Subjects -> ART (Total: 882 journals)
    - ART (468 journals)
    - DANCE (26 journals)
    - FILM AND AUDIOVISUALS (125 journals)
    - MUSIC (171 journals)
    - THEATER (92 journals)

DANCE (26 journals)

Showing 1 - 22 of 22 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Journal of Dance Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Brolga: An Australian Journal about Dance     Full-text available via subscription  
Conceição/Conception     Open Access  
Dance Chronicle     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Dance Education in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dance Major Journal     Open Access  
Dance Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Dance Research Aotearoa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dance Research Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Dance studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dance, Movement & Spiritualities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Screendance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dance & Somatic Practices     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Dance Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Dance Medicine & Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Musikk og Tradisjon     Open Access  
På Spissen     Open Access  
Recherches en Danse     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research in Dance Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Theatre, Dance and Performance Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
American Journal of Dance Therapy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.181
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-3262 - ISSN (Online) 0146-3721
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • More Than One Story, More Than One Man: Laban Movement Analysis
           Re-examined

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      Abstract: Abstract In 2020 a petition from students and recent graduates of dance/movement therapy (DMT) programs was sent to the Board of Directors of the American Dance Therapy Association (ADTA). This petition brought forward concerns and critical questioning of movement observation frames, including a desire to bring a critical and anti-oppressive lens to the access of all bodies within larger psychological theories, DMT theories, and movement observation systems. The petition included a request for a “true” and “comprehensive” history of Rudolf Laban. The Education Committee of the ADTA charged one of three working groups to examine Laban’s history. This paper is the culmination of the history working groups’ exploration. It focuses on how histories are constructed and raises questions about the truth and comprehensiveness of any single account. It is divided into two sections. Laban’s controversial period in Germany (1919–1937) is highlighted first with a comparison of the historical narratives constructed by different scholars. The second part briefly describes the last two decades of Laban’s life (1938–1958) when he expanded his work outside of dance. It follows that no single story, including the ones constructed by this committee, can claim to be “true” and “comprehensive” histories. This history working group recommends integrating a full history of Laban in the teaching of dance therapy courses, engaging in intentional discussions about the cultural limitations of the system due to how it was developed, integrating and encouraging research by non-European dance therapists, and purposefully encouraging and sustaining diverse student bodies to continue the diversification of the DMT field. Decentering characteristics of the dominant culture will not be a quick fix, but a journey which requires the acknowledgement of Laban’s contributions to the discipline, while holding him accountable for his choices.
      PubDate: 2022-07-27
       
  • Abstracts from the 2021 Research and Thesis Poster Session of the 56th
           Annual American Dance Therapy Association Conference, Dance/Movement
           Therapy: Ancient Healing, Modern Practice, Virtual Conference, October
           14–17, 2021

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      Abstract: The Research and Practice Committee of the American Dance Therapy Association (ADTA) presents the research and thesis poster session at each annual conference. The abstracts reported in this paper were selected by the authors for the 2021 Virtual Research and Thesis Poster Session at the 56th Annual ADTA Conference. This year, the 56th Annual ADTA conference took place online, on a virtual platform, and Research and Thesis Poster Session featured two themes: (1) DMT Towards building Resiliency; and (2) DMT Insights from Practice. The following six abstracts have been selected for their quality and contributions to dance/movement therapy literature and feature a wide range of scholarly works in current research.
      PubDate: 2022-06-23
       
  • Biomolecular Effects of Dance and Dance/Movement Therapy: A Review

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      Abstract: Abstract The positive health impacts of dance and dance/movement therapy can be seen all the way down to the molecular level. This narrative-style review illustrates this connection by presenting a collection of clinical and preclinical studies that evaluate the effects of dance activities on hormones and other small-molecule metabolites within the human body. The results of these studies show that dance activities can increase levels of nitric oxide, serotonin, estrogen hormones, and HDL cholesterol, while they can decrease levels of dopamine, serum glucose, serum triglycerides, and LDL cholesterol. Levels of cortisol can either be increased or decreased, depending on the type of dance. Many of these results parallel the biomolecular effects of traditional (non-dance) exercise activities, although some contrasting results can also be seen. The concentrations of these molecules and their distributions throughout the body impact health and a wide variety of disease states. This connection to the molecular level provides a perspective for understanding how it is that dance activities are able to affect larger-scale physiological and psychological responses and lead to the positive health outcomes that are observed in many situations.
      PubDate: 2022-06-23
       
  • Kossak, M. (2021). Attunement in Expressive Arts Therapy: Toward an
           Understanding of Embodied Empathy (2nd ed.). Charles C. Thomas

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      PubDate: 2022-06-13
       
  • Editors’ Note

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      PubDate: 2022-06-10
       
  • The 2021 International Panel: Dance of the Ancient Healers: How Modern-day
           

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      Abstract: Abstract The 26th ADTA International Panel featured dance/movement therapists from the global community who described and demonstrated the healing dances that are part of their countries spiritual, cultural, and historical expression. Panelists contributed a verbal description along with videos incorporating music, rhythm, dance, and movement that represented the ways in which the ancient dance of their cultural ancestors have influenced their modern-day practice as dance/movement therapists. The following are abridged versions of the panel presentations which have been adapted to provide an overview of the panel. The complete transcripts with references and links to accompanying videos can be found by accessing the 2021 ADTA Conference Proceedings via the American Dance Therapy Association.
      PubDate: 2022-06-07
       
  • On the Authentic Movement Model: A Space for Creation—A Place To Be

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      Abstract: Abstract The Authentic Movement (AM) Model involves one or more people moving in the presence of one or more witnesses, whose presence is an integral part of the therapeutic process. After the development of AM in America, the AM model was introduced to Israel and further developed during the 1990s. The AM model is mainly used in group settings, with the model being taught in a compulsory course in programs training dance/movement therapists. While several qualitative studies have explored the significance of these courses for the participants, no large-scale quantitative study had previously been conducted assessing the meaningfulness of these courses. The purpose of this study was, therefore to examine participants’ perceptions of the significance of AM courses to their personal and professional lives, using a quantitative methodology. This study indicates that over 85% of participants in the study who had experienced at least one of various of the AM courses available in Israel believe that all students training as dance/movement therapists should participate in AM courses. Furthermore, the majority of participants in the study who had experienced AM courses indicated that being a witness as well as moving in front of witnesses was a highly significant experience for them.
      PubDate: 2022-06-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s10465-022-09354-5
       
  • Message to Our Readers

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      PubDate: 2022-06-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s10465-022-09366-1
       
  • A Case for Playful Engagement: Synchrony and Interaction Quality During
           Mirroring in ASD. Conceptual Framework and Case Study

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      Abstract: Abstract The social challenges in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) can present as qualitative differences in interactions that make individuals on the autism spectrum appear less engaged with others. Limited interactional synchrony and other nonverbal movement patterns may contribute to these qualitative differences. This article uses the case of Hans, an adult on the autism spectrum, to describe patterns of synchrony and interaction quality during mirroring activities in dance/movement therapy. Raters scored videos of Hans and his partners on affective engagement, flow of the interaction, and interpersonal synchrony. They also qualitatively described his movements and interactions. Hans consistently participated in mirroring, but showed different patterns of attention and engagement when leading, following, interacting, or dancing in an open-ended dance. Hans was able to move in synchrony with partners, showed positive affect, and increased his movement repertoire by returning to others’ movements in later sessions. He was the most engaged when following a playful movement theme with a dance/movement therapy student partner. His affective engagement increased, but only in the less structured open-ended dance and only across the five sessions with this same dance/movement therapy student partner, and not when the sessions with his other partners, including others on the autism spectrum, were included. This points to a potential need to have dance/movement therapists model developing a movement relationship using flexible and playful contexts to emotionally engage the individual and reflect the complexity of everyday social situations. We present clinical recommendations and suggestions for future studies.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10465-022-09359-0
       
  • Where Contact Improvisation Meets Dance/Movement Therapy: An Embodied
           Group Artistic Inquiry

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      Abstract: Abstract The purpose of this study was to explore potential for integrating elements of contact improvisation (CI) into the practice of dance/movement therapy (DMT). This study aimed to determine the critical considerations for introducing an improvisational practice involving the use of touch to clients in a safe and therapeutic manner. The primary research question was: How can CI be used within the practice of DMT' The primary investigator collaborated with three dance/movement therapists who also practice CI to explore the research question through an embodied group artistic inquiry. Co-researchers met three times for three hours each in a private dance studio space. Data were collected and analyzed through arts-based methods, including structured improvisations, visual art, and dialogue which were documented through a short film. The results illuminated the many layers of psychological and emotional content that CI can provoke, suggesting that CI must be broken down into small, manageable experiences specific to the clients’ needs, setting and treatment goals. Two themes emerged that illuminate the purpose of CI in DMT, which are holism and making contact. The study aims to spark further conversation about the ways in which the exploration of contact (both physical and emotional) can be transformational for DMT clients and facilitators.
      PubDate: 2022-05-31
      DOI: 10.1007/s10465-022-09360-7
       
  • Effectiveness of Dance/Movement Therapy Intervention for Children with
           

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      Abstract: Abstract Children with intellectual disability (ID) often have deficits in gross motor skills and static and dynamic balance abilities, poor lower muscle strength, and an increased risk of serious falls. They also face difficulty in continuing physical activity programs due to cognitive impairment and easy loss of motivation. However, dance/movement therapy (DMT) has been found to help children with ID perform static and dynamic movements. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of DMT group sessions for children with ID as part of an early childhood special education preschool program. The outcome measures involved employing a hand-held dynamometer to assess knee extensor muscles, the one-leg stand test for static balance, and the timed “up and go” test for dynamic balance, and administering the Child Behavior Checklist and Caregiver-Teacher Report Form for children’s adaptive functions and behavioral problems, as reported by parents or relatives and teachers respectively. Twenty-one children with ID aged 36 to 72 months participated in the study. Ten 60-min DMT group sessions were conducted as manualized intervention, once a week. The measurements were done before and after the 10 DMT group session, and then compared. The results showed statistically significant changes in both knee extensor muscles, the standing time for both legs in the one-leg stand test, attention problems and affective problems in the Checklist, and total score, internalizing problems (including emotionally reactive and somatic complaints), externalizing problems (including attention problems and aggressive behavior), affective problems, anxiety problems, and attention deficit/hyperactivity problems in the Report Form. This study found that the DMT group sessions as part of an early childhood special education preschool program for children with ID aged 36 to 72 months helped improve their knee extensor muscles and static balance while reducing maladaptive behaviors, enabling them to enjoy the sessions for the full study period.
      PubDate: 2022-05-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s10465-022-09356-3
       
  • Dancing with My Other-Self: A Self-Portrait History of a Healing Process
           Through Dance

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      Abstract: Abstract Where does the seed of recovery from trauma, from illness, from injury find ground, sink roots, and start to grow' Can one find empowerment in a body, subjected to illness, trauma and disability' In this autobiographical article, the authors takes us on a journey into illness, where despair threatens her very will to live. In fact, she becomes to herself something foreign, grotesque, and completely other. And yet, hope sprouts. This work has two voices: the primary voice describes the power of dance in her healing from paralysis (hemiparesis and complete disfigurement of the face) due to viral encephalitis caused by herpes zoster (chickenpox). Sentenced not to walk again, she desperately and willfully turned to dancing to help in her recovery. It took her two years to return to formal dance classes and seven years to perform professionally again.  In this article, she shares in an intimate conversation how dance can be more than an aesthetic art, and can support the process of transformational rehabilitation. The secondary voice from the co-author urges dance/movement therapists to listen carefully to direct experience, and utilize an embodied inquiry into illness and healing. Autobiographical experience offers an invitation for dance/movement therapists to further their understanding of the lived experience of rehabilitation and the psychology of illness and thereby deepen their capacity to clinically support the painful process of integration when healing does not look like a return to a level of prior functioning.
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s10465-022-09358-1
       
  • Marian Chace Foundation Film Screening and Panel Discussion: Dance
           Therapy: The Power of Movement

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      Abstract: Abstract This year, the Marian Chace Foundation faced an an unexpected turn of events. This created a shift in programming that called for quick creative thinking and flexibility in long held traditions. In lieu of a traditional lecturer, the 2021 Marian Chace Foundation Lecture began with a film screening of Dance Therapy: The Power of Movement and culminated with a professional panel including some of the women involved with the 1982 film. The panel moderator guided inquiries around the conception and creation of the film, the clinical processes, and general knowledge of the practice of dance movement therapy. Transcripts of the panel discussion highlight the rich dialogue between those women who were paving the way for dance movement therapy to be a respected career in the United States of America and provided a glimpse, through both the film and the panel, of the remarkable, therapeutic work they were providing decades ago. The 2021 Marian Chace Foundation film screening and professional panel can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch'v=8L7jMlngmLA.
      PubDate: 2022-04-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s10465-022-09355-4
       
  • The Dance of Becoming: Pedagogy in Dance/Movement Therapy in the United
           States

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      Abstract: Abstract The purpose of this study was to begin to define pedagogical theory and practice in the field of dance/movement therapy (DMT). Fourteen DMT educators from American dance therapy association approved programs participated in the study, taking part in individual semi-structured interviews through a phenomenological lens. The participants had taught in the DMT field for at least five years and at most 44 years. Utilizing grounded theory methods, two focus groups were also conducted in which six DMT educators discussed initial qualitative themes from the individual interviews. Through an engaged process, participants were able to participate in the further defining of the study’s themes. Data were analyzed using grounded theory methods of initial and focused coding. The researcher also used member checking, peer review, and a personal research journal to name her own reflexive position within the emerging data. The researcher’s findings centered around six qualitative themes. These themes named the importance of the DMT student’s development of self-awareness including body identity, cultural identity, and professional identity all housed within the experience of embodied learning. Findings also named the importance of educator transparency and modeling in the classroom to create space for student exploration. Recommendations from the study aimed towards creating more opportunities for educators to collaborate and communicate across the field with the goal of creating best practices for DMT education. Also recommendation for DMT educators centered around clarity of expectations in the embodied self-reflective learning process.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10465-021-09351-0
       
  • Re-embodied by the Rhythm: A Jungian Understanding of a Woman’s
           Experience of Birth Trauma and Its Transformation Through a Spiritual
           Dance Practice

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      Abstract: Abstract C. G. Jung, and those who followed in his footsteps to shape Depth Psychology, gave us the words to understand the complexes that develop after someone has experienced trauma. In particular when a woman experiences birth trauma, she can become gripped by the victim complex, feeling trapped by the feeling-toned archetypal core that affects how she interacts with the world. But what is the remedy to heal this' In the mire of my own turmoil, after the terrifying medicalized birth of my son, a chance encounter with a spiritual dance practice on the cliffs of the California coast was the only thing that helped. Curious to determine what was happening within me, I discovered that the ancient practice of dance actually engages the Transcendent Function. Miller (The transcendent function: Jung’s model of psychological growth through dialogue with the unconscious, State University of New York Press, Albany, 2004) offers a beautiful description of this Jungian concept, “The transcendent function is the tissue between consciousness and the unconscious; it is the expression of the space or field that mediates between the two” (p. 126). This connective tissue had been broken during my traumatic experience and it was only when my consciousness could once again successfully communicate with my unconscious that I began to become restored. Thus, my research examines how a complex can develop as a result of trauma, the way in which dance activates the transcendent function, and how these two things worked together to help me align with the complex to work towards individuation after tribulations.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10465-021-09352-z
       
  • Movement Based Experiential Learning and Competency Development in
           Dance/Movement Therapy Graduate Education: Early Practitioner Perspectives
           

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      Abstract: Abstract Experiential classes that use dance/movement as the primary means of learning are universal in dance/movement therapy (DMT) graduate education programs in the United States. Yet, there have been no studies to determine what competencies develop in movement based experiential classes in DMT education. This is a report of a qualitative study that used thematic analysis to identify competencies that DMT students develop from movement based experiential learning (MBEL). Competencies identified in this study were compared to the education standards set by the American Dance Therapy Association (ADTA). As expected, MBEL was most instrumental in developing competencies for clinical practice and professional development. MBEL was less effective in developing competencies for multiculturalism and theoretical knowledge. The study identified a set of new competencies related to emotional intelligence that is not in the ADTA’s standards and is unique to student experiences in MBEL. This study focused on the student perspective, which can help address some of the weaknesses of current education practices. The article ends with the benefits and limitations of a competence based education for DMT.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10465-021-09353-y
       
  • Resistance as an Invitation to Tighten the Therapeutic Relationship Using
           a Dynamic, Empathetic Movement Approach

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      Abstract: Abstract Resistance necessarily erupts in a surprising, spontaneous and authentic manner, manifested as an emotionally powerful, often physical phenomenon. Resistance signifies the client's unwillingness to participate in the therapeutic process. Scholars have tried to understand resistance, and proposed therapeutic interventions. The present study relies on Kohut's approach to the "self-object" as the relationship for consideration. A mixed-methods paradigm using quantitative and qualitative tools, collected therapists' viewpoints on their clients' resistance patterns, to clarify therapists' coping methods, when facing, different emotional, behavioral and physical resistances. It also investigated whether clients could be equipped with professional tools to provide a space for anchors, alternative innovative viewpoints, variation of emotional, behavioral and movement expressions and other ways of expressing the resistance experience. Respondents included 14 occupational therapists, 23 para-medical carers and 17 students on a group leaders' course. Data were collected from questionnaires, eliciting therapists' reactions to resistance situations, and perceptions of the resistant client and from the therapists' observations, reflective writings, case presentations and works on children resisting therapy. Findings indicate that learning in an experiential workshop, field work and reflective writing altered therapists' perceptions of resistance as expressed in movement, behavior and emotions. There was a change in the therapeutic relationship and the intervention methods, and in the therapist's self-image and professional identity. This study alters the image of the resistant other, being perceived not as belligerent, but rather as struggling to experience their self and to express their inner world.
      PubDate: 2021-06-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s10465-021-09349-8
       
  • Dance/Movement Therapists’ Attitudes and Practices Toward Opioid Use
           Disorder

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      Abstract: Abstract The purpose of this study was to explore attitudes and practices among dance/movement therapists regarding the US opioid crisis and management of opioid use disorders (OUD). A novel cross-sectional design survey was administered between November 2018 and December 2018. Participants were predominantly female (96%), White (81%), with the largest group in private practice (35%) (N = 310). The majority of participants believed that dance/movement therapists have an opportunity to respond to the opioid crisis (86%) and improve OUD-related care in their own practice (61%). Yet a striking number did not report routinely screening (68%), providing SUD-focused interventions (41%), referring for addiction care (75%), or administering naloxone (87%). Conclusions found that attitudes toward OUD care are incongruent with actual clinical practices. Future studies to identify the best pathways for dance/movement therapy training in addiction care are warranted.
      PubDate: 2021-06-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s10465-021-09350-1
       
  • Editors’ Note

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      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10465-021-09347-w
       
  • Chaiklin, S. & Wengrower, H. (Eds.) (2021) Dance and Creativity within
           Dance/Movement Therapy: International Perspectives. Routledge

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      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10465-021-09343-0
       
 
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