Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1478 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (700 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

HEALTH AND SAFETY (700 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4     

Showing 601 - 203 of 203 Journals sorted alphabetically
Saúde Coletiva     Open Access  
Saúde e Meio Ambiente : Revista Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Saúde em Redes     Open Access  
Saúde.com     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
School Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Scientia Medica     Open Access  
Scire Salutis     Open Access  
Serviço Social e Saúde     Open Access  
Sextant : Revue de recherche interdisciplinaire sur le genre et la sexualité     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexual Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sexual Medicine Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Sleep and Vigilance : An International Journal of Basic, Translational and Clinical Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Sleep Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Sleep Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SMAD, Revista Electronica en Salud Mental, Alcohol y Drogas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Smart Health     Hybrid Journal  
Social Determinants of Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Theory & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Work in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Work in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Social Work in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Society, Health & Vulnerability     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sosiaalilääketieteellinen Aikakauslehti     Open Access  
South African Family Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South African Journal of Bioethics and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
South African Journal of Child Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
South African Journal of Communication Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
South East Asia Journal of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South Eastern European Journal of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Southern African Journal of Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Southern African Journal of Public Health     Open Access  
Southwest Respiratory and Critical Care Chronicles     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Space Safety Magazine     Free   (Followers: 51)
Sri Lanka Journal of Child Health     Open Access  
SSM - Population Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
SSM - Qualitative Research in Health     Open Access  
Stigma and Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Sundhedsprofessionelle studier     Open Access  
Sustainable Earth     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sustinere : Revista de Saúde e Educação     Open Access  
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Tanzania Journal of Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Technology and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tempus Actas de Saúde Coletiva     Open Access  
Textos & Contextos (Porto Alegre)     Open Access  
The Journal of Aquatic Physical Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Lancet Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 72)
The Lancet Planetary Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Lancet Regional Health : Americas     Open Access  
The Lancet Regional Health : Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Lancet Regional Health : Western Pacific     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Meducator     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Communities : The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Tidsskrift for Forskning i Sygdom og Samfund     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for psykisk helsearbeid     Full-text available via subscription  
Tobacco Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Tobacco Control and Public Health in Eastern Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Transgender Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Transportation Safety and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Journal of Health Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Tropical Medicine and Health     Open Access  
TÜBAV Bilim Dergisi     Open Access  
Universal Journal of Public Health     Open Access  
Universidad y Salud     Open Access  
Unnes Journal of Public Health     Open Access  
Value in Health Regional Issues     Hybrid Journal  
Vascular Health and Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Vigilância Sanitária em Debate     Open Access  
Violence and Gender     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Water Quality, Exposure and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Western Pacific Surveillance and Response     Open Access  
Women & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
World Health & Population     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
World Medical & Health Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Arbeitswissenschaft     Hybrid Journal  
Електромагнітна сумісність та безпека на залізничному транспорті     Open Access  
مجله بهداشت و توسعه     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4     

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  • Social inequalities in early exit from employment in Germany: a causal
           mediation analysis on the role of work, health, and work ability

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      Abstract: Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of work factors, health, and work ability to social inequalities in early exit from employment among older employees in Germany.Methods Longitudinal data from the representative German lidA Cohort study was linked with employment register data to obtain maximum information on exit routes out of paid employment. Information of N=2438 respondents, aged 46 and 52 at baseline, were obtained for a follow-up of six years (2011–2017). Causal mediation analysis with inverse odds weighting was conducted using discrete-time survival outcomes and baseline measurements of the socioeconomic status (SES: education), work factors, health, and work ability.Results Older employees with low SES were at an increased risk of exiting employment early by receiving disability pension and through long-term unemployment but not through an unspecified labor market exit when compared to those with high and moderate SES. Low work ability accounted for up to 38% of the social inequalities in work exits into disability pension. Less-than-good physical health accounted for up to 59% of inequalities in work exits into long-term unemployment. Work factors contributed considerably to inequalities in exits through unemployment but not disability pension.Conclusions This study finds social inequalities in early exits through disability pension and long-term unemployment among older employees in Germany, predominantly attributable to differences in work ability (disability pension) and physical health (unemployment). Investments in work ability and promotion of physical health may constitute promising approaches to counteract an increase of these inequalities. by Rohrbacher M, Hasselhorn HM. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4036
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 17:53:27 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4036
       
  • Chronic disorders, work-unit leadership quality and long-term sickness
           absence among 33 025 public hospital employees

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      Abstract: Objective This study aimed to examine the association between work-unit level leadership quality and individual-level long-term sickness absence (LTSA) in the hospital sector and effect modification by chronic disorders.Methods This longitudinal analysis included 33 025 Danish public hospital employees who were followed-up for one year after baseline in March 2014. Leadership quality was assessed by questionnaire with mean responses aggregated by work-unit and characterized in tertiles. LTSA during follow-up was determined from employer records. Chronic disorders at baseline was assessed from the Danish hospital and prescription registers. We performed multilevel logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusting for potential confounders. We evaluated interaction between chronic illness and low leadership quality on multiplicative and additive scales.Results We identified employees as healthy (60.8%) or with somatic (31.6%), mental (3.3%), or both somatic and mental (4.3%) disorders. During follow-up, 6% of employees registered a LTSA. Medium and high leadership quality were associated with lower risk of LTSA with OR of 0.84 (95% CI 0.76–0.94) and 0.73 (95% CI 0.65–0.82) respectively, compared to low leadership quality. Associations were similar for healthy employees and employees with only somatic disorders, whereas no association was observed for employees with mental disorders (in presence or absence of somatic disorders). No statistically significant (α=0.05) interactions between leadership quality and chronic disorders on LTSA were observed.Conclusion The findings suggest that the quality of leadership in work units is associated with risk of long-term sick leave in the Danish public hospital sector and that strong leadership protects employees against LTSA. by Mehta AJ, Mathisen J, Nguyen T-L, Rugulies R, Hulvej Rod N. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4040
      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2022 21:29:57 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4040
       
  • Time trends in occupational exposure to chemicals in Sweden: proportion
           exposed, distribution across demographic and labor market strata, and
           exposure levels

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      Abstract: Objective This study investigated time trends in occupational exposure to various chemicals in Sweden and the distribution across demographic and labor market sectors.Methods Exposure to six chemicals was investigated from 1980 to 2013 by application of a job exposure matrix to national population registers. Respirable crystalline silica (RCS), diesel engine exhaust, welding fumes, wood dust, chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents, and lead were selected to represent different groups of chemicals. Trends in exposure prevalence were investigated by linear regression and compared to the occupationally active population. Confidence intervals for the rate of change over time were obtained by bootstrapping.Results The proportion of workers born outside the Nordic countries increased over time in those exposed to RCS, diesel exhaust and wood dust. There was a shift of exposed jobs to small companies (
      PubDate: Mon, 13 Jun 2022 22:02:53 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4031
       
  • Association between rotating night shift work and carotid intima-media
           thickness among Chinese steelworkers: a cross-sectional survey

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      Abstract: Objective This study aimed to examine the association between rotating night shift work and subclinical athero­sclerosis among Chinese steelworkers.Methods We evaluated 3582 steelworkers who participated in the legally required health examination in 2017. Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) was measured using ultrasonography. Different exposure metrics of night shifts collected by face-to-face personal interviews were used to examine the relationship between night shift work and the mean CIMT.Results The mean CIMT values were 0.66 (standard deviation 0.22) mm in the study population. Current shift workers shown higher mean CIMT compared to day workers. There were no significant associations between the current shift status, the duration of night shifts, the cumulative number of night shifts, the average frequency of night shifts, and the mean CIMT after all confounding factors adjusted both in male and female.Conclusions Rotating night shift work is not associated with subclinical atherosclerosis among steelworkers. Further large-scale prospective longitudinal studies are warranted to confirm our findings. by Wang L, Zhang S, Yu M, Wu J, Li X, Yuan J. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4038
      PubDate: Mon, 13 Jun 2022 21:28:00 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4038
       
  • The impact of vocational rehabilitation on employment outcomes: A
           regression discontinuity approach

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      Abstract: Objectives Since 2015, Finnish disability pension applicants who are rejected or receive a short-term temporary pension have, under certain conditions, also received a preliminary decision for vocational rehabilitation (VR). A key requirement for eligibility is a certain amount of earnings during the previous five years (€34 910.29 in 2017). We exploit this discontinuity to examine the impact of assignment to VR on labor market outcomes.Methods All new disability pension applicants from 2015 to 2017 were included. Fuzzy regression discontinuity design was used to evaluate the impact of assignment to VR on employment, unemployment and earned income two years later among those close to the threshold (+/- €20 000) providing eligibility for the preliminary decision. Arguably, those just below and just above the earnings limit are similar to each other, allowing causal interpretation of the estimates.Results For each of the employment outcomes, we found a modest effect in the expected direction at the income threshold, but there is considerable uncertainty in these findings. On average, exceeding the income limit increased the probability of employment by 7.6 percentage points, but the estimate was far from statistical significance. Unemployment became slightly less common and earned income slightly increased, but the estimates were also clearly statistically non-significant.Conclusions We found no consistent evidence of the impact of assignment to VR on employment outcomes among low-income disability pension applicants. However, given the narrow and specific study population, this should not be taken as evidence of ineffectiveness of VR more generally. by Laaksonen M, Ilmakunnas I, Tuominen S. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4039
      PubDate: Mon, 13 Jun 2022 15:13:12 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4039
       
  • Psychosocial job stressors and risk of suicidal behavior – an
           observational study among Swedish men

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      Abstract: Objective This study aimed to explore the relationship between psychosocial job stressors and suicidal behavior (fatal and non-fatal) among Swedish men while controlling for potential confounders.Methods Population-based Swedish longitudinal cohort study of male conscripts without previous self-harm (N=1 483 310) enlisting 1968–2002. Conscription examinations included measures of IQ, stress resilience and psychiatric diagnoses. Job demand–control (JDC) exposure was assessed using the Swedish Job Exposure Matrix linked to specific occupations. Suicidal behavior among men aged 30–64 was identified in the National Hospital Register (non-fatal self-harm) and Swedish Cause of Death Register (suicide) during follow-up 2002–2014. Cox regression models were used to estimate associations between JDC category and suicidal behavior.Results In fully adjusted models, passive jobs (low demand-low control) showed the highest risk of suicidal behavior [hazard ratio (HR) 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.25–1.43] compared to those with low strain (low demand-high control), followed by high strain (high demand-low control) (HR 1.12, 95% Cl 1.03–1.22). A lower risk of suicidal behavior was found in the active category, where levels of both demand and control are high (HR 0.64, 95% Cl 0.60–0.70). Separate analyses for suicide as outcome revealed a lower risk of suicide in persons with active jobs (high demands-high control). The passive category showed a higher risk for suicide, but the association did not remain after adjustment for stress resilience and IQ.Conclusions These results show that psychosocial job stressors among men are associated with risk for suicidal behavior. Improving job control has the potential to decrease suicidal behavior for this group. by Åberg M, Staats E, Robertson J, Schiöler L, Torén K, LaMontagne AD, Söderberg M, Waern M, Nyberg J. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4037
      PubDate: Wed, 08 Jun 2022 11:58:02 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4037
       
  • Occupation and SARS-CoV-2 infection risk among 108 960 workers during the
           first pandemic wave in Germany

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      Abstract: Objective The aim of this study was to identify the occupational risk for a SARS-CoV-2 infection in a nationwide sample of German workers during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (1 February–31 August 2020).Methods We used the data of 108 960 workers who participated in a COVID follow-up survey of the German National Cohort (NAKO). Occupational characteristics were derived from the German Classification of Occupations 2010 (Klassifikation der Berufe 2010). PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infections were assessed from self-reports. Incidence rates (IR) and incidence rate ratios (IRR) were estimated using robust Poisson regression, adjusted for person-time at risk, age, sex, migration background, study center, working hours, and employment relationship.Results The IR was 3.7 infections per 1000 workers [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.3–4.1]. IR differed by occupational sector, with the highest rates observed in personal (IR 4.8, 95% CI 4.0–5.6) and business administration (IR 3.4, 95% CI 2.8–3.9) services and the lowest rates in occupations related to the production of goods (IR 2.0, 95% CI 1.5–2.6). Infections were more frequent among essential workers compared with workers in non-essential occupations (IRR 1.95, 95% CI 1.59–2.40) and among highly skilled compared with skilled professions (IRR 1.36, 95% CI 1.07–1.72).Conclusions The results emphasize higher infection risks in essential occupations and personal-related services, especially in the healthcare sector. Additionally, we found evidence that infections were more common in higher occupational status positions at the beginning of the pandemic. by Reuter M, Rigó M, Formazin M, Liebers F, Latza U, Castell S, Jöckel K-H, Greiser KH, Michels KB, Krause G, Albrecht S, Öztürk I, Kuss O, Berger K, Lampl BMJ, Leitzmann M, Zeeb H, Starke KR, Schipf S, Meinke-Franze C, Ahrens W, Seidler A, Klee B, Pischon T, Deckert A, Schmidt B, Mikolajczyk R, Karch A, Bohn B, Brenner H, Holleczek B, Dragano N. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4044
      PubDate: Tue, 07 Jun 2022 12:47:24 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4044
       
  • Supporting workers with mental health problems at work: challenges and
           avenues

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      Abstract: Mental health problems in the workforce present a major public and occupational health challenge and come with significant costs for the individuals, families, employers and society at large. It has been estimated that, globally, the 12-month prevalence of common mental health problems – such as depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, and stress-related disorders – is on average 17.6%, with often serious implications for employment, productivity, and wages (2, 3). The recent OECD report “Fitter Minds, Fitter Jobs” showed that in 2018, across OECD countries, people with mental health problems have 20% lower employment rates, are almost three times more likely to be unemployed, and almost one and a half times more likely to receive disability benefits as those without these problems (2). These key figures barely differ from those presented in 2013 (2). During the past decades, research on the highly complex phenomenon of (return to) work participation of people with common mental health problems has come a long way: many barriers and facilitators to (return to) working have been identified and interventions have been developed and tested for people with common mental health problems to participate in work (eg, 4, 5). To illustrate, facilitating factors concern, for example, an individual’s active coping style (keep a daily rhythm, exercise, stay in contact with work), high self-efficacy, and a supportive family context and social network (5-8); while the severity of mental health problems or the existence of other health problems are known barriers (5). A safe organizational climate (such as openness about mental health) and good psychosocial working conditions, including support from supervisors and colleagues, having decision authority, and no high workload, have been identified as facilitating workplace factors (5, 7, 8). Also, health and social systems may act as a barrier or facilitator with, eg, waiting lists for mental health treatment or the availability of integrative mental health and occupational rehabilitation/employment services (7, 9). It comes as no surprise that Corbière et al (10) identified 11 different stakeholder groups from the work, health and insurance systems and close to 200 relevant stakeholder actions in the return-to-work process of workers with common mental health problems. Despite extensive progress and a large body of evidence on factors to facilitate the (return to) work participation of workers with common mental health problems (for systematic reviews and meta-analyses, covering more than two decades of research, see, eg, 5, 9, 11), we must acknowledge that meta-analyses of intervention studies to date only have shown small effect sizes for sick leave reduction (4, 12–14) and no substantial effects for improved return-to-work (13) or being at work (14) rates. So, how to move the research field forward' Although people with common mental health problems have lower employment rates, the majority (60% on average across OECD countries) is working (OECD 2021), but knowledge about maintaining and improving at-work participation among this group is lacking. We see a great need for a focus shift towards a deeper understanding of at-work participation of people with common mental health problems. In the following, we focus on two challenges and avenues to move forward: (i) measuring at-work outcomes and (ii) examining the complex, interdependent relationship between common mental health problems and at-work participation with more intense, longitudinal real-time designs and a life course lens. Challenges and avenues to support people with common mental health problems at workChallenge 1: Measurement of at-work outcomesThe first challenge concerns the measurement of how people with common mental health problems participate or function at work and what their needs are to enter and stay at work. To better support workers with common mental health problems at work, it is critical to further deepen our understanding of the strategies, work accommodation needs and functioning of these workers. To illustrate, in a qualitative study among workers suffering from common mental health problems, Danielsson et al (15) explored “strategies to keep working”. The authors showed that workers` strategies differed depending on the illness phase; ie, more reactive strategies to avoid strain were used in early phases and more reflective, solution-focused strategies were used in later phases. This knowledge on phase-specific work strategies may be used to better inform and tailor supportive interventions and work accommodation to help workers to maintain working. De Groot et al (16) recently provided first insights about how young adults with a history of mental health problems function at work. It was shown that young adults with both persistent high and elevated levels of mental health problems during childhood and adolescence, compared with those with low-level mental health problems, experience difficulties in meeting their work demands for more than one day a week given a full-time work week at age 29. Moreover, Arends et al (17) showed that many workers who returned to work after being absent with common mental health problems still experience impaired work functioning for up to 12 months. This study also demonstrated that workers recover at a different pace and at a different level in terms of mental health and work functioning. These findings highlight the importance of focusing on at-work strategies and functioning to support workers with common mental health problems as we need to capture early signs of maladaptive strategies or reduced functioning that may inform work accommodations to prevent a further decline in functioning or even more severe consequences as sick leave or work disability. Accommodating work for workers with (common) mental health problems may...
      PubDate: Sun, 05 Jun 2022 16:31:17 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4034
       
  • Workplace bullying and risk of suicide and suicide attempts: A
           

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      Abstract: Objectives The aim of this study was to analyze whether individuals reporting exposure to workplace bullying had a higher risk of suicidal behavior, including both suicide attempt and death by suicide, than those not reporting such exposure.Methods Using a prospective cohort study design, we linked data from nine Danish questionnaire-based surveys (2004–2014) to national registers up to 31 December 2016. Exposure to workplace bullying was measured by a single item. Suicide attempts were identified in hospital registers and death by suicide in the Cause of Death Register. Among participants with no previous suicide attempts, we estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for sex, age, marital status, socioeconomic status, and history of psychiatric morbidity.Results The sample consisted of 98 330 participants (713 798 person-years), 63.6% were women, and the mean age was 44.5 years. Of these participants, 10 259 (10.4%) reported workplace bullying. During a mean follow-up of 7.3 years, we observed 184 cases of suicidal behavior, including 145 suicide attempts, 35 deaths by suicide and 4 cases that died by suicide after surviving a suicide attempt. The fully-adjusted HR for the association between workplace bullying and suicidal behavior was 1.65 (95% CI 1.06–2.58). The HR for suicide attempts and death by suicide were 1.65 (1.09–2.50) and 2.08 (0.82–5.27), respectively. Analyses stratified by sex showed a statistically significant association between workplace bullying and suicidal behavior among men but not women.Conclusions The results suggest that exposure to workplace bullying is associated with an elevated risk of suicidal behavior among men. by Conway PM, Erlangsen A, Grynderup MB, Clausen T, Rugulies R, Bjorner JB, Burr H, Francioli L, Garde AH, Hansen ÅM, Hanson LM, Kirchheiner-Rasmussen J, Kristensen TS, Mikkelsen EG, Stenager E, Thorsen SV, Villadsen E, Høgh A. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4035
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 17:49:04 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4035
       
  • Combined psychosocial work factors and risk of long-term sickness absence
           in the general working population: Prospective cohort with register
           follow-up among 69 371 workers

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      Abstract: Objective This study aimed to investigate the importance of combined psychosocial work factors for the risk of long-term sickness absence (LTSA).Methods We followed 69 371 employees in the general working population (Work Environment and Health in Denmark study 2012–2018), without LTSA during the preceding year, for up to two years in the Danish Register for Evaluation of Marginalization. Using k-means cluster analyses and weighted Cox-regression controlling for age, gender, survey year, education, health-behaviors, and physical work demands, we determined the prospective association of 11 identified clusters – based on the combination of nine psychosocial work factors (recognition, quantitative demands, work pace, emotional demands, influence, justice, role clarity, role conflicts, and support from colleagues) – with the risk of LTSA.Results During 124 045 person-years of follow-up, 6197 employees developed LTSA (weighted 8.5%). Using the cluster with the most favorable psychosocial scores as reference, clusters scoring poorly on several combined psychosocial factors had increased risk of LTSA. The cluster scoring poor on all nine psychosocial factors exhibited the highest risk [hazard ratio (HR) 1.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.45–1.94]. Scoring poorly on one or two psychosocial factors did not increase the risk of LTSA when combined with favorable scores on the other psychosocial factors. Interaction analyses showed that gender, but not age and education, modified the association between cluster and LTSA.Conclusion Scoring poorly on several combined psychosocial work factors plays an important role in the risk of LTSA. Scoring favorably on several psychosocial factors outweighed the potentially adverse effects of scoring poorly on one or two factors. by Andersen LL, Vinstrup J, Thorsen SV, Pedersen J, Sundstrup E, Rugulies R. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4030
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 15:42:16 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4030
       
  • Effects of workplace measures against COVID-19 on psychological distress
           of full-time employees: A 12-month prospective study in the COVID-19
           pandemic

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      Abstract: Objective This study aimed to investigate the prospective effects of corporate and organizational workplace measures against COVID-19 on reducing employees` psychological distress during a 12-month follow-up in the COVID-19 pandemic.Methods Data were retrieved from an online longitudinal panel survey of full-time employees in Japan, with the 1st survey in March 2020, and the 2nd to 6th surveys in May, August, November 2020, February and March 2021, respectively. Seven area-specific workplace measures were assessed using a self-report 23-item scale at the 2nd follow-up. Psychological distress was measured using an 18-item scale of the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire at each survey. Linear regressions and mixed model analysis were conducted of psychological distress at follow-ups on scores of the area-specific workplace measures, adjusting for psychological distress and other covariates at the 1st survey.Results A total of 941 employees responded at baseline; most of them (86.9–90.9%) participated in the follow-up surveys. Linear regression analysis indicated that workplace measures of facilitating employees’ preventive measures (ie, hygiene behaviors) statistically significantly and negatively correlated with psychological distress at the 5th survey [b=-0.518, standard error (SE) 0.259, P=0.046]. A statistically significant and negative interaction between the scores and time of follow-up was observed in the mixed model analysis (b=-0.096, SE 0.047, P=0.041). No such correlation or interaction was found for any of other subcategorical workplace measures.Conclusions The study provides prospective evidence for a protective effect of workplace measures to facilitate employee’s hygiene behaviors on reducing psychological distress of full-time employees in the COVID-19 pandemic. The association seems stronger at a later follow-up. by Asaoka H, Sasaki N, Imamura K, Kuroda R, Tsuno K, Kawakami N. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4033
      PubDate: Mon, 16 May 2022 13:37:12 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4033
       
  • Changes in occupational well-being during COVID-19: the impact of age,
           gender, education, living alone, and telework in a Finnish four-wave
           population sample

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      Abstract: Objectives This study investigated how occupational well-being evolved across different phases, before and during the COVID-19 outbreak in the Finnish population. Whereas studies have suggested that certain demographic groups (eg, young, female) are more at risk during COVID-19, less is known whether the effects of such demographic factors may vary (i) across different phases of the unfolding viral outbreak and (ii) on different dimensions of occupational well-being. As they are predictors of changes in burnout, job boredom, and work engagement, we examined age, gender, education, living alone, and teleworking. This is the first study to provide such detailed knowledge regarding the changes in various occupational well-being dimensions before and during the COVID-19 outbreak.Methods We collected randomized population panel data at the end of 2019 and conducted three follow-up surveys with 6-month intervals (N=532). The data were analyzed with latent change score models.Results Whereas during spring 2020, occupational well-being slightly improved, in autumn 2020 well-being decreased back to pre-COVID-19 levels. There was an indication of slight increases in job boredom between before COVID-19 and summer 2021. Well-being deteriorated more for the young and those who lived alone. There was also some indication of females, those with lower education, and non-teleworkers experiencing less favorable changes in occupational well-being. Teleworking appeared to have more beneficial effects on well-being for those with lower education.Conclusions The study suggests that only relatively minor changes in well-being took place among the employed population. A particular focus in workplaces should be targeted at younger employees. by Kaltiainen J, Hakanen J. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4029
      PubDate: Thu, 12 May 2022 18:13:38 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4029
       
  • Low-quality employment trajectories and the risk of common mental health
           disorders among individuals with Swedish and foreign background – a
           register-based cohort study

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      Abstract: Objective This study aimed to examine the effects of low-quality employment trajectories on severe common mental disorders (CMD) according to Swedish and foreign background.Methods In this longitudinal study based on Swedish population registries (N=2 703 687), low- and high-quality employment trajectories were the main exposures observed across five years (2005–2009), with severe CMD as outcome variable (2010–2017). Adjusted hazard ratios (HR) were calculated by means of Cox regression models and stratified according to Swedish and foreign background [first-generation (i) EU migrants, (ii) non-EU migrants, (iii) second-generation migrants, (iv) Swedish-born of Swedish background] and sex. The reference group was Swedish-born of Swedish background in a constant high-quality employment trajectory.Results Second-generation migrants had an increased risk of CMD compared to Swedish-born of Swedish background when following low-quality employment trajectories [eg, male in constant low-quality HR 1.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.41–1.68]. Female migrant workers, especially first-generation from non-EU countries in low-quality employment trajectories (eg, constant low-quality HR 1.66, 95% CI 1.46–1.88), had a higher risk of CMD compared to female Swedish-born of Swedish background. The risk for CMD according to employment trajectories showed little differences between first- and second-generation migrants.Conclusion Low-quality employment trajectories appear to be determinants of risk for CMD in association with Swedish or foreign background of origin and sex. Our study shows a higher risk for severe CMD in second-generation and non-EU migrant compared to Swedish-born of Swedish background in constant low-quality employment. Further qualitative research is recommended to understand the mechanism behind the differential mental health impact of low-quality employment trajectories according to foreign background. by Pollack R, Kreshpaj B, Jonsson J, Bodin T, Gunn V, Orellana C, Östergren P-O, Muntaner C, Matilla-Santander N. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4032
      PubDate: Thu, 12 May 2022 13:41:53 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4032
       
  • Associations between single and combined occupational mechanical exposures
           and surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome: a nationwide Danish
           cohort study

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      Abstract: Objective This study aimed to evaluate whether the risk of surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) increases with the number of combined occupational mechanical exposures compared with single exposure.Methods We reanalyzed data from a register-based cohort study of the entire Danish working population (N=2 374 403) with 14 118 events of surgery for SIS (2003–2008). Exposure information in 10-year windows was obtained by combining occupational codes with a job exposure matrix. For single and combined mechanical exposures, we created three exposure variables of the number of years with specific exposure intensities with or without co-existing mechanical exposures. We used logistic regression as survival analysis.Results We found exposure–response relations for duration and intensity of each single mechanical exposure except for repetition. The single effect of arm elevation>90º reached a maximum adjusted odds ratio (ORadj) of 1.7 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5–2.0], which increased to 1.8 (95% CI 1.5–2.0), 2.0 (95% CI 1.9–2.2), and 2.2 (95% CI 2.0–2.5) when combined with repetition, force, and both. When combining repetition with arm elevation>90º, force, and both, ORadj increased from 1.5 (95% CI 1.3–1.8) to 2.1 (95% CI 1.8–2.4), 2.5 (95% CI 2.4–2.9), and 2.7 (95% CI 2.4–3.0). For force, ORadj increased from 2.5 (95% CI 2.1–2.9) to 2.6 (95% CI 2.3–2.8), 2.8 (95% CI 2.4–3.2), and 3.0 (95% CI 2.6–3.4).Conclusion We found an increased risk of surgery for SIS with the number of combined exposures; the risk was especially pronounced when the combined exposures included force. by Dalbøge A, Frost P, Andersen JH, Svendsen SW. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4028
      PubDate: Mon, 09 May 2022 14:36:18 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4028
       
  • The influence of chronic diseases and poor working conditions in working
           life expectancy across educational levels among older employees in the
           Netherlands

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      Abstract: Objectives This study aims to estimate the influence of chronic diseases and poor working conditions – across educational levels – on working life expectancy (WLE) and working years lost (WYL) in the Dutch workforce after age 50.Methods Information on demographics, chronic diseases, and working conditions from 11 800 Dutch workers aged 50–66 years participating in the Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation (STREAM) from 2010/2015 was enriched with monthly information on employment status from Statistics Netherlands up to 2018. In a multistate model, transitions were calculated between paid employment and involuntary exit (disability benefits, unemployment) and voluntary exit (economic inactivity, early retirement) to estimate the impact of education, chronic diseases, and working conditions on WLE and WYL between age 50 and 66.Results Workers with a chronic disease (up to 1.01 years) or unfavorable working conditions (up to 0.63 years) had more WYL due to involuntary pathways than workers with no chronic disease or favorable working conditions. The differences in WYL between workers with and without a chronic disease were slightly higher among workers with a lower education level (male: 0.85, female: 1.01 years) compared to workers with a high educational level (male: 0.72, female: 0.82 years). Given the higher prevalence of chronic diseases and unfavorable working conditions, WYL among lower educated workers were higher than among higher educated workers.Conclusions The presence of a chronic disease or unfavorable working conditions, more prevalent among lower educated workers, contribute substantially to WYL among older workers. This will increase educational inequalities in working careers.eers. by Schram JLD, Schuring M, Oude Hengel KM, Burdorf A, Robroek SJW. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4027
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Apr 2022 16:31:32 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4027
       
  • Working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic and its longitudinal
           association with physical activity and sedentary behavior

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      Abstract: Objective Working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic has affected many workers’ daily life and possibly their physical activity behavior. We studied the longitudinal association of working from home during the pandemic with physical activity and sedentary behavior.Methods Longitudinal data from 17 questionnaire rounds of the Lifelines COVID-19 cohort (March 2020–February 2021) were used. In total, 33 325 workers were included. In every round, participants reported their current work situation: location, home, or hybrid (working on location and from home). Physical activity levels and sedentary behavior before and during the pandemic were asked. Logistic generalized estimating equations adjusted for demographic/work/health covariates were used to study the association of work situation with physical activity and sedentary behavior.Results Home workers were less likely to meet the recommended ≥150 minutes/week of moderate-to-vigorous-intensity activity during the pandemic than location workers [odds ratio (OR) 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.90–0.96] and more likely to be less physically active than before the pandemic (OR 1.09, 95% CI 1.04–1.14). Furthermore, compared to location workers, home and hybrid workers were more likely to be more sedentary (sitting ≥8 hours/day) on workdays during than before the pandemic (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.39–1.64/1.36–1.68, respectively).Conclusions Compared to location workers, home workers (and to a lesser extent hybrid workers) were more often physically inactive and sedentary during than before the COVID-19 pandemic. As a substantial part of the working population may continue to work (partly) from home after the pandemic, workers should be supported to increase activity and reduce sitting while working from home. by Loef B, van Oostrom SH, van der Noordt M, Lifelines Corona Research initiative, Proper KI. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4021
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Apr 2022 14:59:11 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4021
       
  • Integrating vocational rehabilitation and mental healthcare to improve the
           return-to-work process for people on sick leave with stress-related
           disorders: results from a randomized trial

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      Abstract: Objective Stress-related disorders are common, associated with substantial individual suffering, and place a large economic burden on society. While treatment appears to be able to reduce symptoms, evidence of interventions to improve vocational outcomes is flimsy. Lack of integration of vocational rehabilitation and healthcare services has been suspected to be a major potential barrier in return-to-work (RTW) processes; therefore, we aimed to test the effectiveness of such integration.Methods We randomized participants who were on sick leave for ≥ 4 weeks with a stress-related disorder. They were allocated to (i) service as usual (SAU), (ii) improved mental healthcare (MHC), or (iii) integrated interventions (INT). The primary outcome was RTW rates measured at 12 months. Secondary outcome were RTW rates measured at 6 months, proportion in work at 12 months, and levels of stress, anxiety, depression, and functioning at 6 months.Results We included 666 participants. On the primary outcome and almost all other vocational outcomes, SAU was superior to both INT and MHC. MHC and INT did not differ on any vocational outcome. On several symptom scales, MHC showed lower values than SAU, whilst INT did not differ from the two other groups.Conclusion Both the INT and the MHC intervention lowered RTW rates compared with SAU, and thereby yielded a worse outcome. However, the MHC group showed a tendency towards having lower symptom levels compared with those in the SAU group; accordingly, the SAU group is not unequivocally superior. MHC and INT showed no general differences. by Hoff A, Fisker J, Poulsen RM, Hjorthøj C, Rosenberg NK, Nordentoft M, Bojesen AB, Eplov LF. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4025
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 15:28:34 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4025
       
  • Interaction of night shift work with polymorphism in melatonin receptor 1B
           gene on incident stroke

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      Abstract: Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate whether melatonin receptor type 1B (MTNR1B) rs10830963 polymorphism interacts with night shift work on the risk of incident stroke.Methods This study included individuals free of stroke at baseline from the UK Biobank. Night-shift work was assessed by the self-reported questions. MTNR1B rs10830963 was directly genotyped (CC, GC, and GG). Incident stroke was ascertained through hospital records and death registries. Cox proportional hazards models were employed to examine the associations of night shift work and MTNR1B rs10830963 with the risk of incident stroke.Results A total of 242 194 participants were finally included (mean age: 52.95 years; 51.63% women). Over 12-year follow-up, 3287 incident stroke events occurred. Night shift work increased the risk of incident stroke [hazard ratio (HR) 1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00–1.28] after adjusting for socio-demographics, and this association attenuated after additional adjustment for lifestyle factors (HR 1.06, 95% CI 0.94–1.20). MTNR1B rs10830963 polymorphism modified the association between night shift work and incident stroke (Pfor interaction =0.010). In the Cox models adjusted for socio-demographics and lifestyle factors, among night-shift workers, minor allele G was associated with reduced risk of incident stroke (GC versus CC, HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.58–0.95; GG versus CC, HR 0.65, 95% CI 0.40–1.06; Pfor trend=0.010); while night shift work was associated with a higher stroke risk only among MTNR1B rs10830963 CC carriers (HR 1.23, 95% CI 1.05–1.44) but not GC/GG carriers.Conclusions These results suggest that MTNR1B rs10830963 may potentially modify the associations between night shift work and incident stroke. by Chen Y, Yang L, Liang Y, He Z, Ai Q-YH, Chen W, Xue H, Zhou M, Wang Y, Ma H, Geng Q. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4022
      PubDate: Mon, 28 Mar 2022 18:16:45 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4022
       
  • Cost and cost-effectiveness of the ‘Stand and Move at Work’
           multicomponent intervention to reduce workplace sedentary time and
           cardiometabolic risk

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      Abstract: Objective Few studies have reported the cost and cost-effectiveness of workplace interventions to reduce sedentary time. The purpose of this study was to complete an economic evaluation of a multilevel intervention to reduce sitting time and increase light-intensity physical activity (LPA) among employees.Methods We conducted a retrospective within-trial cost and cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) to compare a 12-month multilevel intervention with (STAND+) and without (MOVE+) a sit-stand workstation, across 24 worksites (N=630 employee participants) enrolled in a cluster randomized clinical trial. We estimated the intervention costs using activity-based costing strategy. The intervention costs were further expressed as per person and per worksite. CEA was conducted using an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) metric, expressed as costs for additional unit of sitting time (minute/day), LPA (minutes/day), cardiometabolic risk score, and quality-adjusted life years (QALY) increased/decreased at 12 months. We assessed the cost analysis and CEA from the organizational (ie, employer) perspective with a one-year time horizon.Results Total intervention costs were $134 and $72 per person, and $3939 and $1650 per worksite for the STAND+ (N worksites = 12; N employees = 354) and MOVE+ (N worksites = 12; N employees = 276) interventions, respectively. The ICER was $1 (95% CI $0.8–1.4) for each additional minute reduction of workplace sitting time (standardized to 8-hour workday); and $4656 per QALY gained at 12 months. There was a modest and non-significant change of loss of work productivity improvement (-0.03 hours, 95% CI -4.16–4.09 hours), which was associated with a $0.34 return for every $1 invested.Conclusions The multi-level intervention with sit-stand workstations has the potential to be widely implemented to reduce workplace sitting time. Future research into work productivity outcomes in terms of cost-benefits for employers is warranted. by Michaud TL, You W, Estabrooks PA, Leonard K, Rydell SA, Mullane SL, Pereira MA, Buman MP. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4023
      PubDate: Fri, 25 Mar 2022 17:32:10 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4023
       
  • Short-term exposure to stone minerals used in asphalt affect lung function
           and promote pulmonary inflammation among healthy adults

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      Abstract: Objective Stone minerals are a partially ignored environmental challenge but a significant contributor to urban air pollution. We examined if short-term exposure to two stone minerals – quartz diorite and rhomb porphyry – commonly used in asphalt pavement would affect lung function, promote pulmonary inflammation, and affect bronchial reactivity differently.Methods Our randomized crossover study included 24 healthy, non-smoking young adults exposed to the stone minerals quartz diorite, rhomb porphyry, and control dust (lactose). Exposure occurred in an exposure chamber, in three separate 4-hour exposure sessions. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and lung function were monitored before exposure, then immediately following exposure, and 4 and 24 hours after exposure. In addition, methacholine was administered 4 hours following exposure, and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was collected before exposure, then immediately and 4 hours after exposure. EBC was analyzed for pH, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, P-Selectin, surfactant protein D (SP-D), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α).Results Our results showed significantly elevated concentrations of FeNO after exposure to quartz diorite compared to rhomb porphyry, suggesting that quartz diorite is more likely to trigger pulmonary inflammation after short-term exposure. Moreover, short-term exposure to rhomb porphyry was associated with a modest but statistically significant decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) compared to quartz diorite.Conclusion These results emphasize that using stone material in asphalt road construction should be reconsidered as it may affect lung inflammation and lung function in exposed subjects. by Moazami TN, Hilt B, Sørås K, Svendsen KVH, Dahlman HJ, Refsnes M, Låg M, Øvrevik J, Jørgensen RB. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4024
      PubDate: Mon, 21 Mar 2022 17:02:28 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4024
       
  • Precarious employment and migrant workers’ mental health: a systematic
           review of quantitative and qualitative studies

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      Abstract: Objectives Evidence suggests that precarious employment can have detrimental effects on workers’ health, including mental health. Migrant workers are discussed to be especially vulnerable to such effects. Thus, we systematically reviewed existing research on the association between precarious employment and migrant workers’ mental health.Methods Three electronic databases (Web of Science, PsycINFO and PubMed/Medline) were searched for original articles on quantitative and qualitative studies published from January 1970 to February 2022 in English, German, Turkish and Spanish. Multiple dimensions of precarious employment were considered as exposure, with mental health problems as outcomes. Narrative synthesis and thematic analyses were performed to summarize the findings of the included studies along with risk of bias and quality assessment.Results The literature search resulted in 1557 original articles, 66 of which met the inclusion criteria – 43 were of high quality and 22 were of moderate quality. The most common exposure dimensions analyzed in the studies included temporariness, vulnerability, poor interpersonal relationships, disempowerment, lacking workers’ rights and low income. The outcome measures included stress, depression, anxiety and poor general mental health. The prevalence of these outcomes varied between 10–75% among the included quantitative studies. All qualitative studies reported one or more dimensions of precarious employment as an underlying factor of the development of mental health problems among migrants. Of 33 quantitative studies, 23 reported evidence for an association between dimensions of precarious employment and mental health.Conclusion The results of this review support the hypothesis that precarious employment is associated with migrant workers’ mental health. by Koseoglu Ornek O, Waibel J, Wullinger P, Weinmann T. doi:10.5271/sjweh.4020
      PubDate: Wed, 09 Mar 2022 17:27:11 +020
      DOI: 10.5271/sjweh.4020
       
 
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