Subjects -> BIOGRAPHY (Total: 17 journals)
Showing 1 - 1 of 1 Journals sorted alphabetically
a/b : Auto/Biography Studies : Journal of The Autobiography Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Anales Galdosianos     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Biography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Goethe Yearbook     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hemingway Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Henry James Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ibsen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Žižek Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
James Joyce Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Medical Biography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Risk Management in Financial Institutions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Hopkins Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Tolkien Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Wallace Stevens Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
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Wallace Stevens Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.1
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0148-7132 - ISSN (Online) 2160-0570
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • “And the World Had Worlds”: Stevens’s Ways of Doing and
           Becoming World Literature

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      Abstract: THE PEDIGREE of the double special issue we have the pleasure of introducing here stretches back over several decades. More than thirty years ago, Al Filreis initiated what would become a highly productive critical debate when he titled his first major study Wallace Stevens and the Actual World (1991). Importantly, Filreis didn’t limit the case studies gathered in that book to Stevens’s interactions with his immediate spatiotemporal environment, tempting as such an approach might have seemed for such a homebound poet who cultivated the here and now in his verse. Instead, the first half of Filreis’s groundbreaking book was devoted to the poet’s responses to the “world war” raging especially on the European front ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Stevens’s High Sentence for the End Time

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      Abstract: THE WORLD HAS ALWAYS been ending. This ever-imminent finality turns our gaze periodically beyond particular communities— national, ethnic, or religious—to consider the world as such, or as a whole. Culture has helped us in this work—telling stories, providing images, alarming us, consoling us, informing us, misleading us—and its figurations are useful as much for politics as for the spiritual preparation they offer as we consider the extinction of our own species and a lot of others. The Anthropocene period is perhaps different in that humanity itself appears to be the main trigger of global destruction, although human proximity to the cause does not necessarily facilitate understanding; many humans find it ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Twitter Stevens, Tumblr Stevens, Trans Stevens

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      Abstract: WALLACE STEVENS IS NOT our most often quoted modernist— “April is the cruelest month” is hard to beat—but he may be the most often quotable, the one most likely, on any given page of his Collected Poems, to say something curiously pithy, usefully abstract, and fit to reapply: “Things seen are things as seen” (CPP 902); “Where was it one first heard of the truth' The the” (CPP 186); “The greatest poverty is not to live / In a physical world, to feel that one’s desire / Is too difficult to tell from despair” (CPP 286) (I’ll get back to that one later). He makes abstract or general statements that other writers, and not only writers, find useful, memorable, moving, insightful, even out of context. “Life’s nonsense ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Hero on a Pedestal: Reading Stevens in an Indian Classroom

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      Abstract: When a field is filled from end to end with sheep, a stag stands out. When a continent is filled from end to end with the compliant, we learn what heroism is. And alas for the society that requires heroes.The statue may be dismissed, not without speaking of it again as a thing that at least makes us conscious of ourselves as we were, if not as we are. To that extent, it helps us to know ourselves. It helps us to know ourselves as we were and that helps us to know ourselves as we are. The statue is neither of the imagination nor of reality.IF THE HUMANITIES CURRICULUM means anything at all, it means that everyone’s story is also everyone else’s story.1 We must unmoor the curriculum, then, from its elite safe harbors ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “The Phases of This Difference”: Jews, the Figure of the Rabbi, and
           Hebrew Texts in Stevens’s Poetry

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      Abstract: IN MY ROLE as President of the Wallace Stevens Society, I often receive unusual queries regarding Stevens’s life and work. Sometimes intriguing questions come my way having to do with Stevens’s musical interests, or advice about critical works to consult or about a biographical detail. A few years ago, a woman wrote to me with a rather stark question. The email read: “Was Stevens an anti-Semite'” Such a direct question seemed to expect a yes-or-no answer, and I was taken aback. The answer, of course, is much more complex than I could possibly offer in an email response. Yet, it is a question that had gnawed at me well before I received the woman’s query, and continued to do so for a good time after.That Stevens ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “Like Nothing Else in Tennessee”: Stevens’s
           Otherworldliness

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      Abstract: It is shocking to have to say this sort of thing. Please destroy these notes.LIKE MOST CONTRIBUTIONS to this special issue, this essay began as a presentation delivered at Stockholm University in the late spring of 2018, to a symposium with the theme “Wallace Stevens as World Literature.” That topic led me to muse on the nature of the “world” presumed to be the case by his poetry, and of the relation to it in which the poems situate him and, by extension, us, his readers. Considering this poet who evoked “The magnificent cause of being, / The imagination, the one reality / In this imagined world,” one might easily assume that ultimately Stevens self-configured as “the single artificer of the world / In which [he] ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Stevens and the Necessity of Distance: International Influence and the
           Theater Auditorium

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      Abstract: J. HILLIS MILLER described seeing Wallace Stevens perform at a poetry reading at Harvard University around 1950:As the hour went on, Stevens got more and more carried away by his own poetry. His voice got softer and softer, more and more inward, until only those in the first two or three rows, where I happened to be, could hear him. People in the back started leaving, but he paid no attention. Nor did he pay any attention to the loud ambulances and fire engines going by on Mount Auburn Street behind him, bells clanging and sirens wailing. He went right on reading, more and more quietly, absorbed in the sound of his own words.By most measures of what constitutes a “good” public performance, Stevens offered a very ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Probable Source for “The Silver Plough-Boy”

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      Abstract: WHEN THE SECOND EDITION of Harmonium appeared in 1931, Wallace Stevens not only added fourteen poems, he also decided to delete three: “The Silver Plough-Boy,” “Exposition of the Contents of a Cab,” and “Architecture” (Cook 29).1 Thus, “The Silver Plough-Boy” disappeared from view for the rest of Stevens’s lifetime; it was not included in The Collected Poems . We still need to turn to J. M. Edelstein’s descriptive bibliography to trace its publication history to Alfred Kreymborg’s magazine Others, where it first appeared, together with “Peter Quince at the Clavier,” in August of 1915 (Edelstein 195). The poem was subsequently republished in the annual anthology of Others that Kreymborg collected in 1916, as part of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The New Modernist Studies ed. by Douglas Mao (review)

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      Abstract: Modernist studies over the past few decades have undergone a radical sea change that has altered some of the field’s long-standing assumptions about the foundations and meanings of modernism as a theoretical and historical category. Recent critical interventions into what is now commonly referred to as “the new modernist studies” have charted paths that extend the traditional axis of modernism beyond early twentieth-century Euro-American arts and literature. By showing how modernist works operate in diverse geographical locations and cultural forms, and on different timelines, these scholarly activities have transgressed modernism’s previous disciplinary boundaries in various “spatial, temporal and vertical ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Infrathin: An Experiment in Micropoetics by Marjorie Perloff (review)

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      Abstract: Marcel Duchamp coined the adjective infrathin —in French, inframince —as a unit of measurement for the smallest, barely perceptible, but essential differences. Duchamp claimed that he could not define infrathin, and that it could only be understood via examples, including the “warmth of a seat (which has just been left)”; the “whistling sound (in walking) by brushing of the 2 legs” of someone wearing velvet trousers; and the “detonation noise of a gun (very close) and the apparition of the bullet hole in the target” (qtd. in Perloff 2). His parenthetical elucidations are themselves further examples of infrathin details; they make the finest of distinctions.Infrathin: An Experiment in Micropoetics is the title of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The New Wallace Stevens Studies ed. by Bart Eeckhout and Gül Bilge
           Han (review)

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      Abstract: Wallace Stevens is one of those poets who (like Walt Whitman) seems to anticipate in his own verse most of the arguments we make about him, including the argument that arguments, propositions, logical inferences should not rule the day, even for intellective figures such as himself. And so it should be no surprise that a volume of essays about The New Wallace Stevens Studies, with academics of three generations (from the nearly retired to the newly minted), finds the form of its claims anticipated by Stevens. “A great disorder is an order,” he opined in “Connoisseur of Chaos,” and “opposite things partake of one” (CPP 194–95). Like Canon Aspirin, Stevens included “the things / That in each other are included,” even ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Word, Ah, Yes, the Word

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      Abstract: Peggy Aylsworth (1921–2021)Santa Monica, California ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Little Less, and: Perfection

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      Abstract: A little less returned for him each springThe imperfect is our ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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