Subjects -> ABSTRACTING AND INDEXING (Total: 31 journals)
    - ABSTRACTING AND INDEXING (10 journals)
    - BIBLIOGRAPHIES (21 journals)

ABSTRACTING AND INDEXING (10 journals)

Showing 1 - 37 of 37 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of the Society of Archivists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Archives and Records     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Records & Information Management Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of the South African Society of Archivists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Index de Enfermeria     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Lectures     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Similar Journals
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Journal of the South African Society of Archivists
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1012-2796
Published by African Journals Online Homepage  [261 journals]
  • Migrated archives

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      Authors: Francis Garaba
      Pages: 1 - 11
      Abstract: In a paper on migrated archives, Nathan Mnjama puts forward several reasons as to why these archives are in the custody of our former colonisers. Infrastructural challenges, the lack of the development of archival services and security issues are some of the reasons highlighted. Consequently, these archives were not collected and preserved within colonies and were thus repatriated to the metropolitan countries for safe storage. The removal of these archives have created gaps in archival holdings and these archives need to be located, retrieved and brought home, so he argues. The author of this response proposes that we need to start afresh and forget about this genre of archives in view of the protracted issues involved and considering the archival service challenges that most archival institutions are facing. We are now talking about de-colonisation/refiguring or Africanisation of our archives because there is over-documentation of the colonial record in our repositories and these records are often biased or incorrect.
      PubDate: 2021-11-04
      DOI: 10.4314/jsasa.v54i.1
      Issue No: Vol. 54 (2021)
       
  • Harnessing a records management programme for justice delivery at the
           Alice magistrate court in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

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      Authors: Khunjulwa Ntengenyane, Festus Khayundi
      Pages: 12 - 23
      Abstract: This article focuses on harnessing a records management programme for justice delivery at the Alice Magistrates’ court. The objectives of the study were to find the extent to which court records are managed for justice delivery, the influence of court records in court processes, and the challenges, if any, of managing court records for justice delivery. The population of the study comprised all those who created and used court records at the Alice Magistrates’ court. The study used both quantitative and qualitative methods for data collection. Quantitative data were coded and analysed using Microsoft Excel 2010 while qualitative data were analysed using emerging themes based on the objectives of the study. The findings revealed that although records were important for justice delivery by the court, there were challenges posed by inadequate infrastructure, the lack of necessary knowledge and skills, ineffective control of records for justice delivery, and inadequate facilities for preservation and security of records. The study recommended improvement of the existing records management programme as a strategy. This is necessary for effective and efficient records management programme for justice delivery by the Alice Magistrates’ court.
      PubDate: 2021-11-04
      DOI: 10.4314/jsasa.v54i.2
      Issue No: Vol. 54 (2021)
       
  • Assessing records management in municipalities with adverse audit opinions
           in Limpopo Province, South Africa

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      Authors: Lefose Makgahlela, Zawedde Nsibirwa
      Pages: 24 - 42
      Abstract: This article assesses records management in municipalities with adverse audit opinions in the Limpopo province, South Africa. Audit reports issued by the Auditor-General of South Africa (AGSA) yearly indicate that poor recordkeeping is one of the factors contributing to adverse audit opinions in the public sector. The high level of corruption and maladministration, and lack of accountability and transparency in municipalities have become endemic and are a cause for concern in South Africa. Access to relevant and comprehensive information from records is essential for municipalities to perform their constitutional duties effectively. For this study, a quantitative research approach was employed using the survey design. Six municipalities in Limpopo that had adverse audit outcomes in the auditor-general’s report of 2015/2016 were targeted. A total of 92 questionnaires were distributed to registry staff employed in the municipalities and 86 of these were completed and returned. Findings revealed that the selected municipalities in the province face numerous challenges relating to records management practices, including staff shortages, lack of training and poor storage facilities. The study recommends that municipalities’ management and political office-bearers take all the necessary steps to prioritise records management by employing more people. The study further recommends that more universities in South Africa should provide formal qualifications in records management, and government officials should make funding available for records management practices.
      PubDate: 2021-11-04
      DOI: 10.4314/jsasa.v54i.3
      Issue No: Vol. 54 (2021)
       
  • Factors influencing the adoption of free and open-source software for
           electronic records management by municipalities in Gauteng Province, South
           Africa

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      Authors: Mahlatse Shekgola, Jan Maluleka, Antonio Rodrigues
      Pages: 43 - 54
      Abstract: The South African cabinet adopted policy recommendations from the Government Information Technology Officer's Council pertaining to Free and Open-Source Software (FOSS). Even though the South African Cabinet has shown support for the use of FOSS through the enactment of a policy, the adoption of open source software in electronic records management seems to be slow. Proprietary software continues to be adopted and used by most public institutions, including local and provincial municipalities in South Africa. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate factors that may influence the adoption and use of FOSS for electronic records management by South African municipalities. The study adopted a qualitative research approach to collect data from 10 purposively selected municipalities in Gauteng. Data were analysed and presented thematically to address the research question. The findings of this study suggest that municipalities in Gauteng are not adopting FOSS for electronic records management as expected. This study established that top management support, reliability, affordability of the software, inadequate capability, contracts with proprietary software providers, organisational culture and organisational support are some of the factors that contributed to the low uptake when it comes to the adoption of Free and Open-Source Software by the municipalities.
      PubDate: 2021-11-04
      DOI: 10.4314/jsasa.v54i.4
      Issue No: Vol. 54 (2021)
       
  • The use of metadata systems for the preservation of digital records in
           cultural heritage institutions

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      Authors: Tlou Maggie Masenya
      Pages: 55 - 70
      Abstract: Many studies concur that most of the world’s heritage resources, including digital records, are highly vulnerable to loss, and some cannot be recovered due to neglect or mismanagement. Strategies are thus needed to ensure long-term preservation and global access to digital records of enduring value. Metadata systems have been regarded as a suitable strategy to support digital preservation processes and prevent digital records loss within cultural heritage institutions. The purpose of this paper was to investigate the adoption of metadata systems in cultural heritage institutions in South Africa. This study utilised literature review to critically examine the use of metadata systems for the preservation of digital records in cultural heritage institutions. Although various preservation systems and strategies are being developed to enable description, discovery and delivery of digital records, the findings revealed that South African cultural heritage institutions’ level of metadata system adoption is low. This is due to lack of awareness about metadata schemas and standards, lack of technical expertise, inadequate funding and lack of technological infrastructure. Several recommendations are made to enhance preservation of digital records, including increasing awareness and the implementation of metadata systems, schemas and policies.
      PubDate: 2021-11-04
      DOI: 10.4314/jsasa.v54i.5
      Issue No: Vol. 54 (2021)
       
  • “Emailisation” of the public sector: tracing the prevalence of use of
           email in Zimbabwe’s central government

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      Authors: Samson Mutsagondo, Patrick Ngulube
      Pages: 71 - 82
      Abstract: Although paper is still the dominant records format in Zimbabwe, there has been a remarkable rise in use of electronic records, of which electronic mail (email) is a subset. Email dawned in the 1970s but it has increasingly gained much traction in official information and communication in Zimbabwe’s central government in the current decade. The use of email has become a norm or rather a culture, a development which the authors of this article metaphorically coin “emailisation”. This paper traces the rise in official use of email in Zimbabwe’s central government in order to establish changing trends in diffusion of innovations in information and communication. Three objectives are addressed, which are tracing how often email is used in official communication, establishing types of records normally generated and sent using email, and determining the volume of email sent and received in Zimbabwe’s central government per day. This mixed methods research made use of a convergent research design and involved 240 respondents and 10 interviewees. The study calls for responsible and controlled use of email to bring the technology, both official and authentic, in line with the ethos of professional records and information management.
      PubDate: 2021-11-04
      DOI: 10.4314/jsasa.v54i.6
      Issue No: Vol. 54 (2021)
       
  • A strategic framework for digital preservation in the context of
           e-government in Botswana public service

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      Authors: Keneilwe Margret Porogo, Trywell Kalusopa
      Pages: 83 - 101
      Abstract: The purpose of the study was to assess the digital preservation capability maturity readiness in the context of e-government in Botswana Public Service with a view to developing a strategic framework that ensures digital continuity. The study adopted a pragmatic paradigm and case study which were deployed in each of the six selected ministries as a unit of analysis. The target population was 102 respondents from six key purposively sampled ministries. Seventy-nine questionnaires were distributed, of which 55 were completed and returned. Interviews were conducted with 21 staff being senior managers, managers for human resources and administration, heads of divisions for records management units, archives unit, ICT managers and senior records managers. Formal participatory observations of documents were conducted. The study’s findings showed that the Botswana public service has no unified national information systems to manage public sector records, which led to some ministries adopting their own electronic records management systems. Currently, few ministries have implemented the electronic records management system and most digital records are not preserved due to lack of preservation guidelines and strategies. In that regard, the study developed a strategic framework to safeguard digital continuity and make sure that e-government is sustained for the benefit of an open government and increased participatory citizenry.
      PubDate: 2021-11-04
      DOI: 10.4314/jsasa.v54i.7
      Issue No: Vol. 54 (2021)
       
  • The processing of Kgosi Bathoen II private archives collection for
           increased access to archives

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      Authors: Tshepho Mosweu
      Pages: 102 - 113
      Abstract: National archival institutions are responsible for the acquisition, preservation and making accessible of their nation’s documentary heritage. It is on this basis that the Department of Botswana National Archives and Records Services (BNARS) acquires records through the normal transfer of public records from government agencies as well as donations of private archives. The main purpose of this paper is to analyse the processing of private archives of a prominent “Kgosi” in the history of Botswana, Kgosi Bathoen II of the Bangwaketse ethnic group. This is a qualitative study that used literature review to collect data. It also uses the author’s personal observation, as she was involved in the acquisition and processing of the Bathoen II archives. The key findings suggest that even though Batswana have not been donating their private archives in high numbers, BNARS have made strides in collecting private archives of prominent individuals in the country. Unlike public records, private archives collections may not come in any logical arrangement, which may be a tormenting exercise for the archivist to process and select what is worth preserving. This paper concludes that despite the difficulties encountered in processing a huge collection of private papers with no order, private papers should follow the normal archives’ practice of arrangement and description for eventual access by researchers or users. Additionally, the significance of private archives in filling the gaps found in the national repositories was revealed through Bathoen II collection, as it has information on various aspects of Botswana life, customs, traditions and the people. As such, the collection provides diversity to the nation’s documentary heritage and serves as a rich resource for research. This paper also presents lessons learnt in the preservation of private archives in Botswana.
      PubDate: 2021-11-04
      DOI: 10.4314/jsasa.v54i.8
      Issue No: Vol. 54 (2021)
       
  • A book review of Archiving People: A Social History of Dutch Archives by
           Eric Ketelaar

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      Authors: Tshepho Mosweu
      Pages: 114 - 116
      Abstract: This is a book review for Eric Ketelaar’s Archiving People: A Social History of Dutch Archives is a compelling resource for archive users, archival institutions as well as policy makers as it explores the concept of archiving through the influence of social practices using the Model of the archiving context. The book is segmented in 13 Chapters through which the author discusses Archiving People, Churches, States, Cities, Polders and Commons, Property, Trade and Industry, Monies, Litigation, the East, Technologies, Professionals and finally the Dutchness of Dutch Archives. The whole essence of the book as concisely put by Ketelaar is that, “We must understand the societies and the people who created and used the documents before we can really understand their value for research and other purposes. And vice versa: by exploring the social history of archives we may get a better understanding of archiving people in the past, present, and future” (p. 21).
      PubDate: 2021-11-30
      DOI: 10.4314/jsasa.v54i1.
      Issue No: Vol. 54 (2021)
       
 
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