Subjects -> BIOGRAPHY (Total: 17 journals)
Showing 1 - 1 of 1 Journals sorted alphabetically
a/b : Auto/Biography Studies : Journal of The Autobiography Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Anales Galdosianos     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Biography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Goethe Yearbook     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hemingway Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Henry James Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ibsen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Žižek Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
James Joyce Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Medical Biography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Risk Management in Financial Institutions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Hopkins Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Tolkien Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Wallace Stevens Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Hemingway Review
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0276-3362 - ISSN (Online) 1548-4815
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Abbreviations For the Works of Ernest Hemingway

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The Hemingway Review uses the “Abbreviations for Hemingway Works” created for the Cambridge Edition of The Letters of Ernest Hemingway. We are grateful to Sandra Spanier, General Editor of the Cambridge Edition, and to her editorial team for creating and sharing this tool. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “The Snows of Kilimanjaro” as an Allegory of the Anthropocene

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: “He had loved too much, demanded too much, and he wore it all out.” “The Snows of Kilimanjaro”In the 2006 film An Inconvenient Truth, Al Gore suggests that the famed snows of Kilimanjaro are disappearing due to climate change. It is a canny rhetorical move, borrowing from Hemingway’s cultural panache, but it is not incontrovertibly true. Gore’s claim backfired somewhat, setting off a flurry of disputes about the cause of the shrinking snows on that particular mountain (see Figure 1). Glaciologist Doug Hardy noted in 2009 that “there is too little data to blame the ice loss on increasing atmospheric temperatures” (Vastag). A more likely culprit, Hardy suggests, is changes in “Indian-ocean driven circulation ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Ellison’s Hemingway

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: After a friend sent me a copy of the just-published edition of The Selected Letters of Ralph Ellison in December 2019, I found myself unable to stop reading it. There was something strangely compelling about its mixture of outrage and erudition. It is, above all, a story of the longing for culture and of how, after achieving a writing life, a young man who had no money for shoes at Tuskegee succeeded in transforming himself into what we used to call “A Man of Letters.” Edited by John F. Callahan and Marc C. Conner, the volume comes in at 1060 pages. Ellison was a prolific and careful letter writer; he saved carbon copies and even retyped some of his letters several times. The first letter, dated 23 March 1933, is ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Ideological Profit: Hemingway, Kol’tsov, and the Spanish Civil War

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Ernest Hemingway reached the height of his literary popularity within the Soviet Union during the Spanish Civil War, but he would emerge as an iconic, cult figure only in the mid-1950s.1 During the 1930s, his literary works and war correspondence were almost immediately translated into Russian and published in Soviet periodicals. The Soviet version of Hemingway was an ardent anti-Fascist, a supporter of Republican Spain, and a friend of Mikhail Kol’tsov, the popular Pravda war correspondent. For Soviet translators, scholars, and readers of this time, Hemingway also seemed to experience a political awakening and moved to the left, identifying with the Communists as the only ones who could bring order to Republican ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “A Very Real Warmth”': Hemingway and Michael Arlen

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: In a memoir of his early life, Michael J. Arlen, son of the novelist Michael Arlen, recalls a chance encounter with Ernest Hemingway in New York in the early 1950s. Father and son, the latter just down from college, dropped into the 21 Club (a celebrated bar on West 52nd Street) for a drink. They were on their way out whensuddenly, a voice boomed out: “Michael!” My father stopped. The room seemed quite dark. Over in a corner sat Hemingway. Unmistakable. The beard. The face. I walked on over, following my father. “Good to see you, Michael,” he said with evident feeling.Michael Arlen (1895–1956), the recipient of this benevolence, had been one of the most successful popular novelists of the 1920s. Of Armenian ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Hemingway at Work: “Cat in the Rain”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Ernest and Hadley Hemingway came to Rapallo in late February 1923 to escape the rain and cold in Chamby-sur-Montreux that was mucking up the ski slopes. Chamby itself had served as a refuge from Hemingway’s regimen of overtime reporting on the Lausanne peace conference and from Hadley’s disastrous loss of his early fiction and poetry when the valise that contained it was stolen from her train compartment at the Gare de Lyon in Paris. It was December 3, 1922, and she was on her way to join Ernest in Lausanne.A few weeks later the Lausanne conference broke up, and the Hemingways repaired to Chamby, in the mountains above Montreux, at the inexpensive pension-chalet run by the Gangwisch family. They had stayed there ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “The Man from Cook’s”: Hemingway and the Demise of the World’s
           Oldest Travel Company

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The headline on 23 September 2019 in the Financial Times came as a shock for many outside the tourism industry: “Thomas Cook: Collapse of UK’s oldest travel group reverberates around the world” (Georgiadis et al.). Following “knife-edge rescue talks” to avoid insolvency, the article continued, the travel giant had fallen, leaving thousands of “tourists stranded in far-flung locations” and impacting a vast number of employees, stakeholders, and contingent businesses.Thomas Cook (renamed Thomas Cook & Son in 1871) was founded in 1841 by an enterprising cabinet maker and Baptist teetotaler who capitalized on an emerging demand for organized group excursions and leisure travel. By the time Hemingway arrived in Europe ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Her Privates We

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: In his 1942 book, Men at War, Hemingway praised Frederic Manning’s Her Privates We, saying in his Introduction to the book: “It is the finest and noblest book of men in war that I have ever read. I read it once over each year to remember how things really were so that I will never lie to myself nor to anyone else about them” (8). He included the opening chapter of Manning’s book as the opening chapter in Men at War and gave the chapter an epigraph from Shakespeare that Wilson quotes in “The Short Happy Life of Francis Ma-comber”: “By my troth I care not; a man can die but once…” (SS, 12). “Ma-comber” was published in Cosmopolitan in 1936 and in The Fifth Column and the First Forty-nine Stories late 1938. Manning’s ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • For Whom the Bell Tolls: The Hemingway Library Edition by Ernest Hemingway
           (review)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: 16 July 2019 marked the publication date of Ernest Hemingway’s For Whom the Bell Tolls: The Hemingway Library Edition. This new edition of the novel includes a foreword by Hemingway’s son Patrick Hemingway and an introduction by grandson Séan Hemingway, who also serves as the volume’s editor. This publication is the sixth in The Hemingway Library Edition series which began with A Moveable Feast (2009), followed by A Farewell to Arms (2012), The Sun Also Rises (2014), Green Hills of Africa (2015), and The Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway (2018).This new release of For Whom the Bell Tolls includes a trove of supplementary material pertinent to the novel. Appendix I features the text of Ernest Hemingway’s speech to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Hemingway’s Sun Valley: Local Stories Behind His Code, Characters, and
           Crisis by Phil Huss (review)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Ever since Robert Penn Warren’s 1947 Kenyon Review essay, “Hemingway,” scholars and students have been discussing “the Hemingway code,” or, as Warren originally put it, “the way that “code” and “discipline are important [in Hemingway’s world] because they can give meaning to life which otherwise seems to have no meaning or justification” (3). One of the latest entries into this vein of inquiry is Hemingway’s Sun Valley: Local Stories Behind His Code, Characters, and Crisis, in which author and Sun Valley Community School teacher Phil Huss examines Hemingway’s life and writing through the lens of ten “mutually-enhancing code principles” (134).Huss applies Warren’s code thesis to Hemingway’s time in Idaho’s Wood ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Hemingway Industry by David Faris (review)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: An author in possession of an enormous mythos and an immense impact on literary history is going to elicit a robust and expansive critical conversation concerning their oeuvre. Given the presence of a long-running journal like The Hemingway Review, the popularity of films like Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s 2021 documentary series, and the prodigious number of texts produced about his work, there is clearly a thriving conversation about Ernest Hemingway. David Faris’s book The Hemingway Industry engages with this idea: This vast Hemingway-focused discourse, what is being said within it, and its ability to thrive in the sixth decade following the author’s death. Faris, a writer living in Claremont, California, focuses ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Hemingway en los San Fermines by Miguel Izu (review)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The first Navarrese biographer of Ernest Hemingway and San Fermin was José María Iribarren, who wrote the book Hemingway y los San Fermines (1970). Half a century later, and as a tribute to the former biographer (19), Miguel Izu offers a polyphonic story with the same theme. In addition to providing the vagaries of Hemingway in Pamplona, the book delves into different stories propagated about the Nobel winner in the Spanish city. According to the author, the book sets history straight fighting against the many of Hemingway legends that have displaced the truth on benefit of tourism and politics (19).While the book aims for a general public (19), it is a must read if you want to study Hemingway and Spain. It covers ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Caporetto: Das Hemingway-Komplott by Horst Kleinert (review)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Horst Kleinert’s curious German novel Caporetto: Das Hemingway-Komplott [Caporetto: The Hemingway Conspiracy] has two imperatives for its protagonist, Frank, and for the reader: “Lies es.”/“Read it” (the “it” being A Farewell to Arms) and “Seien Sie nicht zu mutig”/“Don’t be too courageous”; that is, extremism will kill you.One might be tempted to add a third: Avoid Death in the Afternoon. In Kleinert’s text, Hemingway’s reading of passages from his bullfighting disquisition alienates guests at the Ocean Inn in Miami Beach. Later, the book is unexpectedly wielded as a deadly weapon by Paula, Frank’s wife, ultimately resulting in her own death.Caporetto’s appendix contains for the Hemingway scholar a fourth ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 100.24.115.215
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-