI 1.15-1.87) sleep among 24-60 month-old children. Each additional daily SSB serving was associated with higher odds of LTR sleep (4-23 months: OR 1.10, CI 1.02-1.19; 24-59 months: OR 1.12, CI 1.08-1.17).ConclusionsHFI and SSB intake are associated with not getting the recommended amount of sleep among low-income WIC participating children. Nutrition assistance program participants may benefit from receiving information about recommended sleep duration for young children and how to establish sleep routines to optimize sleep duration.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-12-29T05:59:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231225289
       
  • Evaluating Workforce Mental Health and Well-Being: A Review of Assessments

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      Authors: Mary T. Imboden, Emily Wolfe, Kerry Evers, Arline Ferrão, Heidi Mochari-Greenberger, Sara Johnson, Wolf Kirsten, Erin L. D. Seaverson
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      The disruption, trauma, and stressors brought by COVID-19 have increased recognition and normalization of workforce mental health needs.ObjectiveGiven the importance of mental health and well-being assessments to employers' efforts to optimize employee health and well-being, this paper reviews mental health assessments that have utility in the workplace.Data SourceA review of publicly available mental health and well-being assessments was conducted with a primary focus on burnout, general mental health and well-being, loneliness, psychological safety, resilience, and stress.Inclusion CriteriaAssessments had to be validated for adult populations; available in English as a stand-alone tool; have utility in an employer setting; and not have a primary purpose of diagnosing a mental health condition.Data ExtractionAll assessments were reviewed by a minimum of two expert reviewers to document number of questions, subscales, fee structure, international use, translations available, scoring/reporting, respondent (ie, employee or organization), and the target of the assessment (ie, mental health domain and organizational or individual level assessments.Data Synthesis & ResultsSixty-six assessments across the six focus areas met inclusion criteria, enabling employers to select assessments that meet their self-identified measurement needs.ConclusionThis review provides employers with resources that can help them understand their workforce’s mental health and well-being status across multiple domains, which can serve as a needs assessment, facilitate strategic planning of mental health and well-being initiatives, and optimize evaluation efforts.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-12-28T12:13:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231223786
       
  • Living Arrangements Predict Frequent Alcohol Consumption Among University
           Students: A Retrospective Cohort Study

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      Authors: Yuichiro Matsumura, Ryohei Yamamoto, Maki Shinzawa, Naoko Otsuki, Masayuki Mizui, Isao Matsui, Yusuke Sakaguchi, Makoto Nishida, Kaori Nakanishi, Seiko Ide, Chisaki Ishibashi, Takashi Kudo, Keiko Yamauchi-Takihara, Izumi Nagatomo, Toshiki Moriyama
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study aimed to confirm the clinical impact of living arrangements on incidence of frequent alcohol consumption in university students.DesignA retrospective cohort study.SettingA national university in Japan.Subjects17,774 university students.MeasuresThe association between living arrangements on admission and the incidence of frequent alcohol consumption (≥4 days/week) was assessed using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional-hazards models.ResultsAmong 5,685, 692, and 5,151 male students living with family, living in the dormitory, and living alone, 5.0%, 6.2%, and 5.8% reported frequent alcohol consumption during the median observational period of 3.0 years, respectively. Living in the dormitory and living alone were identified as significant predictors of frequent alcohol consumption (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios: 1.00 [reference], 1.39 [1.01-1.92], and 1.21 [1.03-1.42], respectively). On the contrary, living arrangements were not associated with the incidence of frequent alcohol consumption among of 6,091 female students, partly because of low incidence of frequent alcohol consumption (2.3%, 1.4%, and 2.6%, respectively).ConclusionsLiving arrangements predicted frequent alcohol consumption among male university students, whereas not among female university students.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-12-27T01:58:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231224882
       
  • Past-Year Mental Illness Diagnosis and E-cigarette Use Status Among a
           College-Aged Sample: Findings From the National College Health Assessment
           (2017-2019)

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      Authors: Elizabeth K. Do, Kathleen Aarvig, Gargi Panigrahi, Elizabeth C. Hair
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo examine associations between past-year mental illness (MI) diagnoses and e-cigarette use status.DesignData were obtained from the National College Health Assessment, a nationally recognized cross-sectional survey of university students.SettingParticipants were recruited from 2-year and 4-year public and private universities across the United States from 2017-2019.SubjectsThe analytic sample included 277 291 university students.MeasuresSelf-reported past-year MI diagnosis, binarily coded, served as the primary predictor. The outcome was e-cigarette use status (never, noncurrent, and current user).AnalysisMultinomial logistic regression models were used to estimate relative risk ratios (RRR) of e-cigarette use, as predicted by past-year MI diagnoses, age, race/ethnicity, sex and gender, sexual identity, geographic region, and other combustible tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use.ResultsCompared to those who had never received any MI diagnosis in the past year, those who did had a 16% higher relative risk (RRR = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.20) of being a noncurrent e-cigarette user and a 33% higher relative risk (RRR = 1.33, 95% CI: 1.28, 1.38) of being a current e-cigarette user. Schizophrenia, substance use or addiction, bipolar disorder, and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnoses demonstrated the strongest associations with noncurrent and current e-cigarette use.ConclusionResults suggest the need to screen young adults for e-cigarette use and mental health indicators to facilitate early detection and timely intervention for at-risk university students.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-12-26T11:51:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231224864
       
  • Relationship Between Patient Activation and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
           Self-management and Clinical Outcomes in Saudi Arabian Primary Care
           Setting

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      Authors: Nasser Almutairi, Vinod Gopaldasani, Hassan Hosseinzadeh
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeType 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) self-management is a comprehensive approach that individuals with T2DM employ to manage and control their condition. Patients’ activation, “an individual’s knowledge, skill, and confidence for managing their health and health care”, has been used as a major driver of self-management. This study aimed to assess the relationship of patient activation with T2DM self-management and clinical outcomes.DesignA cross-sectional study.SubjectsPatients with type T2DM who age 18-years and older.SettingThe primary care centers in Saudi Arabia.MeasuresPatient activation measure (PAM) and the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA).AnalysisDescriptive statistic, T-test, One-way ANOVA test, Chi-square test, and linear and logistic regressions were performed.ResultsA total of 398 patients, mostly male (54.9%) with a mean age of 53.2 (±10.7) years old participated in the study. The participants’ mean of Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was 8.4% (±1.7%) and most of them (74.5%) had an uncontrolled HbA1c level (>7% %). The mean patient activation score was 55.9 (±13.5). 24.4% were at [PA1], 26.7% at [PA2], 37.4% at [PA3], and 11.5% at [PA4]. Patient activation level was positively associated with better glycemic control and self-management behaviors including diet, physical activity, blood glucose self-testing, foot care, and smoking (P < .05) but not with adherence to medication.ConclusionsOur findings reveal a positive association between patient activation level and enhanced glycemic control and self-management behaviors and suggest that patient activation-informed self-management interventions are more likely to yield promising health outcomes.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-12-26T01:03:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231224889
       
  • The Impact of Training Based on the Pender Health Promotion Model on
           Self-Efficacy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Amir Jalali, Arash Ziapour, Ebrahim Ezzati, Shahrokh Kazemi, Mohsen Kazeminia
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThe concept of self-efficacy is a determining factor in many behaviours related to health promotion and health education. Several pilot studies have been conducted in different parts of the world on different populations regarding the impact of training based on the Pender Health Promotion Model on self-efficacy, yielding conflicting results. Therefore, the present systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted with the aim of evaluating and summarizing the results of studies on the impact of training based on the Pender Health Promotion Model on self-efficacy.Data SourceMagIran, SID, PubMed, Embase, Web of Science (WoS), Scopus and Google Scholar.Study Inclusion and Exclusion CriteriaOriginal scientific research articles; Interventional studies; Studies investigating the effects of education based on the Pender Health Promotion Model on self-efficacy; Studies irrelevant to the objective; Cross-sectional studies; case reports; and papers presented in conferences; letters to the editor; systematic and meta-analysis studies.Data ExtractionTwo independent reviewers extracted data and assessed the quality of the 18 included studies using a pre-prepared checklist for the systematic review and meta-analysis process.Data SynthesisWe conducted meta-analyses and reported the characteristics, outcomes, and risk of bias of studies.MethodsThe present study was conducted according to PRISMA guidelines until December 2022. The quality assessment of the included articles for meta-analysis was performed using the JBI checklist. Heterogeneity of the studies was calculated using the I2 statistics, and Egger's regression intercept was used to assess publication bias.ResultsIn the initial search, 13,943 studies were found, and after excluding studies irrelevant to the research objective, a total of 18 articles were included in the meta-analysis. These articles represented a sample size of 1015 individuals in the intervention group and 999 individuals in the control group. The combined results of the studies showed a significant increase in self-efficacy in the intervention group when compared to the control group (1.788 ± .267; CI: 95%, P < .001). With an increase in the year of study and the quality assessment score of the articles, the effect of the intervention decreased (P < .001).ConclusionThe results of this study indicated that training based on the Pender Health Promotion Model significantly increased self-efficacy. Therefore, it seems that training based on this model can have positive effects on individuals' self-efficacy.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-12-23T10:21:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231224101
       
  • Persistent and Changing Food Insecurity Among Students at a Midwestern
           University is Associated With Behavioral and Mental Health Outcomes

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      Authors: Melissa J. Slotnick, Saba Ansari, Lindsey Parnarouskis, Ashley N. Gearhardt, Julia A. Wolfson, Cindy W. Leung
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo assess associations between persistent and changing food insecurity and behavioral and mental health outcomes in college students.DesignOnline surveys conducted November 2018 and March 2019 (freshman year), and March 2020 (sophomore year) were used to assess food insecurity, which was then used to create 4 food security transitions: persistent food insecurity, emergent food insecurity, emergent food security, and persistent food security.SettingLarge Midwestern university.Sample593 students completing all 3 surveys.MeasuresDietary intake and behavioral and mental health outcomes (eating disorders, anxiety, depression, sleep quality) were assessed using validated instruments.AnalysisAssociations between food security transitions and dietary intake, behavioral, and mental health outcomes were examined using generalized linear models.ResultsCompared to persistent food security, emergent and persistent food insecurity was associated with lower (7% and 13% respectively) intake of fruits and vegetables combined; persistent food insecurity was associated with 17% lower intake of fruits, 6% lower intake of fiber and 10% higher intake of added sugar from beverages. Compared to persistent food secure students, eating disorder symptom risk was higher for emergent food insecure (OR = 7.61, 95% CI: 3.32, 17.48), and persistent food insecure (OR = 6.60, 95% CI: 2.60, 16.72) students; emergent (OR = 2.05, 95% CI: 1.14, 3.71) and persistent (OR = 2.55, 95% CI: 1.34, 4.87) food insecure students had higher odds of poor sleep quality, and persistent food insecure, emergent food insecure, and emergent food secure students had higher odds of anxiety and depression (OR range 2.35-2.85).ConclusionFood security transitions were associated with aspects of low diet quality and poorer behavioral and mental health outcomes among college students.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-12-22T05:45:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231224102
       
  • Sociodemographic Correlates of Low Health Literacy Skills Among Cancer
           Survivors: National Findings From BRFSS 2016

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      Authors: Qi Chen, John Moore, Lailea Noel, Kirk von Sternberg, Barbara Jones
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study aimed to explore associations of sociodemographic factors with difficulties in three health literacy (HL) skills and the severity of low HL skills.DesignCross-sectional secondary data analysis. Subjects: Data came from 17,834 adults who responded to the HL module with a response rate of 47% in the 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.MeasuresIndependent variables included sex, age, race/ethnicity, education, employment and income. Dependent variables are three HL skills: obtaining, understanding oral, and understanding written health information.AnalysisWe conducted weighted Chi-square tests and multinominal logistic regressions.ResultsCancer survivors younger than 65 (aged 18-39: AOR = 4.46, P < .001; aged 40-64: AOR = 2.29, P < .001), Hispanic (AOR = 2.17, CI = 1.61-2.50, P < .01) had higher odds of difficulty obtaining health information. Female cancer survivors had lower odds of difficulty comprehending oral (AOR = .69, CI = .55-.87, P < .01) and written (AOR = .58, CI = .46-.74, P < .001) information. The relative risk ratio of having difficulties in three HL tasks was higher for those who were younger than 65 (aged 18-39: RRR = 10.18, CI = 2.41-4.3, P < .01; aged 40-64: RRR = 4.01, CI = 2.09-7.69, P < .001), Hispanic (RRR = 3.24, CI = 1.66-11.34, P < .01), unemployed (RRR = 6.1, CI = 2.88-12.76, P < .001), education levels lower than some college (some high school: RRR = 4.34, P < .01; high school: RRR = 2.62, P < .05) and household income under $25,000 (RRR = 6.99, CI = 2.8-17.5, P < .001).ConclusionIntervention and communication materials need to be tailored for patients with different HL skills considering age, gender, socioeconomic status and cultural backgrounds.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-12-18T10:17:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231222073
       
  • An Investigation of COVID-19 Outcomes and College Student Demographics:
           Results from a National Sample

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      Authors: Alyssa M. Lederer, Mary T. Hoban, Christine Kukich
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo assess the effects of COVID-19 on college students and any differential outcomes across collegiate sub-populations towards the beginning of the pandemic.DesignCross-sectional survey.SettingFall 2020 American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment.SubjectsN = 13 373 undergraduate/graduate/professional students; 22 colleges/universities.MeasuresSix COVID-19 outcomes; 10 demographics.AnalysisCampus-specific weights for student enrollment/sex distribution. Cross-tabulations/Pearson χ2 test; Cramer’s V/effect size; Bonferroni multiple testing correction (P < .0009).Results5.6% of students had been diagnosed with COVID-19. Compared to counterparts within each demographic category, rates were significantly higher among many BIPOC student groups (e.g., Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander: 15.0%); cisgender women (5.9%) and men (5.6%); heterosexuals (6.1%); undergraduates (6.3%); and sorority/fraternity members (13.7%). Due to COVID-19, 8.8% of students had lost a loved one; 14.6% had a loved one with long term effects from COVID; 38.6% had increased stress; 61.4% had more financial concerns; and 52.7% had more difficulty accessing mental healthcare. Students identifying as BIPOC; cisgender women and transgender/gender non-conforming (TGNC); queer-spectrum; undergraduate; first-generation; having a disability; and taking courses online were significantly more affected by most of these outcomes (all comparisons P < .0009).ConclusionsStudents were widely impacted by COVID-19 with substantive differences across sub-populations. Future research should examine trends over time and explore ways to reduce health disparities.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-12-12T08:25:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231216532
       
  • Pathways to Quitting E-cigarettes Among Youth and Young Adults: Evidence
           From the truth® Campaign

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      Authors: Jennifer M. Kreslake, Kathleen Aarvig, Michael (Shiyang) Liu, Donna M. Vallone, Elizabeth C. Hair
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study examines the pathways through which e-cigarette users’ awareness of the truth® campaign influences e-cigarette use frequency over time.Design and SettingData included four waves (2020–2023) of the Truth Longitudinal Cohort, a probability-based, nationally representative survey.ParticipantsThe analytic sample was 15-24-year-olds who reported current e-cigarette use at baseline (N = 718). Wave-by-wave retention rates were 64% to 69%.MeasuresRespondents’ cumulative awareness of truth® ads was calculated (Waves 1–2). Strength of agreement with campaign-targeted attitudes was measured on five-point scales (Wave 2). The outcome was change in the 4-level frequency of e-cigarette use (Waves 2–4).AnalysisLatent growth structural equation modeling examined the pathway from cumulative ad awareness to the frequency of e-cigarette use via campaign-targeted attitudes.ResultsModel fit estimates identified a three-step pathway by which awareness of the campaign reduced e-cigarette use. Ad awareness was significantly associated with stronger campaign-targeted attitudes: perceived risk (β = .20, P < .0001); anti-vape industry (β = .13, P = .003); independence from addiction (β = .13, P = .004); and affinity with groups that reject vaping (β = .18, P < .0001). Each attitude was significantly associated with stronger perceived norms against e-cigarette use (respectively: β = .25, P < .0001; β = .15, P < .0001; β = .12, P = .018; β = .27, P < .0001). Perceived norms against e-cigarette use had a significant negative relationship with growth in e-cigarette use frequency over time (β = −.23, P < .0001).ConclusionGreater truth® anti-vaping ad awareness strengthens campaign-targeted attitudes among current users, increasing perceived norms against e-cigarette use and reducing use over time.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-11-29T11:07:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231218492
       
  • Why Not Offer Routine Screenings for Brain Health'

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      Authors: Paul E. Terry
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      The merits of routine health screening for cancer and cardiovascular diseases are well established given the strong evidence that early detection can lead to effective interventions. Health systems, insurance providers and public health agencies have incorporated systematic approaches to ensuring that preventive screenings for hypertension, hyperlipidemia and cancers are encouraged, readily accessible and reimbursed. Workplace wellness programs intent on containing preventable healthcare costs have also sponsored age- and risk-adjusted health screenings, often including financial incentives to encourage same. Should we also screen for brain health' Is early detection of value for a condition with no proven treatment or cure' This editorial reviews the pros and cons of testing for cognitive decline, Alzheimer’s and related dementias and suggests that with nearly every country in the world getting proportionally older, promoting brain health could emerge as a key intrinsic motivation for promoting healthier lifestyles. I conclude that a person-centered approach to deciding about testing is needed given uncertain evidence connecting health behaviors to cognitive decline.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T08:16:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231219542
       
  • Understanding the Design of Fear Appeals by Applying the Extended Parallel
           Process Model: A Qualitative Analysis of COVID-19 Public Service
           Announcements

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      Authors: Xiaobei Chen, Rachel Son, Zhecheng Xiao, Debbie Treise, Jordan M Alpert
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeIdentify how early COVID-19 public health messages incorporated in the tenets of the extended parallel process model (EPPM).SettingYouTube videos developed by governmental departments, medical institutions, news organizations, and non-profit organizations in the United States were aggregated.MethodThis qualitative study conducted a keyword search to identify public service announcements (PSAs). The sample was further refined after searching PSAs that contained fear appeals. A thematic analysis was performed by using the constant comparative method.SampleA total of forty-three videos was included in the final analysis.ResultTwo themes emerged regarding messages aimed at arousing the perceived severity of threat. These themes include emphasizing the consequences of being infected and utilizing personal narratives. Perceived susceptibility of threat was aroused by emphasizing that some groups have higher risks than others. Two themes emerged around arousing perceived response efficacy: (1) the authority of professionals; and (2) altruism and personal responsibility. One way was identified to arouse perceived self-efficacy, which is informing the protective measures.ConclusionMultiple strategies were used in PSAs about COVID-19 to arouse fear during the early stages of the pandemic. The utilization of self-efficacy was oversimplified, by not providing details about the rationale for the recommended behavior.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T07:00:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231218689
       
  • A Qualitative Investigation on Chronic Disease Management and Prevention
           Among Older Adults During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Michelle C. Yang, Cam Clayton, Devin Harris, Chelsea Pelletier, Julia Schmidt, Jill G. Zwicker, Brodie M. Sakakibara
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo qualitatively describe experiences of chronic disease management and prevention in older adults (age ≥65 years) during COVID-19.ApproachQualitative descriptive approach.SettingData collected online via telephone and video-conferencing technologies to participants located in various cities in British Columbia, Canada. Data analyzed by researchers in the cities of Vancouver and Kelowna in British Columbia.ParticipantsTwenty-four community-living older adults (n = 24) age ≥65 years.MethodsEach participant was invited to complete a 30-to-45-minute virtual, semi-structured, one-on-one interview with a trained interviewer. Interview questions focused on experiences managing health prior to COVID-19 and transitioning experiences of practicing health management and prevention strategies during COVID-19. Audio recordings of interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed thematically.ResultsThe sample’s mean age was 73.4 years (58% female) with 75% reporting two or more chronic conditions (12.5% none, 12.5% one). Three themes described participants’ strategies for chronic disease management and prevention: (1) having a purpose to optimize health (i.e., managing health challenges and maintaining independence); (2) internal self-control strategies (i.e., self-accountability and adaptability); and (3) external support strategies (i.e., informational support, motivational support, and emotional support).ConclusionHelping older adults identify purposes for their own health management, developing internal control strategies, and optimizing social support opportunities may be important person-centred strategies for chronic disease management and prevention during unprecedented times like COVID-19.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-11-24T10:52:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231218681
       
  • Audience Response to COVID Monologues: Research-Based Theater on the
           Societal Impact of COVID-19

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      Authors: Emily A. Hurley, Saraniya Tharmarajah, Genevieve de Mahy, Jess Rassp, Joe Salvatore, Jonathan P. Jones, Steven A. Harvey
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeResearch-based theater uses drama to communicate research findings to audiences beyond those that typically read peer-reviewed journals. We applied research-based theater to translate qualitative research findings on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on different segments of U.S. society.ApproachTheater artists and public health researchers collaborated to create a collection of eight monologues from systematically sourced, peer-reviewed publications. Following three virtual performances in Spring, 2021, audience members were invited to complete a survey.Setting/ParticipantsAudience survey respondents (n = 120) were mostly U.S.-based and were diverse in terms of age, race/ethnicity, gender, profession, and experience attending theater.MethodWe summarized closed-ended responses and explored patterns by demographic characteristics. We synthesized themes of open-ended responses with inductive coding.ResultsAudience members somewhat/strongly agreed that COVID Monologues increased their knowledge (79.4%), represented the reality of the U.S. COVID-19 epidemic (95.7%), and offered new perspectives on what people had been experiencing (87.5%). Most also agreed research-based theater is an effective means of understanding health research (93.5%) and can promote community resilience in times of public health crisis (83.2%). Mann-Whitney U tests suggested less positive reactions from demographics that were not well-represented in monologue characters (cisgender men, Hispanics). Qualitative comments suggested audience members valued monologues that offered self-reflection and validation of their own COVID-19 experiences through relatable characters as well as those that offered insight into the experiences of people different from themselves.ConclusionThis work adds to evidence that research-based theater can help build knowledge and emotional insight around a public health issue. As these elements are foundational to pro-social, preventative health behaviors, research-based theater may have a useful role in promoting collective response to public health crises like COVID-19. Our method of systematically-sourcing research for theater-based dissemination could be extended to target more specific audiences with actionable behaviors.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-11-20T09:13:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231216204
       
  • Do Household Headship and Gender Affect Diet Quality under the
           Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)'

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      Authors: Keehyun Lee, Shuoli Zhao
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeExamine whether the association between Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participation and diet quality is different by gender and household headship.DesignQuantitative, cross-sectional.SettingThe 2007-2018 waves of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).Subjects6180 individuals aged 20 to 65 with household annual income below 130% of the poverty level.MeasuresThe outcome of diet quality was measured using the 2015 Healthy Eating Index (HEI) based on dietary intake from 24-hour diet recall. The exposures were self-reported participation in SNAP and socio-demographic variables.AnalysisOrdinary Least Square (OLS) regression models.ResultsThe study found that female household heads had higher average total HEI scores relative to their male and non-head counterparts (β = 1.81, 95% CI: −.27, 3.88). However, for SNAP participants, female household heads had lower average total HEI scores (β = −3.67, 95% CI: −7.36, .11).ConclusionFemale household heads are more likely to experience difficulty in maintaining diet quality relative to their counterparts. The study suggests that intra-household effort allocation may play an important role in differentiating and maintaining diet quality.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-10-28T03:54:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231211158
       
  • The Role of Health Insurance Type and Clinic Visit on Hypertension Status
           Among Multiethnic Chicago Residents

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      Authors: Jiajun Luo, William I. Krakowka, Andrew Craver, Elizabeth Connellan, Jaime King, Muhammad G. Kibriya, Jayant Pinto, Tamar Polonsky, Karen Kim, Habibul Ahsan, Briseis Aschebrook-Kilfoy
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo investigate the joint relationship of health insurance and clinic visit with hypertension among underserved populations.DesignPopulation-based cohort study.SubjectsData from 1092 participants from the Chicago Multiethnic Prevention and Surveillance Study (COMPASS) between 2013 and 2020 were analyzed.MeasuresFive health insurance types were included: uninsured, Medicaid, Medicare, private, and other. Clinic visit over past 12 months were retrieved from medical records and categorized into 4 groups: no clinic visit, 1-3 visits, 4-7 visits,>7 visits.AnalysisInverse-probability weighted logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for hypertension status according to health insurance and clinic visit. Models were adjusted for individual socio-demographic variables and medical history.ResultsThe study population was predominantly Black (>85%) of low socioeconomic status. Health insurance was not associated with more clinic visit. Measured hypertension was more frequently found in private insurance (OR = 6.48, 95% CI: 1.92-21.85) compared to the uninsured group, while 1-3 clinic visits were associated with less prevalence (OR = .59, 95% CI: .35-1.00) compared to no clinic visit. These associations remained unchanged when health insurance and clinic visit were adjusted for each other.ConclusionIn this study population, private insurance was associated with higher measured hypertension prevalence compared to no insurance. The associations of health insurance and clinic visit were independent of each other.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-10-25T07:39:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231209674
       
  • The ‘Natural’ Accord of DuBois and Washington: An Environmentally
           Racialized Consciousness

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      Authors: Jennifer D. Roberts
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      The conflict and discord between Booker T. Washington and W.E.B DuBois regarding their premise and approach to racial uplift for Black Americans have been very well documented. While Washington sought equality with accommodation, DuBois functioned through agitation. However, their biophilic accord and unity within the natural environment have been both underrecognized and underappreciated. As an honor to these esteemed racial and social justice giants, this special issue article reveals the universality of their environmental justice ideologies while also celebrating the beauty, power and foresight of their ecological language in script and speech.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-10-20T10:22:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231210071
       
  • Perceived Community Belonging as a Moderator of the Association Between
           Sexual Orientation and Health and Well-Being

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      Authors: Lei Chai
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study examines the moderating role of perceived community belonging in the association between sexual orientation and various health and well-being outcomes.DesignA national cross-sectional survey.SettingConfidential microdata from the 2021 Canadian Community Health Survey.SubjectsIndividuals aged 15 and older, with a sample size ranging from 43,000 to 44,100.MeasuresSexual orientation, health and well-being outcomes, and sense of community belonging were all self-reported. Outcomes included self-rated general and mental health, depressive symptoms, and life satisfaction.AnalysisA series of multiple linear regression models.ResultsCompared to heterosexual individuals, bisexual individuals reported poorer self-rated general health (b = .402, P < .001 for men; b = .454, P < .001 for women) and mental health (b = .520, P < .001 for men; b = .643, P < .001 for women), higher depressive symptoms (b = 2.140, P < .001 for men; b = 2.685, P < .001 for women), and lower life satisfaction (b = .383, P < .05 for men; b = .842, P < .001 for women). Few disparities were observed among gay men and lesbians. Contrary to some recent findings, no disparities were observed among individuals uncertain about their sexual orientation or those who chose not to disclose it, even without controlling for covariates. A stronger sense of community belonging mitigated the disadvantages associated with self-rated general health (b = -.276, P < .01) and depressive symptoms (b = -.983, P < .01) for gay men, and life satisfaction (b = -.621, P < .01) for lesbians.ConclusionThis study is among the first to highlight the stress-buffering role of community belonging in the association between sexual orientation and health and well-being outcomes.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-10-04T06:24:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231204472
       
  • Personal Health Planning in Adult-Child Former Caregivers of Parents
           Living With Dementia

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      Authors: Emily L. Mroz, Talha Ali, Amanda Piechota, Tara D. Matta-Singh, Anissa Abboud, Shubam Sharma, Joan K. Monin, Terri R. Fried
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo examine how former caregivers for parents living with dementia engage in personal health planning.DesignAn inductive, qualitative study.SettingVirtual, audio-recorded, semi-structured interviews.ParticipantsThirty-two midlife former primary caregivers for parents who died following advanced dementia 3 months to 3 years prior.MethodParticipants responded to a series of open-ended interview prompts. Interview recordings were transcribed and evaluated by a trained, diverse team to generate Consensual Qualitative Research (CQR) domains and categories.ResultsCaregivers developed health planning outlooks (ie, mindsets regarding willingness and ability to engage in personal health planning) that guided health planning activities (ie, engaging in a healthy lifestyle, initiating cognitive/genetic testing, maintaining independence and aging in place, ensuring financial and legal security). An agentic outlook involved feeling capable of engaging in health planning activities and arose when caregivers witnessed the impact and feasibility of their parents’ health planning. Anxiety-inducing and present-focused outlooks arose when caregivers faced barriers (eg, low self-efficacy, lack of social support, perception that parent’s health planning did not enhance quality of life) and concluded that personal health planning would not be valuable or feasible.ConclusionCaregiving for a parent living with dementia (PLWD) shapes former caregivers’ personal health planning. Interventions should support former caregivers who have developed low self-efficacy or pessimistic views on healthy aging to support them in addressing health planning activities.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-09-28T11:19:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231204670
       
  • Parents’ Trust in COVID-19 Messengers and Implications for
           Vaccination

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      Authors: Lauren M. Klein, Daniel R. S. Habib, Lorece V. Edwards, Erin R. Hager, Andrea A. Berry, Katherine A. Connor, Gabriela Calderon, Yisi Liu, Sara B. Johnson
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo characterize factors associated with parents’ trust in messengers of COVID-19 guidance and determine whether trust in their doctors is associated with COVID-19 vaccination.DesignWeb-based and mailed survey (January-June 2022).SettingMaryland, USA.Subjects567 parents/caregivers of public elementary and middle school students.MeasuresParents rated trust in 9 messengers on a 4-point scale [“not at all” (0) to “a great deal” (3)], dichotomized into low (0-1) vs high (2-3). They reported on health insurance, income, race, ethnicity, education, sex, urbanicity, political affiliation, and COVID-19 vaccination.AnalysisANOVA and t-tests were computed to compare overall trust by parent characteristics. Multivariable logistic regression was run to evaluate factors associated with high trust for each messenger. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between trust in doctors and odds of COVID-19 vaccination.ResultsMost trusted messengers were doctors (M = 2.65), family members (M = 1.87), and schools (M = 1.81). Parents’ trust varied by racial identity, sex, urbanicity, health insurance, and political affiliation. Greater trust in their or their child’s doctor was associated with greater odds of child (aOR: 2.97; 95% CI: 1.10, 7.98) and parent (aOR: 3.30; 95% CI: 1.23, 1.47) vaccination.ConclusionParent characteristics were associated with trust, and trust was linked to vaccination. Public health professionals should anticipate variability in trusted messengers to optimize uptake of public health guidance.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-09-28T05:07:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231204480
       
  • The Effects of Interpersonal Violence on Sleep Following the COVID-19
           Stay-at-Home Order

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      Authors: Daniel J. Schober, Douglas Bruce, Taylor Lewis, Allison Keller, Julia F. Lippert, Meha Singh, Hannah Matzke, Nikhil Prachand
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeLack of sleep is a harm that can lead to chronic diseases ranging from diabetes to heart disease. We examined the exposure to interpersonal violence and its association with sleep, following the COVID-19 stay-at-home order.DesignCross-sectional.SettingSurveys were completed online and via paper-and-pencil in English and Spanish (N = 2049; RR = 68.4%).SubjectsRespondents were 18+ and residing in Chicago.MeasuresThe Chicago Department of Public Health’s “2022 Healthy Chicago Survey COVID-19 Social Impact Survey”.AnalysisWe developed two weighted models. Model 1 examined the effects of neighborhood violence on meeting the national sleep recommendation. Model 2 examined the effects of violence in the home among friends or family on meeting the sleep recommendation, incorporating additional predictors: victimization, stress, gender, race/ethnicity, household income, and general health. Odds ratios were estimated using multivariate logistic regression.ResultsExposure to neighborhood violence and sleep was not significant, but knowing a friend or family member who experienced violence or mistreatment in their home affected the odds of meeting the sleep recommendation (OR = .61, 95% CI = .44-.84). Non-Hispanic Blacks had 52% lower odds of meeting sleep recommendations (OR = .48, 95% CI = .37-.63).ConclusionAddressing the harms to sleep that followed COVID-19 should engage diverse stakeholders in implementing culturally responsive interventions to promote adequate sleep and prevent chronic disease.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-09-28T04:59:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231204144
       
  • Healthcare Providers’ Knowledge of Evidence-Based Treatment for Tobacco
           Dependence, DocStyles 2020

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      Authors: Thomas Golden, Elizabeth Courtney-Long, Brenna VanFrank
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeAlthough smoking cessation reduces the risk of all-cause mortality, evidence-based cessation treatments are underused. This study examined healthcare provider knowledge of evidence-based cessation treatments and associations between knowledge and clinical practice characteristics.DesignCross-sectional survey.Setting2020 DocStyles.Subjects1480 U.S. healthcare providers.MeasuresProvider knowledge of availability of tobacco use disorder diagnostic criteria, clinical practice guideline availability, treatment efficacy, evidence-based counseling modalities, and medications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).AnalysisAdjusted odds ratios (aORs), adjusted for personal and clinical practice characteristics.ResultsLess than half of respondents demonstrated high knowledge of availability of diagnostic criteria (36.8%), cessation treatment efficacy (33.2%), evidence-based counseling modalities (5.6%), and FDA-approved medications (40.1%). Significant differences were found between specialties: compared to internists, family physicians were less likely to have low knowledge of medications (aOR = .69, 95% CI = .53, .90) and obstetricians/gynecologists were more likely to have low knowledge of medications (aOR = 2.62, 95% CI = 1.82, 3.76). Overall, few associations between knowledge and clinical practice characteristics were identified.ConclusionMost providers had low knowledge of the topics of interest, with little variation across clinical practice characteristics, indicating room for improvement. Efforts to improve provider knowledge of evidence-based treatments are an important component of a comprehensive approach to improving delivery and use of cessation interventions and increasing tobacco cessation.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-09-21T05:58:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231202626
       
  • Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Health Behaviors and Outcomes by Age Group
           and Race Ethnicity: Results From Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance
           System Data

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      Authors: Shipra Singh, Mounika Polavarapu, Katharine Vallerand, Sundaye S. Moore
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Examine changes in health behaviors and outcomes during early-pandemic (2020) vs pre-pandemic (2019) by age-group and race/ethnicity. Multivariable logistic regressions were conducted using Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System datasets from 2019 (n = 418 268) and 2020 (n = 401 958). All participants reported less likely to exercise (aOR, .78; 95% CI: .73-.83) and poor physical health (aOR, .91; 95% CI: .86-.98), but excellent general health (aOR, 1.33; 1.17-1.53) during 2020 vs 2019. Compared to 2019, during 2020 (i) Blacks were more likely to exercise (aOR, 1.24; 95% CI: 1.02-1.51) and have excellent general health (aOR, 1.69; 95% CI: 1.13-2.54); (ii) Hispanics were less likely to exercise (aOR, .80; 95% CI: .74-.88), but more likely to have excellent general health (aOR, 2.44; 95% CI: 1.79-3.33) and mental health (aOR, 1.41; 95% CI: 1.15-1.72); and (iii) Whites were less likely to exercise (aOR, .58; 95% CI: .50-.67) and have good physical health (aOR, 0.89; 95% CI: .82-.95). All age groups, except 18-24 years, were less likely to exercise by 18%-39% during 2020 vs 2019. Futhermore, 55-64 years age-group was 36% more likely to report excellent general health but 14% less likely to have good physical health. Identifying the most vulnerable racial/ethnic and age-group is pivotal to prioritizing public health resources and interventions to mitigate the impact of health crises.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-09-01T02:42:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231199399
       
  • Cigarette Smoking Motives and Stages of Change in Smoking Cessation Among
           Veterans: Differences by Gender and Sexual Orientation

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      Authors: Raymond A. Ruiz, Keren Lehavot, Jaimee L. Heffner, Christine M. Kava, India J. Ornelas
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo examine differences across gender and sexual orientation in cigarette smoking motives and stages of change in smoking cessation among Veterans.DesignSecondary data analysis of cross-sectional baseline surveys from a prospective cohort study.SettingUnited States, self-administered online survey.ParticipantsCisgender Veterans who reported past-year smoking (N = 146); 66.4% identified as lesbian, gay, or bisexual and 52.1% were men.MeasuresSmoking motives (i.e., social, self-confidence, boredom relief, and affect regulation), with higher scores indicating stronger motivation to smoke. Stages of change categories included precontemplation, contemplation/preparation, and action/maintenance.AnalysisAnalyses were stratified by gender and sexual orientation. Age-adjusted linear regression models estimated differences in smoking motives scores and multinomial logistic regression models estimated differences in stages of change categories relative to the precontemplation stage (reference category).ResultsIn this Veteran sample, gay men reported higher social smoking motives vs heterosexual men (β = 1.50 (95% CI: .04, 2.97), P-value = .045) and higher boredom relief smoking motives vs bisexual men (β = 1.53 (95% CI: .06, 2.29), P-value = .041) in age-adjusted models. Lesbian women were more likely to be in the action/maintenance stage relative to the precontemplation stage when compared to both heterosexual women (aRRR = 4.88 (95% CI: 1.00, 23.79) P-value = .050) and bisexual women (aRRR = 16.46 (95% CI: 2.12, 127.57), P-value = .007) after adjusting for age.ConclusionSmoking cessation interventions may benefit from enhancing peer support for gay men. Given bisexual and heterosexual women were in less advance stages of change, there may be a greater need for motivational interventions to encourage quitting and additional support to assist with cessation efforts. Overall, findings highlight the diversity of cigarette use within LGB communities.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-08-29T06:03:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231197147
       
  • The ‘Product Environment’ is an Important Driver of Health. It’s
           Time to Measure It

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      Authors: Sara Singer, Stephen J. Downs
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Through their products and services, businesses have a meaningful impact on their customers’ health. When markets reward products that induce unhealthy behaviors, like poor diet and limited physical activity, they fuel the chronic disease epidemic. For market mechanisms to reward positive, and to punish negative, influences on healthy behaviors, companies’ influences will need to be measured. Inspired by the technique of health impact assessment, we propose an approach to measuring these influences, based on examining usage patterns and the activities that result from a given product or service and then mapping those experiences to a core set of health behaviors.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-08-14T02:32:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231195368
       
 
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  Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)                  1 2 3 4 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 203 Journals sorted alphabetically
16 de Abril     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ACM Transactions on Computing for Healthcare     Hybrid Journal  
Acta Scientiarum. Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adultspan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Adversity and Resilience Science : Journal of Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
African Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Afrimedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Aging and Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
AJOB Empirical Bioethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Akademika     Open Access  
American Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Health Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
American Journal of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Health Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
American Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 224)
American Journal of Public Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Annali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità     Open Access  
Annals of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of Health Law     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Applied Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Apuntes Universitarios     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Community Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archivos de Prevención de Riesgos Laborales     Open Access  
ASA Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia Pacific Journal of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Journal of Gambling Issues and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of Medicine and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Population Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Social Health and Behavior     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atención Primaria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atención Primaria Práctica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin     Free   (Followers: 5)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Bijzijn XL     Hybrid Journal  
Biograph-I : Journal of Biostatistics and Demographic Dynamic     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Biomedical Safety & Standards     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Biosafety and Health     Open Access  
Biosalud     Open Access  
Birat Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access  
BLDE University Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Brazilian Journal of Medicine and Human Health     Open Access  
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Buletin Penelitian Kesehatan     Open Access  
Buletin Penelitian Sistem Kesehatan     Open Access  
Cadernos de Educação, Saúde e Fisioterapia     Open Access  
Cadernos de Saúde     Open Access  
Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Family Physician     Partially Free   (Followers: 14)
Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Carta Comunitaria     Open Access  
Case Reports in Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Central Asian Journal of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CES Medicina     Open Access  
CES Salud Pública     Open Access  
Child and Adolescent Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Child's Nervous System     Hybrid Journal  
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Children     Open Access  
Chinese Journal of Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED Journal of Health and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Christian Journal for Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia & Salud     Open Access  
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Ciencia e Innovación en Salud     Open Access  
Ciencia y Cuidado     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia y Salud     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Tecnología y Salud     Open Access  
Cities & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cleaner and Responsible Consumption     Open Access  
Clinical and Experimental Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CME     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Contact (CTC)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Contraception and Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuaderno de investigaciones: semilleros andina     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Current Opinion in Environmental Science & Health     Hybrid Journal  
D Y Patil Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Das österreichische Gesundheitswesen ÖKZ     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Design for Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Digital Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Discover Social Science and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Diversity and Equality in Health and Care     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Diversity of Research in Health Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dramatherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Drogues, santé et société     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Düzce Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Enstitüsü Dergisi / Journal of Duzce University Health Sciences Institute     Open Access  
Early Childhood Research Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
East African Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
EcoHealth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Egyptian Journal of Nutrition and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Egyptian Journal of Occupational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
electronic Journal of Health Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
ElectronicHealthcare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Emerging Trends in Drugs, Addictions, and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ensaios e Ciência : Ciências Biológicas, Agrárias e da Saúde     Open Access  
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Sciences Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Epidemics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
EsSEX : Revista Científica     Open Access  
Estudios sociales : Revista de alimentación contemporánea y desarrollo regional     Open Access  
Ethics & Human Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ethics, Medicine and Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Eurasian Journal of Health Technology Assessment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EUREKA : Health Sciences     Open Access  
European Journal of Health Communication     Open Access  
European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
European Medical, Health and Pharmaceutical Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Evidência - Ciência e Biotecnologia - Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Exploratory Research in Clinical and Social Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Expressa Extensão     Open Access  
F&S Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Face à face     Open Access  
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Family & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Family Medicine and Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
FASEB BioAdvances     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Fatigue : Biomedicine, Health & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Food and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Food Hydrocolloids for Health     Open Access  
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Frontiers in Digital Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Frontiers in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers of Health Services Management     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Gaceta Sanitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Galen Medical Journal     Open Access  
Ganesha Journal     Open Access  
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Geospatial Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gestão e Desenvolvimento     Open Access  
Gesundheitsökonomie & Qualitätsmanagement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Giornale Italiano di Health Technology Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Advances in Health and Medicine     Open Access  
Global Challenges     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Health : Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Global Health Annual Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Health Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Global Health Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Global Journal of Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Global Journal of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Global Medical & Health Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Global Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Security : Health, Science and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Transitions     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Transitions Proceedings     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Hacia la Promoción de la Salud     Open Access  
Hastane Öncesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Hastings Center Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
HCU Journal     Open Access  
HEADline     Hybrid Journal  
Health & Place     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Health and Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Health Behavior and Policy Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Health Behavior Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Health Equity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)

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