Subjects -> BIOGRAPHY (Total: 17 journals)
Showing 1 - 1 of 1 Journals sorted alphabetically
a/b : Auto/Biography Studies : Journal of The Autobiography Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Anales Galdosianos     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Biography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Goethe Yearbook     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hemingway Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Henry James Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ibsen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Žižek Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
James Joyce Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Medical Biography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Risk Management in Financial Institutions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Hopkins Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Tolkien Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Wallace Stevens Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Similar Journals
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SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.1
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0741-5842 - ISSN (Online) 1529-1480
Published by Penn State University Press Homepage  [34 journals]
  • Introduction to Shaw, Journalist

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      Abstract: [The Great War was] a war of ideals. Liberal ideals, Feudal ideals, National ideals, Dynastic ideals, Republican ideals, Church ideals, State ideals, and Class ideals, bourgeois and proletarian, all heaped into a gigantic pile of spiritual high explosive, and then shoveled daily into every house with the morning milk by the newspapers.In a December 1900 letter, Bernard Shaw offered his opinion to Frank Harris, former editor of the Fortnightly Review as well as of the Saturday Review, about Harris's desire to start another journal. "We're too old for it: journalism is not for men over forty," Shaw told Harris, "What you have to do now is to make your will, so to speak, in a series of dramas, tales or what you ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Bernard Shaw, New Journalist (1885–1898)

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      Abstract: I also am a journalist, proud of it, deliberately cutting out of my works all that is not journalism, convinced that nothing that is not journalism will live long as literature. … The man who writes about himself and his own time is the only man who writes about all people and about all time.Shaw's is one of the best documented lives of his time, and his years of full-time journalism (1885–98) are, perhaps, the best documented period of his life given that his diaries just happen to cover this period. While drawing from these same sources, the article that follows proposes to offer, simply by focusing on Shaw the journalist, a different account of this period of his life compared to previous ones. For instance ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • An Introduction to Bernard Shaw's "To Your Tents, Oh Israel!"

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      Abstract: Despite electoral reforms in 1884, due to property requirements still only about 60 percent of adult men in the United Kingdom could vote by the 1890s—and some women, but only in local elections. This left working people, who constituted the large majority of the population, with practically no direct representation in Parliament in an era with, apart from the Irish Parliamentary Party and some independent members, effectively only two English political parties at Westminster, the Tories (or Conservatives) and the Whigs (or Liberals). Working people and their organizations such as trade unions, therefore, had to rely on at least one of these two main parties to enact legislation affecting them. In the 1880s and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "To Your Tents, Oh Israel!"

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      Abstract: Editor's note: Despite its historical importance, the following reprint of the Fabian manifesto "To Your Tents, Oh Israel!" is its first since its original publication in the November 1893 issue of the Fortnightly Review. This may be due to both its topicality and its having being swiftly replaced in the public discourse by Shaw's expanded adaptation of it as Fabian Tract No. 49, A Plan of Campaign for Labor (1894), but even in terms of his own writing, with the exception of his novels, his two major political books, and a few of his longest plays, there is probably no other text on which Shaw labored so long (at the same time as he was also writing his plays Mrs. Warren's Profession and Arms and the Man as well as ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Bernard Shaw: Book Critic

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      Abstract: Even when we speak of Bernard Shaw as a "polymath," the breadth and depth of his endeavors is often overlooked. Admittedly, the fact that he deserves a monographic issue of the SHAW journal for his work as a journalist may come as a surprise to some who are more familiar with his work as a playwright, novelist, political activist, philosopher, social reformer, and so forth. However, within his tenure as a journalist—which expands from the early 1880s to his death in 1950—Shaw displayed an uncanny versatility, penning opinion articles, open letters on the most pressing issues of his time, music criticism, drama criticism, and—perhaps the least known of his journalistic activities—book reviews. Indeed, many of the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Cosmopolitan versus Parochial Irishness in Bernard Shaw's Music Journalism
           (1877–1894)

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      Abstract: From the very start of his career in England, Bernard Shaw positioned himself as an Irish commentator with an incisive, outsider's view of the English. Fintan O'Toole has shown that this Irish perspective was central to Shaw's early journalistic work, whether he was writing anonymously, under the guise of the seemingly "omniscien[t]" political and cultural commentator "G.B.S.," or as the ornery (but very knowledgeable and humorous) music critic "Corno di Bassetto."1 O'Toole further contends that the young Shaw, in his writings and in his day-to-day life, "had no more intention of playing down his Irishness than he had of acting it up."2 Shaw's internationalist Socialism would obviously have made him wary of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Shaw's Letters to Newspapers

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      Abstract: On 20 February 1892, Bernard Shaw took a short train ride out of London to talk about socialism with the Oxford Reform Club. He was expecting "a mere chat on things in general," according to his diary.1 But—as The Times later reported—a group opposed to socialism locked the door so that neither Shaw nor his listeners could leave. "It threatened to be a very serious business," Shaw later recalled: the opposition group "wrecked the adjoining room."2 Shaw and the club members escaped through a window by using two blankets to reach a nearby stairway—getting doused with cold water on their way down.Even that frightening experience couldn't stop the high-spirited GBS from making a joke of the whole experience. He ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • An Introduction to Bernard Shaw's "Mr. Bernard Shaw, Special Interview"

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      Abstract: On 3 October 1910, the day when Bernard Shaw delivered his first public lecture in Dublin, an interview with Shaw was published in The Freeman's Journal, titled "mr. bernard shaw, special interview."1 The interview, under the title of "Mr. Bernard Shaw in Dublin," was also published on the same day in Dublin's Evening Telegraph.2 Since the interview appeared in the two papers, it is certain that it was a self-interview provided by Shaw. While Dan Laurence mentions the interview in Bernard Shaw: A Bibliography, he and David Greene included only a brief excerpt from it in the second edition of The Matter with Ireland, which they titled "My Motto Is Ireland for All." The interview/article was publicity for the lecture ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Mr. Bernard Shaw, Special Interview

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      Abstract: Mr. Bernard Shaw is hard to catch anywhere, but especially so in Dublin. Even when "Blanco Posnet" was produced here last year, and when all the interviewers were on his track, he avoided Dublin rather than submit to their interrogations. This time he appeared likely to be equally elusive. To the Committee which secured his services as a lecturer on the Poor Law, he would only promise to be at the Antient Concert Rooms five minutes before the time fixed for his lecture to-night; any details as to the time of his arrival in Dublin, or his stopping-place, were studiously withheld. It was, therefore, with feelings of triumph that I ran Mr. Shaw to earth yesterday, and induced him to submit to cross-examination as to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • An Introduction to "Mr. Bernard Shaw on Syndicalism"

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      Abstract: On 30 March 1912, a short article that purported to be an interview of Shaw, "Mr. Bernard Shaw on Syndicalism," appeared in the four-page Dublin labor weekly, The Irish Worker. The paper was the organ of the Irish Transport and General Workers' Union (ITGWU) and was then edited by its founder, and the union's general secretary, James Larkin.1 Dan Laurence lists the article in his bibliography, but he and David Greene did not include its text in The Matter with Ireland. The short article is most decidedly a self-interview, with its creation of a scene, as if a play, with the "characters" of Shaw and "O. R.," the paper's "our representative." Given the financial restraints of Larkin's paper in March 1912, it is ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Mr. Bernard Shaw on Syndicalism: Advises People to Treat It Very Politely

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      Abstract: Scene:—Adelphia Terrace, yesterday afternoon. Mr. Bernard Shaw approaches No. 10, outside which [sic] our representative is, and has been patiently waiting. Mr. Shaw is without overcoat, gloves, stick or umbrella; he is wearing a brown tweed suit, a brown trilby hat, and a brown tie; he comes swiftly down the street, his arms swinging loosely, his whole bearing suggesting that if "God's in his heaven, 'G. B. S.' is in Adelphia Terrace, and all is right with the world."(smiling benignly and holding out his hand): You want to see me.Yes, Mr. Shaw; I want to know if this statement is correct.(taking a newspaper cutting, reads): "I hear that Mr. Bernard Shaw has commenced a work in which he will set up a defense of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • An Introduction to Bernard Shaw's "On the Municipal Gallery"

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      Abstract: On 12 April 1913, a day after Bernard Shaw and Charlotte Shaw departed Ireland for Ayot St Lawrence after a fortnight visit with Horace Plunkett at his Kilteragh home outside Dublin, an interview with Shaw appeared in the Irish Times.1 The interview was likely a self-interview, which had been a journalistic device Shaw had employed, if not regularly, then at least on occasions.2 The interview ran with the header "municipal art gallery" with a succession of subheaders: "the bridge site / interview with mr. george bernard shaw / the danger of fire / the poor and pictures."3 The article is not listed in Dan H. Laurence's Bernard Shaw: A Bibliography, nor in Laurence's "Supplement" to the Bibliography (SHAW 20). In ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • On the Municipal Gallery

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      Abstract: Mr. George Bernard Shaw has just been paying a visit to Dublin, as the guest of Sir Horace Plunkett, at Kilteragh, Foxrock.Before returning to London last night he kindly allowed the Irish Times to discuss with him that question of all Dublin municipal questions—the site for the new Art Gallery.On this matter controversy has indeed waxed furious. Though the Corporation has given its decision in the matter, the impression on the public is that all has not yet been said in reference to the site. So, in inviting Mr. Shaw to speak on this burning theme, our representative realised that he was opening up a topic which is apparently still fair matter for debate, as well as one of surpassing civic interest and concern.Mr. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Selected Bibliography: Collections of Bernard Shaw's Journalism

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      Abstract: The following list of books cites published collections that either entirely or in part reprint Shaw's journalism. For itemized bibliographical information, see "Section C: Contributions to Periodicals and Newspapers" in Dan H. Laurence, Bernard Shaw: A Bibliography: Volume II, (Oxford: Clarendon, 1983), 517–824, and also "Section C: Contributions to Periodicals" in Dan H. Laurence, "A Supplement to Bernard Shaw: A Bibliography," in SHAW 20: Bibliographical Shaw, edited by Dan H. Laurence and Fred D. Crawford (University Park: Penn State University Press, 2000). Subsequent items have been noted in the annual Bibliography section of this journal, compiled at first by John Pfeiffer, and now by Gustavo Rodríguez ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Remembering a Life in Writing

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      Abstract: Stanley Weintraub made a brilliant career chronicling the lives of others, so it's fitting that he himself was not so much born as written into existence by the stroke of a pen. Specifically, a ballpoint pen.In the preface to his biographical memoir, A Writing Life, Weintraub tells the story of his parents' inability to decide on a name for their new son. Since the new mother and her baby couldn't be discharged until the birth certificate was filed, an exasperated nurse legally registered the infant as "Male Baby Weintraub" and sent them home. The couple eventually settled on "Stanley," and the assumed name readily carried him through kindergarten registration, his bar mitzvah, various jobs, more school ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Continuing Checklist of Shaviana

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      Abstract: Eltis, Sos, ed. George Bernard Shaw: Mrs Warren's Profession, Candida, and You Never Can Tell. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2021.Gendusa, Enza Maria Ester. La ragazza nera alla ricerca di Dio. Roma: Aracne, 2020. Italian translation (and critical edition) of Adventures of the Black Girl in Her Search for God.Kent, Brad, ed. George Bernard Shaw: Man and Superman, John Bull's Other Island, and Major Barbara. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2021.2Kent, Brad, ed. George Bernard Shaw: Pygmalion, Heartbreak House, and Saint Joan. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2021.Kornhaber, David, ed. George Bernard Shaw: Major Cultural Essays. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2021.Marcantel, Chelsea. Saint Joan by George ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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