Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)                  1 2 3 4 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 203 Journals sorted alphabetically
16 de Abril     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ACM Transactions on Computing for Healthcare     Hybrid Journal  
Acta Scientiarum. Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adultspan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Adversity and Resilience Science : Journal of Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
African Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Afrimedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Aging and Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
AJOB Empirical Bioethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Akademika     Open Access  
American Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Health Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
American Journal of Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
American Journal of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
American Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Health Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
American Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 208)
American Journal of Public Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Annali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità     Open Access  
Annals of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of Health Law     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Applied Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Apuntes Universitarios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Community Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Archivos de Prevención de Riesgos Laborales     Open Access  
ASA Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia Pacific Journal of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asian Journal of Gambling Issues and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of Medicine and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Population Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Social Health and Behavior     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Atención Primaria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atención Primaria Práctica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin     Free   (Followers: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Bijzijn XL     Hybrid Journal  
Biograph-I : Journal of Biostatistics and Demographic Dynamic     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Biomedical Safety & Standards     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Biosafety and Health     Open Access  
Biosalud     Open Access  
Birat Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access  
BLDE University Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Brazilian Journal of Medicine and Human Health     Open Access  
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Buletin Penelitian Kesehatan     Open Access  
Buletin Penelitian Sistem Kesehatan     Open Access  
Cadernos de Educação, Saúde e Fisioterapia     Open Access  
Cadernos de Saúde     Open Access  
Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Family Physician     Partially Free   (Followers: 14)
Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Carta Comunitaria     Open Access  
Case Reports in Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Central Asian Journal of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CES Medicina     Open Access  
CES Salud Pública     Open Access  
Child and Adolescent Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Child's Nervous System     Hybrid Journal  
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Children     Open Access  
Chinese Journal of Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED Journal of Health and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Christian Journal for Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia & Salud     Open Access  
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Ciencia e Innovación en Salud     Open Access  
Ciencia y Cuidado     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia y Salud     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Tecnología y Salud     Open Access  
Cities & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cleaner and Responsible Consumption     Open Access  
Clinical and Experimental Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CME     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Contact (CTC)     Open Access  
Contraception and Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuaderno de investigaciones: semilleros andina     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Current Opinion in Environmental Science & Health     Hybrid Journal  
D Y Patil Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Das österreichische Gesundheitswesen ÖKZ     Hybrid Journal  
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Design for Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Digital Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Discover Social Science and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Diversity and Equality in Health and Care     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Diversity of Research in Health Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dramatherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Drogues, santé et société     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Düzce Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Enstitüsü Dergisi / Journal of Duzce University Health Sciences Institute     Open Access  
Early Childhood Research Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
East African Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
EcoHealth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Egyptian Journal of Nutrition and Health     Open Access  
Egyptian Journal of Occupational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
electronic Journal of Health Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
ElectronicHealthcare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Emerging Trends in Drugs, Addictions, and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ensaios e Ciência : Ciências Biológicas, Agrárias e da Saúde     Open Access  
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Sciences Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Epidemics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
EsSEX : Revista Científica     Open Access  
Estudios sociales : Revista de alimentación contemporánea y desarrollo regional     Open Access  
Ethics & Human Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ethics, Medicine and Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Eurasian Journal of Health Technology Assessment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EUREKA : Health Sciences     Open Access  
European Journal of Health Communication     Open Access  
European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Evidência - Ciência e Biotecnologia - Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Exploratory Research in Clinical and Social Pharmacy     Open Access  
Expressa Extensão     Open Access  
F&S Reports     Open Access  
Face à face     Open Access  
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Family & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Family Medicine and Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
FASEB BioAdvances     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Fatigue : Biomedicine, Health & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Food and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Food Hydrocolloids for Health     Open Access  
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Frontiers in Digital Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Frontiers in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers of Health Services Management     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Gaceta Sanitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Galen Medical Journal     Open Access  
Ganesha Journal     Open Access  
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Geospatial Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gestão e Desenvolvimento     Open Access  
Gesundheitsökonomie & Qualitätsmanagement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Giornale Italiano di Health Technology Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Advances in Health and Medicine     Open Access  
Global Challenges     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Health : Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Global Health Annual Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Health Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Health Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Global Journal of Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Journal of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Global Medical & Health Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Global Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Security : Health, Science and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Transitions     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Transitions Proceedings     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Hacia la Promoción de la Salud     Open Access  
Hastane Öncesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Hastings Center Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
HCU Journal     Open Access  
HEADline     Hybrid Journal  
Health & Place     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health and Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Health Behavior and Policy Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Health Behavior Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Health Equity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Health Information : Jurnal Penelitian     Open Access  

        1 2 3 4 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
American Journal of Health Promotion
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.807
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 24  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0890-1171 - ISSN (Online) 2168-6602
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • In Briefs

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 151 - 155
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 37, Issue 2, Page 151-155, February 2023.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-01-17T03:38:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221148095
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Knowing Well, Being Well: well-being born of understanding: The COVID-19
           Pandemic and Children: Implications for Future Health

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rachel Mosher Henke
      Pages: 263 - 288
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 37, Issue 2, Page 263-288, February 2023.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-01-17T03:38:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221140641
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • The COVID-19 Pandemic and Children: Implications for Future Health

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rachel Mosher Henke
      Pages: 263 - 264
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 37, Issue 2, Page 263-264, February 2023.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-01-17T03:38:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221140641a
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • The COVID-19 Pandemic: Implications for Maternal Mental Health and Early
           Childhood Development

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      Authors: Bonnie D. Kerker, Erica Willheim, J. Rebecca Weis
      Pages: 265 - 269
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 37, Issue 2, Page 265-269, February 2023.
      Women are particularly susceptible to mental health challenges during the perinatal period. With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, much concern was raised about the impact that the associated isolation, uncertainty, grief, loss and economic upheaval would have on mental health. Women experienced a disproportionate amount of environmental strain during this time, including economic stress and challenges associated with being essential workers; stressors were perhaps most prevalent in communities of color and immigrant groups. For women who were pregnant during the height of the pandemic, it is clear that stress, anxiety, and depression were increased due to changes in medical care and decreases in social support. Increased mental health challenges in the perinatal period have been shown to impact social-emotional, cognitive and behavioral health in infants and children, so the potential consequences of the COVID-19 era are great. This paper discusses these potential impacts and describes important pathways for future research.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-01-17T03:38:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221140641b
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Re-imagining Early Childhood Education and School Readiness for Children
           and Families of Color in the Time of COVID-19 and Beyond

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      Authors: Bonnie D. Kerker, Natalia M. Rojas, Spring Dawson-McClure, Cristina Gonzalez
      Pages: 270 - 273
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 37, Issue 2, Page 270-273, February 2023.
      High quality and culturally responsive early childhood education and care (ECEC) for young children before kindergarten is seen as a way to ensure that all children enter school ready to learn. ECEC is even more crucial in the context of recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic and the disproportionate burden of trauma and stress borne by families of color in disinvested neighborhoods. Remote learning and repeated disruptions to in-person instruction as protocols shifted during waves of the pandemic placed an extra strain on families, and may have increased educational disparities in the U.S. Taken together, these challenges have implications for children’s school readiness due to their impact on opportunities for learning at home and in the classroom. This paper explores how ECEC programs can be strengthened to better meet children’s needs, and ways in which future research can shed light on these important issues.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-01-17T03:38:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221140641c
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Adolescents: An Opportunity to
           Build Resilient Systems

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      Authors: Erum Nadeem, Anna R. Van Meter
      Pages: 274 - 281
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 37, Issue 2, Page 274-281, February 2023.
      The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on adolescents is significant. Educational progress and mental health, in particular, have been negatively affected. Among youth from vulnerable communities, pre-existing academic and health disparities have been exacerbated. Youth outcomes are often attributed to individual resilience – or lack thereof; in this paper, we describe how failure to adapt and effectively cope at the system level (ie, lack of system resilience) is implicated in the current dual educational and mental crisis. We describe opportunities to make our systems more nimble and better-equipped to support youth moving forward.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-01-17T03:38:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221140641d
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • The Impact of COVID-19 on Pregnant Women and Children: Recommendations for
           Health Promotion

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      Authors: Whitney Perkins Witt, Nicole Harlaar, Ashley Palmer
      Pages: 282 - 288
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 37, Issue 2, Page 282-288, February 2023.
      COVID-19 continues to have severe repercussions on children and pregnant women. The repercussions include not only the direct impact of COVID-19 (ie, children getting infected by COVID-19) but also indirect impacts (eg, safeguarding from child maltreatment, obesogenic behaviors, language and socioemotional development, educational consequences [eg, interrupted learning]; social isolation; mental health; behavioral health [eg, increased substance use in adolescence]; health and economic impact of COVID-19 on caregivers and family relationships. It has also shed light on long-standing structural and socioeconomic issues, including equity in nutrition and food security, housing, childcare, and internet access. Using a socioecological, life course, and population health approach, we discuss the implications for pregnant women and children’s health and well-being and give recommendations for mitigating the short and long-term deleterious impact COVID- 19 on women, children, and their families.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-01-17T03:38:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221140641e
      Issue No: Vol. 37, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Changes in Screen Time in Brazil: A Time-Series Analysis 2016-2021

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      Authors: Pollyanna Costa Cardoso, Thaís Cristina Marquezine Caldeira, Taciana Maia de Sousa, Rafael Moreira Claro
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo analyze the temporal trend of leisure screen time among adults in Brazil between 2016 and 2021.DesignTime-series analysis of six cross-sectional surveys.SettingData from the Surveillance System for Risk and Protective Factors for Chronic Diseases by Telephone Survey (Vigitel) (2016/21).SubjectsA probabilistic sample of 265 252 adults (≥18 years).MeasuresTime watching television (TV), or using cell phone, computer, or tablet (CCT) during leisure time, and indicators of prolonged exposure for the total population and sociodemographic groups.AnalysisPrais-Winsten regression models were used to identify trends in the studied period.ResultsMean time watching TV remained stable (2.3 h to 2.2 h/day) as the frequency of adults watching TV ≥ 3 hours/day (25.7% to 25.1%) for 2016/21. There was an increase in mean time spent on CCT (1.7 h to 2.0 h/day; .08 h/day/year; P < .001) and in the frequency of adults spending ≥ 3 hours/day on CCT (19.9% to 25.5%; 1.33 pp/year; P < .001) for 2016/21. The increase in screen time was relevant in all sociodemographic groups.ConclusionLeisure screen time has increased in Brazil, with greater intensity over time.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-01-18T07:45:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231152147
       
  • Gender Role Discrepancy Stress and COVID-19 Prevention Behaviors Among Men
           in the United States

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      Authors: Katelyn M. Sileo, Rebecca Luttinen, Suyapa Muñoz, Terrence D. Hill
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo examine the associations between gender role discrepancy (non-conformity to socially prescribed masculine gender role norms) and discrepancy stress (distress arising from this discrepancy) on COVID-19 prevention behaviors among men, and the potential moderating effects of race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, and income on these relationships.DesignA national online survey was conducted between May and June 2021.SettingThe United States.Subjects749 adult men residing in the United States.MeasuresA scale measured gender role discrepancy and discrepancy stress. COVID-19 prevention outcomes were constructed and included self-reported vaccination status/intentions, social distancing, mask-wearing, and hand-sanitizing.AnalysisMultivariate generalized linear models were performed in SPSS.ResultsGender role discrepancy associated with greater odds of vaccination (AOR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.02-1.78, P = .04), while discrepancy stress associated with lower odds of vaccination (AOR = .48, 95% CI = .35-.68, P < 0. 001) and mask-wearing (AOR = .54, 95% CI = .37-.79, P = .001) for men overall. Discrepancy stress’s negative effect on specific COVID-19 prevention behaviors was only apparent or was amplified for men in lower income brackets (vaccination, social distancing, mask-wearing), racial/ethnic minority men (vaccination), and sexual minority men (social distancing).ConclusionThis study demonstrates that gender role discrepancy stress negatively affects men’s engagement in COVID-19 prevention, particularly for men in marginalized populations.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-01-17T11:29:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171231152140
       
  • Letter to the Editor Response: Exploring COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy Among
           Stakeholders in African American and Latinx Communities in the Deep South
           Through the Lens of the Health Belief Model

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      Authors: Lori B. Bateman, Allyson G. Hall, William A. Anderson, Andrea L. Cherrington, Anna Helova, Suzanne Judd, Robert Kimberly, Gabriela R. Oates, Tiffany Osborne, Corilyn Ott, Melissa Ryan, Christian Strong, Mona N. Fouad
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this submission to respond to a Letter to the Editor recently submitted regarding our manuscript, “Exploring COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy among Stakeholders in African American and Latinx Communities in the Deep South through the Lens of the Health Belief Model” published in the American Journal of Health Promotion in February, 2022. The manuscript reported on a study that had as its purpose to qualitatively explore perceptions related to COVID-19 vaccination intention among African American and Latinx participants and suggest potential intervention strategies.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-01-11T05:43:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221146436
       
  • Exploring the Perspectives of Adults Aging With Long-Term Physical
           Disabilities on Physical Activity: A Qualitative Study

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      Authors: Rachel Heeb Desai, Rachel Kiserow, Alicia Mullings, Megan Smith, Susan Tucker, Amy Eyler, Susan Stark, Kerri Morgan
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundAdults aging with long-term physical disabilities (AAwPD) face personal and environmental barriers to living independently, but little is known about their perspectives on and experiences with physical activity (PA).PurposeThe purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of AAwPD on PA.Research DesignQualitative semi-structured interviews with AAwPD were conducted virtually via phone or videoconference.Study SampleA convenience sample of AAwPD aged 45-65 and living with a physical disability for at least 5 years was recruited through aging organizations, disability organizations, and social media in St. Louis, Missouri until thematic saturation was reached (n = 20).Data Collection and AnalysisParticipants were asked semi-structured interview questions about their perspectives and experiences with PA following an interview guide developed by disability, aging, and qualitative research experts. Data were analyzed using text analysis in NVivo 12. Codes were developed into themes by the research team and validated using member checking methods.ResultsFour themes emerged from the data: barriers and facilitators to engaging in PA, motivations and beliefs regarding PA, benefits of PA, and PA routines and habits. Participants reported a desire to engage in more PA but described barriers such as pain and fatigue symptoms, secondary health conditions, lack of social support, and fear of falling. Accessibility of facilities and equipment (eg, lack of ramps or equipment not at wheelchair height) and transportation barriers (eg, inconvenient schedules or excessive wait times) were specifically described as major environmental barriers.ConclusionMost participants’ reported PA routines did not meet the quantity or intensity levels recommended by current guidelines. These results may help inform healthcare providers, community programs, and future interventions to improve PA levels for AAwPD, an underserved but growing demographic.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-01-10T03:02:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221151123
       
  • Prevalence and Predictors of Substantial Postpartum Weight Retention Among
           Participants of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women,
           Infants, and Children (WIC) in Southern California

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      Authors: Hanan M. Yusuf, Maria Koleilat, Shannon E. Whaley
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeIdentify the prevalence and predictors of substantial postpartum weight retention (SPPWR) among WIC mothers in Southern California during their first postpartum year.DesignSecondary data analysis.SettingThe 2020 Los Angeles County WIC Survey.SubjectsMothers of children up to 1-year-old (N = 1019).MeasuresOutcome variable: SPPWR (≥5 kg above pre-pregnancy weight). Predictors: child’s age, mother’s age, race, education, employment status since having child, healthcare coverage, food insecurity, depressed mood, instrumental support, emotional support, spouse’s participation in child’s life, gestational weight gain (GWG), pre-pregnancy BMI, any breastfeeding, and gestational diabetes.AnalysisWeighted descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression.ResultsThe prevalence of SPPWR was 31%. We found that for every 1 month increase in the child’s age (proxy for postpartum duration), the likelihood of SPPWR increased by 9% (AOR = 1.09, CI = 1.04-1.15). Mothers were more likely to have SPPWR when they exceeded GWG guidelines (AOR = 3.43, CI = 2.46-4.79). Compared to mothers with normal pre-pregnancy BMIs, mothers with overweight (AOR = .64, CI = .44-.94) and obese (AOR = .39, CI = .26-.58) pre-pregnancy BMIs were less likely to experience SPPWR.ConclusionPostpartum duration and maternal anthropometric characteristics were associated with SPPWR during the first postpartum year. Extending WIC eligibility for postpartum mothers to 2 years through the Wise Investment in Children Act may give WIC providers the opportunity to work closely with Southern California WIC mothers to achieve a healthy weight after pregnancy.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-01-09T11:07:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221148840
       
  • Perceptions of Water Safety and Tap Water Taste and Their Associations
           With Beverage Intake Among U.S. Adults

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      Authors: Sohyun Park, Stephen J. Onufrak, Angie L. Cradock, Anisha Patel, Christina Hecht, Heidi M. Blanck
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesExamine differences in perceptions of tap water (TW) and bottled water (BW) safety and TW taste and their associations with plain water (PW) and sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake.DesignQuantitative, cross-sectional study.SettingUnited States.Subjects4,041 U.S. adults (≥18 years) in the 2018 SummerStyles survey data.MeasuresOutcomes were intake of TW, BW, PW (tap and bottled water), and SSB. Exposures were perceptions of TW and BW safety and TW taste (disagree, neutral, or agree). Covariates included sociodemographics.AnalysisWe used chi-square analysis to examine sociodemographic differences in perceptions and multivariable logistic regressions to estimate adjusted odds ratios (AOR) for consuming TW ≤ 1 cup/day, BW> 1 cup/day, PW ≤ 3 cups/day, and SSB ≥ 1 time/day by water perceptions.ResultsOne in 7 (15.1%) of adults did not think their home TW was safe to drink, 39.0% thought BW was safer than TW, and 25.9% did not think their local TW tasted good. Adults who did not think local TW was safe to drink had higher odds of drinking TW ≤ 1 cup/day (AOR = 3.12) and BW>1 cup/day (AOR = 2.69). Adults who thought BW was safer than TW had higher odds of drinking TW ≤1 cup/day (AOR = 2.38), BW> 1 cup/day (AOR = 5.80), and SSB ≥ 1 time/day (AOR = 1.39). Adults who did not think TW tasted good had higher odds of drinking TW ≤ 1 cup/day (AOR = 4.39) and BW> 1 cup/day (AOR = 2.91).ConclusionsNegative perceptions of TW safety and taste and a belief BW is safer than TW were common and associated with low TW intake. Perceiving BW is safer than TW increased the likelihood of daily SSB intake. These findings can guide programs and services to support water quality to improve perceptions of TW safety and taste, which might increase TW intake and decrease SSB intake.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-01-07T03:52:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221150093
       
  • Perceptions of and Experiences With Cigarette and E-Cigarette Use Among a
           Diverse Population of US Latino Adolescents and Young Adults

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      Authors: Fernanda Alonso, Jessica Rath, A. Susana Ramírez, Jennifer Cantrell, Ashton Jordan, Sebastian Suarez, Meghan B. Moran
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo determine potential unique factors influencing cigarette and e-cigarette use in US Latino youth.ApproachWe conducted a qualitative study assessing cigarette and e-cigarette perceptions and experiences, including experiences with/perceptions of the products, cultural influences and influences of friends and family.SettingFour online discussion boards, conducted in October 2020.Participants92 Latino youth aged 15-21 years living in the US.MethodData from the discussion groups were coded and analyzed by three trained coders using a thematic analysis approach.ResultsStress relief emerged as the dominant theme connected with both cigarettes and e-cigarettes. Apart from stress, perceptions of and experiences with the products differed. E-cigarettes were commonly viewed as trendy and cool and participants often reported using them due to curiosity and popularity. Participants commonly compared e-cigarettes to cigarettes, noting benefits of e-cigarettes. Participants also noted more negative short and long-term health effects of cigarette use, and discussed generational differences between the two products.ConclusionFindings from this study help address a dearth of research examining tobacco use among diverse groups of Latino youth. Findings indicate that despite differences in country of heritage, Latino youth are united by similar opinions about cigarettes and e-cigarettes. Additionally, they share cultural values and experiences which could be leveraged for tobacco control communications that cut across populations of Latino youth.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2023-01-06T11:32:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221151125
       
  • Association of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors with Exclusive
           Smokeless Tobacco Use among US Males: Cross-Sectional Analysis of NHANES
           Data 2003-2018

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      Authors: Nasir Mushtaq, Zoona Sarwar, Kate Kouplen, Rizwan Ahmed, Laura A. Beebe
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo evaluate cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors among smokeless tobacco (ST) users. Exclusive ST users were compared to exclusive cigarette smokers and non-tobacco users.DesignCross-sectional studySampleData were used from 16,336 adult males who participated in one of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) from 2003 to 2018.MeasuresBiochemically verified tobacco use, CVD risk factors (hypertension, cholesterol levels, BMI categories), physical activity, cotinine concentration, and sociodemographic variables.AnalysisWeighted analysis of the aggregate data was performed. ST users were compared with cigarette smokers and nontobacco users for their association with CVD risk factors. Associations were examined using univariate and multiple logistic regression with odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) reported.ResultsPrevalence of exclusive ST use was 4.4% whereas, exclusive smoking was 22.2%. Among ST users, 36.2% were hypertensive, 24.5% had high cholesterol levels, and most of them were overweight (31.1%) or obese (52.6%). ST users were more likely to have hypertension compared to smokers (aOR = 1.48, 95%CI: 1.12, 1.95) and nontobacco users (aOR = 1.41, 95%CI: 1.09, 1.83) adjusted for other covariates. ST users were twice more likely to be obese than nontobacco users (aOR = 2.18, 95%CI: 1.52, 3.11). ST users had significantly higher cotinine concentration than smokers.ConclusionStudy findings indicate substantial association of ST use among males with hypertension and obesity which are independent risk factors of CVD.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-12-20T03:56:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221141980
       
  • Effects of Multicomponent Injury Prevention Programs on Children and
           Adolescents’ Fundamental Movement Skills: A Systematic Review With
           Meta-Analyses

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      Authors: John A. Jimenez-Garcia, Matthew B. Miller, Richard G. DeMont
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveFundamental movement skills (FMS) are essential to participate in physical activity. Understanding the effects of multicomponent injury prevention programs (MIPP) on FMS may help promote safe physical activity. Our objective was to synthesize the evidence on the effects of MIPP on biomechanical outcomes and neuromuscular performance measured on children and adolescents while performing FMS.Data SourceWe searched PubMed, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science, and SCOPUS.Study Inclusion and Exclusion CriteriaWe included peer-reviewed randomized controlled trials, published in English, that analyzed the effects of MIPP on biomechanics and neuromuscular performance of FMS in participants under 18 years of age.Data ExtractionTwo reviewers screened the articles, assessed the quality of the evidence using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale, and synthesized the data.Data SynthesisWe conducted meta-analyses and reported the characteristics, outcomes, and risk of bias of studies.ResultsWe included 27 articles that reported data from 1,427 participants. Positive effects on FMS were reported in 23 of the 27 included articles. Vertical Jump, running speed, acceleration, and dynamic balance presented positive-significant pooled effect sizes. Dribbling and horizontal jump presented non-significant pooled effect sizes.ConclusionMIPP can positively affect FMS in children and adolescents in sports-related settings. Lack of participant compliance and implementation fidelity may affect MIPP effectiveness. Including MIPP in physical literacy interventions, physical education classes, and organized physical activity may lead to functional adaptations that help promote safe physical activity.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-12-17T12:55:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221146434
       
  • Occupational Therapy Interventions for the Improvement of the Quality of
           

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      Authors: Cristian Uceda Portillo, José Ignacio Calvo Arenillas, Pedro Moruno Miralles
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo evaluate current scientific evidence on the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions for the improvement of the quality of life of healthy adults over 65 years old living in nursing homes.Data sourcePubMed, Web of Science, Dialnet, Scopus, Cochrane, Cinahl and SciELO databases searched between 2012 and 2022.Study Inclusion and Exclusion Criteriaa) Studies involving occupational therapy interventions in residential settings (nursing homes or community residential settings), b) Studies conducted on a population of healthy adults over 65 years old, c) Studies with a level of evidence 1a-1b to 3a-3b, d) Studies containing the MeSH descriptors in the keyword list.Data ExtractionFor each study included in the review, key information was collected and entered into a data extraction form based on Cochrane recommendations, using Microsoft Excel v.16.16.21 software.Data SynthesisDescriptive summary of study characteristics and summarized methodological quality of the studies.ResultsSix of the articles met the inclusion criteria and were categorised into “promotion of active ageing” and “meaningful activities and quality of life”. Overall, the strength of evidence was moderate, and the risk of bias was low.ConclusionOccupational therapy intervention programmes structured around the opportunity to choose meaningful activities can improve the perceived quality of life of healthy older adults living in nursing homes.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-12-12T05:20:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221145159
       
  • Characterizing Responses to COVID-19 Vaccine Promotion on TikTok

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      Authors: Lauren Southwick, Ashley Francisco, Megan Bradley, Elissa Klinger, Sharath Chandra Guntuku
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThe Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) sponsored a TikTok contest to improve vaccination rates among young people. This analysis sought to advance understanding of COVID-19 vaccine perceptions among ADPH contestants and TikTok commenters.ApproachThis exploratory content analysis characterized sentiment and imagery in the TikTok videos and comments. Videos were coded by two reviewers and engagement metrics were collected for each video.SettingPublicly available TikTok videos entered into ADPH’s contest with the hashtags #getvaccinatedAL and #ADPH between July 16 – August 6, 2021.ParticipantsADPH contestants (n = 44) and TikTok comments (n = 502).MethodA content analysis was conducted; videos were coded by two reviewers and engagement metrics was collected for each video (e.g., reason for vaccination, content, type of vaccination received). Video comments were analyzed using VADER, a lexicon and rule-based sentiment analysis tool).ResultsOf 44 videos tagged with #getvaccinatedAL and #ADPH, 37 were related to the contest. Of the 37 videos, most cited family/friends and civic duty as their reason to get the COVID-19 vaccine. Videos were shared an average of 9 times and viewed 977 times. 70% of videos had comments, ranging from 0-61 (mean 44). Words used most in positively coded comments included, “beautiful,” “smiling face emoji with 3 hearts,” “masks,” and “good.;” whereas words used most in negatively coded comments included “baby,” “me,” “chips,” and “cold.”ConclusionUnderstanding COVID-19 vaccine sentiment expressed on social media platforms like TikTok can be a powerful tool and resource for public health messaging.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-12-10T02:12:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221141974
       
  • The Stare Decisis Doctrine and Total Worker Health®: Prior Precedent and
           Continuous Improvement in Health Promotion

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      Authors: Paul E. Terry
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      What advantages are accruing to companies that intentionally integrate their health, safety and mental well-being initiatives' “Total Worker Health®”, using the definition from the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), is: “Policies, programs and practices that integrate protection from work-related safety and health hazards with promotion of injury and illness prevention efforts to advance worker well-being.” The NIOSH WellBQ is an individual level questionnaire that asks employees about their perceptions related to their quality of work life, circumstances outside of work, supervisor support and physical and mental health status. Total Worker Health® related research funded by NIOSH is intended to “build the scientific evidence base necessary to develop new solutions for complex occupational safety and health problems.” This editorial argues that there is an unreconciled tension in the health promotion field relating to the evidence needed to prioritize individual vs social responsibility for health. The NIOSH Total Worker Health® and organizational health scorecards are discussed in the context of honoring the need to balance both lifestyle and environmental oriented interventions.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-12-05T10:38:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221145056
       
  • Characterizing the Influence of Television Health Entertainment Narratives
           in Lay Populations: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Beth L Hoffman, Robert Hoffman, Helena M VonVille, Jaime E Sidani, Jennifer A Manganello, Kar-Hai Chu, Elizabeth M Felter, Elizabeth Miller, Jessica G Burke
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo conduct a scoping review of published literature examining the influence of health storylines from fictional television programs on viewers.Data SourceWe performed literature searches in Medline, PsycINFO, and Mass Media Complete in October 2021, and examined bibliographies of included articles and conducted forward searching using Web of Science with included articles.Study Inclusion and Exclusion CriteriaSelected studies were required to be original research published in English, involve exposure to fictional television programming by individuals not in the medical field, and assess associations between exposure and health-related outcomes.Data ExtractionArticle screening and data abstraction were performed by two independent researchers using DistillerSR (Cohen’s κ range: .73-1.00).Data SynthesisWe analyzed and qualitatively described the data using methods of scoping reviews described by PRISMA-ScR.ResultsOf 5,537 unique records identified, 165 met inclusion criteria. The most frequently studied program was ER (n = 22, 13.3%). Most studies had adult participants (n = 116, 70.3%) and used quantitative methods (n = 136, 82.4%). The most frequently examined health topics were sexual behavior (n = 28, 17.0%) and mental health (n = 28, 17.0%). Exposure had a positive influence on viewers’ health-related outcomes in 28.5% (n = 47) of studies.ConclusionHealth storylines on fictional television influence viewers. Future research could address gaps identified in this review to further elucidate the influence of this programming on health promotion and disease prevention.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-11-22T02:01:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221141080
       
  • Daily Physical Activity: Associations With Memory and Affect

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      Authors: Justin M. Kompf, Margie E. Lachman
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeLittle is known about effects of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and resistance training on daily variations in memory and affect. This study examined the relationship of MVPA and resistance training to memory and affect in daily life.DesignShort-term longitudinal 7-day diary.SettingNortheast; primarily Boston-area communities.SampleAdults aged 25 to 94.MeasuresFor seven days, MVPA was assessed with an Actigraph. and resistance training was self-reported. Each evening, memory failures, positive and negative affect were recorded in a written diary and objective memory performance was assessed by telephone.AnalysisMultilevel linear regression analyses examined the between and within person associations of MVPA and resistance training with memory performance, memory failures, and affect.ResultsThose who engaged in more MVPA had better memory performance across the week (b = 0.0163, SE = 0.0076, f2 = 0.004, p = 0.033). Participants reported higher levels of positive affect on days in which they spent more time in MVPA than usual (b = 0.003, SE = 0.001, f2 = 0.144, p < .001) and on days they engaged in resistance training (b = 0.1547, SE = 0.079, f2 = 0.007; p = 0.049).ConclusionsThose who spent more time in MVPA had better memory performance, and on days with greater than usual MVPA time and resistance training, affect was more positive than on days with less activity. Implications for motivating physical exercise are considered.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-11-17T06:09:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221139836
       
  • Joint Association of Diabetes and Physical Activity With Falls Among
           

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      Authors: Minsuk Oh, Kelly R. Ylitalo
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeWe examined joint associations of diabetes and physical activity (PA) with falls.DesignComplex survey (cross-sectional) design using the 2018 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (Response rate was 53% (landline phones) and 46% (cellular phones)).SettingNational survey in the U.S.SubjectsAdults ≥45 years who self-reported diabetes status, PA, and falls (n = 295,282; 98.5% of eligible samples; N = 130,103,093) were classified into 4 groups: no diabetes–PA, no diabetes–no PA, diabetes–PA, diabetes–no PA.MeasuresSelf-reported PA, diabetes, falls, and major health characteristics.AnalysisPoisson regression models were used to estimate the association of groups with any (≥1 fall) falls.ResultsCompared to no diabetes–active groups, no diabetes–inactive (Relative Risk (RR) = 1.22; 95% CI: 1.18, 1.26), diabetes–active (RR = 1.25; 95% CI: 1.20, 1.30), and diabetes–inactive (RR = 1.46; 95% CI: 1.41, 1.51) groups were more likely to report falls, independent of tested covariates.ConclusionsLeisure-time PA may mitigate the likelihood of falls in adults with and without diabetes. Our findings could be useful for healthcare providers or clinicians to promote the importance of PA in midlife and older adults who are at risk of falls and/or diabetes. More detailed longitudinal information on objectively-estimated PA and a more frequent fall calendar are warranted to prevent recall bias and temporal ambiguity (causality between PA and falls).
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-11-17T06:03:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221141077
       
  • Associations Between Age of Onset of Pediatric Overweight/Obesity, a
           Child’s Sociodemographic Characteristics, and Characteristics of a
           Child’s Home Census Tract

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      Authors: Prateek Bhattacharya, Melissa D. Klein, Andrew F. Beck, Yingying Xu, Roohi Y. Kharofa
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo identify associations between age of onset of overweight/obesity, a child’s sociodemographic characteristics, and characteristics of a child’s home census tract.DesignRetrospective electronic health record review of children with overweight/obesity.SettingThree primary care centers associated with a free-standing, tertiary-care pediatric institution in Cincinnati.SubjectsPatients born between August 1, 2013 and July 31, 2014, who had a body mass index (BMI) ≥85th percentile before 5 years of age (n = 794).MeasuresPrimary outcome was the patient’s age at the first encounter when BMI was ≥85th percentile. Patient-level predictors were sex, age, race/ethnicity, health insurance, and number of moves captured in the health record. Census tract-level predictors were density of bus stops, presence of grocery stores, and a Socioeconomic Deprivation Index.AnalysisMultivariable linear regression models assessed for independent associations between age of onset of overweight/obesity and predictors.ResultsPatients were 55.8% female, 73.6% black, and 79.1% publicly insured. Each additional move per year was associated with onset of overweight/obesity occurring 4.05 months earlier (P < .0001). No significant associations between age of onset of overweight/obesity and census tract-level density of bus stops (P = .82), presence of grocery stores (P = .39), and socioeconomic deprivation (P = .53) were demonstrated.ConclusionPublic policy efforts toward improving access to grocery stores or public transportation may not be sufficient to prevent childhood obesity. Population-level interventions related to improving housing may also reduce obesity.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-11-07T10:50:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221138276
       
  • Understanding the Impact of Perceived Social Support for Breastfeeding
           Among African American Women: Results From the Mama Bear Feasibility Trial
           

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      Authors: Gayle M. Shipp, Lorraine J. Weatherspoon, Sarah S. Comstock, Gwen L. Alexander, Joseph C. Gardiner, Jean M. Kerver
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposePerceived Social Support (PSS) can impact breastfeeding behaviors, and a lack of PSS potentially contributes to disparities in breastfeeding rates for African American women (AA). Objectives were to describe PSS at two timepoints and test associations between PSS and breastfeeding intensity for AA.MethodsData are from a feasibility trial of breastfeeding support among AA. The Hughes Breastfeeding Support Scale was used to measure PSS (Emotional, Informational, Tangible; total range = 30–120) in pregnancy (T1, n = 32) and early postpartum (T2, n = 31). Scale means were compared with t-tests. Associations between PSS at T1 and breastfeeding intensity (ie, quantitative measure of breastfeeding) were assessed with linear regression.ResultsTotal PSS (mean ± SE) was high at both time points (T1 = 90.5 ± 4.8; T2 = 92.8 ± 3.1). At T2, older participants or those living with a partner had higher total PSS scores compared to those younger or living alone. Emotional PSS was significantly higher at T2 than T1 with no differences in tangible or informational PSS over time. Mixed-feeding, exclusive breastfeeding, and exclusive formula feeding was distributed at 39%, 32%, and 29%, respectively. Total PSS was not associated with breastfeeding intensity.ConclusionWomen reported high levels of social support, and emotional PSS increased over time in this small sample of AA. PSS and sources of PSS are understudied, especially among AA, and future studies should explore quantitative methods to assess PSS. The results of such assessments can then be used to design breastfeeding support interventions.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T08:27:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221138275
       
  • Can United States Adults Accurately Assess Their Diet Quality'

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      Authors: Jessica L. Thomson, Alicia S. Landry, Tameka I. Walls
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo estimate the percentage of United States adults who accurately assessed their diet quality (DQ).DesignObservational, cross-sectional, nationally representative.SettingNational Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2015-2018.Sample9757 (86%) of 11 288 adults aged ≥20 years.MeasuresPerceived DQ was assessed by asking participants, how healthy is your diet' The five responses included excellent, very good, good, fair, and poor. Measured DQ was assessed using 24-hours dietary recalls scored with 2015 Healthy Eating Index; scores were categorized using a 10-point grading scale.AnalysisMatches between perceived and measured DQ that were classified as accurate included: excellent = A, very good = A or B, good = B or C, fair = C or D, and poor = D or F. All others were classified as inaccurate. Analyses included descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression for complex survey designs.Results63% of adults perceived their DQ as very good or good while 70% scored DQ grades of F. Overall, 15% of adults accurately assessed their DQ with 96% accuracy in the poor perception group and
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-11-03T06:53:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221137056
       
  • Effects of Health Coaching on Cardiometabolic Health in Middle-Aged
           Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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      Authors: Zoe Ching-man Kwok, An Tao, Helen Yue-lai Chan
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo appraise and synthesize evidence on the effects of health coaching as the primary intervention on cardiometabolic health among middle-aged adults.Data SourceSix electronic databases (MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, PubMed, and the Cochrane library) were searched from inception until July 2021.Study Inclusion and Exclusion CriteriaRandomized controlled trials and controlled clinical trials published in English, reporting health coaching aimed to promote behavioral changes for improving cardiometabolic health among middle-aged adults were included. Studies on health coaching as secondary intervention were excluded.Data ExtractionTwo reviewers selected the articles, appraised the study quality, and extracted data independently. All kinds of outcomes related to cardiometabolic health, including health behaviors, psychological and physiological outcomes, were included.Data SynthesisMeta-analysis was performed if three or more studies reported the same outcomes. Narrative synthesis was performed if pooling of data for meta-analysis was not feasible.ResultsEight studies were reviewed. Most studies involved substantial risk of bias. The majority of the participants were women (99.1%). Meta-analysis showed a small but significant effect of health coaching on increasing physical activity (SMD = .34, 95% CI = .08–.60, p = .01, I2 = 0%); however, its effect on perceived barriers to physical activity and depressive symptoms was nonsignificant. Narrative synthesis yielded inconsistent results on diet, smoking, anxiety, goal achievement and self-efficacy for behavioral change, physiological outcomes, and metabolic syndrome severity, and nonsignificant effects on alcohol consumption, sleep quality, perceived benefits of physical activities, and cardiovascular symptoms.ConclusionsHealth coaching has significant effects on increasing physical activity among middle-aged adults; however, its effects on health behaviors and risk factors related to cardiometabolic health are inconclusive. Further efforts are warranted to examine how health coaching can improve cardiometabolic health among middle-aged adults.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-11-02T03:34:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221137332
       
  • Where Are All the Men' A Qualitative Review of the Barriers,
           Facilitators, and Recommendations to Older Male Participation in Health
           Promotion Interventions

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      Authors: Britteny M. Howell, Jennifer R. Peterson, Sage Corbett
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveOlder men have lower participation rates than females in health promotion interventions. We conducted a qualitative review of 20 years of existing research across a variety of academic search databases to outline the barriers, facilitators, and recommendations for this imbalance.Data SourceA systematic search was conducted across Google Scholar, PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, and Web of Science from dates January 1, 2000 – December 31, 2020.Study Inclusion and Exclusion Criterias were screened based on: original research, English language, recruitment or participation, health promotion or health program, and male gender.Data ExtractionOf 1194 initial search results, 383 article abstracts were thoroughly screened for inclusion and 26 articles met inclusion criteria.SynthesisIncluded studies were coded and analyzed using Grounded Theory.ResultsBarriers included masculine gender roles as well as program scope, environment, and gender of the instructors and other participants. Facilitators included creating social groups of older males that participate in a variety of activities together, including hobbies and health promotion, over a long period of time.ConclusionHealth promotion interventions should involve men in all aspects of program planning and implementation, take into account men’s existing relationships and interests to create gender-sensitive programming, and clearly delineate the benefits to participation.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T06:25:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221123053
       
  • COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy: Disadvantaged Groups’ Experience with
           Perceived Barriers, Cues to Action, and Attitudes

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      Authors: Ioana A Coman, Shan Xu, Masahiro Yamamoto
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeDrawing from the Health Belief Model, we explored how disadvantaged groups in the U.S., including Black, Hispanic, less educated and wealthy individuals, experienced perceived barriers and cues to action in the context of the COVID-19 vaccination.DesignA cross-sectional survey administered in March 2021.SettingUSASubjectsA national sample of U.S. residents (n = 795) recruited from Prolific.MeasuresPerceived barriers (clinical, access, trust, religion/spiritual), cues to action (authorities, social circles), attitudes toward COVID-19 vaccination.AnalysisFactor analysis and Structural Equation Model (SEM) were performed in STATA 16.ResultsBlack and less educated individuals experienced higher clinical barriers (CI [.012, .33]; CI [.027, .10]), trust barriers (CI [.49, .92]; CI [.057, .16]), and religious/spiritual barriers (CI [.28, .66]; CI [.026, .11]). Hispanics experienced lower levels of clinical barriers (CI [-.42, .0001]). Clinical, trust, and religious/spiritual barriers were negatively related to attitudes toward vaccination (CI [-.45, −.15]; CI [-.79, −.51]; CI [-.43, −.13]). Black and less educated individuals experienced fewer cues to action by authority (CI [-.47, −.083]; CI [-.093, −.002]) and social ties (CI [-.75, −.33]; CI [-.18, −.080]). Lower-income individuals experienced fewer cues to action by social ties (CI [-.097, −.032]). Cues from social ties were positively associated with vaccination attitudes (CI [.065, .26]).ConclusionCommunication should be personalized to address perceived barriers disadvantaged groups differentially experience and use sources who exert influences on these groups.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-10-28T09:59:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221136113
       
  • Vaccination Trends and Family-Level Characteristics Associated With
           Incomplete or Delayed Childhood Immunizations: The Healthy Start Study

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      Authors: Lauren M Zell-Baran, Anne P Starling, Deborah H Glueck, Traci A Bekelman, Jill M Norris, John L Adgate, Jared M Brown, Dana Dabelea
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeAssess family-level factors associated with childhood immunization schedule adherence.DesignProspective cohort; Setting; The Healthy Start study enrolled 1,410 pregnant women in Denver, Colorado 2009-2014SubjectsChildren with available vaccination data in medical records (0-6 years old)MeasuresVaccine schedule completion and complianceAnalysisLogistic regression comparing family-level factors that differ based on vaccine schedule adherenceResultsMost immunizations required in Colorado for school entry were below national completion goals with 61.8% of participants (n = 532/861) completing the full vaccination series. Most participants received the first dose of individual vaccines on time (73.5% - 90.7%), but fewer received all doses on time (21.0% - 39.5%). Factors associated with not completing the vaccination series (OR [95% CI]) included: in-utero exposure to cigarette smoke (1.97 [1.41, 2.75]), single parent household (1.70 [1.21, 2.38]), children identified as non-White (Hispanic 1.40 [1.01, 1.94]; Black 1.88 [1.24, 2.85]; Other 2.17 [1.34, 3.49]), mothers not working outside the home (1.98 [1.46, 2.67]), and household income
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-10-27T11:02:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221136532
       
  • Fresh Produce Delivery to Middle School Youth: Outcomes of a Case Study in
           Providing Fresh Fruit and Vegetables to Underserved Youth

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      Authors: Joseph S Lightner, Amanda Grimes, Janet Rhone, Kael Martin, Justin Moss, Bridget Wray, Katlyn Eighmy, Ella Valleroy, Maya Baughn
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate a weekly school-based fruit and vegetable delivery via a mobile market on urban middle schoolers’ nutrition behaviors.DesignOne-group, pretest-posttest design, quasi-experimental intervention in middle schoolers (6th-8th graders, N = 158) in Kansas City, MOInterventionWeekly delivery of free produce via a mobile market over 12 weeks.MeasuresA self-administered survey to assess self-report consumption of fruits, vegetables, soda, and sports drinks.AnalysisUnivariate and bivariate analyses were used. Proportions were compared and chi-square tests were conducted to compare youth at baseline and 12 weeks.ResultsMore youth reported consuming fresh fruit (73.8% to 83.3%; χ2 = 7.76, P = .005) and vegetables (66.4% to 71.3%; χ2 = 13.55, P =
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-10-27T04:31:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221136858
       
  • Activating Worksites to Implement Policy, Systems, and Environmental
           Changes: Outcomes and Overcoming Challenges

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      Authors: Melanie Seiler, Veronica Crosier, James Vance, Nancy O’Hara Tompkins
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeAlthough workplaces are prime settings for health promotion, little is known about the implementation of policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) changes focused on chronic disease. PSEs have broader reach and are more sustainable than individual level strategies.Designnon-experimental, one group design with no control.Setting: West Virginia, a state with significant chronic disease-related health disparitiesSubjectsConvenience sample of 27 workplaces, representing 6 industry types.Intervention$1000 in micro funding awarded to workplaces to participate in Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Work@Health®/ScoreCard, and implement PSEs.MeasuresScoreCard baseline results; post project survey resultsAnalysisDescriptive analysis of ScoreCard; survey responses coded into PSE and I (individual level strategies) categories; frequencies were calculated.Results63% of the workplaces were very small (1-100 employees). Chronic disease-related organizational practices (ScoreCard) were minimal: nutrition (5/24), physical activity (7/22), diabetes (5/15), cholesterol (4/13), and high blood pressure (6/16). Workplaces reported a total of 95 PSEs: P-8, S-55, and E−32.ConclusionPolicy change was the least frequently attempted and reported PSE strategy. More research with a stronger study design is needed to determine if (1) baseline organizational practices (Scorecard scores) improve, (2) PSEs (especially P) can be implemented without micro funding/TA, (3) workplace-type is related to use of the funds/TA, and (4) enacting PSE changes leads to healthier employees.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-10-22T06:31:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221135593
       
  • Examining the Associations of and Interactions Between Intrapersonal and
           Perceived Environmental Factors With Objectively Assessed Physical
           Activity Among Rural Midwestern Adults, USA

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      Authors: Natalicio Serrano, Alan Beck, Deborah Salvo, Amy Eyler, Rodrigo Reis, Joseph T. Steensma, Amanda Gilbert, Ross C. Brownson
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeWe investigated associations of intrapersonal and environmental factors with objectively assessed weekly moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) minutes, and their interactions in rural adults.DesignCross-sectional.Setting14 rural towns participating in a multilevel intervention to promote physical activity.SampleBaseline data from 241 rural community members (19% losses due to missing data).MeasuresSelf-reported demographics, behavioral factors, and neighborhood environment perceptions. Weekly MVPA minutes were assessed using accelerometry data.AnalysisGeneralized linear models using a negative binomial distribution examined associations of and interactions between intrapersonal and environmental correlates with weekly MVPA.ResultsOlder age (β = −1.37; P= .025) and identifying as a woman (β = −.71; p=
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-10-21T08:20:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221134797
       
  • Changes in Harm Perception for E-Cigarettes Among Youth in the United
           States, 2014–2019

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      Authors: Angella Sandra Namwase, Emmanuel A. Gyimah, Bobbi J. Carothers, Todd B. Combs, Jenine K. Harris
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo evaluate the trend of harm perception for e-cigarettes and the trend of the association between harm perception for e-cigarettes and for cigarettes among US youth from 2014 to 2019.Design, setting and subjectsThe National Youth Tobacco Survey is an annual, cross-sectional, school-based survey done among youth selected using three-stage probability sampling.AnalysisData were drawn from the 2014 to 2019 Surveys. A Multinomial logistic regression model was used to assess the association between harm perception for e-cigarettes and harm perception for cigarettes for each year.ResultsThe percentage of youth who perceived e-cigarettes as harmless decreased from 2014 to 2019 (17.2% to 5.8%). From 2015 to 2018, the percentage of smokers who perceived e-cigarettes as a little harmful increased (33.6% to 41.2%). The positive association between harm perception for e-cigarettes and harm perception for cigarettes became stronger with time. In 2014, the odds of perceiving e-cigarettes as harmless relative to very harmful were 19.55 times greater for youth who perceived cigarettes as harmless, compared to those who perceived cigarettes as very harmful (OR = 19.55; 95% CI: 14.19–26.94). These odds increased to 77.65 times in 2019 (OR = 77.65; 95% CI: 41.48–107.85).ConclusionThis study suggests a stronger relationship between perceived harm of cigarettes and e-cigarettes with time. Interventions to prevent smoking have the potential to change e-cigarette use.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-10-20T06:47:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221133805
       
  • Psychosocial Effects of Physical Activity Interventions for Preschoolers,
           Children, and Adolescents: Role of Intervention Settings

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      Authors: Somya Rastogi, Lisa Cadmus-Bertram, Lauren Meyers
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivePhysical activity interventions are potential strategies to enhance psychosocial health of children and adolescents. Interventions are performed at diverse settings (e.g., school, home, community), but little research has addressed whether and how the effectiveness of these programs vary by setting type. The aim of this review is to summarize the psychosocial effects of physical activity programs for preschoolers, children, and adolescents at various intervention settings.Data SourceA systematic search of five electronic databases, MEDLINE-PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, CENTRAL, and Scopus was performed.Study inclusion and exclusion criteriaIncluded studies had participants between 3-18 years, physical activity intervention duration of at least four weeks, experimental design, and at least one psychosocial health outcome.Data ExtractionData on participants, intervention, comparison, outcomes, and findings were extracted.Data SynthesisData were synthesized by the intervention setting; school, home, and community.ResultsOf the thirty-five included studies, 74% were performed at schools. Although fewer studies used community (17%)- and home-based (9%) interventions, these were similarly effective in improving psychosocial health as school-based interventions.ConclusionsCommunity- and home-based intervention settings may be underutilized despite being similarly effective as school-based settings. A large proportion of time is spent out of school during weekends and summer-break. Community- and home-based physical activity programs may be pragmatic strategies to deliver improvements in psychosocial health of preschoolers, children, and adolescents.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-10-19T10:48:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221133803
       
  • Who’s Quitting' Who Needs Additional Support' Cessation
           Disparities by Race, Education, and Income, 2007 to 2018

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      Authors: Kingsbury JH, Boyle RG, Silva J, Parks MJ
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThe current study (1) examines how disparities in quitting cigarette and other tobacco product use have changed by race and socioeconomic status and (2) utilizes an expanded measure, any tobacco quit ratio (aQR), that extends previous work on cigarette quit ratios and captures use and cessation in a growing tobacco marketplace.DesignRepeated cross-sectional representative survey; Setting: MinnesotaSubjectsAdult Minnesotans from the 2007 and 2018 Minnesota Adult Tobacco Survey (combined N=9,258)MeasuresCigarette QR (cQR), aQR (cigarette, cigar, smokeless, pipe, e-cigarette, hookah), past year quit attempts, and recent cessation.AnalysisWeights ensured statewide representativeness. Regression analyses tested for differences by race (Black vs White), income (low vs medium/high), and education (low vs medium/high) across survey years.ResultscQRs and aQRs were relatively high among White respondents and those with medium-high education and income. The disparity in aQR between White and Black respondents decreased from 2007 to 2018. Black respondents were more likely to try to quit than White respondents but were less likely to report recent cessation.ConclusionCessation disparities by race and socioeconomic status have changed little between 2007 and 2018, and the magnitude of the disparity for several cessation indicators remains large. Public health professionals and medical practitioners can play a key role in reducing disparities by supporting public policies and cessation interventions that target social determinants of health and associated barriers to quitting.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-10-19T08:48:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221134796
       
  • School and Home Contributions to Dietary Behaviors of Rural Youth

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      Authors: Kent A. Lorenz, Michalis Stylianou, Pamela Hodges Kulinna, Hyeonho Yu
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study examined dietary behaviors of rural youth at school and at home and sociodemographic differences.DesignA cross-sectional design was used.SettingThe study took place in five rural schools in the Southwestern US.SampleStudent participants (N = 751) were in 3rd-8th grades.MeasuresConsumption of fruits, vegetables, dairy, and soda/pop, at school and at home, were measured using a modified 7-day recall Youth Risk Behavior survey for nutrition instrument (CDC, 2011); Sociodemographic data.AnalysisDescriptive statistics, frequency tables and MANCOVA were used.ResultsFollowing a natural log transformation of the dependent variables, there were significant multivariate effects in dietary behaviors across schools (Wilks’ λ = 0.962, F(16, 2539.4) = 2.05, P = 0.0082) and location (school v. home; Wilks’ λ = 0.849, F(4, 831) = 36.94, P < 0.0001). Follow-up tests showed students in some schools reported higher consumption of fruit, vegetable, and soda at home than school, although most reported consuming less than one serving per day of fruit, vegetables, and dairy across settings. There were no significant main effects for gender/grade/ethnicity across behaviors.ConclusionsFindings highlight poor dietary behaviors of rural youth as well as school/home differences that can help inform efforts to support optimal dietary behaviors of this population. Results should be interpreted considering limitations of the self-report nature of collected data and missing data.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-10-19T08:21:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221134792
       
  • An Analysis of SNAP Online Purchasing Behavior in California: A Review of
           the First 7 Months of Program Implementation and Lessons Learned

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      Authors: Isabelle S. Foster, Christopher LeBoa, Charlie T Hoffs, Angelina M. Polselli, Charly de Nocker, Samantha Y. Liu, Pasquale E. Rummo, Eric J. Brandt, Eric B. Rimm
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThe Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Online Purchasing Pilot (OPP) allows for the online purchase of groceries using SNAP benefits. First implemented in California in late April 2020, little is known about program usage. This study assessed initial implementation of SNAP Online in California using SNAP OPP transaction data from April - October 2020. Insights can identify usage differences by demographics, store availability, and rurality to help inform future pilot programs and nutrition initiatives.DesignUsing generalized estimating equations, we modeled county-level associations between transactions and county-level demographics, rurality, and retailer availability.SettingTransaction data from California’s Department of Social Services (CDSS) was linked with publicly-available, county-level demographics.SubjectsAnonymized county-level data on SNAP Online transactions and CalFresh households.MeasuresThe primary outcome was successful SNAP Online food transactions per county.AnalysisGeneralized estimating equation models with clustering by county was used.ResultsDuring the first 7 months, median SNAP Online transactions per county per month was 665; 2.7% of total SNAP redemptions were from SNAP Online. Counties with more female-led, disabled, Latino, or Asian CalFresh households had fewer Amazon transactions. Each additional Walmart per county corresponded to 260.7 more Walmart transactions (P < .001). Each percent increase in county zip codes covered by Amazon Fresh corresponded to 45.4 fewer Walmart transactions (P < .05) and 37.3 more Amazon transactions (P < .001).ConclusionNumber of stores per county was associated with greater online grocery transactions, whereas rurality was not. County-level SNAP demographics correlated with transactions at particular retailers.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-10-15T09:19:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221131194
       
  • Fish Consumption and Advisory Awareness among a Representative Sample of
           Wisconsin Adults, 2017–2019

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      Authors: Xiaofei He, Carrie Tomasallo, Jonathan Meiman
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo examine fish consumption patterns and fish advisory awareness among Wisconsin adults.DesignCross-sectional data from population-based survey. Setting: 2017-2019 Wisconsin Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), supplemental fish module.Subjects15,757 Wisconsinites aged ≥18 years. Annual response rates ranged 46.1-53.3%.MeasuresFish consumption, advisory awareness, background and demographic characteristics.AnalysisWeighted binary and multinomial logistic regression.ResultsMost Wisconsinites reported eating fish in the past 30 days, with approximately half (49.8%) consuming less than one fish meal per week. One-fifth of adults reported consuming sportfish. Women were less likely to eat any fish (PORadj = .6, 95% CI: .5-.7) and sportfish than men (PORadj = .7, 95% CI: .6-.8). The majority (76.7%) of sportfish consumers were aware of fish advisories. However, women (PORadj = .7, 95% CI: .5-.9) and black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) (PORadj = .4, 95% CI: .2-.7) sportfish consumers were less likely to be aware of fish advisories. Compared to adults aged 18-34 years, adults ≥55 years were twice as likely to eat 1-2 fish meals (vs. less than 1 fish meal) per week (PORadj = 2.3, 95% CI: 1.8-2.9).ConclusionFindings indicate that half of all Wisconsinites consumed less fish than recommended by Wisconsin fish advisories, and women and BIPOC respondents were less likely to be aware of advisories. Educational efforts are needed to improve fish consumption habits.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-10-15T03:13:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221134875
       
  • Womanism and Re-Imagining Black Women's Health Promotion

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      Authors: Jameta Nicole Barlow, Shreenithi Venkataraman
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Black women have been historically disenfranchised by the healthcare system. We apply a Womanist framework—a social change model developed by Black women scholars, including Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Walker, Clenora Hudson-Weems, Layli Philips and many others— to health promotion, reimagining Black women’s health grounded in a framework designed by Black women. Five modalities in particular—dialogue, harmonizing and coordinating, hospitality, mutual aid and social support, and mothering— present an opportunity for radical change within health promotion. We offer a consideration of how these modalities might be utilized to improve health promotion for Black women.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-10-14T12:35:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221134170
       
  • How Media Literacy, Trust of Experts and Flu Vaccine Behaviors Associated
           with COVID-19 Vaccine Intentions

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      Authors: Erica W. Austin, Bruce W. Austin, Porismita Borah, Shawn Domgaard, Sterling M. McPherson
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo assess how previous experiences and new information contributed to COVID-19 vaccine intentions.DesignOnline survey (N = 1264) with quality checks.SettingCross-sectional U.S. survey fielded June 22-July 18, 2020.SampleU.S. residents 18+; quotas reflecting U.S. Census, limited to English speakers participating in internet panels.MeasuresMedia literacy for news content and sources, COVID-19 knowledge; perceived usefulness of health experts; if received flu vaccine in past 12 months; vaccine willingness scale; demographics.AnalysisStructural equation modelling.ResultsPerceived usefulness of health experts (b = .422, P < .001) and media literacy (b = .162, P < .003) predicted most variance in vaccine intentions (R-squared=31.5%). A significant interaction (b = .163, P < .001) between knowledge (b = −.132, P = .052) and getting flu shot (b = .185, P < .001) predicted additional 3.5% of the variance in future vaccine intentions. An increase in knowledge of COVID-19 associated with a decrease in vaccine intention among those declining the flu shot.ConclusionThe interaction result suggests COVID-19 knowledge had a positive association with vaccine intention for flu shot recipients but a counter-productive association for those declining it. Media literacy and trust in health experts provided strong counterbalancing influences. Survey-based findings are correlational; thus, predictions are based on theory. Future research should study these relationships with panel data or experimental designs.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-10-10T12:41:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221132750
       
  • Enablers and Barriers of Community Garden Use in New Orleans, Louisiana:
           An Environmental Assessment and Qualitative Analysis

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      Authors: Julie Cornfield, Harmonii Odinga, Jaleh Kermani, Katherine P. Theall, M. Pia Chaparro
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo explore factors associated with community garden use.ApproachEnvironmental assessment of community gardens and semi-structured interviews.SettingNew Orleans, Louisiana.Participants10 community gardens (environmental assessment), 20 community members (including garden users and non-users) and garden administrators (qualitative interviews).MethodGardens were assessed based on (1) accessibility, (2) information, (3) design, (4) cleanliness, (5) walkability, (6) parking, and (7) noise. Semi-structured interviews took place over Zoom; transcribed interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis.ResultsGardens assessed in the environmental assessment ranked high in design and cleanliness but low on accessibility and information availability. Salient themes from the qualitative interviews include skill-building, access to fresh foods, and increased social engagement as enablers of community garden participation, with availability of information and time as both potential enablers of, or barriers to, participation. Community members perceived that gardens could increase fresh food access, while administrators believed that it is not possible for community gardens to produce enough food to create community-wide impact, highlighting instead the importance of the social aspects of the garden as beneficial for health.ConclusionCommunity gardens should improve garden physical accessibility and information availability to incentivize use. Community gardens are valued as means for skill-building and social engagement. Future research should prioritize investigating the association between the social aspects of participating in community gardens and health outcomes.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T11:15:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221131710
       
  • A Randomized Trial of Behavioral Nudges Delivered Through Text Messages to
           Increase Influenza Vaccination Among Patients With an Upcoming Primary
           Care Visit

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      Authors: Mitesh S. Patel, Katherine L. Milkman, Linnea Gandhi, Heather N. Graci, Dena Gromet, Hung Ho, Joseph S. Kay, Timothy W. Lee, Jake Rothschild, Modupe Akinola, John Beshears, Jonathan E. Bogard, Alison Buttenheim, Christopher Chabris, Gretchen B. Chapman, James J. Choi, Hengchen Dai, Craig R. Fox, Amir Goren, Matthew D. Hilchey, Jillian Hmurovic, Leslie K. John, Dean Karlan, Melanie Kim, David Laibson, Cait Lamberton, Brigitte C. Madrian, Michelle N. Meyer, Maria Modanu, Jimin Nam, Todd Rogers, Renante Rondina, Silvia Saccardo, Maheen Shermohammed, Dilip Soman, Jehan Sparks, Caleb Warren, Megan Weber, Ron Berman, Chalanda N. Evans, Seung Hyeong Lee, Christopher K. Snider, Eli Tsukayama, Christophe Van den Bulte, Kevin G. Volpp, Angela L. Duckworth
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo evaluate if nudges delivered by text message prior to an upcoming primary care visit can increase influenza vaccination rates.DesignRandomized, controlled trial.SettingTwo health systems in the Northeastern US between September 2020 and March 2021.Subjects74,811 adults.InterventionsPatients in the 19 intervention arms received 1-2 text messages in the 3 days preceding their appointment that varied in their format, interactivity, and content.MeasuresInfluenza vaccination.AnalysisIntention-to-treat.ResultsParticipants had a mean (SD) age of 50.7 (16.2) years; 55.8% (41,771) were female, 70.6% (52,826) were White, and 19.0% (14,222) were Black. Among the interventions, 5 of 19 (26.3%) had a significantly greater vaccination rate than control. On average, the 19 interventions increased vaccination relative to control by 1.8 percentage points or 6.1% (P = .005). The top performing text message described the vaccine to the patient as “reserved for you” and led to a 3.1 percentage point increase (95% CI, 1.3 to 4.9; P < .001) in vaccination relative to control. Three of the top five performing messages described the vaccine as “reserved for you.” None of the interventions performed worse than control.ConclusionsText messages encouraging vaccination and delivered prior to an upcoming appointment significantly increased influenza vaccination rates and could be a scalable approach to increase vaccination more broadly.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-10-05T03:56:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221131021
       
  • Social Risk Factors Are Associated With Disability Prevalence – Results
           From 17 States in the 2017 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

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      Authors: Jason A. Sharpe, Rachel Miller, Chad E. Cook, Susan N. Hastings, Timothy J. Rethorn, Kelli D. Allen, Zachary D. Rethorn
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeDetermine the association between incremental increases in the number of social risk factors and the prevalence of any disability and disability type.DesignThe cross-sectional analysis was conducted using 2017 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data from states whose surveys included items about social risk factors.SettingRespondents from 17 US states.SubjectsRespondents included 136 432 adults.MeasuresDichotomized social risk factors included food, housing, and financial insecurity, unsafe neighborhood, and healthcare access hardship.AnalysisWeighted χ2 and logistic regression analyses adjusted for demographic characteristics, measures of socioeconomic position, and comorbid health conditions were used to examine differences in the prevalence of disability by social risk factor and via a social risk index created by summing the social risk factors.ResultsCompared to those reporting 0 social risk factors, respondents reporting ≥4 had more than thrice the odds of reporting a cognition ((adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=3.37; 95%CI [2.75-4.13]), independent living (AOR=3.24 [2.52-4.15]), self-care (AOR=3.33 [2.55-4.34]), or any disability (AOR=3.90 [3.24-4.70]); more than twice the odds of reporting a vision (AOR=2.61 [1.93-3.52]) or mobility (AOR=2.72 [2.16-3.41]) disability; and more than 1.5 times the odds of reporting a hearing disability (AOR=1.59 [1.22-2.07]).ConclusionsIncremental increases in the number of social risk factors were independently associated with higher odds of disability. Intervention efforts should address the social context of US adults with disabilities to improve health outcomes.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-10-04T08:25:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221132390
       
  • Video clips of the Mediterranean Diet on YouTube TM: A social Media
           Content Analysis

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      Authors: Nada Benajiba, Maha Alhomidi, Fahdah Alsunaid, Aljawharah Alabdulkarim, Elizabeth Dodge, Enmanuel A. Chavarria, Basil H. Aboul-Enein
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThe present study conducted a social media content analysis on videos describing the Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) posted onYouTube.SettingYouTube TM online video sharing and social media platform.MethodThree independent content experts evaluated 141 YouTube videos on the MedDiet in August 2020 utilizing standard rubric and protocol. Data abstracted include media source(s) of posted videos, and viewer exposure/engagement metrics. Information quality was measured by each content expert independently through use of the DISCERN instrument, a 16-item tool designed to assess reliability, dependability, and trustworthiness of an online source, scores were then aggregated for analysis.ResultsA majority of videos (n = 102, 72.3%) were educational in nature. A third of videos were less clear and less credible on information presented (n = 46, 32.6%). Most videos were posted by an individual (n = 79, 56%), and the majority of videos were rated as medium quality (n = 88, 62.4%). Overall level of user engagement as measured by number of “likes,” “dislikes,” and user comments varied widely across all sources of media. Exploratory correlation analysis suggests that the number of a video’s views, comments, likes, and dislikes are not correlated with quality.ConclusionStudy findings suggest that MedDiet health promotion and education via YouTube has the potential to reach and inform clients; however, existing video content and quality varies significantly. Future intervention research focused on MedDiet should further examine possible predictors of high quality MedDiet content utilizing diverse online video sharing platforms.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-10-03T06:22:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221132113
       
  • Advancing Healthy Food Service in the United States: State Food Service
           Guidelines Policy Adoption and Implementation Supports, 2015-2019

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      Authors: Amy Lowry-Warnock, Nicole Strombom, Kristy Mugavero, Diane Harris, Heidi M. Blanck, Stephen Onufrak
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeFood service guidelines (FSG) policies can impact the nutritional quality of millions of meals sold or served to government employees, citizens in public places, or institutionalized persons. This study examines state FSG policies adopted January 1, 2015 to April 1, 2019, and uses a FSG Classification Tool (FSG Tool) to quantify alignment with nutrition recommendations for public health impact.DesignQuantitative Content AnalysisSettingState Government Worksites and FacilitiesParticipants50 states and District of Columbia (D.C.) in the United States.MeasuresFrequency of policies and percent alignment to FSG tool.AnalysisFSG policies were identified using legal databases to assess state statutes, regulations, and executive orders. Content analysis and coding determined attributes of policies across 4 FSG Tool domains, (1) nutrition standards referenced; (2) behavioral design strategies encouraging selection of healthier offerings; (3) facility efficiency and environmental sustainability; and (4) FSG implementation supports.ResultsFrom 2015-2019, 5 FSG policies met study inclusion criteria. Four out of 5 policies earned a perfect nutrition score (100%) by referencing nutrition standards that align with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) and are operationalized for use in food service venues. Four out of 5 policies included at least 1 implementation supports provision, such as naming an implementing agency, and 2 included provisions that encourage local food sourcing.ConclusionFrom 2015-2019, overall FSG policy comprehensiveness scores ranged from 24% to 73%, with most policies referencing food and nutrition standards that align to national nutrition recommendations. Public health practitioners can educate decision makers on the potential impact of FSG policies on diet-related health outcomes and associated cost savings, as well as other important co-benefits that support locally grown products and environmental sustainability practices.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-09-30T11:35:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221123311
       
  • A Culturally Tailored Narrative Decreased Resistance to COVID-19
           Vaccination Among Latinas

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      Authors: Ashley Phelps, Yulissa Rodriguez-Hernandez, Sheila T. Murphy, Thomas W. Valente
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study tested the relative efficacy of a culturally tailored dramatic narrative promoting COVID-19 vaccination in changing attitudes and behavioral intent among unvaccinated Latinas compared to a nonnarrative control containing similar information.DesignA pretest-posttest experimental study with unvaccinated Latinas randomly assigned to watch either a dramatic narrative featuring Latina characters countering prevalent myths about COVID-19 vaccines or a nonnarrative film containing similar information (control condition).SettingThe experiment was hosted online with the films embedded in the survey.ParticipantsThree-hundred-ninety adult Latinas living in the United States (mean age = 33.4 years; SD = 11.2) who had not been vaccinated against COVID-19 despite being eligible. At pretest, 57.7% were hesitant and 42.3% were resistant (refusing) to get vaccinated.MeasuresSelf-reported measures of engagement with the film, COVID-19 vaccine attitudes, and intent to get vaccinated within 30 days at pretest and posttest.ResultsResistant women were significantly more engaged in the dramatic narrative than the nonnarrative control film (P = .03). Being engaged in a film predicted more positive post-viewing attitudes toward the vaccine (b = .28; P < .001) and higher intent to get vaccinated (b = 2.34, P < .001).ConclusionUsing culturally tailored stories to promote healthy behaviors such as vaccination can be an effective way of reaching resistant audiences.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-09-26T09:37:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221129538
       
  • Wellness Program Participation and its Association With Reduction in
           Health Risks and Health Care Costs: One University’s Story

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      Authors: Kristi Rahrig Jenkins, Susan L. Bales
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeEvaluate if there is a(n): 1) reduction in health risk behaviors and 2) association between health and wellness initiative participation and claims costs decreases overtime.DesignHealth risk behavior change consisted of the analysis of pre (2009) – post (2019) measures of health questionnaire participants. The medical and pharmaceutical claims costs evaluation consisted of a time-series (2016-2019) design with a comparison group.SettingA large mid-western university with a health system.SampleThe health risk behavior sample ranged from 5215-5399, depending on the variable of interest. The medical and pharmaceutical costs sample used a cohort of participants (participating all 4 years, n=11114) and non-participants (not participating all 4 years, n=4776).InterventionComprehensive employee health and well-being initiative.Measures/analysisMcNemar’s tests were used to identify bivariate associations between 2009 and 2019 health risks. The claims cost analysis used propensity score matching based on select demographics and linear mixed-effects regression modeling.ResultsResults show statistically significant (P> .001) improvements (ranging from −2.1% to −12.5%) in 7 of 8 health risk behaviors. 2016 and 2019 claims costs have a lower statistically significant (P> .001) percent increase for participants (32.6%) compared to non-participants (47.5%).ConclusionEmployers, may consider implementing a comprehensive health and wellness program as part of their strategy to assist in health behavior risk reduction and health care cost containment.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-09-19T12:51:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221127987
       
  • A Scoping Review of the Community Health Worker Model Used for Food
           Systems Interventions Within the United States

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      Authors: Maria DeNunzio, Makenzie Miller, Melissa Chase, Vivica Kraak, Elena Serrano, Sarah Misyak
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo document and analyze the food systems interventions delivered by community health workers (CHW) serving as educators within the United States (U.S.)Data SourceTen databases (ie, Agricola, CAB Abstracts, CINAHL, ERIC, Proquest Social Science and Education, Proquest Theses and Dissertations, PubMed, Scopus, SocIndex, Web of Science) and gray-literature repositories were searched for publications between 2005-2020.Study Inclusion and Exclusion CriteriaEnglish-language and U.S. studies included with CHW as educators or facilitators for food systems interventions. Food systems defined as processes of production, processing, distribution, marketing, access, preparation, consumption, and disposal of food products. Studies excluded for clinical settings; non-adult CHWs; CHWs with medical or public health credentials; and programming guides, reviews, and commentaries.Data ExtractionVariables included CHW and intervention description, priority population, food system processes, and targeted and unexpected outcomes.Data SynthesisData were analyzed by the lead investigator and described narratively.ResultsOf 43 records, CHWs educated for consumption (n = 38), preparation (n = 33), and food access (n = 22) to improve health of priority populations. Community health workers educated for the highest number of food system processes in garden-based interventions. Programs reached many underserved racial and socioeconomic populations.ConclusionsThe CHW model has been used to educate in interventions for all food systems processes and reached many diverse underserved audiences. Future work must explore garden-based food systems education and CHWs as community change agents.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-09-16T03:03:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221125451
       
  • Captive Market Pricing and Lack of Transportation: A Survey of
           Undergraduate Food Insecurity at a Public University in New England

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      Authors: Victoria A Zigmont, Jennifer Anziano, Elizabeth Schwartz, Peggy Gallup
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThe purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence of food insecurity among college students and its relationship to on-campus food purchasing patterns and barriers to eating a healthy and sufficient diet, including the relative cost of food items on campus compared to national chain grocery stores.DesignA campus-wide survey using stratified sampling among undergraduates and food audit.SettingAn urban public university in New England.SubjectsA total of 951 surveys completed by undergraduates.MeasuresDemographic characteristics, behavioral factors and food security status (measured using the USDA 6-item short form) were collected.MethodDescriptive and multivariable analyses were conducted to describe differences between food insecure and food secure undergraduates.ResultsOverall, 35% of undergraduates experienced food insecurity in the past year (response rate = 92%). Food insecure undergraduates had different on-campus purchasing patterns than their food secure counterparts. Food insecure students were more likely to report barriers to healthy eating on all measures, including prices (AOR= 8.12, P < .0001), to experience housing insecurity (AOR= 2.64, P = .001) and to report that transportation is a barrier to buying groceries (AOR= 1.63, P = .01). After multivariable adjustment, food insecure undergraduates had higher odds of being African American (AOR= 1.57, P = .031) or other races (more than 1 race) (AOR= 3.35, P = .002) compared to white undergraduates.ConclusionsFood insecure college students face a variety of barriers to healthy eating on campus, including high food pricing on campus and limited transportation options. Further research is needed to inform campus resource development, policies and programming focused on food insecurity prevention for college students.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-09-14T07:09:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221127006
       
  • Health Coaching for People With Disabilities: An Exploratory Mixed-Methods
           Study

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      Authors: Krys Standley, Craig Ravesloot, Rayna Sage, K. Ann Sondag
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo expand the reach of health-promotion efforts for people with disabilities, we piloted a health-coaching intervention with a disability-specific curriculum. We evaluated the intervention’s effects on health-related quality of life and health behavior change.DesignMixed-methods research design using pre-post measures and semi-structured interviews.Setting/ParticipantsA convenience sample of community-dwelling adults with disabilities (n = 39).InterventionParticipants engaged in a curriculum-based health coaching intervention, titled Health My Way, which used weekly one-on-one coaching for up to 12 weeks.MethodsParticipants completed pre- and post-intervention surveys including questions from the Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) measure and the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II. A subset of participants completed in-depth interviews to explore how health coaching influences health behavior change (n = 12).ResultsWe found statistically significant effects on poor-health days due to physical and mental health, and effects on physical activity. We saw additional effects with engagement in relevant curriculum content. Qualitative main themes (tailoring of information, enthusiasm for personally meaningful goals, and social support) indicated processes by which health coaching supported health behavior changes.ConclusionsThe results of this pilot study indicate health coaching appears to be effective for improving HRQOL and health behavior, especially physical activity, for people with disabilities. Apparent key factors include enthusiasm for personally meaningful goals, having tailored information, and social support.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T05:34:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221109524
       
  • The Twenty Five Most Important Studies in Workplace Health Promotion

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      Authors: Paul E. Terry
      First page: 156
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      In what direction has workplace wellness research been evolving over the past 20 years' What proportion of occupational health researchers have been focusing on how health impacts work compared to researchers who ask how work affects health' This editorial poses an audacious, albeit largely subjective, question. That is, what have been the most important research studies about workplace wellness' Readers are invited to respond with their opinions about seminal studies we missed. Readers are also challenged with a thought experiment and exercise designed to organize the past decades of workplace wellness studies into a table that identifies trends in this research domain. Based on trends, I posit that researchers are waning in their interest in how health affects work productivity and healthcare costs and waxing in their considerations of how work affects well-being.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-08-12T09:32:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221120719
       
  • Legal Evolution of a Law Against Weight Discrimination in the United
           States: A Focus on Massachusetts

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      Authors: Karen J. Campoverde Reyes, Shreya Sabharwal, Fatima Cody Stanford
      First page: 164
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Weight discrimination heightens health inequalities, particularly among racial and ethnically diverse populations. We aim to research the legal evolution of the law against weight discrimination (S.2495) and raise awareness among lawmakers in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. We invited officials (n = 199) to attend a legislative briefing, and 25.6% completed a 14-question anonymous survey upon arrival. Contrary to our hypothesis, this first-of-its-kind study found that most policymakers are aware of weight biases. While S.2495 did not pass, the current bill S.2669, prohibiting body size discrimination, has recently been reported favorably by the Joint Committee on the Judiciary and referred to the committee on Senate Ways and Means.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-08-17T04:42:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221119795
       
  • Health Benefits of a 16-Week Whole Food, High Fiber, Plant Predominant

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      Authors: Rebecca Kelly, Amy Hanus, Pamela Payne-Foster, Janet Calhoun, Ron Stout, Bruce W Sherman
      First page: 168
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo assess improvements in eating behaviors and health measures among adults participating in a whole food plant predominant diet, Full Plate Living (FPL) program.DesignRetrospective, post hoc analysis of self-reported 16-week pre-post participant data obtained over a 3 year program period (2017-19).SettingWellness offering for employees in Southwest U.S.SubjectsOf 6,820 enrollees, 4,477 completed the program, further segmented by generational cohorts.InterventionFPL program materials and weekly online video lessons.MeasuresBaseline and follow-up measures included eating behaviors, self-perceived health status and energy, body weight, and confidence in healthy eating and weight loss.AnalysisPaired t-tests were used to examine changes in eating behaviors and health measures. Mixed-effects models were used to examine whether changes among generational cohorts differed.ResultsSignificant pre-post improvements were demonstrated for all measures, including servings of fruits (1.54 to 2.34), vegetables (2.05 to 2.87), beans (.63 to .99), and weight loss (3.5) (P < .001). Self-perceived health and energy values, and confidence in making healthy food choices and losing weight improved (P < .001). Improvements were observed across generational cohorts (P < .001).ConclusionThe FPL healthy eating approach has a beneficial impact on health measures across generational cohorts, and may be an effective addition to lifestyle medicine and corporate wellness offerings. Longer-term program evaluation is warranted.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-07-19T04:16:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221116066
       
  • Weight Status Among Minnesota Hispanic or Latino/a Youth: An Exploration
           of Protective Factors

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      Authors: Christie L. Martin, Barbara J. McMorris, Marla E. Eisenberg, Renee E. Sieving, Carolyn M. Porta, Michelle A. Mathiason, Sarah M. Espinoza, Yazmin A. Cespedes, Jayne A. Fulkerson
      First page: 177
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposePediatric obesity disproportionately impacts Hispanic or Latino/a adolescents. Culturally appropriate family-based behavioral initiatives to improve weight status are warranted. The purpose of this research was to determine prevalence rates and identify protective factors associated with having overweight/obesity (body mass index ≥ 85th percentile) to inform Hispanic or Latino/a-targeted behavioral intervention development.DesignSecondary data analyses of a population-based statewide survey.SettingMinnesota public high schools.ParticipantsMale (n = 2,644) and female (n = 2,798) Hispanic or Latino/a 9th and 11th graders (N = 5,442).MeasuresObesity-related behaviors (meeting fruit and vegetable [F&V] and physical activity [PA] recommendations), family caring, family country/region of origin, and weight status.AnalysisStepwise logistic regression models (F&V, PA), stratified by biological sex, were used to identify protective factors of overweight/obesity.ResultsThe overall prevalence of meeting F&V and PA recommendations was 11.0% and 11.8%, respectively. Meeting F&V recommendations was not protective against overweight/obesity in either sex. Yet, males and females who met PA recommendations had significantly lower odds of having overweight/obesity (p < .05). In F&V and PA models, family caring was protective against overweight/obesity in females (p < .05), and family country/region of origin was protective against overweight/obesity in both sexes (p < .05).ConclusionFindings illustrate a need for obesity prevention initiatives for Hispanic or Latino/a youth. More research is needed to understand the protective nature of family caring and country/region of origin.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-08-13T12:38:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221120912
       
  • The Roles of Information Valence, Media Literacy and Perceived Information
           Quality on the Association Between Frequent Social Media Exposure and
           COVID-19 Vaccination Intention

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      Authors: Meiqi Xin, Sitong Luo, Suhua Wang, Junfeng Zhao, Guohua Zhang, Lijuan Li, Liping Li, Joseph Tak-Fai Lau
      First page: 189
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study aimed to examine the associations between frequent exposure to positive/negative information about vaccine efficacy/safety on social media and intention of COVID-19 vaccination, and to test if media literacy and perceived information quality would moderate such associations.DesignA multi-city cross-sectional survey.SettingAt five universities in different regions of China.Subjects6922 university students (a response rate of 72.3%).Measuresfrequency of exposure to social media information about COVID-19 vaccination, media literacy, perceived information quality, intention of COVID-19 vaccination, and sociodemographic characteristics.AnalysisLogistic regression analysis was conducted to test main and interaction effects.ResultsHigher exposure to positive information about vaccine efficacy (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.30, P < .001) and vaccine safety (AOR = 1.27, P < .001) were positively associated with vaccination intention. No significant associations were shown between exposure to negative information about vaccine efficacy/safety and vaccination intention. Higher net exposure to negative vs positive information was negatively associated with vaccination intention (AOR = .82, P < .001). High media literacy was further found to attenuate the effect of negative information exposure and strengthen that of positive information exposure. Perceived information quality was not a significant moderator.ConclusionThe valence of social media information regarding the efficacy and safety of COVID-19 vaccines and individuals’ media literacy jointly shaped COVID-19 vaccination intention. The findings can inform the development of effective health promotion strategies for enhancing COVID-19 vaccination.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-08-16T01:56:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221121292
       
  • Motivation to Carry Naloxone: A Qualitative Analysis of Emergency
           Department Patients

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      Authors: Anthony Spadaro, Anish K. Agarwal, Hareena K. Sangha, Jeanmarie Perrone, Mucio Kit Delgado, Margaret Lowenstein
      First page: 200
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeOur aim was to explore perspectives of patients who received naloxone in the emergency department (ED) about (1) naloxone carrying and use following an ED visit and (2) motivation for performing these behaviors.DesignSemi-structured interviews of patients prescribed naloxone at ED discharge.SettingsThree urban academic EDs in Philadelphia, PA.Participants25 participants completed the in-depth, semi-structured interviews and demographic surveys. Participants were majority male, African American, and had previously witnessed or experienced an overdose.MethodsInterviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. We used a hybrid inductive-deductive approach that included prespecified and emergent themes.ResultsWe found that naloxone carrying behavior was variable and influenced by four main motivators: (1) naloxone access; (2) personal experience and salience of naloxone, (3) comfort with naloxone administration, and (4) societal influences on naloxone carrying. In particular, those with personal history of overdose or close friends or family at risk were motivated to carry naloxone.ConclusionsParticipants in this study reported several important motivators for naloxone carrying after an ED visit, including ease of naloxone access and comfort, perceived risk of experiencing or encountering an overdose, and social influences on naloxone carrying behaviors. EDs, health systems, and public health officials should consider these factors influencing motivation when designing future interventions to increase access, carrying, and use of naloxone.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T07:28:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221107908
       
  • “The Pain Doesn’t Have to Control You.” A Qualitative Evaluation of
           Three Pain Clinics Teaching Nonopioid Pain Management Strategies

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      Authors: Marc T Braverman, Karen M Volmar, Diana J Govier
      First page: 210
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo explore factors related to effectiveness of nonpharmacological treatment for opioid-dependent patients suffering with chronic pain.ApproachA qualitative study incorporating individual interviews and focus group interviews.Setting3 rural Oregon nonopioid pain management clinics.InterventionA 10-week nonpharmacological educational program incorporating cognitive-behavioral therapy, movement therapy, mindfulness, and other skills.Participants and methodsAcross sites, we conducted 9 individual interviews with clinic staff and 3 focus group interviews with 34 patients who had participated in the course. Thematic analysis was used to identify themes within and across respondent groups.ResultsAnalysis revealed 4 primary themes: program goals; program benefits; characteristics of patients who benefit from the program; coordination of clinic experiences with other care. Several primary findings can be highlighted. The clinics focused on improving patients’ quality of life, while opioid use reduction was a potential secondary benefit, driven by patients. Major program benefits included enhanced pain self-management skills, patients’ greater assertiveness in communications with healthcare providers, and, in numerous cases, opioid use reduction. Participants were unanimous that predisposition toward active self-management of one’s pain was an essential factor for positive outcomes. Patients reported considerable variability in providers’ understanding of their clinic participation.ConclusionNonpharmacological approaches for treating chronic pain can be effective for many patients. Clinics teaching these approaches should be more fully integrated into the healthcare system.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-09-02T01:57:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221119799
       
  • Coverage and Determinants of COVID-19 Vaccination Among Pregnant Women: An
           Experience From a Low-Income Country

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      Authors: Zaher Nazzal, Ahmad Mohammad, Lama Qub, Hadeel Masri, Ibtesam Abdullah, Hala Qasrawi, Beesan Maraqa
      First page: 222
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purposeto determine COVID-19 vaccination coverage among pregnant women and investigate the factors affecting vaccine uptake.DesignAnalytical cross-sectional study.SettingPalestinian health care facilities. Between October and November 2021 – eight months after the country’s first COVID-19 vaccination.SampleWe needed 820 people to estimate vaccination coverage among pregnant women with a precision rate of 3%. Therefore, we invited 950 pregnant Palestinian women who were eligible and had a response rate of 91.6%.MeasuresAn interviewer-administered questionnaire examined vaccination uptake, attitudes, and concerns about the COVID-19 vaccine.AnalysisBivariable and multivariable analysis using SPSS.Resultsvaccination uptake was reported by 219 pregnant women [25.5%, 95% CI: 22.6% −28.5%]. Knowledge (aOR=2.0; 95% CI: 1.2-3.1), perceived benefits (aOR=1.1; 95% CI: 1.06-1.16), employment (aOR=5; 95% CI: 3.1-8.1), and underlying medical condition (aOR=2.1; 95% CI: 1.1-4.1) predicted uptake. Reporting vaccine barriers reduces vaccine uptake (aOR=.92; 95% CI: .89-95).ConclusionsPregnant women’s COVID-19 vaccination rates are low. Concerns regarding the COVID-19 vaccine for infants affected their decision. COVID-19 vaccination regulations and legislative nudges drove maternal vaccination. Vaccine fears and misconceptions among pregnant women should be addressed.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-08-20T02:59:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221111107
       
  • The Impact of Community-Based Testing Sites and Gift Incentives on
           COVID-19 Testing Uptake in Maryland, April 29 – May 9, 2021

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      Authors: Caitlin Turbyfill, Isabel Thomas, Namita Agravat, Joanna M Prasher, Randall J Nett, Melody Stevens, Jessica N Ricaldi, Tambra M Dunams, Latasha Brickhouse-Frazier, Melissa D Carter, Yonathan Gebru, Ashley King, Coral S May, Joseph D Miller, Chigo Oguh, Amanda Pullman, Kaylin Roman, Charles Rose, Robert Scherr, Turquoise Sidibe, Rieza Soelaeman, Jonathan Weinstein, Todd Wilson, Cuc H Tran
      First page: 228
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeInformation on incentives for COVID-19 testing is needed to understand effective practices that encourage testing uptake. We describe characteristics of those who received an incentive after performing a rapid antigen test.DesignCross-sectional descriptive analysis of survey data.SettingDuring April 29–May 9, 2021, COVID-19 rapid antigen testing was offered in 2 Maryland cities.SampleConvenience sample of 553 adults (≥18 years) who tested and received an incentive; 93% consented to survey.MeasuresSurvey questions assessed reasons for testing, testing history, barriers, and demographics.AnalysisRobust Poisson regressions were used to determine characteristic differences based on testing history and between participants who would re-test in the future without an incentive vs participants who would not.ResultsThe most common reasons for testing were the desire to be tested (n = 280; 54%) and convenience of location (n = 146; 28%). Those motivated by an incentive to test (n = 110; 21%) were 5.83 times as likely to state they would not test again without an incentive, compared to those with other reasons for testing (95% CI: 2.67-12.72, P < .001).Critical LimitationsNo comparative study group.ConclusionResults indicate internal motivation and convenience were prominent factors supporting testing uptake. Incentives may increase community testing participation, particularly among people who have never tested. Keywords COVID-19, pandemic, incentives, health behavior, community testing.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T06:10:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221119796
       
  • Prevalence of Cardiovascular Diseases Among Breast Cancer Survivors:
           Findings From the NHANES 2003-2018

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      Authors: Youngdeok Kim, R. Lee Franco, Alexander R. Lucas, Arnethea L. Sutton, Jessica G. LaRose, Jonathan Kenyon, Jeremy Via, Richard K. Cheng, Ralph; B. D’Agostino, Vanessa B. Sheppard, W. Gregory Hundley
      First page: 233
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo examine the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) among breast cancer (BC) survivors.DesignCross-sectional observational study using the data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2018.SettingUnited States (US).SubjectsA nationally representative sample of US women with a history of BC.MeasuresSelf-reported CVD status (i.e., coronary artery disease (CAD), heart failure, and stroke) and time of the CVD diagnosis were used to categorize BC survivors into three groups: No CVD, preexisting CVD, and post-acquired CVD after BC diagnosis.AnalysisThe prevalence of CVD among BC survivors were estimated by demographic characteristics. Complex sampling design of the NHANES was accounted to estimate the population-level prevalence.ResultsA total of 658 BC survivors were identified, representing 3.01% (≈3.4 million) of the US women aged ≥18 years old. Of those, ≈6% (≈.2 million) had preexisting CVD and ≈11% (≈.4 million) had at least one CVD diagnosed after BC diagnosis, with an average time elapsed ranging from ≈5 years for heart failure to ≈9 years for CAD and stroke. The prevalence of CVD among BC survivors differed by demographic characteristics including age, education, marital status, menopausal, and physical activity levels.ConclusionOur findings suggest that BC survivors are at risk of suffering from CVD and public health strategies for the long-term management of CVD risk factors in this vulnerable population group is recommended.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-08-17T12:35:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221120910
       
  • Racial Fairness in Precision Medicine: Pediatric Asthma Prediction
           Algorithms

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      Authors: Jordan Pennington, Erika Rasnick, Lisa J. Martin, Jocelyn M. Biagini, Tesfaye B. Mersha, Allison Parsons, Gurjit K. Khurana Hershey, Patrick Ryan, Cole Brokamp
      First page: 239
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeQuantify and examine the racial fairness of two widely used childhood asthma predictive precision medicine algorithms: the asthma predictive index (API) and the pediatric asthma risk score (PARS).DesignApply the API and PARS and evaluate model performance overall and when stratified by race.SettingCincinnati, OH, USA.SubjectsA prospective birth cohort of 590 children with clinically measured asthma diagnosis by age seven.MeasuresModel diagnostic criteria included sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV).AnalysisSignificant differences in model performance between Black and white children were considered to be present if the P-value associated with a t-test based on 100 bootstrap replications was less than .05.ResultsCompared to predictions for white children, predictions for Black children using the PARS had a higher sensitivity (.88 vs .57), lower specificity (.55 vs .83), higher PPV (.42 vs .33), but a similar NPV (.93 vs .93). Within the API and compared to predictions for white children, predictions for Black children had a higher sensitivity (.63 vs .53), similar specificity (.81 vs .80), higher PPV (.54 vs .28), and lower NPV (.86 vs .92).ConclusionsOverall, racial disparities in model diagnostic criteria were greatest for sensitivity and specificity in the PARS, but racial disparities existed in three of the four criteria for both the PARS and the API.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-08-16T08:32:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221121639
       
  • School-Based Family-Oriented Health Interventions to Promote Physical
           Activity in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Francisco Santos, Honorato Sousa, Élvio Rúbio Gouveia, Helder Lopes, Miguel Peralta, João Martins, Eugenia Murawska-Ciałowicz, Grzegorz Żurek, Adilson Marques
      First page: 243
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThis study aimed to systematically review and analyse intervention programs in a school context centred on the family, focused on increasing youths' physical activity.Data sourceThe research was carried out in the PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science databases.Study inclusion criteriaStudies were included if participants were children or adolescents, focusing on school-based intervention studies with parental involvement and physical activity, sedentary behaviour or physical fitness outcomes.Data extractionThe search was performed according to the PRISMA protocol. A total of 416 articles were identified. After being considered for eligibility and duplicates, 22 studies were identified as relevant for inclusion.Data synthesisSample and intervention characteristics, objective, the role of the family, outcomes measures, main findings regarding the outcomes and risk of bias.ResultsTen studies reported improvements in physical activity, 6 in sedentary behaviour and 9 in the components of physical fitness and/or skills related to healthy behaviours and lifestyles. Most of the interventions adopted a multidisciplinary and multi-component approach.ConclusionsMost interventions employed a school’s multidisciplinary/multi-component approach to promoting physical activity, nutrition, and general education for healthier lifestyle behaviours. The impact of school-based interventions involving families on youth’s physical activity levels is still a relatively emerging theme. Further research is needed given the diversity of the intervention’s characteristics and the disparity in the results’ efficacy.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2022-11-22T04:16:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171221113836
       
 
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