Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1478 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (700 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

HEALTH AND SAFETY (700 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4     

Showing 601 - 203 of 203 Journals sorted alphabetically
Saúde Coletiva     Open Access  
Saúde e Meio Ambiente : Revista Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Saúde em Redes     Open Access  
Saúde.com     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
School Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Scientia Medica     Open Access  
Scire Salutis     Open Access  
Serviço Social e Saúde     Open Access  
Sextant : Revue de recherche interdisciplinaire sur le genre et la sexualité     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexual Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sexual Medicine Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Sleep and Vigilance : An International Journal of Basic, Translational and Clinical Research     Hybrid Journal  
Sleep Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sleep Science and Practice     Open Access  
SMAD, Revista Electronica en Salud Mental, Alcohol y Drogas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Smart Health     Hybrid Journal  
Social Determinants of Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Theory & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Work in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Work in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Social Work in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Society, Health & Vulnerability     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sosiaalilääketieteellinen Aikakauslehti     Open Access  
South African Family Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South African Journal of Bioethics and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
South African Journal of Child Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
South African Journal of Communication Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
South East Asia Journal of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South Eastern European Journal of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Southern African Journal of Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Southern African Journal of Public Health     Open Access  
Southwest Respiratory and Critical Care Chronicles     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Space Safety Magazine     Free   (Followers: 50)
Sri Lanka Journal of Child Health     Open Access  
SSM - Population Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
SSM - Qualitative Research in Health     Open Access  
Stigma and Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Sundhedsprofessionelle studier     Open Access  
Sustainable Earth     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sustinere : Revista de Saúde e Educação     Open Access  
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Tanzania Journal of Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Technology and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tempus Actas de Saúde Coletiva     Open Access  
Textos & Contextos (Porto Alegre)     Open Access  
The Journal of Aquatic Physical Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Lancet Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 71)
The Lancet Planetary Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Lancet Regional Health : Americas     Open Access  
The Lancet Regional Health : Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Lancet Regional Health : Western Pacific     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Meducator     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Communities : The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Tidsskrift for Forskning i Sygdom og Samfund     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for psykisk helsearbeid     Full-text available via subscription  
Tobacco Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Tobacco Control and Public Health in Eastern Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transgender Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Transportation Safety and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Journal of Health Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Tropical Medicine and Health     Open Access  
TÜBAV Bilim Dergisi     Open Access  
Universal Journal of Public Health     Open Access  
Universidad y Salud     Open Access  
Unnes Journal of Public Health     Open Access  
Value in Health Regional Issues     Hybrid Journal  
Vascular Health and Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Vigilância Sanitária em Debate     Open Access  
Violence and Gender     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Water Quality, Exposure and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Western Pacific Surveillance and Response     Open Access  
Women & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
World Health & Population     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
World Medical & Health Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Arbeitswissenschaft     Hybrid Journal  
Електромагнітна сумісність та безпека на залізничному транспорті     Open Access  
مجله بهداشت و توسعه     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4     

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Social Theory & Health
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.554
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1477-8211 - ISSN (Online) 1477-822X
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Mindfulness meditation as “good medicine”: a new epistemological
           pluralism in health care

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      Abstract: Abstract Scholars have documented tensions that develop as a result of the integration of complementary and alternative medical practices (CAM) into conventional medicine, but few studies have analyzed the process of integration. I use the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction program (MBSR), an increasingly popular CAM intervention, as a case study to investigate this process. Drawing on interviews and salient texts, I argue that MBSR leaders (MBSR teachers, doctors, and researchers) have fostered a cultural environment that allows the paradigms of alternative and conventional medicine to coexist: a new epistemological pluralism. Rather than exclusively defining MBSR as either CAM or conventional medicine, MBSR leaders strategically moved back and forth across contradictory epistemological paradigms, enabling them to maintain the integrity of mindfulness and its approach to “healing” while simultaneously conforming to the structural constraints of conventional medical institutions. This study contributes to theoretical research on institutions by suggesting that although this process may look like institutional isomorphism with CAM therapies conforming to the standards of conventional medical institutions, institutional actors’ comfort with contradictions and hybridized views supports institutional heterogeneity and possibly even divergence.
      PubDate: 2022-05-02
       
  • COVID-19 amongst western democracies: A welfare state analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in more than 282 million cases and almost 5.5 million deaths (WHO Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Dashboard, 2022). Its impact, however, has not been uniform. This analysis examines differences in COVID-19 cases and mortality rates amongst different welfare states within the first three waves of the pandemic using repeated measures Multivariate Analysis of Covariance (MANCOVA). Liberal states fared much better on the number of COVID-19 cases, deaths, and excess deaths than the Conservative/Corporatist welfare democracies. Social Democratic countries, in turn, did not fare any better than their Conservative/Corporatist counterparts once potential confounding economic and political variables were accounted for: countries’ economic status, healthcare spending, availability of medical personnel, hospital beds, pandemic-related income support and debt relief, electoral events, and left-power mobilization. The pandemic-related welfare responses after the first wave were similar across all three types of western democracies, but the differences in pandemic outcomes remained. The somewhat better outlook of the Liberal states could be attributed to the so-called social democratization of the Anglo-American democracies, but also to the fact that neoliberalism could have flattened the previous differences between the welfare states typologies and could have brought states closer to each other, ideologically speaking, in terms of welfare provision.
      PubDate: 2022-04-26
       
  • Coronavirus, capitalism and a ‘thousand tiny dis/advantages’:
           a more-than-human analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper establishes a relational, post-anthropocentric and materialist approach to the Covid-19 coronavirus pandemic. Analysis of the ‘pandemic assemblage’ reveals that the virus has subverted the social and economic relations of capitalism, enabling its global spread. This insight establishes a materialist framework for exploring socio-economic disparities in Covid-19 incidence and death rates, via a more-than-human and monist analysis of capitalist production and markets. Disparities derive from the ‘thousand tiny dis/advantages’ produced by people’s daily interactions with human and non-human matter, making sense of the unequal occupational patterning of coronavirus incidence. This more-than-human approach supplies a critical alternative to the mainstream public health and scientific perspectives on the pandemic, with important implications for current and future policy to counter future microbiological outbreaks.
      PubDate: 2022-04-20
       
  • An unproblematized truth: Foucault, biopolitics, and the making of a
           sociological canon

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      Abstract: Abstract Foucault’s argument that a major break occurred in the nature of power in the European Eighteenth century—an unprecedented socialization of medicine and concern for the health of bodies and populations, the birth of biopolitics—has become since the 1990s a dominant narrative among sociologists but is rarely if ever scrutinized in its premises. This article problematizes Foucault’s periodization about the politics of health and the way its story has been solidified into an uncritical account. Building on novel historiographic work, it challenges the modernist bias of histories of biopolitics and public health and considers an earlier and more plural history of collective practices of health of which the story told by Foucault is just one important episode. Finally, it discusses the implications of this revised model for wider sociological debates on the link between modernity, health and the body.
      PubDate: 2022-03-07
      DOI: 10.1057/s41285-022-00177-5
       
  • The healthy Indian child: a colonial construct

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      Abstract: Abstract In the Indian Subcontinent, many commercial advertisements still use white children's images to promote their products and push forward the idea that Indian children need to become better versions of themselves, both physically and mentally. Such views are neither encouraged nor accepted in the western world. We argue that these ideas are not new and that they were introduced during the British Raj. We further argue that the hegemonic culture promulgated by the British colonial rulers is still prevalent in this postcolonial era and is being used by international and local manufacturers, intentionally or unintentionally, as part of their promotional activities for Indian consumers. Drawing from historical and contemporary evidence, we offer arguments to this claim and analysis of the workings of the hegemonic culture in producing such advertisements.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41285-020-00152-y
       
  • Self-reported health and the social body

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      Abstract: Abstract Since the strong predictive power of self-reported health (SRH) for prospective health and social outcomes has been established, researchers have been in a quest to build a theoretical understanding of this widely used health measure. Current literature based predominantly in a biomedical perspective asserts a linear relationship between physical conditions and perception of health. Discrepancies from this expected relationship are considered an important weakness of SRH. Systematic discrepancies between physical conditions and reporting of SRH have been documented across different socio-economic groups. Evidence identified for educational groups shows that for the same level of health status, lower-educated groups report poorer levels of perceived health. This raised doubts whether it is useful to use SRH to measure social inequalities in health within and between countries. To date, sociologists of health have not engaged in the discussion of reporting heterogeneity in SRH. After reviewing existing evidence, we contend that the discrepancy in SRH reporting across social groups argued to be a weakness of SRH as a health measure is a strength from a sociological perspective. SRH as a social measure of health is a better predictor than objective measures of health precisely because it captures the lived experience of the embodied agent.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41285-020-00150-0
       
  • Medical hybridity and beyond: professional transitions in Italian
           outpatient settings

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      Abstract: Abstract The marketization of public healthcare has brought about organizational transformations, affecting health professionals' ways of working in hospitals and outpatient organizations. As a result of the reforms in the 1990s, the principle of business-like healthcare has been introduced in the Italian health system. This paper presents the main findings of a study of specialist doctors working in two local health organizations in the Tuscany region. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with specialist doctors working in an outpatient setting, the article examines the manifold reactions to changes of the medical profession within outpatient settings. In particular, the combination of professional and organizational dimensions has been taken into consideration. The results show that a change is involving outpatient specialist doctors' identity: organizational change affects several dimensions of the medical professional ethos. The change has been understood by categorizing three major types of approaches to medical professionalism, which are aimed to understand the complexity of the domain and to summarize professionals' reactions: the first is linked to a traditional model of professionalism; the second accepts partially business-like organizational issues, while trying to create individual spaces of autonomy in daily tasks; the third co-opts new organizational issues, which become part of the medical professional ethos.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41285-020-00153-x
       
  • Bodies need yoga' No plastic surgery! Naturalistic versus instrumental
           bodies among professions in the Danish healthcare field

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      Abstract: Abstract What characterises the similarities and differences in body investments among professions in the Danish healthcare field' This can be important when healthcare professionals relate to each other and to bodies of patients regarding differences in class, gender, age, and disease group. The study takes inspiration from Bourdieu’s sociology and the concept of health capital. We ask whether health capital can explain distinctions in the empirical data' We used the explorative–descriptive method multicorrespondence analysis (MCA) on data from 440 respondents gathered through an online survey. The respondents range from chief physicians to healthcare students. MCA makes it possible to condense frequency statistics and examine patterns of body investments through an examination of variables such as food intake, exercise, and medicine use that are then further related to supplementary variables such as social class and age. The analysis supports the concept of health capital and shows that some groups in the Danish healthcare field have a more instrumental body perception, such as the young age group (e.g. open to surgery, consume medicine, high exercise), while the upper-middle-class and older respondents have a more naturalistic perception of the body (e.g. read often, eat vegetables, practice yoga).
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41285-020-00151-z
       
  • The changing governance of welfare: revisiting Jessop’s framework in
           the context of healthcare

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper revisits Jessop’s governance of welfare framework, suggesting that in the post-financial crisis era of austerity we need to look again at its analytical dimensions. The paper reformulates Jessop’s Schumpeterian Welfare Postnational Regime ideal-type framework through critique, and then applies its reformulated Galbrathian, Affluent Postnational Oligarchy ideal-type to the case of the English NHS to present a new political economy of health.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41285-020-00147-9
       
  • Assistive spectacles: A vision for the future

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      Abstract: Abstract Recent work in the intersections of feminist technoscience studies and critical disability studies provides a wealth of perspectives with which to challenge ableist and curative imaginaries that remain in the foreground of emerging accessible technologies (Hamraie in Hypatia 30(1):307–313, 2015; Kafer in Feminist, Queer, Crip. Indiana University Press, Bloomington, 2013; Shildrick 2015). These visions frequently cast such technologies as harbingers of a future where disability is all but eliminated. Perhaps no other device best exemplifies this trend than eSight, makers of a wearable headset, whose mission is “to make blindness history by 2020” (eSight in Make Blindness History by 2020, 2018e. https://web.archive.org/web/20190117025248/https://www.makeblindnesshistory.com/). The company uses viral marketing and crowdfunding campaigns with ‘tear-jerker’ (their words) videos of users regaining their sight or being able to see for the first time, inviting viewers to become donors and “see what happens when you give the gift of sight” (eSight in Moments. https://www.esighteyewear.com/moments, 2008b). In this paper, we explore the promises and perils of such visions of disabled lives and advocate for accessible futures (Kafer in Feminist, Queer, Crip. Indiana University Press, Bloomington, 2013), rather than just able-bodied ones. Crip technoscience offers a new way of thinking about disability and technology that crucially needs to be reflected in how these devices, narratives—and their users—are fashioned, reproduced and taken up; disability’s desirable future is more than just a marketing spectacle.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41285-020-00140-2
       
  • Examining the U.S. premed path as an example of discriminatory design
           & exploring the role(s) of capital

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      Abstract: Abstract The college-level pathway to medical school (i.e., the “premed path”) includes all coursework, extra-curriculars, shadowing, volunteering, high-stakes examination (e.g., MCAT®), and application-related processes. Although medical school admission committees routinely insist their interest in diverse and “well-rounded” applicants, the premed path (PMP), through formal and informal mechanisms, is constructed to favor those from high in socioeconomic status (SES) privileged backgrounds, and those majoring in typical premed majors such as in the Biological Sciences. In these respects, the PMP is an example of Discriminatory Design—an entity constructed and sustained in a manner that (un)intentionally discriminates against certain groups of individuals. We begin this paper by providing a brief description of the PMP (within the U.S. specifically) and conceptual and theoretical overview of the discriminatory design framework. We then explore how the PMP is an example of discriminatory design through the distinct but related role(s) of financial, social, cultural, and (what we term) (extra)curricular capital. Using data gleaned from interviews with premedical students, content analyses of the curricular structure of particular majors and publicly available data on the various “costs” associated with the PMP, we detail how the PMP is reflective of discriminatory design, spotlighting specific barriers and hurdles for certain groups of students. Given the persistent lack of representation of students from minoritized groups as well as those from diverse academic backgrounds within medical schools, our goal is to spotlight key features and processes within the PMP that actively favor the pursuit of certain majors and students from more privileged backgrounds. In turn, we conclude by offering medical schools and undergraduate institutions specific recommendations for remediating these barriers and hurdles.
      PubDate: 2022-02-02
      DOI: 10.1057/s41285-022-00175-7
       
  • What shapes local health system actors’ thinking and action on social
           inequalities in health' A meta-ethnography

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      Abstract: Abstract Local health systems are increasingly tasked to play a more central role in driving action to reduce social inequalities in health. Past experience, however, has demonstrated the challenge of reorienting health system actions towards prevention and the wider determinants of health. In this review, I use meta-ethnographic methods to synthesise findings from eleven qualitative research studies that have examined how ambitions to tackle social inequalities in health take shape within local health systems. The resulting line-of-argument illustrates how such inequalities continue to be problematised in narrow and reductionist ways to fit both with pre-existing conceptions of health, and the institutional practices which shape thinking and action. Instances of health system actors adopting a more social view of inequalities, and taking a more active role in influencing the social and structural determinants of health, were attributed to the beliefs and values of system leaders, and their ability to push-back against dominant discourses and institutional norms. This synthesised account provides an additional layer of understanding about the specific challenges experienced by health workforces when tasked to address this complex and enduring problem, and provides essential insights for understanding the success and shortcomings of future cross-sectoral efforts to tackle social inequalities in health.
      PubDate: 2022-01-31
      DOI: 10.1057/s41285-022-00176-6
       
  • Responsibilisation of caregivers in depression: the limitations of
           policy-based evidence

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      Abstract: Abstract The principle of family and carer involvement is scattered throughout much recent mental health policy. Inspired by Bacchi’s ‘what’s the problem represented to be’ approach to policy analysis, we consider guidelines relating to depression in the UK and Denmark, two examples of European health systems which have undergone reforms based on neoliberal principles effectuating austerity politics. The analysis shows how carer involvement recommendations in depression guidelines reflect a responsibilisation agenda rather than a sound evidence and that the policies represent the problem to be a potentially risky patient along with consequential bureaucratic risks of involving the caregiver. In order to put the political agenda into perspective, we outline qualitative research on family life with depression which we argue could have informed ‘evidence-based’ guidelines. This research emphasises the complexity of family life with depression in which the origins of depression, maintaining factors, family context, pathways to treatment, treatment models and other routes to recovery all interact in a way that means the requirement for ‘carer involvement’ as simplified in current guidelines is naïve at best. We consider the gap between evidence and policy and note that carer involvement recommendations reflect a failure to understand depression within a context of complex dynamic family relationships.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41285-020-00136-y
       
  • Medicalising the moral: the case of depression as revealed in internet
           blogs

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      Abstract: Abstract Depression is regularly declared to be equivalent to a bodily illness, yet critics have long contested this ‘medical’ view of mental disorders. Following the ideas of Szasz and Foucault, we describe an alternative ‘moral’ view of depression, which emphasises the agency of the individual and presents depression as a potentially problematic but meaningful response that can be regarded as an aspect of character. We use popular internet blogs by people with depression to explore these contrasting conceptions, which can also be found in other research and information on depression. In blogs, the medical view is used to challenge what bloggers perceive as a persistently influential moral view, by deflecting criticism and responsibility and disowning unwanted aspects of the self. At the same time, bloggers make positive use of the moral concept of depression when discussing recovery. The moral view enables people to take active steps to address their difficulties and to integrate the experience of depression into their understanding of themselves in a challenging yet rewarding process of personal development. We suggest that the moral view of depression represents an enduring aspect of our understanding of ourselves, which the medical view has been superimposed onto, but has not managed to suppress.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41285-020-00141-1
       
  • The complexities of developing equal relationships in patient and public
           involvement in health research

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      Abstract: Abstract Health researchers are encouraged to involve patients and the public in each stage of the research process. Patient and public involvement (PPI) seeks to redress an apparent ‘democratic deficit’ in the production of health research. While many claims have been made of the benefits of involving and increasingly co-producing research with patient and public members, it has proven difficult to measure its impact. To inform understanding of why involvement initiatives ‘fail’ or ‘succeed’, this paper focuses on the relational dynamics of PPI and co-production. Through an examination of the discourse of relationships in UK health research guidance it is argued that while emphasis is placed on ‘sharing power’, there persists limited understanding of the constraints of institutional structures and how power asymmetries come to be performed, reinforced or resisted in PPI and co-production settings. To reshape and rethink existing practices I examine the theories that underlie PPI and co-production referring to Habermas’ (The theory of communicative action, Polity Press, Cambridge, 1987) and Mouffe’s (Social Research 66:745–758, 1999; Politica Comun, https://doi.org/10.3998/pc.12322227.0009.011, 2016) contrasting perspectives on the role of public participation in democratic designs. I suggest that power differentials cannot simply be eradicated or bracketed by guidelines and rhetoric, and that PPI and co-production must be understood as profoundly relational and interactional processes.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41285-020-00142-0
       
  • Medicalisation in public primary mental health care services in Chile

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      Abstract: Abstract The integration of mental health services into primary care is a globally acclaimed strategy to close the treatment gap for mental disorders, but it has also been criticised for encouraging the medicalisation of everyday life. In Chile, this strategy has gained support and spread quickly in the last decades, and today, all primary public care centres have incorporated a mental health service. However, although some reports highlight problems that have arisen with integrated primary care, the critical social analysis of its impact on services, teams and communities is scarce. This article aims to analyse how primary public mental healthcare services (PPMHSs) in Chile could be contributing to medicalise life. Health policies, reports, evidence from research on local public health issues and the author’s experience are examined to develop the arguments. It is suggested that issues with the universal health access and integrated primary public care policies and the institutionalised use of standard classifications of mental disorders support the survival of a reductionist biomedical disease model and a trend to psychopathologise life. We conclude that these factors underpin the medicalisation of everyday life in primary public mental healthcare services in Chile. Critical engagement with daily practice is necessary to prevent PPMHSs from disempowering people and communities by providing them with medicalised solutions, instead of generating agency in their everyday problem-solving behaviours.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41285-020-00130-4
       
  • Reinterpreting epistemologies: an exploratory study of the ova donation
           websites in Delhi

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      Abstract: Abstract The paper is based on the study of the websites of egg donation centres and ART clinics based in Delhi, India. The treatment of infertility with the help of egg donor-IVF has not only birthed offspring for the infertile but also new social phenomena that challenge the existing paradigms and ontologies of social sciences. The binaries of nature-culture that are crucial in the cognition of social reality need to be reinterpreted in the light of unprecedented changes generated by egg donation. Ova donation is perhaps the only context in which the altruistic and commercial motives co-exist, the former promoting the latter, diluting the opposition between gift and commodity. In analysing these developments, sociological concepts need to be refreshed. The conjunction of biology and technology, third party involvement and the intrusion of market forces bring about denaturalization of childbirth on the one hand, and ‘culturing up’ of nature, on the other. Furthermore, relations of family parenthood and kinship that were conventionally premised on shared biogenetic material have to be reconceptualised at intervention of donor-IVF. Sociological study of donor-IVF calls for reconfiguration of nature-culture and gift-commodity in a symbiotic relationship rather than that marked by diametrical opposition.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41285-020-00138-w
       
  • Challenging the clinically-situated emotion-deficient version of empathy
           within medicine and medical education research

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      Abstract: Abstract In this paper, we argue that the notion of a clinically-situated empathy (e.g. physician empathy), is potentially problematic as it perpetuates an emotion-deficient version of empathy within medicine and medicine education research. Utilizing classic and contemporary empathy theory from various social science disciplines, we discuss how empathy in the general sense differs conceptually from clinically-situated empathy—paying particular attention to the role of emotional contagion. To highlight this contrast, we draw upon Hojat et al.’s model of physician empathy and how this body of work reflects broader medical-cultural norms that problematize the role and impact of emotions within the clinical encounter. Alternatively, we present a more encompassing model of empathy drawing upon the fields of social-psychology and social-neuroscience in order to bring the notion of “feeling with” and emotional contagion more specifically, into medical education, medical education research, and medicine more generally.
      PubDate: 2021-11-22
      DOI: 10.1057/s41285-021-00174-0
       
  • Patients’ knowledge and their trust in surgical doctors. A
           questionnaire-based study and a theoretical discussion from Norway

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper seeks to examine whether knowledge about treatment, mental well-being and socio-demographic variables can predict patients’ trust in surgeons. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Norway. A total of 147 participants completed a questionnaire with items on knowledge, mental well-being, socio-demographic background, and trust in doctors in elective surgery. Our findings indicate that knowledge about treatment was a significant predictor of trust, and that the lowest levels of knowledge were associated with lower levels of trust. Most participants reported moderate/high well-being, however, patients with the lowest well-being scores had significantly lower trust in surgical doctors. We discuss these findings in the context of other relevant research and provide a theoretical discussion on the issue using Luhmann’s theory of trust. We argue that both knowledge and trust have forward-looking aspects, meaning that knowledge is to some extent acquired to cope with the future and trust is also related to expectations of the future. This theoretical approach can provide a framework for understanding our empiric findings. As knowledge was a significant predictor of trust, and is related to future expectations, information given to patients should focus on issues that may affect their personal future health.
      PubDate: 2021-11-17
      DOI: 10.1057/s41285-021-00171-3
       
  • ‘You’d think they’d know’: social epistemology and informal carers
           of mental health service users

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper considers the experience of informal carers for people with mental health problems from the point of view of social epistemology, where human knowledge is seen as a social achievement and people’s social position informs the kinds of knowledge they accumulate and deploy. Based on interviews with 31 carers for people with mental health problems, three areas of localised, specified epistemological activity were identified. First, the management of knowledge involved in shaping the situation to gain professionals’ recognition. Relatedly, the second theme concerned the participants’ construction of what it was that the professionals knew but which was felt to be withheld from carers. Finally, there were aspects of being a carer, such as dealing with the emotional friction in the caring relationship which either ‘nobody tells you about’ or which ‘you can’t tell anyone’. Examining these experiences through the lens of social epistemology highlights the interactive and personal work that carer participants did to create, shape and manage both knowledge itself and their relationships with health professionals and the cared-for person.
      PubDate: 2021-11-16
      DOI: 10.1057/s41285-021-00172-2
       
 
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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
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