Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)

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School Mental Health
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.898
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1866-2633 - ISSN (Online) 1866-2625
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Teacher-Rated Mental Health of Siblings of Children with Chronic Disorders

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      Abstract: Abstract Siblings of children with chronic disorders are at a heightened risk for internalizing and externalizing problems. Studies on sibling mental health typically use parent report, and sometimes sibling self-report, but do not include the perspectives of teachers. We investigated how teachers and parents in Norway rated sibling mental health to gain a more coherent picture of siblings’ well-being and functioning across the home and school contexts. We compared how siblings aged 8–16 years (45% boys, 54% girls) were scored on the strengths and difficulties questionnaire by teachers (n = 125), mothers (n = 115), and fathers (n = 81) with population norms and clinical cutoffs. For boys, the mean teacher scores did not indicate problems for total difficulties or any subscale except hyperactivity–inattention, but mean parent scores were higher for total difficulties and most subscales (d = .44 to .96). For girls, teachers indicated higher than norm scores for total difficulties, emotional problems, hyperactivity–inattention and peer problems (d = .26 to .46), while parents indicated higher total difficulties and problems across most subscales (d = .31 to .54). Prosocial behavior was as a relative strength of siblings across all raters. Siblings may not display the same level of mental health problems in school as at home, and teachers can offer an important perspective on siblings’ mental health and functioning.
      PubDate: 2024-07-10
       
  • A Global Study of the Wellbeing of Adolescent Students During the COVID-19
           2020 Lockdown

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      Abstract: Abstract As the COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) virus spread across the world, countries took drastic measures to counter the disease by requiring their citizens to home self-isolate i.e., lockdown. While it was not known how young people would cope with the social distancing restrictions, there was concern that the lockdown would have a debilitating effect on youth mental health. This study examined whether there was an association between adolescent subjective wellbeing and the amount of time spent in lockdown. Global Research Alliance researchers in 15 countries collected data using the Mental Health Continuum (Keyes in Am J Orthopsych 76:395–402, 2006) from over 7000 middle-school students aged 11–18. Findings show a decline in eudemonic wellbeing, particularly among females during the first 6 months of lockdown, which was most strongly associated with diminished psychological wellbeing, followed by social wellbeing, while emotional wellbeing remained relatively stable. An adaptation effect was noted after approximately 6 months. There was evidence suggesting females were slower to adapt to lockdown conditions compared to males. More attention should be paid to the wellbeing of students in lockdown to overcome languishing tendencies and educators should be cognizant of diminished student wellbeing, particularly among females, when students return to school. Positive school experiences, and positive relationships within the school community, may assist in reducing the risk of languishing in lockdown conditions, so schools should design interactive online activities for off-campus learning.
      PubDate: 2024-07-08
       
  • A School-Based Evaluation of the FRIENDS Resilience Programs: Implications
           for Mental Health Concerns in Rural Students

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      Abstract: Abstract The FRIENDS Resilience programs provide cognitive-behavioral skills across the developmental spectrum and can be applied as a universal or selective prevention program. In the current study, we assessed whether, relative to the schools’ existing counseling curriculum (“guidance”), FRIENDS improved social skills, problem behaviors, and academic competence in a sample of 650 students in kindergarten, 2nd, 5th, and 7th grade in a rural community in the northeastern United States. Student, parent, and teacher reports were obtained pre-intervention, post-intervention, and 4 months later. Analyses examined FRIENDS as a universal prevention program in the general school population and as a selective intervention for at-risk students (those with elevated existing symptoms). Teachers reported improvements in social skills, problem behaviors, and academic competence, and parents reported improved problem behaviors immediately post-intervention for all students receiving FRIENDS and guidance. However, at-risk students who received FRIENDS experienced significantly greater improvements in teacher-reported problem behaviors compared to those who received guidance. When assessing changes over time once all students had received FRIENDS, teacher-rated social skills and academic competence improved, and student- and parent-rated problem behaviors decreased from pre- to post-FRIENDS and 4-month follow-up. Effects were consistent for the overall sample and at-risk students, with stronger effects for those at-risk. These small yet significant effects of FRIENDS as universal prevention may be more limited relative to usual guidance curriculum, but preventative effects may be enhanced for those students in more immediate need of support. Directions for future evaluation of FRIENDS are discussed.
      PubDate: 2024-06-29
       
  • Global and School-Specific Subjective Well-Being as Predictors of
           Educational Outcomes

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      Abstract: Abstract Youths’ subjective well-being (SWB) is theorized to be an integral element of school success. However, little is known about the relative predictive power of different SWB indicators on educational outcomes. Thus, we investigated youths’ global and school-specific SWB as predictors of multidimensional educational performance. Participants were adolescent students (N = 893) in Grades 9–12 within one district and one school in the United States. Regression models were run using adolescent self-reported survey data and school-reported student sociodemographics and outcomes. Global SWB predictors were self-reports of life satisfaction and positive affect; school-specific SWB predictors were self-reports of joy of learning, school connectedness, educational purpose, and academic efficacy. The educational outcomes of interests were end-of-term grades in English language arts, math, and overall coursework, as well absences and suspension. Our models accounted for several student sociodemographic covariates that might affect academic performance. Results showed that, when general SWB predictors were modeled alone, life satisfaction was a consistently meaningful predictor of all educational outcomes. However, when school-specific SWB predictors were added to the models, the predictive power of life satisfaction attenuated, and academic efficacy emerged as the strongest and most consistent predictor of all educational outcomes. Interestingly, joy of learning, school connectedness, and educational purpose did not show meaningful predictive power across educational outcomes. Implications for research and practice are discussed.
      PubDate: 2024-06-27
       
  • Exploring the Association Between Bullying Victimization and Poor Mental
           Health in Rural Chinese Adolescents: The Mediating Effects of Emotion
           Regulation

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      Abstract: Abstract Bullying is one of the most common forms of school violence. Although the negative impact of bullying victimization on students’ mental health outcomes has been well documented, the underlying mechanism of the association lacks investigation, especially in the rural Chinese boarding school context. This study examined (1) the associations between bullying victimization and mental health (i.e., subjective well-being and depressive symptoms), and (2) the mediating roles of cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression in Chinese boys and girls from a rural boarding school in Gansu province. This cross-sectional study involved 655 Chinese rural adolescents in a boarding school in Gansu province (Mage = 15.68 years, SD = 0.96; 408 girls). Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to evaluate the mediation model, and the bootstrap approach was used to test the indirect effect. The total effects from bullying victimization to subjective well-being (for boys: β = − 0.32, p < 0.001; for girls: β = − 0.35, p < 0.001) and depressive symptoms (for boys: β = 0.29, p < 0.001; for girls: β = 0.32, p < 0.001) were significant in boys and girls. The indirect effect of bullying victimization through cognitive reappraisal on subjective well-being (β = -0.11, 95% CI − 0.17 to − 0.06) and depressive symptoms (β = 0.09, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.15) was significant in girls, whereas the indirect effect was not significant in boys. The indirect effect through expressive suppression was not significant in both boys and girls. This study extends the literature by demonstrating the underlying mechanism linking bullying victimization to poor mental health. Gender differences were identified regarding the indirect effects. These findings have cultural implications for bullying victimization intervention on Chinese rural adolescents’ mental health.
      PubDate: 2024-06-24
       
  • Are Elementary Educators Prepared to Address Student Mental Health in
           Title 1 Schools' An Examination of Role Breadth, Self-Efficacy, and
           Attitudes Toward Trauma-Informed Care

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      Abstract: Abstract This study examined the perceived preparedness of educators working in Title 1 schools to address the mental health needs of students. Data were gathered from educators (defined as teachers and other school personnel; N = 299) employed by eight Title 1 public schools within one district in Florida, most of whom were K-5 teachers (n = 199). Participants completed measures of perceived role breadth (i.e., the degree to which they believe that attending to mental health needs is part of their role as an educator), self-efficacy in addressing student mental health needs, and attitudes toward trauma-informed care principles and ideals. Results showed that participants had a relatively high average score on the role breadth measure [M = 4.31 on a scale from 1 (low) to 5 (high)], indicating that they believe their role includes responsibility not only for student learning but also for attending to the mental health of students. Scores on the self-efficacy measure showed a moderate level of confidence in addressing the mental health needs of students [M = 3.08 on a scale from 1 (low) to 4 (high)], although there was variability in mean levels of confidence across different types of tasks. In terms of attitudes toward trauma-informed care, participants showed moderately positive attitudes on the ARTIC-10 [M = 5.05 on a scale from 1 (low) to 7 (high)]. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the relation between the outcome variable of attitudes toward trauma-informed care and the following predictor variables: school, role (teacher vs. non-teacher), role breadth, and self-efficacy. Results showed that role breadth and self-efficacy were significant and positive predictors (p < 0.01) of attitudes toward trauma-informed care. Implications for school-level trauma initiatives are discussed.
      PubDate: 2024-06-23
       
  • Leveraging Technology to Support Teachers’ Fidelity of Universal
           Classroom Management Interventions: Lessons Learned and Future
           Applications

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      Abstract: Abstract The Good Behavior Game (GBG), a universal classroom management intervention, has shown clear benefits in promoting the behavioral, social-emotional, and academic development of students. However, the quality with which this intervention is delivered tends to diminish over time, which decreases the likelihood of these positive outcomes. By leveraging the benefits of technology, we built a sophisticated online platform to support teachers’ fidelity of the GBG in collaboration with expert consultants and education partners. This paper details initial steps to develop and refine GBG Technology (GBG Tech). Three teacher consultants and two experts in technology-enhanced and classroom management interventions provided ongoing feedback as GBG Tech was initially developed through a rapid prototyping approach by a team of high-tech engineers. Twenty-four teachers participated in focus groups to inform subsequent revisions of the technology, and seven teachers tested the feasibility of GBG Tech in their classrooms for 6 weeks. As anticipated, teachers found GBG Tech to be acceptable, understandable, and feasible to use. Moreover, teachers reached fidelity quickly (M = 2.43 weeks), sustained fidelity for 6 weeks, and delivered the GBG at the recommended dosage. The results of this study informed a full version of GBG Tech that is ready for large-scale testing and a set of design principles intended to guide the development of other technology-delivered interventions aimed at sustaining fidelity in authentic classroom settings.
      PubDate: 2024-06-22
       
  • Understanding Teachers' Attributions and Responses to Student Misbehavior:
           The Roles of Explanatory Rationale and Personal Beliefs

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      Abstract: Abstract In this mixed-methods experiment, we examined the impacts of an externally provided rationale and teachers’ own beliefs on cognitive, emotional, and behavioral responses to student misbehavior. Teachers (N = 120) viewed a video describing three instances of a student’s misbehavior, then were randomly assigned to receive one of three explanatory rationales for the misbehaviors, including intentionality, cognitive deficits, adverse childhood experiences, or a comparison condition that offered no new information. Teachers reported causal attributions, emotional responses, perceived self-efficacy, and disciplinary strategy. Results suggest that teachers’ attributions are independently predicted by their own beliefs about the student’s misbehavior and the provided rationale. Further, both sources of information predicted teachers’ feelings, self-efficacy, and disciplinary strategies. We discuss implications for changing teachers’ attributions of misbehavior and increasing the use of positive behavior management strategies.
      PubDate: 2024-06-22
       
  • Predicting Teachers’ Burnout: Trauma Experience and Attitudes
           Towards Trauma-Affected Students

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      Abstract: Abstract Childhood trauma can result in developmental and psychosocial problems leaving teachers struggling to manage the effects of students’ trauma and potentially leading to increased burnout. The present study investigated whether teachers’ attitudes towards teaching trauma-affected students and prior experience with trauma predicted teacher burnout. Five types of prior experience were informed by the multidimensional model of attitude strength: the extent and valence (i.e., how favourable or unfavourable the experience was) of direct teaching experience, the extent and valence of personal experience, and the extent of indirect experience (trauma-training). The study investigated whether the relationships between prior experiences and burnout were mediated by teachers’ attitudes, controlling for teacher age. Australian mainstream teachers (N = 536) were recruited to an online survey through snowball sampling on social media. Results showed that attitudes significantly mediated the relationships between all experience variables with burnout, except for the extent of personal experience. More favourable attitudes were predicted by more direct experience (contrary to the hypothesised direction) and indirect experience (as hypothesised). Regarding valence of experience, exploratory analyses found more favourable direct and personal experiences predicted more favourable attitudes. Supporting the hypotheses, all mediations found more favourable attitudes predicted less burnout, while more personal experience predicted greater burnout. These cross-sectional findings suggest that greater experience teaching trauma-affected students, trauma-training, and fostering favourable perceptions of teachers’ personal trauma may protect teachers from burnout. Future research using longitudinal designs is needed to support causal effects between teachers’ experiences, attitudes, and burnout.
      PubDate: 2024-06-20
       
  • The Role of Social Comparison in Academic Development and Subjective
           Well-Being Among Chinese Adolescents: From Variable- and Person-Centered
           Perspectives

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      Abstract: Abstract The purpose of this study was to address the role of social comparison in determining individual development by exploring the relationship of four types of social comparison with academic persistence‒procrastination and subjective well-being among Chinese adolescents (n = 530, Mage = 14.59) from both variable- and person-centered perspectives. Results showed that the paths from social comparison to outcome were significant in most cases. Upward contrast (i.e., focusing on differences with superior targets) and downward identification (i.e., focusing on similarities with inferior targets) seemed detrimental, but upward identification (i.e., focusing on similarities with superior targets) and downward contrast (i.e., focusing on differences with inferior targets) seemed beneficial for adolescent development. Moreover, four social comparison profiles (moderate, 52.1%; high, 14.3%; upward contrast, 5.7%; and positive interpretation, 27.9%) emerged. The upward contrast profile was the least adaptive, and the positive interpretation profile (with high upward identification and downward contrast) was the most adaptive. This study provides new insights for understanding the role of social comparison in adolescent development and how to make more constructive use of it.
      PubDate: 2024-06-19
       
  • A Community-Partnered Research Process for Implementation Strategy Design:
           Developing Resources to Support Behavioral Classroom Interventions

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      Abstract: Abstract Schools need effective, sustainable implementation strategies to support teachers in using effective Tier 1 (i.e., whole class) and Tier 2 (i.e., targeted) behavioral interventions in the classroom. This paper describes an iterative, community-partnered process of developing implementation resources to support teachers in using Tier 1 and 2 positive behavior management interventions; we call these resources the Positive Behavior Management Toolkit (PBMT). There were two key aspects to the iterative development process: 1) working with a Program Development Team of district—and school-employed partners to identify priorities, interpret data, provide feedback on resources, and plan for sustainment; and 2) conducting a series of tryouts in which teachers used a version of the PBMT in their classrooms and provided quantitative and qualitative feedback on acceptability, appropriateness, feasibility, and recommendations for improvement. In partnership with the Program Development Team, we used data from the tryouts to inform revisions to the PBMT. This paper presents quantitative and qualitative data from the tryouts and describes how these data informed revisions to the PBMT. We also describe the processes by which we engaged the team, considerations related to contextual appropriateness, and lessons learned related to community-engaged intervention development research.
      PubDate: 2024-06-18
       
  • “It Takes Reflection at All Different Levels, Not Just People on the
           Floor”: A Qualitative Exploration of Early Childhood Professionals’
           Experiences and Perspectives Towards Trauma-Informed Early Childhood
           Organisations

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      Abstract: Abstract Trauma in early childhood is a significant public health concern. Early childhood education and care (ECEC) services play a critical role in identifying and responding to children impacted by trauma. However, little is known about early childhood professionals’ experiences and needs relating to supporting trauma-impacted children. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore early childhood professionals’ experiences of working with trauma-impacted children in ECEC, the barriers to adopting trauma-informed approaches, and the organisation-wide shift that is needed to embed them. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 early childhood educators, organisational leaders, and childhood trauma consultants in Victoria, Australia. Thematic analyses revealed that early childhood professionals’ perceived increasing prevalence of trauma in children attending ECEC. However, educators are generally unprepared and unsupported for this, and experience many workplace challenges leaving them feeling overwhelmed. This highlighted the need to support the professional development and well-being of early childhood educators. Meanwhile, the study identified systemic barriers impeding the implementation of trauma-informed approaches within ECEC. The findings also suggest that the collective efforts “starting from the top”, with everyone engaged, coupled with cross-sector collaboration is needed for meaningful, trauma-informed organisational change within ECEC.
      PubDate: 2024-06-17
       
  • The Feasibility and Acceptability of Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for
           Trauma in Schools (CBITS) in a Rural Community Impacted by Environmental
           Trauma and Covid-19

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      Abstract: Abstract Traumatic events are becoming more prevalent in youth, especially considering the increase in disaster exposure, impacting the wellbeing and mental health of youth. Youth in rural communities are more adversely impacted due to a lack of access to available support and services. Interventions geared toward treating traumatic stress are needed for youth residing in these communities. The Cognitive-behavioral Intervention in Schools is a school-based trauma-focused group therapy intervention geared for adolescents between 5 to 12th grade who have experienced traumatic events. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness of CBITS in a rural community impacted by a natural disaster.This study utilized a non-probability sample of youth attending primary and secondary school in a rural community impacted by Hurricane Michael. Data collection occurred with youth and parents at three-time points: pre-, post- and three months post-intervention. Feasibility and acceptability were measured through count data of referrals, assents/consents, and the number of sessions attended. Outcomes explored improvement in trauma symptomology and problem-solving skills. Results showed CBITS is a feasible and acceptable intervention for youth exposed to a natural disaster. Results of the outcome measures showed significant differences between baseline and three-month follow-up and from the post-test to the three-month follow-up on the youth self-report. Parent proxy report showed a significant decrease in PTSD symptomology from the post-test to the three-month follow-up. To examine predictors of improvement at follow-up, a regression analysis was conducted. Results showed that trauma exposure and gender were significant predictors for trauma symptom follow-up scores on the youth self-report. Youth trauma experiences vary, but for youth impacted by natural disasters, CBITS may be a feasible and acceptable intervention. School-based interventions are integral for serving youth who may not receive trauma intervention otherwise, especially for those in rural communities.
      PubDate: 2024-06-17
       
  • Understanding the Attacks on Social–Emotional Learning: Strategizing on
           the Response and Advocacy of School Mental Health Practitioners

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      Abstract: Abstract Since 2020, a network of actors and organizations have united in the implementation of education censorship—posing school-wide implications and impositions on the practice of mental health practitioners. States have outlined race and diversity curricula bans, sports and restroom bans, anti-Diversity, Equity and Inclusion legislation, and laws to undermine Social–Emotional Learning. In this paper, we explore the impact of education censorship and anti-Social-Emotional Learning legislation in relation to school mental health. To discuss the responses and advocacy of school mental health practitioners, we provide an overview of education censorship, noting the scope, prevalence, and evolution of topics to explicate a deeper understanding of the legislative action imposed over the last few years. Next, we delineate three non-exhaustive explanations of the legislation: the evolution of education censorship, education governance and corporate curricula control, and the shift to transformative Social–Emotional Learning. To strategize on how to respond to these trends we provide two alternative response pathways, offer implications, and discuss aspects of advocacy, resistance, and action. In conclusion, we provide a discussion to extend each response pathway, providing additional considerations, implications, and outline calls for action.
      PubDate: 2024-06-11
       
  • A 10-Week School-Based Mindfulness Intervention and Symptoms of Depression
           and Anxiety Among School Children and Adolescents: A Controlled Study

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      Abstract: Abstract Mental health problems are increasing among children and adolescents. School-based mindfulness interventions are gaining popularity worldwide and may be a way to decrease depression and anxiety symptoms in students. However, before introducing large-scale mindfulness interventions in school settings, more research is needed on feasible, easily applicable practices that are possible to fit in the school schedule. In this controlled intervention study, a total of 1399 students aged 9–16 were included. The 10-week classroom-based mindfulness intervention comprised daily, brief mindfulness sessions led by schoolteachers or via audio files. Symptoms of depression and anxiety were evaluated with Beck scales prior to and after the intervention. In addition to whole group analyses, subgroup analyses on age, sex as well as mode of delivery were performed. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT03327714. No significant differences between the intervention and control group in change of depression or anxiety symptoms after the intervention were detected. However, the subgroup of students who received teacher-led mindfulness sessions (16%) had a significant decrease of depression and anxiety symptoms after 10 weeks compared to those who received the sessions via audio files. Brief mindfulness sessions on daily basis did not have any detectable overall effect on depression and anxiety symptoms among schoolchildren. Our findings do not support an introduction of large-scale mindfulness interventions in schools although the potential influence of mode of delivery needs to be further examined. Clinical trial registration The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: NCT03327714).
      PubDate: 2024-06-04
       
  • Bringing Mental Health Knowledge to Schools Through Academic-Community
           Partnership: A City Year Tale of Equal Service to Training and Research

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      Abstract: Abstract This article highlights an ongoing academic-community partnership between university researchers and City Year Miami, the local site of a national education non-profit serving the nation’s third-largest school district. AmeriCorps Members (ACMs) serve as small-group interventionists and behavior/attendance coaches for the county’s lowest performing students. Collaboration with City Year Miami supplemented their routine workforce support with trainings (n = 18) for City Year Miami Team Leaders (TLs) and ACMs focused on youth mental health. Trainings emphasized the Cognitive Triangle by highlighting how to bring compassion and intentionality to their work with students, school partners (e.g., teachers, teammates, and administrators), and their own self-care. We present our collaboration, the training model, and process data representing three layers of organizational voice that informed iterative revisions and refinement to the training model. Data sources (n = 45 TLs and ACMs) highlight what was learned from each group (TLs, ACMs, and leadership) and include: (1) pre-training survey data, (2) training-generated data such as attendance and exit slips, (3) post-training survey data measuring intent to use training content, and facilitators and barriers to use, and (4) meeting-generated data from formal (planned, agenda-driven) and informal (impromptu) partner discussions. Emphasis is placed on the role of City Year Miami organizational leaders and providers at all stages of research and implementation, as well as lessons learned in this community-partnered, school-engaged work, including takeaways related to positionality, partnership, and research.
      PubDate: 2024-06-02
       
  • The PositivaMente Program: Universal Prevention of Suicidal Behaviour in
           Educational Settings

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      Abstract: Abstract Suicidal behaviour is a major socio-health problem worldwide. However, there are few empirically validated programs for universal prevention of suicidal behaviour in school settings. The aim of the present study was to design and validate the PositivaMente program for the prevention of suicidal behaviour in school-age adolescents aged 14–15 from the North of Spain. A quasi-experimental design was used with pre- and post-treatment evaluation with experimental and control groups and a six-month follow-up. The final sample consisted of 264 participants (M = 14.30 years, SD = 0.56; 54.5% girls), with 161 participants in the experimental group and 103 in the control group. Measuring instruments were administered to assess suicidal behaviour, emotional and behavioural difficulties, depressive symptomatology, prosocial behaviour, subjective well-being, and self-esteem. The PositivaMente program was designed and implemented in educational settings. A statistically significant improvement in subjective well-being was found, as well as a statistically significant reduction in emotional problems and problems with peers among female participants in the experimental group versus those in the control group at the 6-month follow-up. However, male participants did not seem to benefit from the program. The overall evaluation from the sample and satisfaction with PositivaMente were positive. Empirically supported actions for the prevention of suicidal behaviour need to be designed in order to make informed decisions. Future studies should implement the PositivaMente program with other populations and contexts, develop a brief version, and collect information on cost-effectiveness.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Teachers as School Mental Health Professionals and their Daily Practices

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      Abstract: Abstract Despite the fundamental role of teachers in School Mental Health Systems, their work has been under-recognized and under-supported. Moreover, few studies on this role have been conducted in low- and middle-income countries. This study explores and describes the mental health actions undertaken by teachers in schools and categorizes them using latent class analysis. The study collected data from 726 teachers in Chile using snowball sampling. Three self-reported questionnaires were administered: Mental Health Actions and Teaching Role Questionnaire; Interprofessional Competence in Mental Health Questionnaire and Checklist of Mental Health Issues Addressed in School. The results showed that teachers play a significant role in identifying and addressing mental health issues among students, with 90% of respondents reporting that they had provided support to students with mental health concerns. The results also suggest that teachers face several challenges in this role, including a lack of training and resources, time constraints, and the need for better communication and collaboration with mental health professionals. Six latent class of teachers was founded: ow activity Class, Classroom-Centered Class, Individual Emotional Support-Centered Class, Self-Care and Professional Development Class, Mental Health Curriculum-Centered Class, and High activity Class. Based on the results provides applied recommendations for teachers to support their students' mental health, such as creating a safe and supportive classroom environment, promoting social-emotional learning, and collaborating with specialised school mental health professionals. Overall, this study highlights the need for a comprehensive and integrated approach to school mental health that involves teachers, mental health professionals, and other stakeholders.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • What is Essential in School Social Work Practice

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      Abstract: Abstract As the need for school social work (SSW) practitioners increases, more research may be useful to understand how roles and practices are shaped and how this differs from their perceptions of essential practice. To understand the roles and functions of SSW, a survey of nine critical components was developed through an evaluation of national association’s standards that offer guidance for SSW practice. Survey respondents (N = 318) consisted mostly of SSW practitioners (85%), evaluated nine critical components: advocacy, building capacity, home-school liaison, multi-tier system of support, navigating school settings, professional values, service delivery, social work theory, use of data and evidence, and suggested the addition of new essential components. The results focus on which practices are deemed essential and the frequency of performing these tasks. We conclude with implications of practice essentiality and frequency discussed across the nine critical component domains, offering suggestions for future research, education, training, and professional development of SSW practitioners.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Bias-Based Harassment Among US Adolescents

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      Abstract: Abstract Bias-based (also called identity-based) harassment refers specifically to a subset of peer victimization that targets a person’s identity, such as their gender identity, religion, immigration status, sexual orientation, race, or ethnicity. Research indicates that bias-based harassment is a particularly devastating form of victimization that has an even stronger association with poor mental health and school functioning than general forms of bullying and harassment that do not target identity characteristics. In the current study, we used the AmeriSpeak Teen Panel, a US nationally representative panel of youth ages 13–17, to examine the prevalence and predictors of bias-based harassment. Youth (N = 639) completed a self-report survey about their experiences with victimization and perpetration of bias-based harassment. A series of regression models tested the association of individual youth demographic characteristics with reports of bias-based harassment victimization and perpetration. Overall, 28.2% of youth reported experiences of bias-based victimization, and 12.4% reported bias-based perpetration. Bias-based harassment most often targeted students’ race, sexual orientation, and gender identity. Results have implications for school-based prevention and intervention planning to address bias-based harassment.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
 
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  Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)

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