Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1527 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (88 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (721 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (381 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (113 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (120 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

HEALTH AND SAFETY (721 journals)                  1 2 3 4 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 203 Journals sorted alphabetically
16 de Abril     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ACM Transactions on Computing for Healthcare     Hybrid Journal  
Acta Informatica Medica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Scientiarum. Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adultspan Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Adversity and Resilience Science : Journal of Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
African Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Afrimedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Aging and Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
AJOB Empirical Bioethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Akademika     Open Access  
American Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Health Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
American Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Health Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American Journal of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
American Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 187)
American Journal of Public Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Annales des Sciences de la Santé     Open Access  
Annali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità     Open Access  
Annals of Clinical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Annals of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Annals of Health Law     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Applied Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Apuntes Universitarios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Community Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Archivos de Prevención de Riesgos Laborales     Open Access  
Arquivos de Ciências da Saúde     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia Pacific Journal of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Gambling Issues and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Medicine and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Social Health and Behavior     Open Access  
Atención Primaria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atención Primaria Práctica     Open Access  
Australasian Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin     Free   (Followers: 5)
Bijzijn XL     Hybrid Journal  
Biograph-I : Journal of Biostatistics and Demographic Dynamic     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Biomedical Safety & Standards     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Biosafety and Health     Open Access  
Biosalud     Open Access  
Birat Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access  
BLDE University Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access  
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Brazilian Journal of Medicine and Human Health     Open Access  
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Buletin Penelitian Kesehatan     Open Access  
Buletin Penelitian Sistem Kesehatan     Open Access  
Bulletin of the World Health Organization     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Cadernos de Educação, Saúde e Fisioterapia     Open Access  
Cadernos de Saúde     Open Access  
Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Canadian Family Physician     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Carta Comunitaria     Open Access  
Case Reports in Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Central Asian Journal of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CES Medicina     Open Access  
CES Salud Pública     Open Access  
Child and Adolescent Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Child's Nervous System     Hybrid Journal  
Chinese Journal of Physiology     Open Access  
CHRISMED Journal of Health and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Christian Journal for Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia & Salud     Open Access  
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Ciencia e Innovación en Salud     Open Access  
Ciencia y Cuidado     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia y Salud     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia y Salud Virtual     Open Access  
Ciencia, Tecnología y Salud     Open Access  
Cities & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cleaner and Responsible Consumption     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical and Experimental Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CME     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Contraception and Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuaderno de investigaciones: semilleros andina     Open Access  
Cuadernos de la Escuela de Salud Pública     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Current Opinion in Environmental Science & Health     Hybrid Journal  
D Y Patil Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Das österreichische Gesundheitswesen ÖKZ     Hybrid Journal  
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Design for Health     Hybrid Journal  
Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Diversity and Equality in Health and Care     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Diversity of Research in Health Journal     Open Access  
Dramatherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Drogues, santé et société     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Duazary     Open Access  
Düzce Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Enstitüsü Dergisi / Journal of Duzce University Health Sciences Institute     Open Access  
Early Childhood Research Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
East African Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
EcoHealth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
ElectronicHealthcare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Emerging Trends in Drugs, Addictions, and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ensaios e Ciência : Ciências Biológicas, Agrárias e da Saúde     Open Access  
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Sciences Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Epidemics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
EsSEX : Revista Científica     Open Access  
Estudios sociales : Revista de alimentación contemporánea y desarrollo regional     Open Access  
Ethics & Human Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ethics, Medicine and Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Eurasian Journal of Health Technology Assessment     Open Access  
EUREKA : Health Sciences     Open Access  
European Journal of Health Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Evidência - Ciência e Biotecnologia - Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Exploratory Research in Clinical and Social Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Expressa Extensão     Open Access  
F&S Reports     Open Access  
Face à face     Open Access  
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Family & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Family Medicine and Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
FASEB BioAdvances     Open Access  
Fatigue : Biomedicine, Health & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Food and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Food Hydrocolloids for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Frontiers in Digital Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Frontiers in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Frontiers of Health Services Management     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Gaceta Sanitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Galen Medical Journal     Open Access  
Ganesha Journal     Open Access  
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Geospatial Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gestão e Desenvolvimento     Open Access  
Gesundheitsökonomie & Qualitätsmanagement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Giornale Italiano di Health Technology Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Challenges     Open Access  
Global Health : Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Global Health Annual Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Health Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Journal of Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Journal of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Global Medical & Health Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Global Reproductive Health     Open Access  
Global Security : Health, Science and Policy     Open Access  
Global Transitions     Open Access  
Global Transitions Proceedings     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Hacia la Promoción de la Salud     Open Access  
Hastane Öncesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Hastings Center Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
HCU Journal     Open Access  
HEADline     Hybrid Journal  
Health & Place     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Health and Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Health and Research Journal     Open Access  
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Health Behavior and Policy Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Health Behavior Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Health Equity     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health Information : Jurnal Penelitian     Open Access  
Health Notions     Open Access  
Health Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Health Policy and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Health Policy OPEN     Open Access  
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Health Promotion Journal of Australia : Official Journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Health Prospect     Open Access  
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
Health Psychology Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Health Psychology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)

        1 2 3 4 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Global Health Promotion
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1757-9759 - ISSN (Online) 1757-9767
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  • Promoting health in a globalized world requires adopting a One Health
           perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eric Muraille
      Pages: 3 - 5
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Volume 28, Issue 3, Page 3-5, September 2021.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-09-11T11:06:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211035070
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • English Abstracts

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 73 - 74
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Volume 28, Issue 3, Page 73-74, September 2021.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T11:18:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211035085
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • La promotion de la santé dans un monde globalisé nécessite l’adoption
           d’une perspective One health

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eric Muraille
      Pages: 75 - 77
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Volume 28, Issue 3, Page 75-77, September 2021.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-09-11T11:08:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211035072
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Résumés

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      Pages: 86 - 91
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Volume 28, Issue 3, Page 86-91, September 2021.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T11:18:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211036280
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • La promoción de la salud en un mundo globalizado necesita adoptar la
           perspectiva ‘Una Salud’

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      Authors: Eric Muraille
      Pages: 92 - 94
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Volume 28, Issue 3, Page 92-94, September 2021.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-09-11T11:07:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211035071
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Resúmenes

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      Pages: 122 - 126
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Volume 28, Issue 3, Page 122-126, September 2021.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T11:18:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211035086
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • A short-form suggestion for the Turkish version of the European Health
           Literacy Survey Questionnaire: a development and validation study in
           university students

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mehmet Ali Sungur, Zerrin Gamsizkan, Demet Hanife Sungur
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      The European Health Literacy Survey Questionnaire was translated into Turkish following a validity and reliability study, but there is no comprehensive short form available. We aimed to suggest a short form of the 47-item Turkish version of European Health Literacy Survey Questionnaire in this study. Data were obtained from a cross-sectional study that included a total of 686 students, 345 male and 341 female, conducted in nine different faculties of a university using the Turkish version of European Health Literacy Survey Questionnaire. The development process of the short form was conducted using principal component analysis with exploratory factor analysis, and correlation and regression analyses. The validation process was done using confirmatory factor analysis and regression analysis. Based on the results, a 12-item short form was developed, retaining the conceptual framework of the European Health Literacy Survey Questionnaire. The short form was shown to have adequate psychometric properties with high reliability, good validity, a high and moderate level of correlation, and a good model fit with the independent dataset in this cross-sectional study. The short form developed in this study was demonstrated to be a valid and reliable tool to measure health literacy easily and rapidly in Turkey.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-12-22T05:27:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211064261
       
  • Strengthening health promotion practice: capacity development for a
           transdisciplinary field

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      Authors: Stephan Van den Broucke
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      The growing burden of non-communicable and newly emerging communicable diseases, multi-morbidity, increasing health inequalities, the health effects of climate change and natural disasters and the revolution in communication technology require a shift of focus towards more preventive, people-centred and community-based health services. This has implications for the health workforce, which needs to develop new capacities and skills, many of which are at the core of health promotion. Health promotion is thus being mainstreamed into modern public health. For health promotion, this offers both opportunities and challenges. A stronger focus on the enablers of health enhances the strategic importance of health promotion’s whole-of-society approach to health, showcases the achievements of health promotion with regard to core professional competencies, and helps build public health capacity with health promotion accents. On the other hand, mainstreaming health promotion can weaken its organizational capacity and visibility, and bears the risk of it being absorbed into a traditional public health discourse dominated by medical professions. To address these challenges and grasp the opportunities, it is essential for the health promotion workforce to position itself within the diversifying primary care and public health field. Taking the transdisciplinary status of health promotion and existing capacity development systems in primary and secondary prevention and health promotion as reference points, this paper considers the possibilities to integrate and implement health promotion capacities within and across disciplinary boundaries, arguing that the contribution of health promotion to public health development lies in the complementary nature of specialist and mainstreamed health promotion.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-12-21T12:29:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211061751
       
  • Waiora: the importance of Indigenous worldviews and spirituality to
           inspire and inform Planetary Health Promotion in the Anthropocene

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      Authors: Sione Tu’itahi, Huti Watson, Richard Egan, Margot W. Parkes, Trevor Hancock
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      We now live in a new geological age, the Anthropocene – the age of humans – the start of which coincides with the founding of the International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) 70 years ago. In this article, we address the fundamental challenge facing health promotion in its next 70 years, which takes us almost to 2100: how do we achieve planetary health' We begin with a brief overview of the massive and rapid global ecological changes we face, the social, economic and technological driving forces behind those changes, and their health implications. At the heart of these driving forces lie a set of core values that are incompatible with planetary health. Central to our argument is the need for a new set of values, which heed and privilege the wisdom of Indigenous worldviews, as well as a renewed sense of spirituality that can re-establish a reverence for nature. We propose an Indigenous-informed framing to inspire and inform what we call planetary health promotion so that, as the United Nations Secretary General wrote recently, we can make peace with nature.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-12-21T12:26:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211062261
       
  • The International Union for Health Promotion and Education 1987–2001:
           health promotion experiences, reflections and possible lessons

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Spencer Hagard
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-12-14T10:25:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211059035
       
  • The IUHPE: 70 years young, but what’s in a date'

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      Authors: Graham Robertson
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-12-14T05:03:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211059032
       
  • ‘Visioning the future of health promotion: learning from the past,
           shaping the future’

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      Authors: Margaret M. Barry
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-12-11T12:52:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211058979
       
  • Redefining health promotion to reach the unreached: opportunities for
           transformative change in South and South-East Asia

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      Authors: Alok Mukhopadhyay, Nancepreet Kaur
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      The pandemic has exposed the vulnerability of our civilization and reinforced the importance of living in harmony with nature, not rampaging it in a conquering mode. South and South-East Asia have a vital role to play in achieving the global goal of ‘Health for All’ as the regions have a significantly large share of global income and multidimensional poor compared to other regions. Clearly, the progress in health and development outcomes of these regions cannot be achieved without addressing social determinants of health and ensuring active public participation. These regions must collectively address the social determinants of health following a realistic health promotion model. It is indeed a favourable time to look beyond the so-called predominantly reductionist biomedical model of health care to a more holistic model of health, that places humans and the environment at the centre, and emphasizes the importance of promoting health and wellbeing.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-12-11T04:28:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211057577
       
  • Reviewer list 2021

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      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-12-11T04:27:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211063697
       
  • Statement by David V. McQueen* on the 70th anniversary of the
           International Union for Health Promotion and Education, 1 March 2021

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      Authors: David V. McQueen
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-12-11T04:13:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211059036
       
  • Global Health Promotion Edición especial de aniversario, 70 años de la
           UIPES: “Una mirada al futuro de la Promoción de la Salud: aprender del
           pasado, preparar el futuro”

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      Authors: Liane Comeau, Marie-Claude Lamarre
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-12-03T11:42:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211059017
       
  • Global Health Promotion Special Issue for the 70th anniversary of the
           IUHPE: “Visioning the Future of Health Promotion: Learning from the
           past, shaping the future”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Liane Comeau, Marie-Claude Lamarre
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-12-03T11:41:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211059016
       
  • Global Health Promotion Special Issue for the 70th anniversary of the
           IUHPE: “Visioning the Future of Health Promotion: Learning from the
           past, shaping the future”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Liane Comeau, Marie-Claude Lamarre
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-12-03T11:40:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211059005
       
  • ‘Una mirada al futuro de la Promoción de la Salud: aprender del pasado,
           preparar el futuro’

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      Authors: Margaret M. Barry
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-12-03T11:38:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211058993
       
  • “Un regard sur l’avenir de la promotion de la santé: apprendre du
           passé, façonner l’avenir”

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      Authors: Margaret M. Barry
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-12-03T11:32:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211058992
       
  • Reflections on the International Union for Health Promotion and Education
           from past president Michael Sparks

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      Authors: Michael Sparks
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-11-29T05:54:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211059034
       
  • Toward resourcefulness: pathways for community positive health

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      Authors: Laura E. R. Peters, Geordan Shannon, Ilan Kelman, Eija Meriläinen
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Communities are powerful and necessary agents for defining and pursuing their health, but outside organizations often adopt community health promotion approaches that are patronizing and top-down. Conversely, bottom-up approaches that build on and mobilize community health assets are often critiqued for tasking the most vulnerable and marginalized communities to use their own limited resources without real opportunities for change. Taking into consideration these community health promotion shortcomings, this article asks how communities may be most effectively and appropriately supported in pursuing their health. This article reviews how community health is understood, moving from negative to positive conceptualizations; how it is determined, moving from a risk-factor orientation to social determination; and how it is promoted, moving from top-down to bottom-up approaches. Building on these understandings, we offer the concept of ‘resourcefulness’ as an approach to strengthen positive health for communities, and we discuss how it engages with three interrelated tensions in community health promotion: resources and sustainability, interdependence and autonomy, and community diversity and inclusion. We make practical suggestions for outside organizations to apply resourcefulness as a process-based, place-based, and relational approach to community health promotion, arguing that resourcefulness can forge new pathways to sustainable and self-sustaining community positive health.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-11-22T11:20:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211051370
       
  • Representaciones de la salud mental en dos diarios de circulación
           nacional en Perú

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      Authors: Liliana Hidalgo-Padilla, Lucila Rozas Urrunaga, Peter Busse, Francisco Diez-Canseco
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Antecedentes:Los medios de comunicación son una de las fuentes que modelan las representaciones de la salud mental. Sólo un estudio previo realizado en Perú ha analizado las noticias sobre la salud mental en los medios de comunicación.Objetivo:describir cómo se representa la salud mental en la prensa escrita de alcance nacional en el Perú.Método:se utilizó la técnica de análisis de contenido. Se realizó una búsqueda de artículos a partir de una lista de términos relacionados con salud mental en 30 ediciones de dos diarios de circulación nacional del año 2016. Se identificaron 351 artículos, de los cuales se extrajo información sobre los términos de salud mental utilizados, el nivel de contenido de salud mental, la presencia de fuentes citadas, la inclusión de personajes y la valoración atribuida a estos.Resultados:271 artículos (77.21%) contenían términos referidos a salud mental, pero sin ser desarrollados, 51 (14.53%) abordaban la salud mental de manera parcial, y solo 29 (8.26%) lo hacían como tema principal. Entre los 80 artículos que abordaban la salud mental de manera parcial o principal, solo 32 (40%) citaban fuentes. Finalmente, de los 59 artículos que hacían referencia a personajes, 29 (49.15%) los describían de manera negativa.Conclusiones:la prensa escrita suele utilizar términos de salud mental, pero sin desarrollar el tema en profundidad. El uso de fuentes es infrecuente y no se cita a personas con afecciones de salud mental. Al describirlas, se destaca su inestabilidad y peligrosidad. Estos hallazgos sugieren que la prensa escrita podría contribuir al fortalecimiento del estigma relacionado con la salud mental.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-11-02T10:01:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211052200
       
  • From health education to digital health literacy – building on the
           past to shape the future

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      Authors: Don Nutbeam
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Health education has continuously evolved and taken several distinctive forms over the decades. The emergence of new concepts such as health promotion and health literacy have helped to shape and refine our understanding of how the purpose, content and methods of health education can adapt with to new public health methods and priorities. Viewing health education through the lens of health literacy has been particularly helpful in differentiating between traditional task-focused health education, and skills-focused health education designed to develop more generic, transferable skills. The advent of digital media has enabled unprecedented access to health information but brought with it new challenges. Managing the volume of available information, and assessing its quality and reliability have become essential digital health literacy skills in the information age. As health educators we need to continue to adapt our practices to these new opportunities and understand the challenges that come with them.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-11-01T04:39:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211044079
       
  • How can health promotion contribute to pulling humans back from the brink
           of disaster'

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      Authors: Fran Baum
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Health promotion has evolved over the last decades from a primary focus on behaviour change to establishing an ambitious goal of creating healthy, fair and sustainable environments in a manner which realises the rights of all people to health and well-being while protecting the health of our planet and its ecosystems. This paper argues that in order to contribute to this ambitious goal, health promotion must address three key tasks. The first is the need to take planetary health more seriously and move away from reductionist thinking to an approach that sees the planet as a complex system and values more harmony with nature, protects biodiversity and prevents global warming. The second task is to advocate and support governments to govern for health. The key to doing this is putting health and equity before profit, creating healthy urban environments, encouraging participatory decision-making, advocating for healthy economic models and assessing the ways in which corporate determinants of health operate. The third task is to ensure that moves to professionalise health promotion do not come at the expense of health promotion advocacy to powerful people and organisations. Health promotion is well placed to support civil society movements arguing for social and economic change that will benefit health such as the Black Lives Matter and environment movements.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-10-29T06:30:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211044074
       
  • Social distancing during COVID-19: threat and efficacy among university
           students in seven nations

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      Authors: Jeanine P. D. Guidry, Paul B. Perrin, Nadine Bol, BaoBao Song, Cheng Hong, Alessandro Lovari, Ioana A. Coman, Nicole H. O’Donnell, Mariam Alkazemi, Jing Niu, Sara J. R. Pabian, Annemiek J. Linn, Carrie A. Miller, Kellie E. Carlyle
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19 has been spreading fast worldwide, and until effective and safe vaccines have been widely adopted, preventive measures such as social distancing are crucial to keep the pandemic under control. The study’s research questions asked which psychosocial factors predict social distancing behavior and whether there are country-level differences in social distancing' Using the Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM) as a theoretical lens, we examined the predictive effects of threat and efficacy and demographic variables on adherence to the COVID-19 preventive behavior of social distancing using a survey among an international sample of university students. Using path modeling and analysis of covariance, we confirmed the predictive effects of the EPPM on social distancing behavior. Our final model showed that perceived susceptibility to COVID-19 was both directly and indirectly (through response efficacy) associated with social distancing behavior; that perceived severity of COVID-19 yielded a significant indirect effect on social distancing behavior through both self-efficacy and response efficacy; that perceived susceptibility is indirectly and positively associated with social distancing behavior through response efficacy; and that self-efficacy and response efficacy were directly associated with social distancing behavior. Additionally, there were country-level differences in social distancing. Possible explanations for and implications of these findings are discussed.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-10-27T04:40:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211051368
       
  • Health promotion research has come of age! Structuring the field based on
           the practices of health promotion researchers

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      Authors: Louise Potvin, Didier Jourdan
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Health promotion is mostly framed as a discourse and practices based on a set of values and principles that promote changes at various levels (individual, community and global). There is no well-defined knowledge base and no widely agreed knowledge development methods. During the past decades, health promotion knowledge has developed following a potluck model. Researchers from various disciplinary backgrounds attracted to the values and transformative vision of health promotion have used their disciplinary-based research methods and theories to conduct studies about the various practices that are associated with health promotion. Although health promotion research has acquired many attributes of a distinct field, researching practices from various disciplinary perspectives is not sufficient to create a coherent knowledge base for health promotion. We propose three dimensions to further structure health promotion research. The first relates to the object for which knowledge is produced. For health promotion research this relates to health social practices. The second dimension relates to the purpose and ethics of research. In the case of health promotion research it pursues the dual purpose of producing knowledge (epistemic aim) and contributing to social changes (transformative aim). The third dimension concerns the knowledge produced and the conditions for valid knowledge. In the case of health promotion research, the condition of knowledge production should include a recognition of the complexity of social practice and the necessary dialogue between scientific. True to health promotion principles, we propose a bottom-up process for structuring the field through the creation of a ‘Global Handbook of Health Promotion Research’ that would draw on the research practices of those involved in health promotion research.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-10-25T08:56:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211044077
       
  • People-Planet-Health: promoting grassroots movements through participatory
           co-production

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      Authors: Claudia Meier Magistretti, Jake Sallaway-Costello, Shadhaab Fatima, Rachel Hartnoll
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      The threat of anthropogenic climate change demands immediate action to prevent further damage to human health and fragile natural ecosystems. This process of change might locally have already begun, led by grassroots organisations around the world. Conceiving their actions as a form of salutogenesis, these organisations build a Sense of Coherence to empower communities to participate in the potentially overwhelming challenge of planetary health. People-Planet-Health aims at giving voice and visibility to those groups and their actions. Contributors will further be invited to co-create a position paper, to inform the revised WHO Global Strategy for Health Promotion.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-10-25T08:55:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211044073
       
  • Romper el statu quo al promover políticas para la salud, el bienestar y
           la equidad: un preludio a la UIPES 2022

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      Authors: Brittany Wenniserí:iostha Jock, Carole Clavier, Evelyne de Leeuw, Katherine L. Frohlich
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-10-25T08:53:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211038485
       
  • Perceptions of participation in school and association with health and
           wellbeing: comparison among Nigerian and Irish pupils

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      Authors: Yetunde O. John-Akinola, Mary O. Balogun, Adeyimika T. Desmennu, Damilola O. Awobiyi, Saoirse Nic Gabhainn
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      School participation among pupils is considered a key value of the health promoting school approach. However, few studies have documented the relationship between the school participation of pupils and health and wellbeing outcomes in different geographical contexts, especially looking at developing and developed country contexts. This study investigated the perceptions of Nigerian and Irish pupils on participation in school and reported health and wellbeing. Data was collected using self-completed questionnaires among 333 and 231 primary school pupils in 4th, 5th and 6th classes across 17 schools in Nigeria and Ireland. Logistic regression analysis was used to analyse the data from both countries. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean scores for participation in school activities (NIG mean = 22.8, SD 3.5; IRE mean = 22.3, SD 3.4) and school events (NIG mean = 18.8, SD 3.7; IRE mean = 17.1, SD 3.6). However, participation in school decisions and rules (NIG mean = 17.3, SD 4.7; IRE mean = 15.8, SD 3.6) and health and wellbeing (NIG mean = 16.9, SD 1.7; IRE mean = 15.3, SD 2.4) scores were significantly higher among Nigerian pupils, while positive perception of school participation (NIG mean = 24.2, SD 4.1; IRE mean = 26.2, SD 3.4) was significantly higher among Irish pupils. The findings suggest that Irish and Nigerian pupils have positive perceptions of their schools irrespective of their location and levels of development. However, further research using qualitative approaches might be needed to better clarify dimensions of pupils’ perceptions of school life and school participation among Nigerian pupils in order to substantiate these claims.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-09-27T12:13:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211038248
       
  • Mala nutrición en población escolar mexicana: factores geográficos y
           escolares asociados

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      Authors: Abelardo Ávila Curiel, Carlos Galindo Gómez, Liliana Juárez Martínez, Armando García-Guerra, Marti Yareli Del Monte Vega, Jesús Martínez Domínguez, y Marco Antonio Ávila Arcos
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Resumen:Objetivos:Determinar prevalencias de mala nutrición [sobrepeso u obesidad (Sp+O) y talla baja (TB)] en población mexicana de 6 a 12 años de edad de nivel básico de primaria, y su asociación con características geográficas (ámbito, marginación y región del país), y de la escuela (tipo, turno y grado).Métodos:Con información de 10 528 676 escolares, se estimaron prevalencias (e I.C. 95%), a nivel nacional y por características de interés, y su asociación mediante modelos de regresión logística.Resultados:La prevalencia nacional de Sp+O fue 34.4%, 36.5% en ámbito urbano y 40.2% en escuelas privadas. La prevalencia nacional de TB fue 8.7%; en área rural, 13.7% y 28.8% en escuelas tipo indígenas. El Sp+O y la TB se asociaron significativamente con características geográficas y de escuelas.Conclusiones:Existe una polarización nutricional en el contexto escolar del país. Es importante continuar con sistemas de monitoreo y vigilancia nutricional.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-09-24T12:16:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211038381
       
  • Universal masking to prevent SARS-CoV-2 transmission from Taiwan’s
           practices

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      Authors: Chia-Wei Chao, Vivian Chia-Rong Hsieh, Chun-Yi Tan, Min-Hao Yuan
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      In the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic, Taiwan, with its universal masking policy, slowed down the spread of cases and flattened its epidemic curve without enforcing lockdown or mass quarantine in 2020. This study identifies the distinguishing features of Taiwan’s universal masking policy practice, such as priority, continuous improvement, multi-stakeholder partnership, transparency and accountability, and altruism and social solidarity. By confronting uncertainty through the COVID-19 crisis, this study suggests that face masking, rather than being just a physical barrier of non-pharmacological intervention, can be adopted as an interactive policy platform to empower the public for stimulating cross-sector collaboration towards social innovation and creating spillover effects, such as acts of public trust, altruism, and solidarity.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-09-23T10:36:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211033831
       
  • Il faut démanteler le statu quo et promouvoir des politiques pour la
           santé, le bien-être et l’équité : un prélude à l’ « IUHPE2022
           »

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      Authors: Brittany Wenniserí:iostha Jock, Carole Clavier, Evelyne de Leeuw, Katherine L. Frohlich
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-09-17T01:29:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211044290
       
  • Travail de care des travailleuses de la santé en situation de pandémie
           de COVID-19 : quel engagement de la part des autorités
           gouvernementales'

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      Authors: Geneviève McCready, Marie-Ève Lajeunesse-Mousseau, Josée Lapalme, Sandra Harrisson
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      La COVID-19 a pressé les gouvernements à intervenir à l’aide de données partielles sur l’efficacité des moyens. Les femmes sont particulièrement touchées car elles sont plus nombreuses à s’occuper des autres. Cette étude a pour but de comprendre l’influence des décisions politiques sur les conditions de vie et de travail des travailleuses de la santé. Une analyse des interventions gouvernementales de santé publique du Québec et des revendications des travailleuses de la santé retrouvées dans les documents journalistiques et les communiqués de presse officiels du gouvernement (13 avril au 1er juillet 2020) a été effectuée. Les résultats démontrent le manque de reconnaissance des autorités face à certains types de care, ainsi qu’une inadéquation dans les moyens de prise en charge pour prendre soin de la population. Le peu de reconnaissance des conditions de vie et de travail lors de décisions politiques engendre une répartition inéquitable des fardeaux associés à la pandémie.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-09-16T05:13:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211042764
       
  • A connected community response to COVID-19 in Toronto

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      Authors: Garrett T. Morgan, Blake Poland, Suzanne F. Jackson, Anne Gloger, Sarah Luca, Norene Lach, Imara Ajani Rolston
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      In this commentary, we describe initial learnings from a community-based research project that explored how the relational space between residents and formal institutions in six marginalised communities in Toronto, Ontario, Canada impacted grassroots responses to the health and psycho-social stresses that were created and amplified by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Our research found that grassroots community leaders stepped up to fill the gaps left by Toronto’s formal public health and emergency management systems and were essential for mitigating the psycho-social and socioeconomic impacts of the pandemic that exacerbated pre-existing inequities and systemic failures. We suggest that building community resilience in marginalised communities in Toronto can embody health promotion in action where community members, organisational, institutional and government players create the social infrastructure necessary to build on local assets and work together to promote health by strengthening community action, advocating for healthy public policy and creating supportive environments.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-09-11T11:10:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211038258
       
  • Visioning the future of health promotion

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      Authors: Ilona Kickbusch
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19 has shown us clearly that the world must commit to a transformative approach that promotes health and wellbeing. Living in the Anthropocene – an epoch defined by human impact on our ecosystems – moves us into unknown territory. The challenge is to find a way of living that aims to meet the needs of all people within the means of the living planet. We will require foresight, agility and resilience to be well prepared. The global risks we face are enormous and they are interconnected – yet the opportunity to accelerate change for the better is extraordinary as well. We have models, knowledge and technologies at our disposal that could significantly improve health and wellbeing and create fairer and more sustainable societies – yet they have not been used widely to serve the public purpose and to address inequities.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-09-11T11:09:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211035705
       
  • Early perception, behavior, knowledge, and preventive practices related to
           COVID-19 among Palestinians

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      Authors: Basma Salim Salameh, Sami Basha, Jihad Abdallah, Walid Basha
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      It is necessary to understand early perception, behavior, and knowledge of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and preventive practices in relation to suggested policies and information accessible to the Palestinian population during the early stages of the pandemic. The aim of this research is to contribute to this understanding for the purpose of affecting future practical preventive policies that can be implemented and adapted in Palestine in order to shape a new reflective practices model to face any future epidemic crisis of any type. A cross-sectional design was used to conduct the study over 3 weeks in April 2020 and an online survey was disseminated in all areas of Palestine. A total of 1040 responses were collected from persons who were over 18 years of age. A high level of knowledge related to COVID-19 was found, including symptoms and characteristics of the virus, prevention practices, and at-risk groups. Respondents believe that they are more susceptible to influenza than COVID-19 and more likely to be infected by the influenza virus than the COVID-19 virus but expect that infection of influenza would be less severe than infection of COVID-19. Respondents were more inclined to find COVID-19 worrying and stressful than they were to find it fear-inducing. Around two-thirds of respondents believe that different types of COVID-19-related conspiracy theories are true to some degree. Going forward, it is crucial and essential to provide basic awareness among large populations around diseases, which can contribute to positively influencing people’s knowledge and attitudes and their perception toward such diseases and combat conspiracy theories.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-09-11T11:08:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211035092
       
  • Understanding the landscape and propagation of COVID-19 misinformation and
           its correction on Sina Weibo

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      Authors: Qinghua Yang, Zhifan Luo, Muyang Li, Jiangmeng Liu
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      The prevalence of health misinformation on social media could significantly influence individuals’ health behaviors. To examine the prevalent topics, propagation, and correction of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) misinformation, automated content analyses were conducted for posts on Sina Weibo, which is China’s largest microblogging site. In total, 177,816 posts related to COVID-19 misinformation during the COVID-19 outbreak in China were analyzed. The structural topic modeling identified 23 valid topics regarding COVID-19 misinformation and its correction, which were further categorized into three general themes. Sentiment analysis was conducted to generate positive and negative sentiment scores for each post. The zero-inflated Poisson model indicated that only the negative sentiment was a significant predictor of the number of comments (β = 0.003, p < 0.001) but not reposts. Furthermore, users are more prone to repost and comment on information regarding prevention/treatment (e.g., traditional Chinese medicine preventing COVID) as well as potential threats of COVID-19 (e.g., COVID-19 was defined as an epidemic by World Health Organization). Health education and promotion implications are discussed.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-09-11T11:06:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211035053
       
  • A health political science for health promotion

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      Authors: Evelyne de Leeuw, Patrick Harris, Jinhee Kim, Aryati Yashadhana
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      If health promotion as a field of change for human and ecological health is to maintain its urgency, it needs to continue building its policy credentials. This paper charts the development of policy as a concern for IUHE/IUHPE (International Union for Health Education/International Union for Health Promotion and Education) from the mid-1970s when ‘health education policies’ were prominent issues, to the launch of Healthy Public Policy (in the 1980s) and Health in All Policy (in the 2000s). We argue that solid conceptual and theoretical foundations exist to frame and develop the relevance and connectedness of health promotion more prominently. We start off with a brief introduction into (health) political science, and then illustrate the urgency of the argument with three case studies. The first takes a critical realist perspective on ‘closing the gap’ in Australian Indigenous populations. With recent evidence it demonstrates that the core of the policymaking process needs to re-align itself with an Indigenous narrative. The second case study reviews the politics of healthy urban planning and health equity in cities. Taking a critical theory institutionalist view, the case describes how the political and narrative parallels between urban theory and health equity have gone underexplored. With an explicit gaze to connect the two, the field could become a large and influential driver of enhanced health promotion and public health policy. The third case describes the languages, policy frames, and distinctions, in four urban/health paradigms. It shows that unconscious policy and practice bias exists in policy priorities and processes. We conclude with observations and recommendations on the role of health promotion as a conceptual realm and field of activity. We show that all health promoters should be aware of the political nature of their enterprise. Tools and analyses exist to help further action.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-09-11T11:05:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211034418
       
  • Re-envisioning health promotion: Thinking and acting salutogenically
           towards equity for historically resilient communities

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      Authors: Fungisai Gwanzura Ottemöller, Tulani Francis L. Matenga, J. Hope Corbin, Humaira Nakhuda, Peter Delobelle, Christa Ayele, Nikita Boston-Fisher, Stephanie Leitch, Josette Wicker, Oliver Mweemba
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores how the salutogenic theory can enable us to re-envision health promotion work with marginalized communities, towards an approach that acknowledges and honours their resilience. We use the three core concepts in Antonovsky’s salutogenic model of health – sense of coherence, generalized resistance resources and specific resistance resources – to explore the theory’s relevance to health equity, thus presenting new opportunities for how we might radically re-evaluate current health promotion approaches. We conclude that a more equitable health promotion requires increased participation of marginalized communities in shaping their futures and suggest a new model for historically grounded salutogenic health promotion.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-09-03T05:21:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211035089
       
  • Planetary health indicators for the local level: opportunities and
           challenges in applying the happy planet index in Victoria, Australia

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      Authors: Rebecca Patrick, Claire Henderson-Wilson, Justin Lawson, Teresa Capetola, Amy Shaw, Mia Davison, Alison Freeman
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, New Urban Agenda and Paris Agreement on Climate Change are blueprints for health promotion action that mandate human health is linked inextricably to the health of the environment. In the Anthropocene, new indicators are required to promote community engagement with, and measurement of, healthy and sustainable wellbeing for people and planet. This study explored the need for a metric such as the Happy Planet Index that explicitly links human health to health of the environment for a local level scale in Australia. The project arose from an international coalition of health promoters advocating for ‘planetary health’ approaches. Qualitative description methods guided the study design involving key informant interviews (n = 17) and four focus groups (n = 27 participants) with health and/or sustainability academics, practitioners and policy-makers. Document analysis of health and environment indices and policy mandates augmented the analysis. Qualitative content analysis techniques were used to analyse the findings. There was strong interest for a local level composite indicator, such as a rescaled Happy Planet Index (life expectancy × life satisfaction × equity adjustment/ecological footprint) for use at a local level. The value of a composite index was: its ability to promote community engagement with planetary health thinking; an advocacy tool for joint health and sustainability policy; to justify programs on health and environmental co-benefits; and to provide a mechanism for correlative comparisons between local governments and national comparisons. However, disciplinary silos currently limit partnerships for health promotion and planetary health and a local composite index could help bridge these divides.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-09-03T05:19:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211038367
       
  • Knowledge and perceptions of human trafficking among community-based and
           faith-based organization members in South Los Angeles

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      Authors: Zahra Mobasher, Susie B. Baldwin, Beatriz Navarro, Deanna Bressler-Montgomery, Jan King, Leila Family, Lisa V. Smith, Tony Kuo
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      The objectives of this study were (1) to assess the knowledge and perceptions of human trafficking (HT) among leaders and staff from 11 community-based organizations (CBOs) and faith-based organizations (FBOs) in South Los Angeles, and (2) to identify gaps in knowledge of HT and inform community organizations regarding possible best practices in health promotion for addressing this emerging public health problem. A self-administered survey was conducted during the period from 4 December 2015 to 28 January 2016. Descriptive statistics were generated and a logistic regression model was constructed using SAS 9.3. A total of 277 CBO and FBO leaders and staff completed the survey. Participants demonstrated high levels of knowledge of HT but their knowledge was not comprehensive, as gaps exist in recognizing the context in which HT usually takes place; understanding the local laws that govern this activity; and ways to follow related policies/procedures when the problem is suspected. A majority (a) believed there were not enough services in Los Angeles County to help survivors of HT, (b) could not recognize the signs of HT, and (c) did not know what steps to take if they suspected this criminal activity. A statistically significant association was found between education and participants’ knowledge of HT, and with their beliefs and attitudes toward this violation of human rights. Study findings suggest that, generally, CBO/FBO leaders and staff in South Los Angeles have good knowledge about HT. However, notable gaps in knowledge and misperceptions remain, suggesting opportunities for Public Health to further educate and intervene.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-07-30T05:21:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211028177
       
  • The IUHPE Health Promotion Accreditation System – developing and
           maintaining a competent health promotion workforce

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      Authors: Barbara Battel-Kirk, Shu-Ti Chiou, Liane Comeau, Ronan Dillon, Kirsten Doherty, Andrew Jones-Roberts, Tia Lockwood, Marguerite Claire Sendall, Viv Speller, Margaret M Barry
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      This commentary reports on the development and implementation of the competency-based IUHPE Health Promotion Accreditation System in the context of workforce capacity as a key activity of the International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE). The process of developing the System is described, including how it built on, and added to, international research and experience in competency-based approaches to health promotion. An overview of how the System works, its current status and future plans, is presented. Evidence of the positive impact of the System to date, in particular in the context of health promotion education, is considered.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-07-26T05:02:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211029603
       
  • Health-promoting university: the implementation of an integrated guidance
           post for non-communicable diseases (Posbindu PTM) among university
           employees

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      Authors: Tri Siswati, Margono, Novi Husmarini, Yuliasti Eka Purnamaningrum, Bunga Astria Paramashanti
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) remain a challenge globally and in Indonesia. Workplace environments may place employees at risk for NCD behavioral factors. This study aimed to develop an integrated guidance post for NCD (in Indonesian, ‘pos pembinaan terpadu penyakit tidak menular’ [Posbindu PTM] early detection among employees in one of the Indonesian universities. Posbindu PTM is a community-based program oriented towards promotive and preventive efforts to control NCDs where the community acted as change agents. We conducted a process evaluation based on a quantitative approach through a survey (n = 313) and a qualitative method using in-depth interviews (n = 12) to support our findings that Posbindu PTM was acceptable and feasible to implement in a university context. High participation in Posbindu PTM showed that the program could encourage the university employees to join NCD prevention strategies from early detection to counseling and referral. All participants positively accepted Posbindu PTM for its benefits to health, the flexibility of the program, and the quality service provided by cadres. A need-based program planning, commitment from university leaders, adequate human resources and facilitation, and cooperation between departments, the clinic, and local primary health center and health department determined the success of Posbindu PTM implementation. In contrast, external activities negatively affected participants to join Posbindu PTM. There is a need for more routine scheduling and online-based application to enhance the program’s performance. Posbindu PTM is essential for engaging employees with their health and may serve as a model for NCD prevention and control in similar settings. With Posbindu PTM implementation’s success, a further stage is required to empower and sustain the Posbindu PTM program towards health-promoting universities.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T10:25:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211021363
       
  • Psychological response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada: main stressors
           and assets

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      Authors: Mélissa Généreux, Mathieu Roy, Marc D. David, Marie-Ève Carignan, Gabriel Blouin-Genest, S.M. Zeeshan Qadar, Olivier Champagne-Poirier
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The COVID-19 crisis has unique features that increase the sense of fear, and comes with additional stressors (e.g., confusion, discrimination, quarantine), which can lead to adverse psychological responses. There is however limited understanding of differences between sociocultural contexts in psychological response to pandemics and other disasters.Objective:To examine how Canadians in different provinces, and with different governance modes and sociocultural contexts, understand and react to the COVID-19 pandemic.Methods:A web-based survey was conducted from April 8–11, 2020, among a representative sample of 600 Canadian adults from two different contexts (n=300 in Quebec, the French part of Canada, and n=300 elsewhere in Canada). Two psychological outcomes were assessed: probable post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and probable generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The roles of various stressors (i.e., threat perceived for oneself or family/friends, quarantine or isolation, financial losses, victims of stigma), assets (i.e., trust in authorities, information received, and compliance with directives) and sources of information used on these two outcomes were also examined. Chi-square tests were performed to examine differences in the distribution of probable PTSD and GAD according to these stressors and assets.Results:Probable PTSD and GAD were observed in 25.5% and 25.4% of the respondents, respectively. These proportions were significantly lower in Quebec than elsewhere in Canada. Perceiving a high level of threat and being a victim of stigma were positively associated with probable PTSD and GAD (but not quarantine/isolation and financial losses). A high level of trust in authorities was the only asset associated with a lower risk of PTSD or GAD. Interestingly, this asset was more frequently reported in Quebec than elsewhere in Canada.Conclusion:The COVID-19 pandemic represents a unique opportunity to evaluate the psychosocial impacts on various sociocultural groups and contexts, providing important lessons that could help respond to future disasters.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T10:25:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211023671
       
  • Tobacco epidemic in Jordan: the time to act is now

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      Authors: Ala’a B. Al-Tammemi
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Tobacco use still represents a major threat to global public health and this calls for extensive efforts to control tobacco products and advocate harm-reduction policies. Recent global trends of prevalence rates in smoking are promising, as trajectories show a decline in all World Health Organization regions. Yet, this decline varies significantly at the national level. Jordan, as a country in the Eastern Mediterranean Region, has been in a long battle against tobacco. Despite that, the country is found to have one of the highest prevalence rates of tobacco use in the region and the world. Many challenges slow down effective and successful anti-tobacco policy implementation in Jordan, most notably cultural influences on smoking and the interference of the tobacco industry in tobacco policy making. Decision makers in Jordan should consider strengthening of anti-tobacco measures to avoid a public health catastrophe if tobacco use keeps rising at the current pace.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T10:25:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211026181
       
  • ‘Let me move to another level’: career advancement desires and
           opportunities for community health nurses in Ghana

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      Authors: Meghan Bellerose, Koku Awoonor-Williams, Soumya Alva, Sophia Magalona, Emma Sacks
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Career advancement and continued education are critical components of health worker motivation and retention. Continuous advancement also builds health system capacity by ensuring that leaders are those with experience and strong performance records. To understand more about the satisfaction, desires, and career opportunities available to community health nurses (CHNs) in Ghana, we conducted 29 in-depth interviews and four focus group discussions across five predominantly rural districts. Interview transcripts and summary notes were coded in NVivo based on pre-defined and emergent codes using thematic content analysis. Frustration with existing opportunities for career advancement and continued education emerged as key themes. Overall, the CHNs desired greater opportunities for career development, as most aspired to return to school to pursue higher-level health positions. While workshops were available to improve CHNs knowledge and skills, they were infrequent and irregular. CHNs wanted greater recognition for their work experience in the form of respect from leaders within the Ghana Health System and credit towards future degree programs. CHNs are part of a rapidly expanding cadre of salaried community-based workers in sub-Saharan Africa, and information about their experiences and needs can be used to shape future health policy and program planning.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T10:24:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211027426
       
  • Scoping health literacy in Latin America

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      Authors: E. Arrighi, E. M. Ruiz de Castilla, F. Peres, R. Mejía, K. Sørensen, C. Gunther, R. Lopez, L. Myers, J. G. Quijada, M. Vichnin, A. Pleasant
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Studies evaluating the influence of health literacy on patient behavior and outcomes suggest a positive relationship between health literacy and health knowledge, health behaviors, and health status. In Latin American countries, studies assessing health literacy are few, regional, and demonstrate considerable variation, with reported rates of adequate health literacy ranging from 5.0% to 73.3%. In this paper, we examine and explore the state of health literacy and efforts to promote it in Latin America. Key challenges to those efforts include socioeconomic inequality, social/geographic isolation, and cultural-, language-, and policy-related barriers, many of which disproportionately affect indigenous populations and others living in rural areas. Greater use of infographics, videos, and mobile apps may enhance health literacy and patient empowerment, especially when language barriers exist. This paper provides strategies and tools for tailored programming, examples of successful health literacy interventions, and policy recommendations to improve health literacy in Latin America, intending to spur additional discussion and action. Centrally organized collaboration across multiple sectors of society, with community involvement, will enhance health literacy and improve health and well-being across Latin America.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-06-25T10:22:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211016802
       
  • The COVID-19 and lifestyle nexus: settling the debate

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      Authors: Sathyanarayanan Doraiswamy, Sohaila Cheema, Ravinder Mamtani
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      A recent debate that has gained our attention is that of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) being referred to as a lifestyle disease by the Royal College of General Practitioners (in the title of an online event) for which they later apologized and withdrew the reference. In this commentary, we demystify diseases related to ‘lifestyle’ and put this in the context of the age-old public health way of classifying diseases as communicable and non-communicable (NCDs). Evidence indicates that unhealthy lifestyles, in addition to causing NCDs, can also result in reduced immunity and/or cause injury to organs predisposing individuals to diseases, and their severity, traditionally defined as ‘communicable’ such as COVID-19. COVID-19 has demonstrated the nexus between communicable and NCDs as never before in no uncertain terms. Two important messages that have emerged from the pandemic are: (1) there is close proximity of communicable diseases to NCDs; and (2) individual personal hygiene-related lifestyles can influence the occurrence, severity and prevention of communicable diseases such as COVID-19.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-06-24T12:21:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211018417
       
  • Designing a multi-component ‘Stop Bullying-School Intervention
           Program’ in Chandigarh, a North Indian Union Territory

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      Authors: Monica Rana, Madhu Gupta, Prahbhjot Malhi, Sandeep Grover, Manmeet Kaur
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Bullying, a prevalent global public health issue, is proven to have an adverse impact on the physical and psychological health of school students. There are few intervention programs to prevent bullying in the South East Asian Region, and none in India. The objective of this study was to design a multi-component antibullying intervention program known as ‘Stop Bullying–School Intervention Program (SB-SIP)’ for school students. It was developed in five stages. Stage one was the review of existing literature on intervention studies to prevent bullying, globally. A qualitative study to explore the beliefs and perceptions of teachers, students, and parents regarding antibullying intervention programs was conducted in stage two. In the third stage, a conceptual model was framed. A consultation workshop was conducted to finalize the contents of the intervention in the fourth stage. Pretesting of the intervention was done in the fifth stage. The literature review provided evidence that a whole-school intervention program based on the socio-ecological model was the most effective. The awareness of the effects of bullying and effective strategies to prevent it in the school setting was suggested to be part of the SB-SIP by the majority of the participants in the focus group discussions. The recommendations given by the stakeholders in the consultation workshop contributed mainly to the method of delivery of the program. The five-stage process helped in recognition of the conceptual model and modifiable factors, which exerts its effects on bullying and its psychosocial outcome, through which the multi-component antibullying intervention program SB-SIP was finalized.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-06-23T11:20:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211021061
       
  • The potential effects of autonomous vehicles on walking

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      Authors: Simone Pettigrew
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Vehicle automation is progressing rapidly and autonomous vehicles (AVs) are forecast to become a central feature of transportation systems globally. This development has the potential to result in profound changes in walking behaviors. The present study examined this issue from the perspective of relevant experts for the purpose of informing health policy. Interviews were conducted with 44 key stakeholders in Australia (n = 34), the European Union (n = 5), the UK (n = 4), and the US (n = 1). The stakeholders represented a wide range of sectors including government, AV manufacturing/servicing companies, transport policy consortiums, technology firms, insurers (public and private), trade unions, consumer representation organizations, and academia. Two potential scenarios were evident in interviewees’ discussions of the ways AVs are likely to be introduced and the implications for walking behaviors. The most beneficial scenario, but the least likely to eventuate, was considered to be the situation where people relinquish private vehicle ownership and rely on a combination of walking, public transport, and on-demand transport. The alternative scenario involved greater private AV ownership, traffic congestion, and urban sprawl, resulting in less walking activity. The convergence of the stakeholders’ views around the opposing identified scenarios highlights the need for proactive policy development to ensure the emerging transport transformation does not result in substantial increases in sedentarism.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-06-23T11:17:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211019219
       
  • Transformative health promotion: what is needed to advance progress'

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      Authors: Margaret M. Barry
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Transformative health promotion actions are needed to achieve health equity and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), advance human and planetary wellbeing, and ensure that we build back better post-COVID-19. Health policies and systems need to be aligned with the values, principles and strategies of health promotion and investment made in strengthening essential health promotion functions. This paper considers how transformative health promotion can be advanced, by reflecting critically on what progress needs to be made and the structures and processes that are required to strengthen health promotion at a systems level. Progress in implementing health promotion is variable, and there is a general lack of investment in developing the necessary health promotion systems for substantive progress to be made. Key enablers and system requirements for comprehensive health promotion are examined, including the following critical elements: (i) effective advocacy for the concept and practice of health promotion; (ii) enabling policy structures for universal health promotion actions on a cross-sectoral basis; (iii) effective implementation systems, support mechanisms and workforce capacity for multisectoral health promotion action; (iv) investment in innovative research methods and knowledge translation to inform transformative health promotion approaches. In strengthening capacity to implement transformative health promotion actions, political will needs to be mobilized to ensure that dedicated and sustainable funding is made available, and the organizational and workforce capacity to deliver effective health promotion interventions is in place. The International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) plays a central role in advancing transformative health promotion through mobilising and supporting its global members and partners in strengthening health promotion systems.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-06-23T11:15:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211013766
       
  • Dismantling the status quo: promoting policies for health, well-being and
           equity: an IUHPE2022 prelude

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      Authors: Brittany Wenniserí:iostha Jock, Carole Clavier, Evelyne de Leeuw, Katherine L. Frohlich
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      The next international gathering of the global health promotion family will be in Montreal, in May 2022. The 24th IUHPE conference is themed ‘Promoting policies for health, well-being and equity’. Conference organizers have decided to transcend the ‘usual suspects’ rhetoric and frame a conference program that truly challenges these key notions for health promotion. In this contribution, members of the Canadian National and Global Scientific Committees reflect on the state of play and the opportunities ahead. We propose three themes as follows: (a) breaking news (the promise and opportunities for disruptions and tipping points, whether from pandemic health challenges, climate change, geopolitical shifts, social unrest or technological promise); (b) breaking free (from world-views that favor only market solutions, divisions between North and South, toward emancipatory decolonizing practices and knowledge systems); and (c) breaking through (disciplines, silos, boundaries and identities engrained in our practices and understandings for innovation.)
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-06-16T08:13:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211019214
       
  • The picture of smoking in my mind: a need for effective anti-smoking
           public service announcements based on the self-construals of smokers

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      Authors: Mutlu Önen, Forrest Watson
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      This qualitative study sought to understand the behaviours of smokers with independent and interdependent self-construals to design effective anti-smoking public service announcements (PSAs). Findings from the participants’ narratives and drawings suggest that individualistic message content (focused on the individual smoker) can be effective for smokers with independent self-construal, while collectivistic message content (focused on a smoker group) can be effective for smokers with interdependent self-construal to increase their quitting intentions. This study also revealed characteristics of the smoker groups in terms of routines, meanings and symbolic values of smoking, which can be used to enrich the contents for anti-smoking PSAs. The implications of this study are discussed for public policy makers and nonprofit organizations that seek to match their message with the audience to improve public health.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-06-12T08:29:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211015178
       
  • COVID-19 and health promotion in Brazil: community health workers between
           vulnerability and resistance

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      Authors: Gabriela Lotta, João Nunes
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Health promotion in Brazil relies on community health workers (CHWs), frontline providers linking the health system with vulnerable groups. Brazilian CHWs are overwhelmingly women from poor backgrounds, with precarious and sometimes hazardous working conditions, as well as fragmented and unsystematic training. This paper evaluates how the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated pre-existing vulnerabilities of CHWs (pertaining to low salary, precarious and hazardous working conditions and inadequate training) and created new ones, with a profound impact on their ability to carry out health promotion activities. Drawing on testimonials of dozens of CHWs and online discussions promoted by their unions, the paper reveals that during the pandemic CHWs were asked to continue their work without adequate training and protective equipment, thus exposing themselves to the risk of infection. It further shows how the pandemic rendered dangerous the close interaction with patients that is at the heart of their health promotion role. Nonetheless, CHWs sought to adapt their work. In the absence of leadership and coordination on the part of the federal government, CHWs mobilized different forms of resistance at the national and individual levels. Despite this, COVID-19 contributed to a trajectory of erosion of health promotion in Brazil. Findings from this case signal the difficulties for health promotion in low- and middle-income countries relying on CHWs to bridge the health system and vulnerable users.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-06-11T06:35:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211012375
       
  • Climate change impacts on indigenous health promotion: the case study of
           Dikgale community in Limpopo Province, South Africa

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      Authors: Sejabaledi A. Rankoana
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      The most important determinants of indigenous health promotion are availability and accessibility of water, food and traditional medicine. It is for this reason that the 1986 Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion proposed the inclusion of food, water and ecosystems in any health promotion strategies. The present study describes the extent to which climate change in the form of rainfall scarcity and increased temperatures impacts the availability and accessibility of quality water, food and traditional medicine as basic determinants of indigenous health promotion. In-depth interviews were conducted with 240 participants purposely selected from Dikgale community in Limpopo Province, South Africa. The study results show that availability and accessibility of water, food and traditional medicine are negatively impacted by increased temperature and scarcity of rainfall. These resources are scarcely encountered, and where they exist, they are of poor quality. However, community members resorted to modern technological practices such as sourcing water from the municipal water reticulation system, buying foodstuffs from retail outlets and immunization against disease via modern health care facilities. It can be deduced from the study that the prerequisites of indigenous health promotion are climate-sensitive. They become available and accessible under favourable climate conditions, and are scarce under unfavourable climate conditions, a situation that compromises the practice of indigenous health promotion.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-06-10T10:21:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211015183
       
  • Desarrollo de un proceso participativo para el diagnóstico de salud
           comunitaria en estudiantes de la Universidad Miguel Hernández: Proyecto
           #beUMHealthy

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      Authors: Desirée Valera-Gran, Daniel Prieto-Botella, Miriam Hurtado-Pomares, Sergio Hernández-Sánchez, Manoli Garcia-de-la-Hera, Eva María Navarrete-Muñoz, María Teresa Pérez-Vazquez
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Los procesos participativos permiten analizar, comprender, debatir y promover la acción colectiva en asuntos significativos para una comunidad. Estas metodologías activas favorecen la identificación de necesidades y activos en salud para elaborar un diagnóstico de salud comunitaria y promover acciones colectivas. En este sentido, la aplicación de los procesos participativos en el contexto universitario resulta de gran interés para el fortalecimiento de las universidades como comunidades promotoras de la salud. En este trabajo se describe el desarrollo del proceso participativo #beUMHealthy, cuyo objetivo principal fue potenciar el debate sobre la salud y las iniciativas de promoción de la salud en el alumnado de la Universidad Miguel Hernández (UMH). El proyecto se desarrolló entre mayo y noviembre del 2019. Se recogieron 22 participaciones mediante WhatsApp y 173 cuestionarios diligenciados en línea. Este proceso permitió identificar necesidades y activos en salud en el alumnado de la UMH y obtener propuestas para su mejora. Esta información se usará para promover acciones futuras que incrementen la salud de la comunidad universitaria.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-05-27T09:41:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211015912
       
  • Efectos de las acciones de prevención y control del SARS-CoV-2: la
           importancia de tender puentes entre la salud pública y las intervenciones
           para la atención de las violencias de género

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      Authors: Claudia Gómez López
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      La Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS) respalda la cuarentena como uno de los mecanismos más efectivos para el control del SARS-CoV-2. Sin embargo, dicha medida en salud pública trae consigo impactos diferenciados. Las cifras de Bogotá, Distrito Capital de Colombia, evidencian que esta medida entra en conflicto con la garantía y la no vulneración de otros derechos. Una vez instaurada en Bogotá la cuarentena obligatoria, el número de reportes de casos de violencia contra las mujeres aumentó en más del 200%. El Distrito, consciente del riesgo que supone para las mujeres el aislamiento social en convivencia con el (los) agresor(es), activó cinco intervenciones para la prevención de las violencias, el acompañamiento a las víctimas y la mitigación del riesgo feminicida. Las intervenciones implementadas pusieron de manifiesto que, pese a los avances normativos y de política pública, es necesario fortalecer, durante la pandemia y en el largo plazo, la respuesta institucional a las violencias de género, en términos de activación y flexibilización de la ruta de atención, fortalecimiento del sistema de protección y, en particular, la articulación interinstitucional e intersectorial para dar una respuesta integral que derive en el restablecimiento de derechos. La experiencia de Bogotá insta al diálogo entre las acciones en salud y los derechos fundamentales en el marco de la atención a una crisis social y de salud, y a trascender las intervenciones clínicas y epidemiológicas dando lugar a estrategias más integrales, en términos de bienestar poblacional.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-05-27T09:41:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211010684
       
  • Proyecto piloto de promoción de la salud en consumo dual de cannabis y
           tabaco en universitarios: ÉVICT-Universidad

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      Authors: Víctor J. Villanueva, Eva Herrera-Gutiérrez, Susana Redondo-Martín, Manuel Isorna, Adelaida Lozano-Polo
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Introducción:La universidad es el lugar de formación de los futuros profesionales de los ámbitos educativo, sanitario y social. La implementación de programas de formación, prevención de adicciones y promoción de la salud con universitarios provoca un doble impacto, sobre el propio individuo y, dado su papel mediador, sobre la comunidad universitaria en general. El objetivo del trabajo es, partiendo de un proyecto piloto de investigación-acción, establecer un marco de promoción de la salud en contraposición al consumo dual de cannabis y tabaco en el contexto universitario, involucrando a la comunidad universitaria como agente de cambio.Metodología:Estudio descriptivo de la implementación, cobertura y resultados preliminares del Proyecto piloto ÉVICT-Universidad.Resultados:Entre el 2018 y el 2020 se implementó el Proyecto ÉVICT-Universidad en 11 universidades. Se formó a estudiantes universitarios como mediadores y se realizaron actividades comunitarias de sensibilización e información orientadas a la promoción de la salud y la prevención del uso de cannabis y tabaco, con especial foco en el consumo dual de estas sustancias, alcanzando a un total de 1471 beneficiarios en los tres años de implementación.Conclusiones:La experiencia piloto permite detectar fortalezas, aspectos de mejora y resultados prometedores sobre el nivel de conocimientos, contribuyendo a la adopción de estilos de vida saludables en el ámbito universitario. En especial, se destaca la contribución a la formación como agentes promotores de salud de estudiantes y, por tanto, el empoderamiento en salud desde la propia comunidad universitaria.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-05-21T06:49:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211007454
       
  • Effets d’un programme de développement des compétences psychosociales
           en milieu scolaire : Le PROgramme de Développement Affectif et Social
           (PRODAS) : Revue de la littérature

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      Authors: Aurélie Tardy, Brimbelle Roth, Alexandre Daguzan, Roland Sambuc, Marie-Claude Lagouanelle-Simeoni
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Objectif :Le Programme de Développement Affectif et Social (PRODAS) est un programme de développement des compétences psychosociales des enfants ou adolescents mis en œuvre depuis 2005 en milieu scolaire par une association française (le Planning familial). L’objectif de cet article était de synthétiser les connaissances sur les effets de ce programme, afin de contribuer à l’étude de sa transférabilité.Méthodes :La revue de littérature réalisée a porté sur des études datant de 1970 à 2017. Ont été interrogées les bases de données : ScienceDirect, PsycNET, ERIC, PsycINFO, erudit, ISIDOR, Cochrane. Les mots clés utilisés étaient « Human Development Program » ou « PRODAS ».Résultats :Une amélioration, le plus souvent significative, des compétences émotionnelles et sociales des enfants et des adolescents était rapportée. Une relation de type dose-effet était également suggérée par certains résultats. Peu de données étaient disponibles chez les jeunes enfants (école maternelle) et aucune étude n’explorait les effets du programme à long terme.Conclusion :Cette synthèse a permis de mettre en lumière les principaux effets du PRODAS. Toutefois, considérant que ce programme est un des seuls à s’adresser aux enfants dès 4 ans en France, de futures études portant sur des enfants d’écoles maternelles, avec un suivi à long terme, seraient utiles pour compléter les données sur l’efficacité d’un tel programme.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-05-03T06:47:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211007456
       
  • Individual and community experience of rising burden of non-communicable
           diseases in two case districts of Nepal: a qualitative exploration

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      Authors: Sudesh R. Sharma, Anna Matheson, Danielle Lambrick, James Faulkner, David W. Lounsbury, Abhinav Vaidya, Rachel Page
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a rapidly emerging global health challenge with multi-level determinants popularly known as social determinants. The objective of this paper is to describe the individual and community experiences of NCDs in the two case districts of Nepal from a social determinants of health perspective.Method:This study adopted qualitative study design to identify the experiences of NCDs. Sixty-three interviews were conducted with key informants from different sectors pertinent to NCD prevention at two case districts and at the policy level in Nepal. Twelve focus group discussions were conducted in the selected communities within those case districts. Data collection and analysis were informed by the adapted Social Determinants of Health Framework. The research team utilised the framework approach to carry out the thematic analysis. The study also involved three sense-making workshops with policy level and local stakeholders.Results:Three key themes emerged during the analysis. The first theme highlighted that individuals and communities were experiencing the rising burden of NCDs and metabolic risks in both urban and rural areas. The other two themes elaborated on the participant’s experiences based on their socio-economic background and gender. Disadvantaged populations were more vulnerable to the risk of NCDs. Further, being female put one into an even more disadvantaged position in experiencing NCD risks and accessing health services.Conclusion:The findings indicated that key social determinants such as age, geographical location, socio-economic status and gender were driving the NCD epidemic. There is an urgent need to take action on social determinants of health through multi-sectoral action, thus also translating the spirit of the recommendations made a decade ago by the Commission on Social Determinants of Health in addressing a complex challenge like NCDs in Nepal.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-04-13T06:17:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211001718
       
  • Structured internship in health promotion: an approach used in a
           middle-income developing country—Jamaica

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      Authors: Nickesha Noreen Fowler-Holdham, Desmalee Holder-Nevins, Dawn Walters
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Internship programmes have the potential to provide learning and professional experiences, build students’ competency and strengthen partnerships between community and training institutions. In this paper, we examine the extent to which a structured internship at The University of the West Indies contributed to experience and competency-building, provided focus and met learners’ expectations and satisfaction among a cohort of unpaid health promotion interns. The contribution of placements to the strengthening of health education and promotion competencies and interns’ feelings about their experiences are included. Twenty-four (24) internship reports were reviewed using a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods. The majority of interns were Jamaicans (70.8%), 12.5% were from Dominica and the remaining 16.7% represented other nationalities. Health professionals comprised the highest percentage of cohorts (79.2%) and governmental agencies comprised the largest proportion (63%) of internship sites. Activities undertaken were in the areas of planning, implementing and evaluating programmes (71%) and conducting needs assessments (63%). Communication-related activities were reported by 43% of interns. Twenty-one per cent were engaged in lobbying and collaboration with other partners, while 23% established committees to oversee the sustainability of initiatives. While some interns reported negative experiences with supervision at their placement agencies, all valued internship seminars, which they found as a supportive environment in which they were able to share their progress with peers and academics. The opportunity for applying theory to practice and acting as resource persons were reflected as positives. The structured internship approach seems to have merits for building competence and engendering individual satisfaction.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-03-23T05:52:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1757975921995716
       
  • Validation of an educational game to promote cardiovascular health in
           children

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      Authors: Francisca Bertilia Chaves Costa, Ana Maria Fontenelle Catrib, Lana Paula Crivelaro Monteiro de Almeida, Zélia Maria de Souza Araújo Santos, July Grassiely de Oliveira Branco, Carlos Antonio Bruno da Silva
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:The aim of this study was to validate the content and appearance of an educational game for children aged 7 to 10 years, focusing mainly on cardiovascular health promotion.Method:The study used methodological research, with a quantitative approach. The validation process included the participation of 17 specialists in children and/or cardiovascular health. A concordance index of at least 0.80 was considered for content validation and 0.75 for the appearance of the proposed educational material.Results:The proposal of the educational game was considered valid, through some suggestions, in view of the purpose of sensitizing children in relation to the promotion of cardiovascular health while still in childhood.Final considerations:As a relevant factor in the use of games as strategies to improve health education, we emphasize that the participant is the active agent and the protagonist of the health-disease process.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-03-20T05:10:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1757975921996684
       
  • TABADO 2 : une stratégie d’accompagnement au sevrage tabagique des
           adolescents en milieu scolaire

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      Authors: Amandine Vallata, Marjorie Cadeville, Charlotte Kanski, François Alla
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      La consommation de tabac est une des premières causes de mortalité évitable au niveau mondial. La dépendance au tabac s’observe dès l’adolescence. En complément des actions visant à prévenir l’entrée des jeunes dans le tabagisme, il est donc nécessaire de développer des stratégies spécifiques pour les adolescents déjà fumeurs. Un programme d’accompagnement au sevrage tabagique pour adolescents, TABADO, a montré son efficacité lors d’un essai contrôlé mené dans des centres de formation des apprentis en 2007/2009. En 2018, l’Institut national du cancer a souhaité généraliser TABADO au niveau national et l’étendre aux lycées professionnels. Pour accompagner ce processus de mise à l’échelle, il était essentiel d’élaborer la théorie d’intervention et d’analyser la transférabilité de TABADO en conditions de vie réelle et dans de nouveaux contextes, et de proposer les adaptations correspondantes. Une recherche spécifique a été conduite et détaillée par ailleurs. L’objectif de cette publication pragmatique est de présenter la nouvelle stratégie TABADO 2 aux acteurs et décideurs de santé publique, et le guide afférent développé pour les accompagner dans la mise en œuvre.Une étude de cas multiples (n = 10) a été menée à partir de la mise en œuvre de TABADO dans trois régions françaises, qui reposait sur des observations, entretiens et séminaires de retour d’expérience. Elle a mis en évidence l’adaptation de l’intervention aux contextes locaux, ainsi que de nouveaux leviers interventionnels mis en œuvre. De plus, les investigations ont montré que pour instaurer un climat favorable à la démarche d’arrêt de la consommation de tabac et soutenir son maintien sur la durée, il était nécessaire d’inscrire TABADO dans une stratégie globale de l’établissement scolaire et de son environnement. Cette démarche a permis de proposer une transformation de l’intervention TABADO en une nouvelle stratégie – TABADO 2 – et de proposer un guide pour accompagner son déploiement national.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-03-20T05:07:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1757975921997721
       
  • Tackling social inequalities in health: acceptability and feasibility of a
           systematic approach toward health impact assessment of urban projects

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      Authors: Geneviève Bretagne, Jeanne Blanc-Février, Thierry Lang
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:The general objective of this research project was to explore the feasibility and acceptability of an original method intended to systematically identify urban planning projects whose potential impacts on health and social inequalities in health (SIH) would be most damaging. An approach based on a short meeting and a tool would help to discuss whether or not to engage in a more comprehensive health impact assessment.Methods:A tool was developed by the research team based on various tools reported in the literature and modified with urban planners. Meetings were organized for each development project with the volunteer planners, who were working on the projects selected. Reviews of six projects at different stages of design made it possible to assess the acceptability and feasibility of this approach to identify public health and social equity issues in health.Results:The process and the use of the tool were found to be feasible. The tool was easily understandable, adapted to the practices of planners and usable without real training other than a quick introduction to tool usage. It was also found to be acceptable. Despite an interest in the inclusion of SIH, the integration of the relationship between SIH and urban development was not easy for most of the urban planners.Conclusion:This exploratory work suggests that a systematic approach to assessing the impact of urban projects on health and SIH is feasible and acceptable. Dealing with SIH was not found to be easy by the urban planners.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-03-20T05:03:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1757975921995468
       
  • Health services, intersectoriality and social control: a comparative study
           on a conditional income transfer program

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      Authors: José Anael Neves, Lia Thieme Oikawa Zangirolani, Maria Angélica Tavares de Medeiros
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      The Bolsa Família Program (BFP) is one of the largest conditional cash transfer programs in the world, providing cash transfers and intersectoral actions. The aim of this study was to compare whether there is a difference in access to health services, intersectoral actions and social control, between families entitled or not, to the BFP. A cross-sectional study was carried out. A representative sample of a peripheral, socioeconomically vulnerable population from a large urban center in southeastern Brazil was calculated, totaling 380 families. Chi-square or Fisher’s exact tests and multiple correspondence analysis were used to compare groups. Families entitled to the BFP had worse living conditions in general and greater access to health services, such as: medical care (p-value 0.009), community healthcare agent (p-value 0.001) and home visits (p-value 0.041). Being entitled or not affected the variability in the pattern of access to services by 31%; low access to intersectoral actions was identified in both groups; social control was incipient. There was an adequate focus on the program; greater access to health services was related to compliance with conditionalities; low access to intersectoral actions can restrict the interruption of the cycle of intergenerational transmission of poverty.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-03-15T12:02:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1757975921996150
       
  • Peri-urban water, sanitation and hygiene in Lusaka, Zambia: photovoice
           empowering local assessment via ecological theory

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      Authors: Sikopo Nyambe, Taro Yamauchi
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) factors are responsible for 11.4% of deaths in Zambia, making WASH a key public health concern. Despite annual waterborne disease outbreaks in the nation’s peri-urban (slum) settlements being linked to poor WASH, few studies have proactively analysed and conceptualised peri-urban WASH and its maintaining factors. Our study aimed to (a) establish residents’ definition of peri-urban WASH and their WASH priorities; and (b) use ecological theory to analyse the peri-urban WASH ecosystem, highlighting maintaining factors. Our study incorporated 16 young people (aged 17–24) residing in peri-urban Lusaka, Zambia in a photovoice exercise. Participants took photographs answering the framing question, ‘What is WASH in your community'’ Then, through contextualisation and basic codifying, participants told the stories of their photographs and made posters to summarise problems and WASH priorities. Participant contextualisation and codifying further underwent theoretical thematic analysis to pinpoint causal factors alongside key players, dissecting the peri-urban WASH ecosystem via the five-tier ecological theory ranging from intrapersonal to public policy levels. Via ecological theory, peri-urban WASH was defined as: (a) poor practice (intrapersonal, interpersonal); (b) a health hazard (community norm); (c) substandard and unregulated (public policy, organisational); and (d) offering hope for change (intrapersonal, interpersonal). Linked to these themes, participant findings revealed a community level gap, with public policy level standards, regulations and implementation having minimal impact on overall peri-urban WASH and public health due to shallow community engagement and poor acknowledgement of the WASH realities of high-density locations. Rather than a top-down approach, participants recommended increased government–resident collaboration, offering residents more ownership and empowerment for intervention, implementation and defending of preferred peri-urban WASH standards.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-03-06T08:55:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1757975921995713
       
  • The critical role of health promotion for effective universal health
           coverage

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      Authors: Trevor Shilton, Margaret M. Barry
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      The Political Declaration from the United Nations High-Level Meeting on Universal Health Coverage: Moving Together to Build a Healthier World (2019) provided important reaffirmation of health as a precondition for sustainable development and equity, as well as of the role for primary care as a cornerstone of universal health coverage. Health promotion, prevention and sustainable healthcare go hand in glove. Health promotion can enable more effective use of health resources by reducing demand for expensive health services and reducing hospital admissions. Promoting mental and physical health, and addressing health literacy and the social determinants of health, enables governments and departments of health to (i) empower citizens and communities to take control of their health, and (ii) better support innovative and financially sustainable healthcare. Without the bedrock underpinning of effective health promotion, treasuries and health systems will struggle to meet the rising costs and burden of ill health.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-02-04T06:58:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1757975920984217
       
  • Description of an integrated e-health monitoring system in a Portuguese
           higher education institution: the e.cuidHaMUstm program

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      Authors: Maria Piedade Brandão, Pedro Sa-Couto, Gonçalo Gomes, Pedro Beça
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The World Health Organization and the International Labour Organization recognize that workplace health is not only affected by occupational hazards, but is mainly affected by social determinants and individual factors. An accelerated rise in noncommunicable diseases has fostered the importance of creating supportive environments and encouraging healthy behaviours. Therefore, an operational approach to making workplaces healthy and sustainable is needed. This paper describes the development of an e-Health monitoring program entitled ‘Integrated eHealth Monitoring System for Health Management in Universities’ (e.cuidHaMUsTM) as a possible solution to that operational approach.Methods:We developed the program e.cuidHaMUsTM that proposes to detect risk behaviours related to noncommunicable diseases and to implement problem-solving measures by establishing a health-promoting workspace in a Portuguese higher education institution. Based on the ‘I-Change’ conceptual model, our program provides personalized feedback; improves health-related knowledge, attitude and good practices; and encourages actions to promote healthy lifestyles through individual health capacitation. Focusing on evaluation as an activity that generates knowledge, the e.cuidHaMUsTM program aggregates all the relevant health information, shares the results with decision-makers and evaluates health-related policy changes in the workplace.Discussion:This paper presents the design of the e.cuidHaMUsTM program, the development of an eHealth web platform to share information between the different stakeholders, and a questionnaire to evaluate the health status of higher education institution workers (e.cuidHaMUs.QueST®). Also, the procedures for data collection and analysis are outlined. The e.cuidHaMUsTM program can enhance health surveillance through cross-sectional and longitudinal studies and provide scientific evidence to support the envisioned interventions and promotions of healthy lifestyles. This program is an effort to incorporate a holistic culture of health-promoting workspace in higher education institution policies.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-02-03T07:11:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1757975920984222
       
  • Healthy cities and self-reported health: evidence from Israel

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      Authors: Dana Bar Ilan, Yaniv Reingewertz, Orna Baron-Epel
      First page: 41
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      The World Health Organization’s Healthy Cities Network (HCN) enlists community stakeholders (residents, businesses, non-governmental organizations and municipal governments) to promote health, quality of life and sustainable development in urban settings. The project, now three decades old, involves thousands of municipalities globally, including 52 in Israel. However, there is very little evidence regarding the effects of joining the HCN. This study examines whether HCN membership affects residents’ self-reported health (SRH). Social survey data for Israel’s 13 largest cities in 2005–2017 were analyzed using difference-in-differences and event study research designs. We use the gradual entry of cities to the HCN to compare SRH before and after network entry. Examined variables include municipal spending on health and duration of the city’s participation in the network. Data were analyzed through multivariate linear regression with fixed effects at the city and year levels. Joining the HCN does not have an immediate effect on SRH. SRH increases with the duration of the city’s participation in the network, but this result is only marginally statistically significant. Municipal health spending mildly increases with membership duration. A weak negative association was found between municipal health spending and SRH. Duration of a city’s membership in the HCN is positively associated with residents’ SRH; this association is not explained by an increase in municipal health spending. Identifying a mechanism for this improvement is beyond the scope of this study and is left for future research.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-01-15T06:16:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1757975920984212
       
  • Food autonomy: decolonial perspectives for Indigenous health and buen
           vivir

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      Authors: Juan Camilo Calderón Farfán, Juan David Dussán Chaux, Dolly Arias Torres
      First page: 50
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Indigenous peoples’ food systems have weakened as a result of pressures exerted by agro-commercial policies and chains, which has led to the dependency and deterioration of their ways of life. It is in this context that the construction of perspectives on food autonomy positions itself as a potential and strategic field of social decolonial mobilization for indigenous peoples’ health and buen vivir.Objective:The aim of this study was to analyze the meanings of food autonomy from the perspectives of a Nasa Indigenous community in Colombia.Method:This was a qualitative study, involving 38 Indigenous people belonging to the Nasa Huila Indigenous community, aged between 18 and 73, with different occupations. The information was obtained by means of discussion groups and processed through content analysis. The project had the consent and ethical endorsement of the indigenous community.Results:According to the study group, food autonomy is related to the Nasa identity, today weakened by territorial conditions, proximity to non-indigenous populations and the external influence of institutional food programs. Food autonomy develops by means of practices aimed at the production, distribution, preparation and consumption of healthy, chemical-free, homegrown food products from the family level, for self-consumption and in resistance to dependence on external commercial chains.Conclusion:Food autonomy positions itself as a community and political strategy that integrates the strengthening of family gardens, the adaptation of a food program menu, education and governance towards the development of autonomous processes from a decolonial perspective, for the promotion of health and buen vivir.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-01-28T11:57:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1757975920984206
       
  • Impact of home visits to pregnant women and their spouses on gender norms
           and dynamics in Bauchi State, Nigeria: Narratives from visited men and
           women

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      Authors: Hadiza Mudi, Umar Dutse, Loubna Belaid, Umaira Ansari, Khalid Omer, Yagana Gidado, Muhd Chadi Baba, Amina Mahdi, Neil Andersson, Anne Cockcroft
      First page: 59
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Maternal and newborn child health are priority concerns in Bauchi State, northern Nigeria. Increased male involvement in reproductive health is recommended by the World Health Organization. A trial of a program of universal home visits to pregnant women and their spouses, with an intention to increase male involvement in pregnancy and childbirth, showed improvements in actionable risk factors and in maternal morbidity. We used a narrative technique to explore experiences of the visits and their effect on gender roles and dynamics within the households.Methods:Trained fieldworkers collected narratives of change from 23 visited women and 21 visited men. After translation of the stories into English, we conducted an inductive thematic analysis to examine the impact of the visits on gender norms and dynamics.Results:The analysis indicated that the visits improved men’s support for antenatal care, immunization, and seeking help for danger signs, increased spousal communication, and led to changes in perceptions about gender violence and promoted non-violent gender relationships. However, although some stories described increased spousal communication, they did not mention that this translated into shared decision-making or increased autonomy for women. Many of the men’s stories described a continuing paternalistic, male-dominant position in decision-making.Conclusions:Few studies have examined the gender-transformative potential of interventions to promote male involvement in reproductive health; our analysis provides some initial insights into this.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-02-01T08:43:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1757975920986703
       
  • Respectful maternity care and breastfeeding

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      Authors: Humaira Ansari, Rajiv Yeravdekar
      First page: 70
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Respectful maternity care and its effect on breastfeeding is not widely explored. Disrespect and abuse affect the health of the mother and the newborn, affect lactogenesis and negatively influence breastfeeding. This has serious short-term and long-term ill effects. Separation of the mother and the newborn result in failure to establish early breastfeeding. Interventions, policies and programs should be developed to address the issues pertaining to respectful maternity care. This will not only help in breastfeeding but will also safeguard the fundamental rights of the mother and the child.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-01-27T07:11:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1757975920984216
       
  • El efecto mediador del sentido de coherencia en la relación entre
           autocuidado y control glucémico de personas diabéticas

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      Authors: Jesús Humberto Márquez-Palacios, Alfonso Urzúa-Morales, Carlos Calderón-Carvajal, José Guadalupe Salazar-Estrada, Felipe de Jesús Díaz-Reséndiz
      First page: 95
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Mantener un adecuado control de la diabetes se relaciona con variables como autocuidado y sentido de coherencia que reducen las tasas de morbilidad y mortalidad. El objetivo fue evaluar el efecto mediador del sentido de coherencia en la relación entre autocuidado y niveles de glucosa en sangre de personas con diabetes. A 220 sujetos con diabetes mellitus tipo 2 se les aplicó un instrumento para autocuidado y otro para sentido de coherencia, mientras que la hemoglobina glucosilada se obtuvo del expediente médico, posteriormente se analizaron los datos por medio de un modelo de ecuaciones estructurales. Los resultados muestran que el tanto el autocuidado (c’ = −0.33; p < 0.05), como el sentido de coherencia (b = −0.34; p < 0.05) tienen un efecto directo sobre los niveles de glucosa, así como también un efecto indirecto significativo (−0.168; p < 0.05). El efecto total de AC sobre A1c corresponden a −0.498. En consecuencia, este modelo estimado corresponde a un modelo de mediación simple parcial. Los resultados confirman la hipótesis de que el sentido de coherencia en personas con diabetes media la relación entre AC y HbA1c. El enfoque salutogénico mejora la adherencia a las conductas de autocuidado, lo que puede facilitar el control glucémico de la enfermedad.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-02-12T06:46:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1757975920987388
       
  • La pandemia de la COVID-19 y las estrategias de promoción de la salud en
           las ciudades brasileñas

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      Authors: Ana Maria Girotti Sperandio, Rodrigo Brandini Bloes, Giovanna Gastaldo Cifoni, Mônica de Andrade
      First page: 104
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      La promoción de la salud busca influir en los determinantes sociales y actuar en acciones que no solo mejoran la calidad de vida sino que también pueden ser fundamentales y estratégicas en la prevención y mitigación de situaciones de crisis, como la actual pandemia de la COVID-19. En el contexto brasileño, los responsables de la toma de decisiones consideran como acciones necesarias para combatir la pandemia la participación y movilización comunitaria, la contribución de los diferentes sectores (trabajo intersectorial), la emisión de políticas públicas, la transformación de los entornos, y el desarrollo de conocimientos y competencias en la población. Este estudio tiene como finalidad identificar las acciones de afrontamiento de la pandemia de la COVID-19 y señalar conexiones entre los principios y valores de la promoción de la salud y una ciudad saludable. Se observaron publicaciones periodísticas entre marzo y julio del 2020 relacionadas con la pandemia. Fue observado registros de hechos que retratan la realidad para servir a la población vulnerable, lo que impulsó acciones solidarias locales, con la formación de microrredes, para superar las limitaciones estructurales. Se destacan los esfuerzos intersectoriales para afrontar la pandemia y las contribuciones enfocadas a garantizar unas condiciones básicas de vida a la población brasileña. Este trabajo describe la necesidad de desarrollar acciones transversales de promoción de la salud, la importancia de la toma de decisiones con un enfoque de salud en todas las políticas y de optimizar espacios de desarrollo de habilidades personales, que inspiren y permitan a la comunidad actuar conjuntamente para resolver desafíos y administrar la ciudad.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-05-15T08:50:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211009196
       
  • Aislamiento comunitario como estrategia para la mitigación de un brote de
           COVID-19: el caso de Villa Azul

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      Authors: Melina Esposito, Soledad Bustos, Leandro Cardonetti, Maria Jose Pueyo Alvarado, Berenice Latorre, Luis Parrilla, Enio Garcia, Nicolás Kreplak, Jonatan Konfino
      First page: 114
      Abstract: Global Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Introducción:frente a la identificación de la ocurrencia de un brote de COVID-19 en el barrio Villa Azul (Buenos Aires, Argentina) y dadas las características de vulnerabilidad del barrio que dificultarían cumplir con el aislamiento domiciliario y las medidas de prevención, se implementó una estrategia de aislamiento comunitario como respuesta sanitaria al brote.Objetivo:describir la estrategia de aislamiento comunitario utilizada en el barrio Villa Azul para contener y mitigar un brote de COVID-19.Métodos:se identificaron los límites del barrio y se procedió al cierre del mismo con fuerzas de seguridad. Quedó permitida la circulación interna asumiendo que todos los habitantes eran casos sospechosos de COVID-19 o bien eran contactos estrechos de algún caso. En los días subsiguientes se continuó con la búsqueda activa de casos sospechosos, se realizaron los hisopados en el barrio y se obtuvieron los resultados a las 24 horas. Todos los días, luego de la recepción de los casos se les informaba el resultado a los casos negativos y se iba a las casas de los casos positivos para notificarlos del resultado y sugerirles el aislamiento fuera del barrio para cortar la cadena de contagios.Resultados:en el barrio Villa Azul entre el 22 de mayo y el 20 de junio, se registraron 731 casos sospechosos de los cuales 379 fueron casos confirmados de COVID-19 (tasa de positividad acumulada del 52,1%). La primera semana hubo entre 20 y 40 casos confirmados diarios con un índice de positividad entre el 66 y el 81% pero con el correr del tiempo como consecuencia de la estrategia descripta fueron bajando el número de casos por día y también la positividad. Se trasladaron 193 pacientes confirmados para aislarlos afuera del barrio. Fallecieron 3 personas (tasa de letalidad 0,8%).Discusión:la estrategia de aislamiento comunitario resultó efectiva para contener el brote de COVID-19 en el barrio Villa Azul.
      Citation: Global Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-04-30T08:04:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579759211007120
       
 
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