Subjects -> BIOGRAPHY (Total: 17 journals)
Showing 1 - 1 of 1 Journals sorted alphabetically
a/b : Auto/Biography Studies : Journal of The Autobiography Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Anales Galdosianos     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Biography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Goethe Yearbook     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hemingway Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Henry James Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ibsen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Žižek Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
James Joyce Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Medical Biography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Risk Management in Financial Institutions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Hopkins Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Tolkien Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Wallace Stevens Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
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The Hopkins Review
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1939-6589 - ISSN (Online) 1939-9774
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • I Am the Glory

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      Abstract: Acrylic, oil, and metal leaf on panel. Courtesy of the Artist and De Buck Gallery.48 × 36 in.2020This piece references Stephen Towns’s two art practices—quilting and painting. The title is a play on the term “Old Glory,” used to reference the American flag. The figure in the painting represents the creativity and ingenuity of formerly enslaved Black Americans. This painting is part of the exhibition Stephen Towns: Declaration & Resistance, which examines the American dream through the lives of Black Americans from the late 18th century to the present time. Using labor as a backdrop, Towns highlights the role African Americans have played in shaping the economy, and explores their resilience, resistance, and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Letter from the Editor

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      Abstract: If you’re new to The Hopkins Review, welcome. You’re joining us at an appropriate moment, as this issue—my first as editor in chief—launches our new look and website, designed to be fresh, functional, and representative of the journal’s dynamic present and future. If you’re a longtime thr aficionado, you can expect your support to be matched by our continued commitment to creative and critical excellence. Three-quarters of the authors and artists you’ll encounter in this issue are first-time contributors to our pages, but you’ll likely recognize plenty of familiar award-winning names, alongside emerging writers we’re excited to champion. In this issue and beyond, you’ll cross languages, borders, and cultures; ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • In Kansas It Is against the Law to Catch a Fish with Your Hands, and:
           Rosehips

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      Abstract: After Laura ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Divided House

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      Abstract: Megan’s work was suffering. The scholarship files were mislabeled, she was taking 15-minute bathroom breaks, and she answered the phone with “What'” Diane knew she had to say something: it was impossible to supervise someone who didn’t give a shit. Today, Megan returned from a 30-minute bathroom break and lay down on the floor behind the work study desk, arms spread like she was trying to make a snow angel on the carpet.“What the hell is wrong with you'” Diane had been practicing that sentence in her head so it would come out stern yet friendly. “You’ve been a mess all week.”“Nothing’s wrong,” said Megan. She peeled herself from the floor and stood, all six feet of her. When Diane was in college, in the ’80s ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Spartan

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      Abstract: It was odd how Dean ate. So thought Chris, sitting opposite. The fork was all askew, waved to the left. The knife did everything.“Those fucking whatever-they-are in number 33. . . .” said Dean.One of the children glanced quickly into the room, then withdrew.“Paint job on the house. Vans, ladders, stuff everywhere. . . . ”“Polish. From Poland,” said Chris, quietly.“They’re blocking the whole street.”Chris felt around in his coat pocket. Thank God. Still there, didn’t forget.“The whole fucking street,” Dean repeated. And then said it again.It wasn’t the usual Saturday morning. Chris had received four letters through the post, by way of Car Craft, answering his query of a couple weeks ago. One was of particular ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Perpetual Resin: A Cento, and: First Black Cop Bop

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      Abstract: Sources: Lyn Hejinian, Brigit Pegeen Kelly, D. A. Powell, Howard Nemerov, Lynne Thompson, Jacques J. Rancourt, Donald Revell, Roxane Beth Johnson, Fanny Howe, Wilfred Owen, Ishmael Reed, Tongo Eisen-Martin, Geoffrey Brock, Roger Robinson, Kay Ryan, Gwen Head, Donté Clark, Henry Dumas, Layli Long Soldier, Graham Foust, Owen Dodson, Camille Guthrie, Reginald Lockett, Robin Morgan, Victoria Chang, and Robert Whitehead.Notes: The italicized lines in “First Black Cop Bop” are from “N.Y. State of Mind” by Nas from his debut studio album Illmatic (Columbia Records, 1994). The Bop is a poetic form coined by Afaa M. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • From Comet

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      Abstract: Across the pages of her collection Comet (Ensemble, 2019), human bodies and natural bodies fuse. Especially vibrant are the parts of us that communicate and, in doing so, connect—“[s]ounds / and knots exist amongst throats wind / and mountains,” and “fields of quivering light” are paired with “lips that tremble.” Our vocal organs and the sounds they generate are central to Comet, which explores individual and collective voice across communities and spaces. “Is the mouth enough for narration, / a piano’s keys'” asks the speaker of one poem. Another poem’s speaker compels the poem’s reader to communicate, to “[w]hisper me your / enthusiasm like surprise,” closing the circle with reciprocal speech acts.Just as ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Jill Nathanson

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      Abstract: From the very beginning of her life as an artist, when she was a recent graduate of Bennington College, Jill Nathanson’s paintings have been notable for their commitment to abstraction and, above all, for their highly individual, unpredictable sense of color. While she has explored diverse possibilities over the years, in a logical progression, from brushy all-over field paintings, to more disciplined geometric, grid-based compositions, to the lyrical, clearly defined structures of overlapping planes of recent years, her work has always depended on the multiple associations color triggers in us. Nathanson orchestrates complex relationships of unnamable hues like a composer writing for nontraditional combinations of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • From Steel Inside Cotton

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      Abstract: Baltimore sits at the top of the Chesapeake Bay, a quiet jewel the Confederacy desperately wanted, and tried to get with the support of a broad base of southern sympathizers in the city, so many that Ft. McHenry became a detention center during the Civil War, with Union cannons on Federal Hill, and Union encampments all over the city. The Mason-Dixon line is the northern boundary of Maryland, and the state song is an homage to plantation culture. After the War, Baltimore became a mecca for supremacists from the Old South, including faculty at Hopkins and Peabody. When I was born, Black folk had their own world inside this white world, and I looked out at the white world from the safety of Blackness. We understood ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Aperture

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      Abstract: Tijani was an avid watcher, the only child to a single parent with no sibling to look up to, no one to play with. His mother, Mama Agnes, was a social studies teacher and a disciplinarian. Going out to play was often not allowed. When Tijani was not in school or doing homework or thumbing through his father’s old books, he busied himself with whatever was around, playing with what he could get his hands on—empty milk cans, bottle tops, the soft tube inside an abandoned tire. There was the old camera that Mama Agnes said used to belong to his father. Although it didn’t work, he used it anyway, spying on the streets through its cracked lens.They lived on the second floor of a tenement building and from the louver ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Risky, the Bold, the Audacious: A Remembrance of Lucie Brock-Broido,
           1956–2018

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      Abstract: The last time I saw Lucie Brock-Broido, we were shopping at my local Target, in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in 2006. The previous night, she had given a fierce, and fiercely funny, reading at Dickinson College at my invitation, and now she was about to drive back to New York. In addition to the reading, a class visit, and a party at my house, Lucie had agreed to an informal gathering with students, on the condition that it take place in a Starbucks.Carlisle’s only Starbucks is inside Target. My memory of that session is mainly of the late-afternoon sun making it difficult to see anyone, and of exhaustion from having stayed up most of the night talking with Lucie, whose nocturnal ways seemed both cause and effect of the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Autumntide of the Middle Ages

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      Abstract: Reading the newly translated Waning of the Middle Ages hit me like sudden death—not so much the dying part, as the instant review of a long life. Reabsorbing the antic contents of Huizinga’ s history (now entitled Autumntide) sparked a version of the search-and-recover expedition harkened by the sled called Rosebud, and the French cookie, Madeleine. The Dutchman’s freewheeling account of 14th and 15th-century France and the Low Countries, now richly seeded with full-color illuminations, rang bell after bell, until I realized that it was the key to almost every chapter of my own life.How could that be'It began nearly half a century ago, upon the purchase of The Waning of the Middle Ages, a yellow paperback, picked ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Solitary Ducks: On The FSG Poetry Anthology

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      Abstract: One of the wonderful—and discouraging—things about poetry anthologies is that they’re almost compulsory; they scream “required reading,” and they often are. One could imagine a compendium of great anthologies, from Tottel’s Miscellany to Pound’s collation of the Troubadours and James Weldon Johnson’s Book of American Negro Poetry. The curatorial impulse haunts poets and poetry—since more than a couple dozen poems fit in the space of a book, more and more books exist to house the memorable ones.In their fsg Poetry Anthology, Farrar, Strauss, and (inevitably) Giroux have supplied, through editors Jonathan Galassi and Robyn Creswell, possibly the best anthology in recent memory. Not that they had much choice; fsg ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Leading All Our Voices to Thrum: Amanda Moore’s Requeening

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      Abstract: In Requeening, the 2020 National Poetry Series winner selected by Ocean Vuong, Amanda Moore uses the metaphor of the hive to examine the work we each must do to build, and rebuild, a life. A domestic hive is its own entity, humming with hidden, internal energies, yet it requires keeping—a steady, attuned involvement in the smooth running of its affairs. Requeening is thus a timely and fascinating tutorial in seeking a right balance between freedom and care. In the melodic first sentence of “Afterswarm,” this balance is off:The stakes of such distraction in the handling of a hive—or a life—are mortally high, and the poem’s speaker learns her lesson, vowing in the final stanza, “I will be alive this time / to what ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Tangled Persistence: On Kim Addonizio’s Now We’re Getting
           Somewhere

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      Abstract: Kim Addonizio’s eighth collection of poems, Now We’re Getting Somewhere, is alive with tension between the habits that dominated her earlier books and the emerging new truths of her later years (she was born in 1954). One famous inclination throughout her books has been to suggest that sexual romance is (though fraught with miseries) the only powerful escape from dreariness and dismay. At the same time, she has habitually presented her speaker as a jaded survivor of eros, someone who sees through romantic illusions. Addonizio can make both of those views convincing, but they become even more interesting when they intersect with other truths involving stoicism, humor, generosity, and hope; these attitudes have ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Joy and Grief in Tandem: A Review of Michelle Zauner’s Jubilee and
           Crying In H Mart

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      Abstract: Michelle Zauner, who is more widely known as the musician Japanese Breakfast, has devoted years and albums to her mother’s passing. Her 2016 release, Psychopomp, recorded just months after her mother’s death from cancer, features a picture of her mom reaching for the camera, never quite touching it. The album centers bright and soaring instrumentals that belie a deep and complex pain. This light and the dark coexisting in a fraught space is a staple of Zauner’s work, and the same duality characterizes Zauner’s recent back-to-back projects, the memoir Crying in H Mart and the album Jubilee. Through both media, Zauner has reimagined what it means to be an artist, to grieve publicly, and to find solace in the everyday ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Zoom, Zoom into the Great American Dark: Reading the Smithereens in Greg
           Brownderville’s Fire Bones

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      Abstract: It begins when a pickup truck pulls alongside the airstrip as the first fingers of yellow-purple stretch across the treetops. Amra Boustani tightens the last nut on the new tail brace wire assembly she’s been working on since before daylight. Up all night preparing a sermon for some future Sunday, she’d poured one too many cups of coffee. The man steps down from the pickup and pulls the waist of his pants up to a suitable height. A local soybean farmer, he needs Amra to make a run over his field. His wife would normally have this scheduled way out in advance, but yesterday he noticed soybean loopers on the undersides of his leaves and fears they’ll be the end of his crop if he sits and does nothing. They stand ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • In Praise of Small Hope: Petite Maman and Ambivalent Motherhood

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      Abstract: Celine Sciamma’s Petite Maman is a movie that, in many ways, shouldn’t have worked. Made during lockdown with a cast of five, two of whom are eight-year-old twins, it is a cross-generational, time-travel film that flouts the narrative framework by which cross-generational and time-travel films (Big, Vice Versa, Back to the Future) have been known to succeed: young person who finds parent hopelessly clueless visits the past and realizes 1) their parent was once young like them, with a comparably raucous array of insecurities, quirks, and lovable vices, and 2) the cultural circumstances that surrounded that parent’s youth were once, miraculously, cool in their own right. Petite Maman does not concern itself with how ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Notes on Contributors

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      Abstract: elijah burrell is the author of The Skin of The River (2014) and troubler (2018), both published by Aldrich Press. His writing has appeared in agni, North American Review, Southwest Review, The Rumpus, Sugar House Review, and elsewhere. He is an associate professor of English at Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Missouri.stephanie burt is Professor of English at Harvard. Her recent books include After Callimachus (Princeton UP, 2020) and Don’t Read Poetry: A Book About How to Read Poems (Basic, 2019). A new collection from Graywolf will appear in late 2022. Ask her about the X-Men.andrea cohen is the author of seven collections of poetry, including, most recently, Everything. A new collection, The Sorrow ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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