Subjects -> BIOGRAPHY (Total: 17 journals)
Showing 1 - 1 of 1 Journals sorted alphabetically
a/b : Auto/Biography Studies : Journal of The Autobiography Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Anales Galdosianos     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Biography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Goethe Yearbook     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hemingway Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Henry James Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ibsen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Žižek Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
James Joyce Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Medical Biography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Risk Management in Financial Institutions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Hopkins Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Tolkien Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Wallace Stevens Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Tolkien Studies
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1547-3155 - ISSN (Online) 1547-3163
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Editors' Introduction

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This is the 18th issue of Tolkien Studies, the first refereed journal solely devoted to the scholarly study of the works of J.R.R. Tolkien. As editors, our goal is to publish excellent scholarship on Tolkien as well as to gather useful research information, reviews, notes, documents, and bibliographical material.All articles have been subject to anonymous, external review as well as receiving a positive judgment by the Editors. In the cases of articles by individuals associated with the journal in any way, each article had to receive at least two positive evaluations from two different outside reviewers. Reviewer comments were anonymously conveyed to the authors of the articles. Although they are solicited and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Acknowledgments

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The Editors would like to thank Wheaton College, Norton, MA for its support. Thanks also to Paula Smith-MacDonald, Paul E. Thomas, Raquel D'Oyen, and Berni Phillips, and also to West Virginia University Press, Melody Negron, Than Saffel, and Sara Georgi.Finally, we acknowledge a special debt of gratitude to our anonymous, outside reviewers who with their collegial service contribute so much to Tolkien ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Conventions and Abbreviations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Because there are so many editions of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, citations will be by book and chapter as well as by page-number (referenced to the editions listed below). Thus a citation from The Fellowship of the Ring, book two, chapter four, page 318 is written (FR, II, iv, 318). References to the Appendices of The Lord of the Rings are abbreviated by Appendix, Section and subsection, so subsection iii of section I of Appendix A is written (RK, Appendix A, I, iii, 321). The Silmarillion indicates the body of stories and poems developed over many years by Tolkien; The Silmarillion indicates the volume first published in 1977.The Lay of Aotrou and Itroun together with the Corrigan Poems. (Poem first ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Richard C. West, 1944–2020

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The passing of Richard Carroll West (August 13, 1944 to November 29, 2020) at the age of seventy-six marks the end of a career in Tolkien, Inklings, and fantasy studies that from the very start combined the enthusiasm of fandom with the scrutiny of scholarship. The eldest of eight children, Richard was born and raised in the Boston area. He attended Cathedral High School, graduating second in his class. Both devout and tolerant, he took a modest pride in his descent from the family of Archbishop John Carroll, the first bishop appointed to serve in the post-revolutionary United States. He never thought to impose his views on others, yet when attending cons or academic conferences he was careful to schedule time for ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Richard C. West, 1944–2020

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press, 1970Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press, 1981 [Revised edition] [Based on earlier work published as "An Annotated Bibliography of Tolkien Criticism" in Orcrist, no. 1 (1966–67): 52–91; Supplement One in Orcrist, no. 2 (1967–68): 40–54; Supplement Two in Orcrist, no. 3 (co-published as Tolkien Journal, 4 no. 1; whole no. 11; 1969): 22–23; Supplement Three in Orcrist, no. 5 (co-published as Tolkien Journal, 4 no. 3; whole no. 14; 1970–71): 14–31. Material from the first two issues of Orcrist was revised and published as "An Annotated Bibliography of Tolkien Criticism," Extrapolation, 10 no. 1 (December 1968): 17–45. A highly selective supplement is "A Tolkien Checklist: ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "The Lay of Aotrou and Itroun": Sexuality, Imagery, and Desire in
           Tolkien's Works

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The book publication of The Lay of Aotrou and Itroun in 2016 brought to wide attention a text first published in 1945 and likely completed in 1930 (Aotrou xi). "The Lay of Aotrou and Itroun," based on Breton models,1 relates the story of a childless Lord (Aotrou) and Lady (Itroun),2 and the Lord's choice to seek out the help of a corrigan who then attempts to coerce him into sexual intercourse as payment once twins are born; when he refuses, he dies, followed shortly in death by his Lady. Neither sees their son and daughter grow up. Belonging to an earlier period than Tolkien's better-known works The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings and associated with his early experiments in turning medieval poetry of many genres ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "A translator is not free": J.R.R. Tolkien's Rules for Translation and
           Their Application in Sir Orfeo

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Amidst a description of many difficulties related to the translation of the Middle English poem Pearl, J.R.R. Tolkien complained in a letter to his aunt, Jane Neave, that "a translator is not free" (Letters 317). While he did not delineate a set of rules by which translators are shackled, over the years of his career as a professor, author, language inventor, and, indeed, translator, Tolkien occasionally offered thoughts about what constitutes a good translation, and in some cases he even prescribed rules—or at least guidelines—which translators should follow to produce a worthy translation. Some of these thoughts are revealed in letters like the one to his aunt, while others are found in the notes of his ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Faery, Faith, and Self-Portrayal: An Allegorical Interpretation of Smith
           of Wootton Major

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: It is not often realized that all commentary is allegorical interpretation, an attaching of ideas to the structure of poetic imagery. The instant that any critic permits himself to make a genuine comment about a poem… he has begun to allegorize.At the height of Tolkien's popularity in 1966, he agreed to give a talk as part of a series on "Faith and Literature" at Blackfriars, the Dominican house of studies in Oxford. But when he arrived at the event, he read from one of his stories instead, the then unpublished Smith of Wootton Major. In his opening remarks, he apologized for not speaking on poetry, briefly introduced Smith, and explained that "it is not an allegory—properly so-called" (qtd. at C&G 3: 1217).1 If ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "This gift of freedom": The Gift of Ilúvatar, from Mythological
           Solution to Theological Problem

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Among the many themes present in his writings, J.R.R. Tolkien himself on several occasions emphasized death and deathlessness as being particularly important to him. Thus in his reply to one reader's attempt at interpreting The Lord of the Rings:I do not think that even Power or Domination is the real centre of [The Lord of the Rings]. … The real theme for me is about something much more permanent and difficult: Death and Immortality: the mystery of the love of the world in the hearts of a race 'doomed' to leave and seemingly lose it; the anguish in the hearts of a race 'doomed' not to leave it, until its whole evil-aroused story is complete.(Letters 246)Exploration of mortality and deathlessness, and their ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Túrin the Hapless: Tolkien and the Sanctification of Suffering

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The story of Túrin Turambar is the knottiest and most conflicted of all the tales in J.R.R. Tolkien's vast legendarium. Developed out of Tolkien's first attempt at story-writing, Túrin's story went through more permutations than any other part of Tolkien's mythology, and he continued to work on an array of conflicting and overlapping versions throughout his lifetime. Nonetheless, the most problematic aspect of Túrin's story is one that was established in the very beginning and never was abandoned by Tolkien. Despite Túrin's flawed nature, and despite his violation of one of the most sacred tenets of Tolkien's own faith, it is Túrin who is destined to achieve the final defeat of Morgoth Bauglir, the ultimate ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Speculative Mythology: Tolkien's Adaptation of Winter and the Devil in Old
           English Poetry

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Not only do J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-earth writings include fairy tales, mythological adventures, linguistic exercises, and theological reflections; they also provided their author with a place for scholarly play. Tolkien's fictional work often serves as a philological sandbox, free from the demands and criticisms of a scholarly audience. For example, as several scholars have noted, the Gothic names of the Rohirrim's distant ancestors (Vidugavia, Vidumavi, etc.) suggest that the Rohirrim's real-world counterparts, the Anglo-Saxons, might have had Gothic ancestry.1 This conjecture is much safer hidden in fictional genealogies than it would be in a scholarly publication. In this essay, I explore another example of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "To trees all Men are Orcs": The Environmental Ethic of J.R.R. Tolkien's
           "The New Shadow"

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: In the last few decades, a number of works have aimed to examine the environmental ethics implicit in the writings of J.R.R. Tolkien. The bulk of this scholarly attention has focused on the text of the published Lord of the Rings, with some secondary consideration for The Hobbit and The Silmarillion. In doing so, most scholars1 have passed over what may be Tolkien's most explicit statement about environmental ethics in his writings about his legendarium: a debate in "The New Shadow"—his abortive attempt to write a sequel to The Lord of the Rings (Peoples 409–21)—between the characters Saelon and Borlas that directly considers the proper relationship of humans to nature, and the limits of our exploitation of it.This ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "What a lot of things you do use Good morning for!": Gandalf the Wandering
           Deconstructionist in The Hobbit

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: In The Lord of the Rings, the wizard Gandalf is a font of wisdom, a brave and self-sacrificing guide, and a kind of earthbound angel. His original appearance in The Hobbit, however, does not foreshadow the angelic origin he is later given or his reserves of wisdom; while he serves as a deus ex machina who gets Thorin and Company out of a number of tight spots early in the novel, he is a comic figure with limited powers and knowledge. For example, he cannot or will not read the Elvish writing on the blades found in the trolls' cave, and his spells are unable to keep the wolves and goblins at bay for very long in the Misty Mountains. In The Individuated Hobbit: Jung, Tolkien and the Archetypes of Middle-earth ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Depth, Globalization, and the Domestic Hero: The Postmodern Transformation
           of Tolkien's Bard in Peter Jackson's Hobbit Films

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Ancient Political Thinkers incessantly talked about morals and virtue, those of our time talk only of business and money.I desired that the Senate of Rome might appear before me in one large Chamber, and a modern Representative, in Counterview in another. The first seemed to be an Assembly of Heroes and Demigods; the other a Knot of Pedlars, Pickpockets, Highwaymen, and Bullies.At one point in The Battle of the Five Armies (2014), the third installment of Peter Jackson's Hobbit film trilogy, the sycophantic Alfrid Lickspittle asks Bard the Bowman, "The Master's mantle was there for the taking, but you threw it all away. And for what'" Although Bard declines to respond, the camera pans quickly to Bard's children. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Wið or mid' A Glimpse into Treebeard's Diachronic Perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: There are Ents and Ents, you know; or there are Ents and things that look like Ents but ain't, as you might say.Thus comments Treebeard—the enormous, troll-like, tree-like creature whom Merry and Pippin have just met—regarding the hobbits' unusual (to him) haste in revealing their "name," Hobbit, to a stranger: which, at this point in the story, he certainly is. Names are powerful things, he suggests, and one should not be too quick to give others access to them. There are Ents and Ents, after all. "You'll be letting out your own right names if you're not careful" (TT, III, iv, 68).Notable, in this exchange, is the ent's already emerging preoccupation with words, one which matches that of J.R.R. Tolkien, his ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Worlds of J.R.R. Tolkien: The Places That Inspired Middle-earth by
           John Garth (review)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Much scholarship on J.R.R. Tolkien and his creative works addresses nature or environmental considerations. Scholarship rooted in geographic considerations, different from the perspective of nature or environmental concerns, has focused on a few themes. Some works look at the physical geography of Middle-earth. Other work has examined the compass directions and the characteristics of the lands within Middle-earth associated with them. Finally, some individuals have engaged in what I would describe as "geographic source criticism," where they closely examine various geographic locations from Tolkien's life with the goal of identifying those that served as models for something in The Lord of the Rings. I view this ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Tolkien's Modern Reading: Middle-earth Beyond the Middle Ages by Holly
           Ordway (review)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Holly Ordway's thesis is paradoxically modest and bold. On one hand, her argument is restrained, as she says that in contrast to Tolkien's modern reading, "principally his medieval reading, but also the study of languages, his personal friendships with the Inklings and other formative experiences, especially in the Great War—occupy a more important place in his creative imagination" (9). The traditional picture of Tolkien, established in the authorized biography by Humphrey Carpenter and reinforced by numerous other works, emphasizes these elements of Tolkien's inspiration to the exclusion of anything modern. Ordway cites Carpenter's statement on Tolkien, "He read very little modern fiction, and took no serious ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Utopian and Dystopian Themes in Tolkien's Legendarium by Mark Doyle
           (review)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Mark Doyle's Utopian and Dystopian Themes in Tolkien's Legendarium is an interesting but flawed work of scholarship. Doyle draws from a wide-ranging array of numerous sources, but while the research and the treatment of the sources is impressive, the arguments constructed from them are highly dubious and detract from the overall work. Doyle is at his best introducing a source to the discussion and showing his reader how to fit the new source alongside the others. The weakest moments tend to come soon after the introduction of a source, as Doyle constructs arguments that are often unimaginative and occasionally self-contradicting or highly subjective. It is also difficult to know what audience this book is written ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Tolkien's Cosmology: Divine Beings and Middle-earth by Sam McBride
           (review)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Sam McBride's Tolkien's Cosmology sets out to answer a fundamental and sensible question: since Tolkien presumed religious elements to be a component of his fictional work, specifically The Lord of the Rings, and became annoyed with critics who made assertions to the contrary, what are those contents within the fiction itself that suggested divinity to its author, if not to his less perceptive critics' McBride's book aims to be a systematization and explication of religious elements across Tolkien's legendarium, with special attention paid to reading a continuity into the relationship between Tolkien's hobbit-centered tales and his mythological and philosophical efforts composed both before and after The Hobbit and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Music in Tolkien's Work and Beyond ed. by Julian Eilmann and Friedhelm
           Schneidewind (review)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This is the third anthology of articles about Tolkien and music. Together with its two predecessors (Music in Middle-earth, edited by Heidi Steimel and Friedhelm Schneidewind, Walking Tree, 2010; and Middle-earth Minstrel: Essays on Music in Tolkien, edited by Bradford Lee Eden, McFarland, 2010), it demonstrates that music was vital to Tolkien's imagination. All three anthologies venture outside of the topic of music as strictly defined, into lyrics on their own as poetry, and into Tolkien's special interest of the music—if it may be so called—of language as studied in philology. The "and beyond" of this book's title, however, alludes to articles discussing other authors in comparison with Tolkien, and to articles ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • J.R.R. Tolkien: A Guide for the Perplexed by Toby Widdicombe (review)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Though presented as a subtitle for the volume, "A Guide for the Perplexed" is actually the name of the series in which this book appeared. Bloomsbury has published several dozen short, introductory books under this heading, most of them in theology or philosophy, dealing either with concepts or important writers. A few are on literary subjects, either fields (modernist literature, science fiction) or authors. The 20th-century authors covered are otherwise canonical modernists (Eliot, Joyce, Kafka, Woolf), so to find Tolkien in their company is a notable mark of his growth in perceived literary status.Toby Widdicombe, English-raised and now a professor of English literature at the University of Alaska-Anchorage, is ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Year's Work in Tolkien Studies 2018

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: An accounting of 2018's outstanding monographs on Tolkien should begin with "The Sweet and the Bitter": Death and Dying in J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, by Amy Amendt-Raduege (Kent, OH: Kent State UP, 2018). More reduced than expanded or revised from the author's 2007 thesis from Marquette University, this book won the 2020 Mythopoeic Scholarship Award from the Mythopoeic Society. Pagan Saints in Middle-earth by Claudio A. Testi (Zurich: Walking Tree, 2018) is another notable monograph of the year. This book expands on previous work by Testi, including "Tolkien's Work: Is it Christian or Pagan' A Proposal for a 'Synthetic' Approach" in Tolkien Studies 10 (2013). Several more books of interest are also ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Notes on Contributors

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Douglas A. Anderson co-founded Tolkien Studies with Michael D. C. Drout and Verlyn Flieger, and co-edited the first nine annual volumes.Magne Bergland works in the University of Bergen's IT division. He has been a member of The Tolkien Society and Arthedain—The Tolkien Society of Norway—since the 1980s. He was for several years editor of Angerthas, the journal of Arthedain. Previous Tolkien-related work includes several papers and talks in Norwegian, as well as a paper for the conference "Tolkien 2005: The Ring Goes Ever On."David Bratman is co-editor of Tolkien Studies.Stentor Danielson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geography, Geology, and the Environment at Slippery Rock University of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 100.24.115.215
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-