Subjects -> EDUCATION (Total: 2346 journals)
    - ADULT EDUCATION (24 journals)
    - COLLEGE AND ALUMNI (10 journals)
    - E-LEARNING (38 journals)
    - EDUCATION (1996 journals)
    - HIGHER EDUCATION (140 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS (4 journals)
    - ONLINE EDUCATION (42 journals)
    - SCHOOL ORGANIZATION (14 journals)
    - SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION (40 journals)
    - TEACHING METHODS AND CURRICULUM (38 journals)

ONLINE EDUCATION (42 journals)

Showing 1 - 41 of 41 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aprendo con NooJ     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Association of Open Universities Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Distance Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Campus Virtuales     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Issues in Emerging eLearning     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Designs for Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Digital Education Review     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Edu Komputika Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Edutec : Revista Electrónica de Tecnología Educativa     Open Access  
European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
ICT Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Computer-Assisted Language Learning and Teaching     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Cyber Ethics in Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Educational Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Educational Technology in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Game-Based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Mobile Learning and Organisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Virtual and Personal Learning Environments     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Web-Based Learning and Teaching Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal on Advances in ICT for Emerging Regions (ICTer)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
International Technology and Education Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Irish Journal of Academic Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Irish Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Computers in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Learning and Teaching in Digital Age     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Learning for Development     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Open, Flexible and Distance Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Research on Technology in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Teaching and Learning with Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Multicultural Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Networks : An Online Journal for Teacher Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
OUSL Journal     Open Access  
Research and Practice in Technology Enhanced Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Revista Interuniversitaria de Investigación en Tecnología Educativa     Open Access  
Smart Learning Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Teknodika     Open Access  
Theory and methods of e-learning     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Computers in Education
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2197-9987 - ISSN (Online) 2197-9995
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Interactivity during Covid-19: mediation of learner interactions on social
           

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      Abstract: Abstract Social presence in education pertains to the connectedness students have with one another and is highly indicative of course satisfaction and performance. Further, social presence fosters motivation and promotes opportunities for collaboration, therefore, considered a critical factor in influencing second language acquisition. In the context of emergency remote online courses due to Covid-19, this study investigates the role of social presence in relation to learner interactions and learning outcome beliefs. To this end, this research is interested in learning how social presence influences learner-learner, learner-instructor, and learner-content interactions within videoconference-supported EFL classes. This study also identifies the mediating effects learner interactions have on the relationship between social presence and expected learning outcomes. This cross-sectional questionnaire study surveyed 547 South Korean university EFL students and data were analyzed using structural equation modeling to measure direct and indirect relationships among the variables of interest. The findings indicate that students’ levels of social presence positively influenced rates of interactions with their classmates, the instructor, and course content. Results further provide insight pertaining to the academic achievement students expect when participating in videoconferencing courses, and how this relationship between social presence and academic learning outcome is distinctly mediated by learner-instructor and learner-content interactions. Findings give insight into the sorts of activities and practices instructors can employ; for instance, EFL instructors are recommended to clearly assess learner-learner interactions if such interactions are to have a significant influence on course outcome beliefs when using videoconferencing tools effectively in the post Covid-19 era.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Global trends in the application of virtual reality for people with autism
           spectrum disorders: conceptual, intellectual and the social structure of
           scientific production

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      Abstract: Abstract Research in recent years has shown an increase in scientific production on the application of virtual reality in people with autism spectrum disorder. However, there is no global picture about the research carried out in the field during the last years. Therefore, we propose to analyze conceptually, intellectually and socially the global trends in the use of virtual reality for learning by people with ASD through bibliometric techniques. A bibliometric analysis was carried out with a sample of 378 documents obtained from the main collection of the Web of Science during the period 1996–2020. Results show that Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders is the Journal around which the field of publications is organized. In addition, those authors who receive the most citations are not the most producers, but they do take central positions in collaborative networks. Therefore, it produces teams of more authors. Finally, the use of cheaper and more portable VR devices has led to the spread of this tool to various areas of people with ASD that had not been worked on before. These are closely related to factors that influence social interactions. These findings may help to suggest the use of other bibliometric indicators that would broaden the field of knowledge of the study and the creation of a new software to analyse in more detail the application of VR in people with autism spectrum disorders.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • A comparison of pre-service teachers’ variable misconceptions in various
           computer-programming preferences: findings to teacher education course

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      Abstract: Abstract For over a decade, researchers have been concerned about variable misconceptions within teaching and learning computer programming. Few studies exist to explore this concern in-depth from a pre-service teacher’s perspective. Importantly, the identification of pre-service teachers’ misconceptions in computer programming may significantly impact teaching and learning since it provides remedies to minimize or prevent effects on students. This study examines variable misconceptions of computer science pre-service teachers in Thailand and the effects of different computer-programming preferences on variable misconceptions. This study used a quantitative research method to examine a Thai sample of 151 computer science pre-service teachers with different preferences of programming languages. In this study, the pre-service teachers were asked to evaluate the provided programming tasks relating to variables. The Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U tests were performed to compare the computer-programming preferences between the groups. The findings of this study slightly reveal that the computer programming pre-service teachers have misconceptions about variables. The pre-service teachers in Logo and Scratch groups have similarly observed misconceptions. The Python group, however, is better at interpreting the misconceptions about variables. A design of pre-service teacher education activities to tackle variable misconceptions in the K-12 computer programming curriculum will be suggested according to the findings of this study.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • The effects of blocked and massed practice opportunities on learning
           software applications with video tutorials

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      Abstract: Abstract The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect and use of two practice opportunities (blocked practice vs. massed practice) in the context of complex software training in higher education. The effectiveness of these practice opportunities lies in the contextual interference effect, a motor learning method that is experienced when practising multiple skills within one session. The most fascinating facet of the contextual interference effect is the inverse relationship between performance during training and performance after training. This study employed an experiment to compare the contribution of blocked practice and massed practice on task performance. Additionally, mental effort as an indicator of cognitive load and motivational constructs (self-efficacy, flow, and motivation) was explored for experimental purposes. A cohort of computer science undergraduates with high information communication technology skills (N = 118) participated in this study. Individuals practised three tasks in either a blocked or massed schedule. The results showed an effect of practice arrangement (favouring blocked practice) during training (p < .02), but no effect of practice arrangement after training for this user demographic. Moreover, blocked practice contributed to self-efficacy, flow, and motivation. The paper concludes with a discussion of the findings and recommendations for enhancing the effectiveness of video tutorials.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Explorations of two approaches to learning CT in a game environment for
           elementary school students

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      Abstract: Abstract Collaboration can be a significant determinant in the teaching and development of computational thinking (CT) skills in school students. This paper presented a case study on how students learned CT skills through a coding game via two approaches: one using collaborative learning (through cognitive apprenticeship) and the other through individual learning. The quasi-experimental design was used in two classes (24 students in each class) and was divided into using one of the two approaches. Relevant data were collected through pre- and post-tests based on the E-game CT test. The research results indicated: (1) Both collaborative learning (through cognitive apprenticeship) and individual learning effectively enhanced the learning effects of students’ development for CT skills in an E-game coding education platform; (2) In collaborative learning (through cognitive apprenticeship), students in lower-scoring groups could enhance their CT skills more effectively than those in higher-scoring groups; (3) For those students who fell in the two lower-scoring groups, those in collaborative learning (through cognitive apprenticeship) had higher significant learning effects than those in individual learning; (4) Students with lower scores who programmed with a higher-scoring partner learned more than when they programmed alone. Overall, this study showed that the use of an E-game learning platform enabled the learning process of CT to become more interesting and challenging for students.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Prediction of social media effects on students’ academic performance
           using Machine Learning Algorithms (MLAs)

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      Abstract: Abstract The global increase in social media (or social networking site) usage among college and university students, both outside and inside lecture halls, has open discussions on its effects on their academic performance. However, existing research probing its effects on students’ academic performance is not settled. Thus, a section of studies on social networking site usage and multitasking strongly supports a negative consequence on students’ academic performance. At the same time, other scholars have found little to no effect of social networking site usage on academic performance. The current study examined the association between the usage rate, the nature of use, usage in class, and level of exposure to a social networking site by students and their academic performance. Five-Hundred and Fifty (550) were sampled using a convenient sampling technique; an effort was made to address the divergent views on social media use and academic performance in the literature. Also, we predicted the student’s GPA using a predictive framework based on Decision Tree (DT) and Random Forest (RF) machine learning algorithms. The outcome of the current study shows that the rate of social networking site usage and its use in class partially affects students’ academic performance.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • An in-depth analysis of programming in the Swedish school
           curriculum—rationale, knowledge content and teacher guidance

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper reports a study of Swedish curriculum documents for compulsory school in order to unfold how novel programming content is communicated to the main policy enactors, that is, the teachers. Specifically, the study focusses on: (1) arguments for why programming is relevant and for what purposes, (2) what programming knowledge that is specified and (3) what guidance the curriculum documents provide to help teachers realise the programming content in their teaching. Text analysis was used as method of analysis. Two conceptual frameworks were used during analysis to identify and classify arguments for computer science in compulsory education, and to identify types of programming knowledge. Results reveal that the curriculum documents are sparse on details about what programming knowledge entails. Instead, programming is mainly presented as an interdisciplinary tool to achieve other learning goals. Guidance is given mainly in the form of cautious suggestions on how the work can be organised and through broad explanations and examples of how programming can be useful. However, some important and difficult strategic decisions are left entirely to the teachers without any clear guidance. The programming message in its entirety is communicated through several texts from different subjects. Altogether, this may complicate teachers’ process of transforming the curriculum into teaching and learning activities. In turn, there is a risk of inequality amongst schools and that the programming experience for the children becomes fragmented, superficial, misses out on key points, or is omitted, in part or in whole.
      PubDate: 2022-04-26
       
  • Evaluation of a mobile-based scaffolding board game developed by
           scaffolding-based game editor: analysis of learners’ performance,
           anxiety and behavior patterns

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      Abstract: Abstract Game-based learning with scaffolding is expected to provide learners with an effective and positive learning environment. This study developed a scaffold-oriented educational game editor that allows teachers to design educational game activities that combine physical board game cards. Players could obtain mobile-based scaffolding by manipulating and scanning the cards. We used the editor to develop a game activity, "Return," for a high school chemistry course, and conducted a preliminary empirical evaluation of the mobile-based scaffolding game. Participants were students in a high school in northern Taiwan. The study analyzed the learning effectiveness, anxiety level, and learning behavior patterns of the learners. Results showed that learners' learning effectiveness improved significantly, and their anxiety level decreased after using the game. Analysis of learning behavior patterns revealed that learners were able to fully utilize the mobile-based cognitive scaffolding and real-time feedback provided in the game to try to combine various hidden clues to solve problems.
      PubDate: 2022-04-13
       
  • Mediated transfer: impact on programming misconceptions

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      Abstract: Programming misconceptions have been a known issue for programming novices since the beginning of programming education. During the learning process, students develop mental models about programming concepts they learn. Programming misconceptions occur when students develop incorrect mental models. Several factors can contribute to developing or preventing misconceptions, such as the age of students, choice of the programming language, and programming context. Mentioned factors are more critical for younger students. Since block-based programming languages (BPL) eliminate syntax problems and lower abstraction, they could be appropriate for elementary school introductory programming. However, when BPL is used as a first programming language, students have difficulties transferring learned programming concepts to a text-based programming language (TBPL). Nevertheless, the final goal is to introduce students to the “real” TBPL. In this paper, we aimed to discover can we use BPL for mediated transfer to minimise known misconceptions in a TBPL. We conducted the study to analyse the impact of using a BPL MakeCode for micro:bit for mediated transfer of basic programming concepts to the TBPL Python. The study was conducted in the school setting among 49 sixth-graders in elementary school during Informatics lectures, following the national curriculum. Therefore, students were introduced to programming using TBPL Python and afterwards, they switched to BPL MakeCode as mediated transfer tool to TBPL Python. In this paper, we deal with the impact of the mediated transfer on misconceptions in TBPL. The results indicate that the use of BPL significantly decreased the frequency of misconceptions in TBPL Python.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
       
  • What happens to your body during learning with computer-based
           environments' Exploring negative academic emotions using
           psychophysiological measurements

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      Abstract: Abstract This explorative study aims to examine if electrodermal activity (EDA) and heart rate (HR) are appropriate measures for identifying and monitoring academic emotions during learning in computer-based learning environments (CBLEs). Understanding learners' emotions while using CBLEs, allows improving the design of CBLEs. Therefore, we collected EDA, HR, and self-report data from 32 participants to measure academic emotions during learning with CBLEs in a laboratory setting. We induced negative academic emotions during learning using harmful connotated learning content about animal welfare. In a pre-post design, participants reported their emotional state before and after learning. We collated the self-reports with the EDA and HR curves to identify the emotional change in real-time. We prepared the data for repeated measurement analyses and group differences (high-, middle-, low learning performance; bored vs. not bored participants). Negative academic emotions were detected in increased EDA and HR. EDA turned out to be an indicator of learning performance. Boredom manifested in HR decrease. Findings show that EDA and HR are appropriate tools to measure academic emotions. We want to show the importance of real-time measures for learning and the efficiency of EDA and HR measures. It is worth considering EDA as a predictor for learning success and implementing EDA and HR measurements in CBLEs. However, more research is needed to clarify the role of HR in the context of learning performance.
      PubDate: 2022-03-27
       
  • E-content development of English language courses during COVID-19: a
           comprehensive analysis of students’ satisfaction

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      Abstract: Abstract There was a sudden switch to online learning approaches because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Universities were under pressure to provide a variety of e-learning designs during a short time, impacting the quality of the learning. This study tended to evaluate the quality of e-content development related to English language courses by Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS) faculties. The survey was conducted on 610 undergraduate students of SUMS who had an English course in the first semester which was during the same time that the pandemic started. A self-devised questionnaire including 30 items in five main domains: physical design, affective design, cognitive design (e-content organization and multimedia principles), flexibility, and ease of use was used to achieve students’ satisfaction around the quality of the e-content developed by their teachers. Data were analyzed using SPSS 22 via one-sample t-test, Independent t-test, and ANOVA. Despite the limitations of e-content development by teachers, students had a satisfactory perception overall. Among the dimensions of e-content quality, physical design, cognitive design, ease of use, and flexibility had a score higher than the cut-off point but the score of the affective design was less. In addition, the differences were significant concerning age, gender, degree, type of digital device, and the faculties. It seems that in the situation of pandemics and lack of access to students, faculty members in terms of structural and cognitive dimensions have been able to develop satisfactory e-content in a short and intensive time, but it is necessary to be motivating, interactive, and up-to-date.
      PubDate: 2022-03-26
       
  • Examining the effect of seat location on students’ real-time social
           interactions in a smart classroom using experience sampling method

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      Abstract: Abstract While prior research has examined the impact of seats on students' performance in the classroom, no agreement has reached on how seat locations influence students’ social interactions, especially in technology-enhanced classrooms. This study seeks to understand how different seats of smart classrooms are associated with student real-time social interactions. In this study, we examine how the situational and individual factors as the key variables may account for the students' real-time social interactions. Specifically, data on real-time social interactions and different seats were collected using the experience sampling method (ESM) from 36 sophomores at a university in central China, resulting in 180 ESM responses. The results of Multilevel Analysis showed that the students' seat location and the week number within the individual had a significant impact on the student's real-time social interactions, while the gender and mastery goal of students affected their social interactions among individuals. Meanwhile, the seat fluctuations of students who participated in the smart classroom presented three typical types: front row stable type, rear stable row type, and fluctuating type.
      PubDate: 2022-03-21
       
  • Narrative inquiry for CALL teacher preparation programs amidst the
           COVID-19 pandemic: language teachers’ technological needs and
           suggestions

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      Abstract: Abstract Drawing on qualitative research, this study explores the Iranian EFL teachers’ technological needs and their suggestions for using computer-assisted language learning (CALL) during the COVID-19 pandemic. We analyzed the narratives produced by 66 English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers for their themes through deductive and inductive thematic analysis phases using MAXQDA. The findings indicate that CALL teacher preparation programs should prioritize technological pedagogical knowledge (TPK), then technological content knowledge (TCK), and finally technological knowledge (TK). Moreover, teachers stated that CALL teacher preparation programs should develop their knowledge concerning the intersections of TCK/TPK and TPK/TK. Furthermore, Iranian EFL teachers suggested that CALL can be used during the pandemic if cooperation among teachers, students, and parents will be made, technological-related infrastructures will be developed, and teacher preparation programs will develop EFL teachers’ collaboration, digital literacy, teacher autonomy, and TPK with special attention to the educational needs made by the pandemic situation. The findings have implications for teacher educators, professional development course designers and providers, and decision-makers by highlighting promising directions to devote their precious time and resources.
      PubDate: 2022-03-09
       
  • Exploring the role of sociability, sense of community and course
           satisfaction on students' engagement in flipped classroom supported by
           facebook groups

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      Abstract: Abstract In recent years, how students’ engagement can be developed in flipped classroom (FC) model has become a critical issue addressed in an educational context. Evidence suggests that students’ behavioral, cognitive, and emotional engagement may decrease in FC in time. It is thought that social networking sites (SNS) can contribute to this problem in FC. Since it is believed that students will show greater interest in discussions and knowledge exchange about the course, supporting courses with SNS is significant in terms of providing students with a social learning environment, it is assumed that students’ role of sociability, sense of community, and course satisfaction will increase, thereby promoting students’ engagement in those courses supported by SNS. This assumption appears in the literature as a gap that needs to be explored. In this sense, the purpose of this current research is to examine perceived sociability, sense of community, and student satisfaction and to determine how these variables predict behavioral, cognitive, and emotional engagement of students in FC supported by a virtual learning community. A total of 219 university students at a state university in Turkey. The research was carried out in the Computing I course conducted according to the FC model, and it was supported by the virtual learning community created on Facebook. Knowledge sharing and discussions about the course were made in Facebook groups. The data draws on students’ responses via three self-report instruments: satisfaction scale, students’ engagement scale, perceived sociability scale, and sense of community scale. Stepwise multiple linear regression was conducted for the data analysis. The findings indicate that students’ engagement in FC applications supported by the Facebook-based virtual learning community is high. Regarding sub-dimensions, students’ behavioral and emotional engagement scores are high, while cognitive engagement is moderate. Additionally, perceived sociability, sense of community, and satisfaction are significant predictors of students’ engagement. Several implications and future research recommendations are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-03-08
       
  • Instructional techniques and tools reported as being used by teachers
           within empirical research focusing on in-class digital ability
           development: a literature review

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      Abstract: Abstract Despite vast amounts of existing research regarding digital ability development, there is a dearth of studies that systematize and evaluate the instructional techniques and tools reported as being used to develop them. The aim of this study is to contribute to the state of knowledge regarding the instructional techniques and tools reported as being used by teachers to develop digital abilities. To such an end, a systematized literature review was conducted. For the extraction of articles, a specific search code was used within the Web of Science All Collections, including SciELO, databases. Without setting a year-limit, and concluding the search on the 24 of April 2021, 613 articles were found. Sixty cleared selection criterion and, ultimately, 17 contributed to the purpose of the review. Findings show that a majority of articles report on classroom interventions and not on classroom observations. Additionally, they also suggest that six instructional techniques were employed by all studies: analyzing multiple perspectives of a same learning assignment, using authentic problems, collaboration, providing feedback, giving progressive autonomy to students and asking them to share their work. Regarding methodology, a preferred approach is the use of pre-post test design with a small number of cases and where non-probabilistic sampling and self-reported questionaries are favored.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40692-022-00222-2
       
  • Self-directed learning of core vocabulary in English by EFL learners:
           comparing the outcomes from paper and mobile application flashcards

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      Abstract: Abstract In light of the recent developments in mobile technologies and students’ increased uses of these platforms for educational purposes, research on mobile-assisted learning is gaining increased attention. Within this line of inquiry, the current study explored vocabulary learning outcomes from paper and mobile application flashcards. The study used a repeated measures design, by exposing the participants (55 high-school students) to different learning conditions and testing their receptive knowledge of core vocabulary in English in three junctures of time over a year. The participants were asked to use digital or paper flashcards for vocabulary learning, and two standard measures of vocabulary knowledge in pre- and post-tests were used to compare vocabulary gains. The results revealed that both groups improved their vocabulary knowledge over time. Nevertheless, the participants in the experimental group who used mobile applications outperformed the control group (paper flashcards) in the post-tests, and the effect size of the observed differences was very large. The findings underscore the long-term impacts of mobile-assisted vocabulary learning, and the affordances provided by such platforms for learning a considerable number of words by EFL learners. The findings also promise implications for language learners/teachers and materials developers in English language teaching programmes.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40692-021-00197-6
       
  • Blending asynchronous and synchronous digital technologies and
           instructional approaches to facilitate remote learning

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      Abstract: Abstract This two-stage qualitative-dominant sequential mixed-method study, using an online survey of elementary and secondary school English language teachers (N = 73) and follow-up interviews (N = 10), collectively explores how teachers in Hong Kong adapted their instruction to online teaching in responses to COVID-19. The findings indicate that teachers used a variety of asynchronous and synchronous digital technologies and instructional approaches to facilitate students’ learning, assess learning, and communicate with students and parents remotely. The findings suggest that a blend of asynchronous and synchronous modes are seen as optimum to support student learning online. A model is proposed on how teachers can blend asynchronous and synchronous digital technologies and instructional approaches within a sequence of learning.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40692-021-00195-8
       
  • Adoption of online education channel during the COVID-19 pandemic and
           associated economic lockdown: an empirical study from push–pull-mooring
           framework

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      Abstract: Abstract The purpose of the research was to study how the onset of COVID-19 pandemic fuelled shift towards digitalization in the education ecosystem. The study consisted of responses from 316 engineering students collected during the COVID-19 pandemic physical lockdown in India from March to May 2020. The collected data was analysed using structural equation modelling to develop a model for online education in the study context based upon the push–pull-mooring framework. Hayes’ model was used to analyze the effect of the multiple mediators to understand the relationship between the antecedents (Platform knowledge scope, alternative media attractiveness and normative environmental pressure) and switching behaviour for performance. This research contributed to the push–pull-mooring framework theory in the context of a crisis event.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40692-021-00193-w
       
  • Analyzing students’ performance in computerized formative assessments to
           optimize teachers’ test administration decisions using deep learning
           frameworks

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      Abstract: Abstract Artificial intelligence (AI) applications continue to improve decision-making processes at all levels of education. A relatively untouched area in which AI can be quite useful is automating assessment-related decisions about students’ learning outcomes when monitoring students’ learning progress through computerized formative assessments. While the use of computerized formative assessments in the classroom allows teachers to assess students’ learning continuously and more frequently, there are implementation-related barriers that prevent teachers from maximizing the diagnostic value of such assessments. For example, the administration frequency and scheduling of computerized formative assessments are highly critical for students regardless of their performance level. Traditionally, most teachers have to rely on their judgment and observations in determining the testing schedule for all students. Human judgments, however, might be highly subjective given that teachers are not likely to oversee each student’s academic history closely. In this study, we aim to introduce a deep learning framework to predict and optimize the number of test administrations and support the decisions using clustering approaches. We used math performance data gathered from 10,107 first graders during the 2017–2018 school year. Our best model demonstrated highly accurate prediction results with average accuracy scores close to 90%. In addition, the clustering approach revealed interpretable insights into how the test administration decisions were associated with students’ performance profiles. The proposed system would greatly help teachers make more systematic and informed test administration decisions and thereby maximize the effectiveness of computerized formative assessments in promoting student learning.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40692-021-00196-7
       
  • A systematic literature review on adaptive content recommenders in
           personalized learning environments from 2015 to 2020

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      Abstract: Abstract In personalized learning, each student gets a customized learning plan according to their pace of learning, instructional preferences, learning objects, etc. Hence the content recommender system in Personalized Learning Environment (PLE) should adapt to learner attributes and suggest appropriate learning resources to aid the learning process and improve the learning outcomes. This systematic literature review aims to analyze and summarize the studies on learning content recommenders in adaptive and personalized learning environments from 2015 to 2020. The publications were searched using proper keywords and filtered using the inclusion and exclusion criteria, which resulted in 52 publications. This paper summarizes the recent trends in research on different aspects of the recommender systems, such as learner attributes, recommendation methods, evaluation metrics, and the usability tests used by the researchers. It is observed that cognitive aspects of learners like learning style, preferences, knowledge level, etc., are used by most studies than non-cognitive aspects as social tags or trust. In most cases, recommendation engines are a hybrid of collaborative filtering, content-based filtering, ontological approaches, etc. All models were evaluated for the correctness of the prediction done, and a few studies have also done evaluations based on learner satisfaction or usability.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40692-021-00199-4
       
 
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