Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1478 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (700 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

HEALTH AND SAFETY (700 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4     

Showing 601 - 203 of 203 Journals sorted alphabetically
Saúde Coletiva     Open Access  
Saúde e Meio Ambiente : Revista Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Saúde em Redes     Open Access  
Saúde.com     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
School Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Scientia Medica     Open Access  
Scire Salutis     Open Access  
Serviço Social e Saúde     Open Access  
Sextant : Revue de recherche interdisciplinaire sur le genre et la sexualité     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexual Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sexual Medicine Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Sleep and Vigilance : An International Journal of Basic, Translational and Clinical Research     Hybrid Journal  
Sleep Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sleep Science and Practice     Open Access  
SMAD, Revista Electronica en Salud Mental, Alcohol y Drogas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Smart Health     Hybrid Journal  
Social Determinants of Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Theory & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Work in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Work in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Social Work in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Society, Health & Vulnerability     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sosiaalilääketieteellinen Aikakauslehti     Open Access  
South African Family Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South African Journal of Bioethics and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
South African Journal of Child Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
South African Journal of Communication Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
South East Asia Journal of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South Eastern European Journal of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Southern African Journal of Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Southern African Journal of Public Health     Open Access  
Southwest Respiratory and Critical Care Chronicles     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Space Safety Magazine     Free   (Followers: 50)
Sri Lanka Journal of Child Health     Open Access  
SSM - Population Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
SSM - Qualitative Research in Health     Open Access  
Stigma and Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Sundhedsprofessionelle studier     Open Access  
Sustainable Earth     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sustinere : Revista de Saúde e Educação     Open Access  
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Tanzania Journal of Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Technology and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tempus Actas de Saúde Coletiva     Open Access  
Textos & Contextos (Porto Alegre)     Open Access  
The Journal of Aquatic Physical Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Lancet Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 71)
The Lancet Planetary Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Lancet Regional Health : Americas     Open Access  
The Lancet Regional Health : Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Lancet Regional Health : Western Pacific     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Meducator     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Communities : The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Tidsskrift for Forskning i Sygdom og Samfund     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for psykisk helsearbeid     Full-text available via subscription  
Tobacco Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Tobacco Control and Public Health in Eastern Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transgender Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Transportation Safety and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Journal of Health Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Tropical Medicine and Health     Open Access  
TÜBAV Bilim Dergisi     Open Access  
Universal Journal of Public Health     Open Access  
Universidad y Salud     Open Access  
Unnes Journal of Public Health     Open Access  
Value in Health Regional Issues     Hybrid Journal  
Vascular Health and Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Vigilância Sanitária em Debate     Open Access  
Violence and Gender     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Water Quality, Exposure and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Western Pacific Surveillance and Response     Open Access  
Women & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
World Health & Population     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
World Medical & Health Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Arbeitswissenschaft     Hybrid Journal  
Електромагнітна сумісність та безпека на залізничному транспорті     Open Access  
مجله بهداشت و توسعه     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4     

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School Mental Health
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.898
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1866-2633 - ISSN (Online) 1866-2625
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Association of Depressive Symptoms in Late Adolescence and School Dropout

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      Abstract: Abstract The present study investigated the association between symptoms of depression in late adolescence and completion of upper secondary school, taking symptoms of ADHD and conduct disorder, and parental education into account. The study is based on the youth@hordaland-survey, conducted in Western Norway in 2012. A total of 9157 adolescents (aged 16–19 years, 53% girls) consented to participation and registry linkage and comprised the sample of the present study. Symptoms of depression, ADHD, and conduct disorder were based on adolescent self-report. Information on parental education, grade point average (GPA), and upper secondary school completion was retrieved from the National Education Database. In the sample, 14.8% had not completed upper secondary education within 5 years. Symptoms of depression were associated with higher odds of failure to graduate within 5 years (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.50). The association was attenuated but remained significant when adjusting for symptoms of ADHD, conduct disorder, and parental education. Adolescents reporting high levels of both depression and conduct disorder had the highest odds of dropout (AOR = 4.15). GPA partially mediated the association between symptoms of depression and dropout. The results show a consistent, but small association between symptoms of depression in late adolescence and failure to complete upper secondary education within five years. Given the high rate of depressive symptoms in the adolescent population, it is important to identify protective factors that promote school functioning and graduation for adolescents experiencing such symptoms.
      PubDate: 2022-05-06
       
  • Which Children are Frequently Victimized in US Elementary Schools'
           Population-Based Estimates

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      Abstract: Abstract We analyzed a population-based cohort of 11,780 US children to identify risk and protective factors by kindergarten predictive of being frequently verbally, social, reputationally, or physically victimized during the upper elementary grades. We also stratified the analyses by biological sex. Kindergarten children displaying externalizing problem behaviors were at consistently higher risk of being frequently victimized during third–fifth grade (odds ratios [OR] for verbal = 1.82, social = 1.60, reputational = 1.85, physical = 1.67, and total = 1.93). Hispanic children (OR range = 0.51 to 0.68) and those from higher income families (OR range = 0.73 to 0.83) were less likely to experience victimization. Boys were more likely than girls to be physically victimized (OR = 1.38) but less likely to be verbally (OR = 0.83), socially (OR = .66), or reputationally (OR = 0.83) victimized or to experience total victimization (OR = .82). Other variables predictive of increased risks for frequent victimization included having a disability, experiencing cognitively stimulating parenting, and displaying lower academic achievement.
      PubDate: 2022-04-16
       
  • Understanding High Quality Teacher-Student Interactions in High Needs
           Elementary Schools: An Exploration of Teacher, Student, and Relational
           Contributors

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      Abstract: Abstract Research consistently demonstrates that high quality teacher-student interactions have meaningful links to students’ learning, development, and mental health (Choi et al., Early Education and Development, 30(3):337–356, 2019; Mashburn et al., Child Development 79:732–749, 2008; McLean and Connor, Child Development 86:945–954, 2015). However, little is known about the factors that contribute to quality teacher-student interactions (Early et al., 2007). These interactions are dynamic; therefore, they are likely influenced by teacher characteristics, student characteristics, and dyadic relational elements. In 330 third- and fourth-grade classrooms across 60 high needs elementary schools, we aimed to better understand how teacher burnout, student aggression, and teacher-student relational closeness explained variation in observed classroom interaction quality (i.e., emotional support, instructional support, and classroom organization) later in the year, controlling for earlier observations. Importantly, student aggression and teacher-student relational closeness were measured from both teacher and student perspectives. While teacher burnout earlier in the year was not significantly associated with changes in interaction quality across the year, the results highlighted the importance of student behavior and relational factors. Specifically, more teacher-reported classroom-level aggression was associated with less emotional support and classroom organization across the year. Additionally, greater student-reported teacher-student relational closeness was linked to increased emotional support, instructional support, and classroom organization. These results indicate that fostering close teacher-student relationships may contribute to improved classroom interaction quality. Practical implications for teachers, instructional coaches, and school psychologists are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-04-16
       
  • A Cluster Randomized Pilot Trial of the Equity-Explicit
           Establish-Maintain-Restore Program among High School Teachers and Students
           

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      Abstract: Abstract Student–teacher relationships are important to student outcomes and may be especially pivotal at the high school transition and for minoritized racial/ethnic groups. Although interventions exist to improve student–teacher relationships, none have been shown to be effective among high school students or in narrowing racial/ethnic disparities in student outcomes. This study was conducted to examine the effects of an equity-explicit student–teacher relationship intervention (Equity-Explicit Establish Maintain Restore, or E-EMR) for high school teachers and students. A cluster-randomized pilot trial was conducted with 94 ninth grade teachers and 417 ninth grade students in six high schools. Teachers in three schools were randomized to receive E-EMR training and follow-up supports for one year. Teachers in three control schools conducted business as usual. Student–teacher relationships, sense of school belonging, academic motivation, and academic engagement were collected via student self-report in September and January of their ninth-grade year. Longitudinal models revealed non-significant main effects of E-EMR. However, there were targeted benefits for students who started with low scores at baseline, for Asian, Latinx, multicultural, and (to a lesser extent) Black students. We also found some unexpected effects, where high-performing and/or advantaged groups in the E-EMR condition had less favorable outcomes at post, compared to those in the control group, which may be a result of the equity-explicit focus of E-EMR. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-04-15
       
  • Exploring the Role of Teacher–Child Relationships in the Longitudinal
           Associations Between Childhood Shyness and Social Functioning at School: A
           Prospective Cohort Study

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      Abstract: Abstract The goal of this study was to explore longitudinally the protective role of relationships with early childhood and education care (ECEC) teachers for shy children’s social functioning at age 5 and 8 years. Participants were N = 7343 children from the Norwegian Mother, Father and Child (MoBa) study, a prospective longitudinal cohort study in Norway. Measures included maternal rating of child shyness at age 18 months, 3 and 5 years, ECEC teacher ratings of teacher–child relationships and maternal ratings of child peer play behaviors at age 5 years, and teacher ratings of child social competence at age 8 years. We conducted latent moderated-mediation analyses within a SEM framework. Among the results, childhood shyness was negatively associated with social functioning. However, significant indirect and moderation effects were also found, with a pattern suggesting that early positive teacher–child relationships have a buffering influence on shy children’s risk for social difficulties.
      PubDate: 2022-04-09
       
  • Preschool Children’s Observed Interactions with Teachers: Implications
           for Understanding Teacher–Child Relationships

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      Abstract: Abstract Theory and research point to the daily interactions between individual children and teachers as formative to teacher–child relationships, yet observed dyadic teacher–child interactions in preschool classrooms have largely been overlooked. This study provides a descriptive examination of the quality of individual children’s interactions with their teacher as a basis for understanding one source of information theorized to inform children’s and teachers’ perceptions of their relationships with each other. Children’s dyadic interactions with teacher, including their positive engagement, communication, and conflict, were observed across a large and racially/ethnically diverse sample of 767 preschool children (M = 4.39 years) at three time points in the year. On average, most children displayed low-to-moderate levels of positive engagement (78%), while nearly all children showed rare communication (81%) and conflict (99%) with the teacher. Boys demonstrated lower positive engagement and higher conflict with the teacher than girls. Black children were observed to demonstrate higher positive engagement with the teacher compared to White children. No differences in interaction quality were observed for Black children with a White teacher compared to White child-White teacher or Black child-Black teacher pairs. Results advance our understanding of dyadic teacher–child interactions in preschool classrooms and raise new questions to expand our knowledge of how teacher–child relationships are established, maintained, and modified, to ultimately support teachers in building strong relationships with each and every preschooler.
      PubDate: 2022-04-09
       
  • Compassion Satisfaction, Secondary Traumatic Stress, and Burnout: A Mixed
           Methods Analysis in a Sample of Public-School Educators Working in
           Marginalized Communities

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      Abstract: Abstract The majority of children living in the USA have experienced at least one adverse experience. Long term, negative psychological, behavioral, and physical health consequences for students are associated with exposure to traumatic experiences. What is less well understood is how students’ exposure to traumatic events may impact the lives and work of educators who serve them. Educators receive little training or support to cope with the stressors associated with their direct work with youth exposed to trauma. There is a critical need to understand the psychological and emotional consequences of working with students who have experienced trauma as teachers’ own emotional well-being influences the quality of education they provide to students. Although research with other helping professionals has identified both positive and negative effects of working with individuals exposed to trauma for other helping professionals, such research with teachers is rare. The current study design includes both concurrent and sequential mixed method processes to examine how teachers experience compassion satisfaction, secondary traumatic stress (STS), and burnout. Additionally, we examine whether the most common measurement model needs to be expanded to include additional salient constructs for educators. Mixed methods analyses demonstrate that the most common measurement model does not fit well for the samples of educators, and educators have unique experiences with the constructs of STS, burnout, compassion satisfaction, and emotional well-being. Understanding the strengths and vulnerabilities for teachers working with students exposed to trauma will inform the accurate and efficient measurement of constructs unique to this population.
      PubDate: 2022-03-25
       
  • Special Education for Children with ADHD: Services Received and a
           Comparison to Children with ADHD in General Education

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      Abstract: Abstract Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) receive supports and services in general and special education classrooms in schools. The present study aimed to report the contents of individualized education programs (IEPs) for children with ADHD and to compare the behavior of children with ADHD who had IEPs versus those with ADHD who did not have IEPs. Two-hundred one children with ADHD participating in a summer treatment program (STP) were grouped by whether they had an IEP (N = 50 children) or not (N = 151). The content of the IEPs was descriptively reviewed. Further, children with and without IEPs were compared on measures of ADHD symptoms, aggressive behaviors, academic achievement, and psychosocial impairment. Groups were also compared on functioning in the STP setting on behavioral measures of rule-following, negative behaviors, and academic productivity in situations where intensive behavior modification procedures were and were not employed. The results indicated no significant differences between the two groups on any ratings or behavioral measures, with the exception of academic achievement scores (children in special education scored lower, on average). All children improved within the context of intensive behavioral intervention. The results are discussed in light of current approaches to supporting children with ADHD in schools.
      PubDate: 2022-03-22
       
  • An Examination of the Associations Among Teacher Secondary Traumatic
           Stress, Teacher–Student Relationship Quality, and Student
           Socio-Emotional Functioning

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      Abstract: Abstract Teacher emotional wellbeing can exert a strong influence over the ability to effectively perform important aspects of the job, including fostering healthy teacher–student relationships. Our investigation explores one understudied aspect of teacher wellbeing, the presence of secondary traumatic stress (STS). Across helping professions, STS has been associated with a range of emotional and occupational impairments, including difficulty connecting with others (Clunies-Ross et al. in Educ Psychol 28:693–710, 2008). The primary goal of the current study was to determine whether teacher STS influences student socio-emotional functioning through its effects on teacher–student relationship quality. This study was conducted with 150 educators (79% Female, 63% White, 32% Black) and 610 students (59% Female, 91% Black, 1% White) across six urban, public, charter schools in the Gulf South. Results from multi-level structural equation modeling indicated that, as hypothesized, teacher STS symptoms were positively associated with their ratings of students’ socio-emotional difficulties (β = .28, p < .01) such that as teacher symptomology increased, so did the level of student difficulties reported. Contrary to the hypothesis, teacher reports of relationship quality with students were not found to mediate this relationship. Teacher–student relationship quality was negatively associated with their ratings of student socio-emotional difficulties (β = − .30, p < .01). As teacher reports of relationships improved, their ratings of socio-emotional difficulties decreased. These findings highlight the importance of efforts to identify the prevalence and impact of STS among teachers and the associated outcomes for students. Additionally, results can inform efforts to train and support educators as they work to build relationships with students and foster student socio-emotional functioning.
      PubDate: 2022-03-14
       
  • Trauma-Informed Attitudes, Teacher Stress, and Expulsion Decision Risk in
           Preschool Classrooms

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      Abstract: Abstract Despite the known relationship between trauma and academic outcomes, including expulsion risk, for preschoolers, little is known about the role that teachers may play in addressing the effects of childhood trauma within preschool settings. The current study examined the relationship between a teacher’s overall stress, trauma-informed attitudes, and indicators of children’s expulsion decision risk using a sample of preschool lead and assistant teachers (n = 129) recruited from Head Start classrooms in the Mountain West. Multivariate multiple regression was used to determine whether teachers stress and trauma-informed attitudes (trauma-informed knowledge, self-efficacy, and reactions) were related to three indicators of expulsion decision risk using subscales of the Preschool Expulsion Risk Measure (classroom disruption, fear of accountability, and child-related stress) for the most disruptive child in the teacher’s classroom. Higher overall stress significantly predicted higher fear of accountability (β = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.07, .45, p = 0.007). Higher trauma-informed knowledge was significantly related to lower child-related stress (β  = −0.40, 95% CI = −0.63, −.17, p = 0.001). Higher trauma-informed self-efficacy was significantly related to lower classroom disruption (β  = −0.45, 95% CI = −0.66, −.25, p < 0.001). Multigroup models revealed significantly different pathways for children of color (Black, Latinx, and American Indian children) compared to White children; teacher stress predicted higher expulsion decision risk for children of color and trauma-informed attitudes predicted lower expulsion decision risk for White children. Implications for development and evaluation of trauma-informed approaches for early childhood settings are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-03-09
       
  • Treatment Fidelity in Brief Versus Standard-Length School-Based
           Interventions for Youth with Anxiety

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      Abstract: Abstract To examine treatment fidelity in a randomized controlled trial of indicated school-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) delivered in groups to youth with anxiety. We investigated whether adherence and competence (a) differed across brief and standard-length CBT, and (b) if adherence and competence predicted change in anxiety symptoms and impairment. Method: Sessions were observationally coded with the Competence and Adherence Scale for CBT for Anxiety Disorders in Youth. Coders (N = 7) rated 104 sessions from 52 groups delivered by 32 facilitators (M age = 43.2 years, SD = 8.1) to 295 youth (M age = 14.0 years, SD = 0.8). Outcomes were youth- and parent-reported anxiety symptoms and impairment at post-intervention and 1-year follow-up. Linear mixed effect models were used to analyze whether fidelity predicted clinical outcomes. Results: Levels of adherence and competence were adequate in both programs, but higher in brief compared to standard-length CBT p < .001 and p = .010, respectively). Neither adherence nor competence predicted clinical outcomes at any timepoints. Conclusion: Higher levels of adherence and competence in brief CBT suggest that it may be easier for novice CBT providers to achieve fidelity in simplified and less flexible interventions. Contrary to expectation, adherence and competence did not predict clinical outcomes.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12310-021-09458-2
       
  • A Theory-Informed Approach to Locally Managed Learning School Systems:
           Integrating Treatment Integrity and Youth Mental Health Outcome Data to
           Promote Youth Mental Health

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      Abstract: Abstract Numerous evidence-based programs (EBPs) exist for delivery in schools to promote youth mental health outcomes. However, school systems often lack the internal infrastructure to support the effective implementation and sustainment of EBPs when external supports are withdrawn, resulting in notable attenuation in the benefits in youth clinical outcomes that are associated with EBPs. This paper illustrates how to leverage concepts from improvement science and implementation science to develop learning school systems dedicated to enhancing the infrastructure capacity of a school to advance the implementation and sustainment of EBPs. In particular, we discuss how treatment integrity (extent to which an EBP is delivered as designed) and youth mental health outcome data are (a) collected, (b) analyzed and interpreted and (c) fed back into the school system to increase organizational supports and promote school practitioners’ behavior change to produce improvements in youth mental health outcomes. We also discuss psychological safety among the people within a school system as a key characteristic of a learning school system. We then present a theory-informed approach to learning school systems to demonstrate how data generated by a learning school system can lead to precise and effective plans that continuously improve implementation and result in the eventual sustainment of EBPs. We conclude with a brief research agenda with concrete steps toward realizing the potential of learning school systems to support the implementation and sustainment of EBPs for mental health problems.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12310-021-09413-1
       
  • What should a Universal School-Based Psychoeducational Programme to
           Support Psychological Well-Being amongst Children and Young People in
           South Africa Focus on and how should it be Delivered' A
           Multi-Stakeholder Perspective

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      Abstract: Abstract Children and young people are vulnerable to developing mental health problems. In South Africa, this vulnerability is compounded by contextual risk factors such as community violence and poverty. However, mental health services are scarce and costly, which precludes access for many. Universal school-based mental health programmes can prevent the onset of mental health problems in children and young people and have been implemented to good effect in high-income settings. We sought to understand stakeholder perspectives on what such a programme should focus on and how it could be implemented in practice within the South African context. We interviewed children and young people (n = 22), parents (n = 21), teachers (n = 17), and school mental health counsellors (n = 6) recruited from two schools in the Western Cape, South Africa. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. We generated three overarching themes: ‘the value of a mental health and well-being programme’, ‘content and delivery’, and ‘practicalities and logistics’. Participants were optimistic about the potential value of such a programme. Developing content that was appropriate for group delivery, flexible and timed to fit within the school schedule was important. Finding ways to make activities meaningful for large classes was important logistically, as was determining to what extent leaners would feel comfortable participating alongside their peers. Participants felt that outsiders, as opposed to school staff, should deliver the programme and that parents should be involved where possible. Developing a mental health programme for children and young people in the South African context requires careful understanding of who the key role players in such an intervention will be and how exactly they want to be involved and, how the challenges associated with practicalities and logistics can be overcome.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12310-021-09465-3
       
  • Assessing Adolescent Mental Health Service Use: Developing the Adolescent
           Mental Health Support Scale (AMHSS)

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      Abstract: Abstract Many schools and communities conduct regular surveillance surveys to monitor student mental health risk. These surveys rarely ask about use of mental health services, despite the potential importance of this information to support service planning and resource allocation. The current study developed and tested the Adolescent Mental Health Support Scale (AMHSS), a brief self-report measure that can be added to student surveillance surveys to evaluate adolescent mental health service use. The AMHSS includes questions assessing desire to use mental health services, use of mental health services, and barriers to accessing school mental health services. The development process included: (1) a search of the literature for existing questions to include in a question bank for use or adaptation for the new measure; (2) focus groups with adolescents to learn about their conceptualization of mental health services and obtain feedback on candidate survey items; (3) expert review and validation by school-based mental health service providers and research experts; and (4) survey administration and evaluation of psychometric properties. The AMHSS was administered as part of the fall 2018 MetroWest Adolescent Health Survey to students in 27 communities in the MetroWest region of Boston, Massachusetts. Analysis of survey results from 12,924 middle and 26,318 high school students indicated that response patterns were consistent with well-established demographic patterns in help-seeking and mental health service use. Results provide initial support for the AMHSS as a brief measure of mental health service use that could be administered in surveillance surveys to adolescents, with the goal of improving services access.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12310-021-09460-8
       
  • Advancing the Science of Integrity Measurement in School Mental Health
           Research

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      Abstract: Abstract The purpose of this special series is to highlight how the measurement of integrity, both treatment integrity and integrity for implementation strategies, can support intervention development, evaluation, and implementation research. The seven papers and one commentary in this special series illustrate how diverse measurement approaches are used for integrity across various types of intervention research. This introductory paper provides a general overview of the themes that cut across the papers in this special series. We define key terms and discuss how the measurement of treatment integrity (i.e., extent to which the core practices of a protocol are delivered) and integrity to implementation strategies (i.e., extent to which the core practices of an implementation strategy are delivered) changes as an intervention progresses along the treatment development pipeline spanning from basic research to implementation and dissemination research. Then we discuss the ways that the measurement of integrity can change across the different steps in the pipeline to meet the goals associated with different stops along the pipeline. We finish the paper with a description of the papers in the special series and concluding thoughts.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12310-021-09468-0
       
  • Examining the Correspondence Between Teacher- and Observer-Report
           Treatment Integrity Measures

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      Abstract: Abstract Teacher-reported measures of treatment integrity (the extent to which prescribed practices are delivered as intended by teachers) have the potential to support efforts to evaluate and implement evidence-based interventions in early childhood settings. However, self-report treatment integrity measures have shown poor correspondence with observer-report treatment integrity measures, raising questions about score validity. This paper reports on the development and initial evaluation of the score reliability and validity of the Treatment Integrity Measure for Early Childhood Settings Teacher Report (TIMECS-TR), which is designed to address limitations of previous self-report treatment integrity measures that may have contributed to low correspondence with observer-rated measures. The TIMECS-TR includes 24 items designed to represent practices found in evidence-based interventions delivered in early childhood settings that target child social, emotional, and behavioral skills, rather than adherence to practices found in a specific evidence-based intervention. Fifty-four teachers (92.6% female, 7.4% male; 61.1% White) completed the TIMECS-TR weekly for a total of 618 times (M = 6.79 per child; SD = 2.16; range 2 to 11) about the practices they delivered with 91 children (45.1% female, 54.9% male; M = 4.53 years old; SD = 45.1% Black) who were at risk for emotional and behavioral disorders. Analyses indicated that the TIMECS-TR items evidenced mild to moderate test–retest score reliability over one week. However, analyses did not support the convergent score validity of the TIMECS-TR items or scale with observational ratings of the same practices. Teachers reported higher levels of practice delivery on the TIMECS-TR items relative to observer report. Overall, our findings raise concerns about the accuracy of teacher-report adherence measures. Lessons from this research can be used to identify possible reasons for the low correspondence between teacher- and observer-report treatment integrity measures so that future research can strive to dependably capture teacher delivery of the practices found in evidence-based interventions.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12310-021-09437-7
       
  • Do Teacher Autonomy Support and Teacher–Student Relationships Influence
           Students’ Depression' A 3-Year Longitudinal Study

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      Abstract: Abstract Grounded in Self-Determination Theory, this study examined trends in depression and the longitudinal impacts of teacher autonomy support and teacher–student relationships on students’ depressive symptoms. A total of 1613 Chinese primary school students (48.17% females) and 1397 Chinese middle school students (47.67% females) completed self-report questionnaires on depression, teacher autonomy support, and teacher–student relationships. The measurements were conducted in the 4th, 5th, and 6th grades for the primary school group and in the 7th, 8th, and 9th grades for the middle school group. Latent growth curve modelling revealed that the depressive symptoms of the primary school girls increased while the primary school boys’ depressive symptoms declined over time. The middle school students’ depressive symptoms increased, with no gender differences. As hypothesized, the findings underlined the buffering effect of teacher autonomy support and teacher–student relationships on depression in both primary school and middle school and for both boys and girls.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12310-021-09456-4
       
  • Effects of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy Skills Training for Emotional
           Problem Solving for Adolescents (DBT STEPS-A) Program of Rural Ninth-Grade
           Students

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      Abstract: Abstract A classroom guidance curriculum following the dialectical behavior therapy skills training for emotion problem solving for adolescents (DBT STEPS-A) was evaluated using a pretest–posttest nonequivalent groups quasi-experimental design. Data from 94 ninth-grade students (42 treatment, 52 control) enrolled in a rural high school were analyzed via hierarchical linear modeling. Results indicated a treatment effect on students’ self-reported social resilience and emotion regulation difficulties, indicating potential for the classroom guidance curriculum. Results from exploratory analyses also supported a treatment effect for understanding and acceptance of DBT skills. The findings have direct implications for school counselors and other school-based mental health professionals, highlighting the positive effects of proactively employing universal social and emotional learning interventions targeting the development of adolescent social and emotional skill building. A discussion on future practice and research is also included.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12310-021-09463-5
       
  • Under the Surface: The Role of Covert Cues in Peer Suicide Risk Referrals

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      Abstract: Abstract Suicidal thoughts and behaviors are highly prevalent among adolescents, and peers are often the first, and sometimes only, people to know about youth suicidality. Since many adolescents do not directly disclose suicidal thoughts, school-based suicide prevention programs aim to train youth to recognize warning signs of suicide in their peers that serve as “cues” to refer at-risk peers to an appropriate adult. However, peer-presented cues vary widely in presentation, and adolescents are more likely to recognize overt (i.e., obvious or explicit) as opposed to covert (i.e., hidden or implied) cues. The type of cue exhibited may, in turn, affect whether adolescents make a referral to an adult. The current study examined whether training suicide prevention influences referral intentions for overt and covert suicide cues. Participants included 244 high school students (54% female; Mage = 16.21) in the Southeastern United States who received suicide prevention training (SOS; signs of suicide) as part of their health curriculum. Prior to training, students endorsed higher referral intentions for peers exhibiting overt compared to covert cues. Training was associated with increased intentions to refer peers across cue type, but referral intentions for covert cues improved significantly from pre to post-training while those for overt cues remained high and stable. Findings suggest that suicide prevention training might differentially improve students’ ability to detect and respond appropriately to less obvious indicators of suicide risk. These findings may inform the adaptation and development of future, more nuanced school-based suicide prevention programming.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12310-021-09459-1
       
  • Developing Treatment Integrity Measures for Teacher-Delivered
           Interventions: Progress, Recommendations and Future Directions

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      Abstract: Abstract While the measurement of treatment integrity is important to determine how much, and how well, interventions are delivered in schools, the science of treatment integrity is not well developed in education research. The purpose of this paper is to describe a program of research that has developed treatment integrity measures over the past 10 years to assess teacher delivery of an indicated program targeting reductions in problem behavior in early childhood and elementary school classrooms. Specifically, this paper will highlight the importance of active use of conceptual models to guide treatment integrity measure development, multidimensional assessment of treatment integrity and training procedures for observers, using several studies to illustrate the evolution and refinement of our measurement approach. Recommendations for researchers developing and evaluating interventions in schools are provided, as are recommendations to help the field move toward a more rigorous science of treatment integrity.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12310-021-09423-z
       
 
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