Subjects -> LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (Total: 2147 journals)
    - LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (954 journals)
    - LANGUAGES (276 journals)
    - LITERARY AND POLITICAL REVIEWS (201 journals)
    - LITERATURE (GENERAL) (180 journals)
    - NOVELS (13 journals)
    - PHILOLOGY AND LINGUISTICS (500 journals)
    - POETRY (23 journals)

LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (954 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 127 of 127 Journals sorted alphabetically
Studia Metrica et Poetica     Open Access  
Studia Neophilologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Studia Pigoniana     Open Access  
Studia Romanica Posnaniensia     Open Access  
Studia Rossica Gedanensia     Open Access  
Studia Scandinavica     Open Access  
Studia Slavica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Studia theodisca     Open Access  
Studien zur deutschen Sprache und Literatur     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Studies in African Languages and Cultures     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studies in American Indian Literatures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Applied Linguistics & TESOL (SALT)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Studies in Canadian Literature / Études en littérature canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Studies in ELT and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Studies in Scottish Literature     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Studies in the Age of Chaucer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Studies in the Novel     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
SubStance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Suomalais-Ugrilaisen Seuran Aikakauskirja : Journal de la Société Finno-Ougrienne     Open Access  
Sustainable Multilingualism     Open Access  
Swedish Journal of Romanian Studies     Open Access  
Sylloge epigraphica Barcinonensis : SEBarc     Open Access  
symploke     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sztuka Edycji     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Tabuleiro de Letras     Open Access  
Teksty Drugie     Open Access  
Telar     Open Access  
Telondefondo : Revista de Teoría y Crítica Teatral     Open Access  
Temps zero     Open Access  
Tenso     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Teoliterária : Revista Brasileira de Literaturas e Teologias     Open Access  
Terminàlia     Open Access  
Territories : A Trans-Cultural Journal of Regional Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Texas Studies in Literature and Language     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Text Matters     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Textual Cultures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Textual Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Texturas     Open Access  
The BARS Review     Open Access  
The CLR James Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
The Comparatist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Eighteenth Century     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
The Explicator     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The F. Scott Fitzgerald Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
The Highlander Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Hopkins Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Lion and the Unicorn     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
The Literacy Trek     Open Access  
The Mark Twain Annual     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The New Yorker     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
The Vernal Pool     Open Access  
Tirant : Butlletí informatiu i bibliogràfic de literatura de cavalleries     Open Access  
Tolkien Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
TradTerm     Open Access  
Traduire : Revue française de la traduction     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
TRANS : Revista de Traductología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transalpina     Open Access  
Transfer : e-Journal on Translation and Intercultural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Translation and Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Translation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Translation Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Translationes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Transversal     Open Access  
Trasvases Entre la Literatura y el Cine     Open Access  
Trípodos     Open Access  
Tropelías : Revista de Teoría de la Literatura y Literatura Comparada     Open Access  
Tsafon : Revue Interdisciplinaire d'études Juives     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Turkish Review of Communication Studies     Open Access  
Tutur : Cakrawala Kajian Bahasa-Bahasa Nusantara     Open Access  
Tydskrif vir Letterkunde     Open Access  
Uncommon Culture     Open Access  
Unidiversidad     Open Access  
Urdimento : Revista de Estudos em Artes Cênicas     Open Access  
US Latino & Latina Oral History Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Valenciana     Open Access  
Variants : Journal of the European Society for Textual Scholarship     Open Access  
Verba : Anuario Galego de Filoloxía     Full-text available via subscription  
Verba Hispanica     Open Access  
Vertimo studijos (Translation Studies)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Via Panorâmica : Revista de Estudos Anglo-Americanos     Open Access  
Victorian Literature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Victorian Poetry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Vilnius University Open Series     Open Access  
Vision : Journal for Language and Foreign Language Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Vita Latina     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Voice and Speech Review     Hybrid Journal  
Voix et Images     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Vox Romanica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Wacana     Open Access  
Wacana : Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wasafiri     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Werkwinkel : Journal of Low Countries and South African Studies     Open Access  
Western American Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
WikiJournal of Humanities     Open Access  
William Carlos Williams Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Word Structure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Writing Systems Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Written Language & Literacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
WSQ: Women's Studies Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Year's Work in English Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Yearbook of Ancient Greek Epic Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Yearbook of Langland Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Załącznik Kulturoznawczy / Cultural Studies Appendix     Open Access  
Zeitschrift fuer deutsches Altertum und Literatur     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Zeitschrift für Interkulturellen Fremdsprachenunterricht     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Literaturwissenschaft und Linguistik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Wortbildung / Journal of Word Formation     Full-text available via subscription  
Zeszyty Cyrylo-Metodiańskie     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zibaldone : Estudios Italianos     Open Access  
Zutot     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Œuvres et Critiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Известия Южного федерального университета. Филологические науки     Open Access  

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Studies in the Age of Chaucer
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.24
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0190-2407 - ISSN (Online) 1949-0755
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Uncertain Refuge: Sanctuary in the Literature of Medieval England by
           Elizabeth Allen (review)

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      Abstract: At first glance, the practice of sanctuary may seem too exceptional to offer general insight into medieval English literature and culture. After all, appeals for mercy made by desperate individuals fleeing to religious spaces for refuge might seem too infrequent significantly to illuminate the religious and secular systems colliding in such encounters, and the fact that sanctuary disappeared from English practice in the early seventeenth century might make it seem too esoteric for those looking for lively medieval connections with modernity.However, Elizabeth Allen, in a searching study that explores a wide range of literary and historical works and their informing legal and political contexts, shows that sanctuary ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Middle English Recipes and Literary Play, 1375–1500 by Hannah Bower
           (review)

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      Abstract: This is an excellent book. It will be read and cited by scholars of medieval literature, medicine, and intellectual culture for many years to come.Medieval medical recipes, as Bower argues, have significance that extends beyond their self-proclaimed practicality. They might provide their readers a tangible treatment. But they also provide a point of connection for different written and oral styles, spaces, and identities. They carry an imaginative and aesthetic power that counts as a form of figurative writing and that often undermines—or exceeds or redefines—their ostensibly curative function.Their cross cutting significance means, as Bower persuasively suggests, that medical recipes invite a more holistic reading ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Christian Jew and the Unmarked Jewess: The Polemics of Sameness in
           Medieval English Anti-Judaism by Adrienne Williams Boyarin (review)

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      Abstract: Built on nearly two centuries of Jewish studies scholarship, Adrienne Williams Boyarin's The Christian Jew and the Unmarked Jewess: The Polemics of Sameness in Medieval English Anti-Judaism brings nineteenth-, twentieth-, and twenty-first-century scholars into conversation with each other to explore her observations about the distressing practice of "saming the Jew." Closing with a discussion of Grace Aguilar's 1847 essay "The Story of the Jews in England," Boyarin deploys the work of this "first author to attempt a history of medieval English Jewry" (222) to conclude her study of the misogynistic and antisemitic agenda that lingers in and fuels the veritable landmine that Boyarin terms the "politics of sameness" ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Mobility and Identity in Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales." by Sarah
           Breckenridge Wright (review)

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      Abstract: Sarah Breckenridge Wright's Mobility and Identity in Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales" invites exploration of wide-ranging connections between the two titular concepts. These connections are examined over the course of four chapters covering both medieval and contemporary theories of movement, as well as an ambitious range of social, historical, geographical, and architectural manifestations of these theories in the Canterbury Tales. Throughout these chapters, Breckenridge Wright provides consistently rich, engaged discussions of relevant literary and philosophical texts, historical materials, and theoretical frameworks (such as ecocriticism and actor–network theories). Starting from broad cultural contexts and moving ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Machines of the Mind: Personification in Medieval Literature by Katharine
           Breen (review)

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      Abstract: The device of personification has been made to bear many literary historical burdens over the years: exemplar of premodern naïveté, manifestation of all that is crudely mechanical in allegory, or a privileged mode that reveals the deep workings of linguistic signification. As Katharine Breen's necessary new book shows, many of the far-reaching claims for personification's status in the development of the literary have relied on incomplete or muddled formulations of personification's relationship to philosophical paradigms such as realism and nominalism. Machines of the Mind puts the study of personification on a new footing by parsing the interrelationships of these terms and using a more precise philosophical ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Paper in Medieval England: From Pulp to Fiction by Orietta Da Rold
           (review)

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      Abstract: On April 13, 2019, a New York Times headline announced that "Cursive Seemed to Go the Way of Quills and Parchment. Now It's Coming Back." The article recounts how, since the requirement that cursive be taught to American schoolchildren was dropped in 2010, proponents have argued for its reinstatement, citing its use in historical documents and personal correspondence, its utility in note-taking, and its role in the development of cognitive and fine motor skills. These pro-cursive activists have had substantial success; as of 2022, more than twenty US states once again mandate that cursive be taught in elementary schools.The twenty-first-century story of cursive and the widespread adaptation of paper as a writing ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Shape of Sex: Nonbinary Gender from Genesis to the Renaissance by Leah
           DeVun (review)

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      Abstract: The Shape of Sex had my heart racing as fast as my mind. In this spectacularly dizzying work DeVun spins a literary history of nonbinary sex from the "Adam androgyne" of early Christian theology to the "Jesus hermaphrodite" of early modern alchemy. Central to DeVun's book is the changing—and changeable—nonbinary-sexed figure. The nonbinary-sexed figure inspired medieval theologians, jurists, alchemists, surgeons, and poets in their myriad attempts to explain the divinity of the world and the bodies that make it up. The Shape of Sex moves between histories of intersex people, such as Berengaria's medical case presented to a Catalan court, and ideas about nonbinary sex that shaped premodern ideas of what it meant to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Writing Regional Identities in Medieval England: From the "Gesta Herwardi"
           to "Richard Coer de Lyon by Emily Dolmans (review)

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      Abstract: Scholarship on the articulation of English identity during the medieval period has been somewhat of a boom industry over the past twenty-five years. To a large extent initiated by the publication of Thorlac Turville-Petre's England the Nation in 1996, the subfield has borne forth a rich variety of monographs, articles, and conferences examining the development of Englishness, in its manifold theorized forms, from the arrival of the Early English through to the end of the Middle Ages. Many of these studies have sought to understand these nascent forms of English group identity (the concept of nation is problematic in a medieval context) by examining the way in which identity coalesces around the center, most often ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Reception of Chaucer's Shorter Poems, 1400–1450: Female Audiences,
           English Manuscripts, French Contexts by Kara A. Doyle (review)

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      Abstract: Kara A. Doyle's new book uncovers an exciting early chapter in the reception of Chaucer's poetry. Exploring six manuscript compilations dating to between 1410 and 1450, Doyle demonstrates how early compilers placed Chaucer in a French literary context that encouraged readers to focus on Chaucer's female-voiced critique of fin'amors. Creators of fifteenth-century compilations developed Chaucer's reputation as "womanis frend" by positioning his poetry alongside French and English texts that highlight female perspective, agency, and voice. Through codicological interpretation and comparative literary analysis, Doyle reconstructs the intertextual reading experience of medieval audiences, showing how compilers and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Unfinished Book ed. by Alexandra Gillespie and Deidre Lynch (review)

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      Abstract: The Unfinished Book is a testament to the vital, ongoing work of book history today. Beginning with the question of what a "book about books" has to offer literary studies in the present moment—the charge of the Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature series—we are treated to an exhilarating overview of the best current scholarship on the history, theory, and politics of textual studies (1). Alexandra Gillespie and Deidre Lynch have assembled chapters from thirty-two scholars at the forefronts of diverse fields, including print culture, the history of reading, the history of libraries and museums, conservation, manuscript studies, humanism and classical reception, authorship, digital humanities ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Transfiguring Medievalism: Poetry, Attention, and the Mysteries of the
           Body by Cary Howie (review)

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      Abstract: Cary Howie's Transfiguring Medievalism: Poetry, Attention, and the Mysteries of the Body is a series of comparative readings, or what he calls "an especially concentrated set of turns and returns" (53), that range across a wide selection of texts including contemporary American lyric poetry, Italian and French medieval poetry, medieval theology and hagiography, and twentieth-century continental philosophy. In a delicate, beautiful mash-up, Howie presses together seemingly disparate texts to marshal claims about meditation, theology, desire, and the bounds of the embodied self. Comprising nine brief chapters, the book is also framed by a series of Howie's original free-verse poems or "interludes" that reflect ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Antiracist Medievalisms: From "Yellow Peril" to Black Lives Matter by
           Jonathan Hsy (review)

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      Abstract: Antiracist Medievalisms: From "Yellow Peril" to Black Lives Matter arrives in the wake of a sea change in medieval studies. After years of the field coming to accept race as a worthy lens through which to read certain medieval texts and as a structuring apparatus that precedes scholarly engagement, discovery or justification are no longer the foremost critical interventions. Rather, what seems to have been missing from this conversation is the infrastructure upon which durable projects on race and the Middle Ages can be built for decades to come. This need echoes the succession of political events that helped expedite the racial turn in medieval studies: a resurgence of white nationalism, the concussive murders of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Sleep and Its Spaces in Middle English Literature: Emotions, Ethics,
           Dreams by Megan G. Leitch (review)

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      Abstract: We all know that sleep governs our lives. Too little and we cannot function; too much and we become lethargic. In Sleep and Its Spaces in Middle English Literature, Megan G. Leitch shows that sleep was also a central preoccupation throughout the Middle Ages. Medieval sleeping was not only an embodied practice investigated by medical and regimental texts; it was also an important literary resource for Middle English writers. Working at the nexus of affect theory, ethics, and sense theory, this book outlines a "hermeneutics of sleep" (95) that can gather together the somatic, social, and spiritual experience of sleeping in the service of tracking it as an important and mobile trope in a wide range of Middle English ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Gift of Narrative in Medieval England by Nicholas Perkins (review)

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      Abstract: A recent spate of publications on the topics of value and exchange in late medieval literature has demonstrated their enduring importance while taking them in invigorating new directions. The present volume joins the worthy company of, for example, Diane Cady's The Gender of Money in Middle English Literature (2019), Robert Epstein's Chaucer's Gifts (2018), and Walter Wadiak's Savage Economy (2017), with the latter two books, as Nicholas Perkins recognizes, having particular affinity with his own. Both Epstein and Wadiak, like Perkins, bring to bear on the literature of late medieval England theories of the gift that ultimately have roots in such key figures as Marcel Mauss. Perkins shares Wadiak's focus on romance ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Objects of Affection: The Book and the Household in Late Medieval England
           by Myra Seaman (review)

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      Abstract: Of late there has been something of a vogue for monographs or edited collections focusing on a single Middle English manuscript. Myra Seaman's excellent and fascinating book joins this host of recent publications. These studies all share a belief that medieval multitext codices are complex cultural objects, demanding sustained attention from a diversity of critical angles. Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Ashmole 61, the subject of Seaman's analysis, is certainly worthy of such a detailed treatment. What sets this study apart from most of its predecessors, however, are its formalist and theoretical commitments. Certainly, Seaman handles the manuscript's codicological, linguistic, and historical evidence quite ably, but ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Practical Cues and Social Spectacle in the Chester Plays by Matthew Sergi
           (review)

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      Abstract: In Practical Cues and Social Spectacle in the Chester Plays, Matthew Sergi's object of study is the extra-verbal elements of performance that can be discerned from the textual remains of the Middle English Chester Cycle. His analytical lens, which he terms "practical cues," derives from his own extensive experience as a theatre practitioner, yielding a thorough and common-sense reading of the Chester plays that offers compelling new insights. Defining "practical cues" as "the manuscripts' verbal prompts for extra-verbal action" (2), this work demonstrates a method of "practical reading" (25) that deductively reconstructs key aspects of Chester's staging, performance, and spectatorship that have been previously ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • John Trevisa's Information Age: Knowledge and the Pursuit of Literature,
           c. 1400 by Emily Steiner (review)

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      Abstract: John Trevisa, father of English prose' Is that a prosaic father, or can informative writing be beautiful' What contributions to a history of style does a translator make' What is the relationship between facts and literature' When have there been "information ages"' Emily Steiner's John Trevisa's Information Age asks these questions and offers thoughtful answers in seven carefully researched chapters. Each draws attention to Trevisa's contributions to English, English literature, and English "information culture" (1). The book contends that Trevisa's translations of compendious works helped shape English literary prose style and English literature more broadly by making English a suitable and even eloquent ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Continental England: Form, Translation, and Chaucer in the Hundred Years'
           War by Elizaveta Strakhov (review)

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      Abstract: Elizaveta Strakhov's ambitious new study is a welcome addition to the burgeoning scholarship on England's continental connections that follows upon Ardis Butterfield's Familiar Enemy (2009). One of the achievements of that book was to raise into suspension a set of arguments that previous writers had chosen between—for example, that French was either for the French (continental French) or the English (Anglo-Norman). In contrast, Continental England sets out to prove a thesis. Strakhov argues that while the Hundred Years War threatened to tear apart the northwest corner of Europe, a group of poets was intent on repairing the damage wrought by fostering a shared repertory of poetic forms, the formes fixes lyrics. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Scripting the Nation: Court Poetry and the Authority of History in Late
           Medieval Scotland by Katherine H. Terrell (review)

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      Abstract: Katherine H. Terrell's Scripting the Nation creates a cohesive, compelling literary history of Scottish historiographic and poetic writing from the late fourteenth century to the reign of James VI of Scotland and I of England in the early seventeenth century. Reading historical chronicles alongside manuscript miscellanies and poetry by James I of Scotland, Walter Kennedy, William Dunbar, and Gavin Douglas, Terrell conveys the intense challenges Scottish writers faced in attempting to write their nation. What unites the broad range of literature Terrell studies is an investment in using the past to write the future of the nation: Scottish writers forged sustaining bonds of national tradition from origin myths ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • An Annotated Chaucer Bibliography, 2020

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      Abstract: Regular contributors:Mark Allen, University of Texas at San AntonioStephanie Amsel, Southern Methodist University (Texas)Tim Arner, Grinnell College (Iowa)Debra Best, California State University at Dominguez HillsThomas H. Blake, Austin College (Texas)Agnès Blandeau, Université de Nantes (France)Matthew Brumit, University of Mary (North Dakota)Margaret Connolly, University of St. Andrews (Scotland)Stefania D'Agata D'Ottavi, Università per Stranieri di Siena (Italy)Jamie C. Fumo, Florida State UniversityJames B. Harr III, North Carolina State UniversityDouglas W. Hayes, Lakehead UniversityAna Sáez Hidalgo, Universidad de Valladolid (Spain)Andrew James Johnston, Freie Universität Berlin (Germany)Yoshinobu Kudo ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • On Not Being Chaucer

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      Abstract: THE PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESSThe New Chaucer SocietyExpo2021July 18–22, 2021Language is my home. … Language is my home, I say; not one particular language.And what we long for / Is to hear each other's tales / And to tell them again / … To hear the unsaid spoken / And then repeated / Made / Unambiguous and loud.I want to begin by recognizing the important conversations about Chaucer and race and about the understanding of Chaucer as a global writer that took place when the New Chaucer Society last met in person, at the Twenty-First Biennial Congress in Toronto, Canada in 2018, and I want to acknowledge the events at that Congress that centered First Nations people and Indigenous scholars and writers.3 Those events and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Chaucer and Ibn al-Haytham (Alhacen): Perspectiva, Arabic Mathematics, and
           Acts of Looking

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      Abstract: In his study on linear perspective in Renaissance art and Arabic optics the art historian Hans Belting sets out a compelling history of the Latin term perspectiva:The word "perspective" (perspectiva in Latin) was commonly used in the Middle Ages by scientists before it was introduced in the field of art during the Renaissance. Then it denoted a visual theory that was Arab in origin; only later, during the sixteenth century, did writers begin using it as a synonym for the term "optics," which occurs in scientific texts of classical antiquity.1Belting attributes a precise cultural signifier to medieval visual theory: it is unequivocally "Arab in origin," a position that cuts against the grain of the simplest ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Prior to the Prioress: Chaucer's Clergeon in Its Original Context

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      Abstract: Like other stories in the Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer composed what we now know as The Prioress's Tale long before he conceived of the overarching narrative to frame them. Chaucer probably started working around the year 1387 on linking tales told by an assorted group of fictional travelers heading on pilgrimage from London to the shrine of St. Thomas at Canterbury, but he had begun writing individual elements in previous years. He was still revising the text before he died in 1400, by which time he had written twenty-four tales.1 He changed the sequence, adjusted links between the tales and assigned different stories to different speakers.2 The Prioress's Tale, a version of the miracle of the singing ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "A Familiar Vois and Stevene": Hearing Voices in Chaucer's Dream Visions

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      Abstract: When the Eagle explains what moved Jupiter to send an emissary to the dreamer in Chaucer's House of Fame he specifies that it is on account of both the dreamer's accomplishments and his shortcomings, specifically his facility with writing and his failure to listen. On the one hand, the dreamer has diligently labored, composing "bookys, songes, dytees, / In ryme or elles in cadence" (HF, 622–23).1 On the other, he lacks "tydynges" (644) about "Loves folk" (645) because he lives like a hermit, "sitt[ing] at another book / Tyl fully dawsed ys [his] look" (657–59). The dreamer's eremitical disposition is such, the Eagle observes, that "But of thy verray neyghebores, / That duellen almost at thy dores, / Thou herist ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Hunting the Corpus Troilus: Illuminating Textura

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      Abstract: In Chaucer Studies, Cambridge, Corpus Christi College, MS 61, a copy of Troilus and Criseyde known as the "Corpus Troilus," stands alone. The manuscript opens with a frankly stunning frontispiece set within a jewel-tone foliate border, featuring a fantastic landscape inside which a crowd of luxuriously dressed nobles lounge. However, while the following text is complete, the volume is not. After that first, overwhelming image, spaces were left for illuminated initials and miniatures, but none was ever added. Many thousands of words have been written about the frontispiece, and the text itself remains among the best copies of Troilus and Criseyde extant. Yet, beyond those elements, very little is known about the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Storytelling at the Gates of Hell: Narrative Epistemology in Piers Plowman

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      Abstract: In her seminal essay on Piers Plowman's "episodic form," Anne Middleton describes the poem as "not quite a story, nor a collection of shorter ones."1 Her assertion is apt, given the encyclopedic array of textual modes in the poem,2 and makes sense for her larger argument about its recursive, conflict-driven structure. Yet the delimitation of Piers Plowman as not quite a story collection may too readily encourage distinction between the poem and the comparatively more orderly compilations of stories created by Langland's literary contemporaries. Formally, of course, Piers Plowman differs profoundly from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales or Gower's Confessio Amantis. Its narrative episodes, Middleton observes, are typically ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Wicked Wives and the Insatiable Virgin: Reading the Codicological
           Unconscious in a Fragment of MS Bodley 851

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      Abstract: What is in a book of wicked wives' The question and its best-known answer come from Geoffrey Chaucer's Wife of Bath, in her description of one such manuscript owned by her fifth husband, Jankyn, a clerk of Oxford. According to Alisoun, although the compilation contained various antifeminist materials "bounden in o volume," Jankyn called his book "Valerie and Theofraste" (WBP, 681, 671).1 The shorthand title refers to two tracts against marriage familiar to medieval European audiences: Walter Map's Dissuasio Valerii ad Rufinum (Valerius Dissuades Rufus [c. 1170]), for which Map adopted the pseudonym "Valerius", and Theophrastus's Aureolus liber de nuptiis (Golden Book on Marriage [c. 300 bce']), which may in fact be ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Ode to Titivillus: Apathy and the Transformative Potentialities of "Sloth"
           in Late Medieval England

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      Abstract: The second sermon to appear in Jacob's Well, a mid-fifteenth-century penitential sermon cycle extant only in Salisbury Cathedral, MS 103, contains an exemplum outlining the misbehavior of a clerk named Ode.1 Ode's role in this tale is that of the antihero, for "he was cursed in his werkys, noȝt dredyng þe censure of holy cherche."2 In this sermon, Ode falls ill and sends his servant to seek medical assistance; while he is gone, our antihero dies and the servant experiences a vision of his master suffering demonic torment as a result of his slothful misconduct: "Ode, þou has lovyd wel ese & reste, tendyrnesse to lyn & to gon in softe & delycat beddyng & clothing, & in swete bathys, & to slepe longe in bedde. þerfore ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Introduction

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      Abstract: COLLOQUIUMHistoricizing Consent: Bodies, Wills, Desires Edited by Carissa M. Harris and Fiona SomersetSilence means consent. Or does it' In the early twenty-first century, we have all seen protest signs that make this assertion and urge us to action.1 Do something—and at the very least speak up and speak out, even if there is not much else you can do. As Archbishop Stephen Langton says in his 1207 letter to the English Church and people, who among you is there who cannot be of some help in anything'2 Yet the costs of speaking out can be high, in terms of personal relationships and even physical safety, especially for those with fewer resources and less power.3 We are acutely aware of this high cost of speaking out ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Chasing the Consent of Alice Chaucer

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      Abstract: In the waning days of the year 1424, a series of marriage ceremonies provided entertainment for the elite of Lancastrian France. On November 30, 1424, Philip ("the Good"), duke of Burgundy, England's foremost ally in her ambition to claim all of France, married his second wife, Bonne of Artois. And yet, the ceremony associated with the union of Philip and Bonne was seemingly less elaborate—and was weighed down by fewer plots—than the wedding ceremonies that had preceded it. In July, Burgundy's Grand Chamberlain, Jean de la Trémoille, wed in an event designed to display the magnificent collaboration and mutual loyalty of Burgundy and the regent of English France, John of Bedford. The wedding was held at Burgundy's ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Unequal Power and Sexual Consent: The Case of Cassotte la Joye

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      Abstract: In 1386, something troubling, damaging, and potentially violative happened to Cassotte la Joye. She had a sexual relationship with a man named Jean Ayore and became pregnant by him, but he would neither marry her nor support their child. Cassotte went to the diocesan court in Paris to seek justice for what Jean had done to her and she had reason to believe that the court might help her as it had other women in her position.1 But Cassotte was socially marginalized in respect to Jean, and disadvantaged in terms of her gender and single status, and the court did not help her. She claimed that Jean had made her future promises of marriage followed by sexual relations, which had resulted in her defloration ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • #NotAllMen: In Conversation with Lucia Akard and Samantha Katz Seal

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      Abstract: It was a mild enough evening in London on March 3, 2021, that thirty-three-year-old Sarah Everard could leave a friend's house in Clapham wearing a green rain jacket rather than a heavy winter coat. That jacket was caught on CCTV at 9.30 p.m. as Sarah walked the two miles home to Brixton, and that footage was released to the public by the Metropolitan Police four days later to aid ongoing inquiries into her disappearance. The internet responded with thoughts and prayers, and also the inevitable questions about why a woman would walk home alone at night, as if it is criminally reckless for a grown woman to take a walk on an early spring night in a part of a city she knows well. Sarah's route took her across Clapham ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Yeoman's Canon: On Toxic Mentors

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      Abstract: When a complaint is stripped of its legal fetters it is a lamentation. In fourteenth-century Middle English the verb compleinen meant both to grieve and to make a formal accusation or appeal.2 Complaint reflects the shadows of Latin complangere (com-[with] + plangere [to strike, beat oneself, mourn]) and French complaindre (from plaindre [weep, complain]), which highlight its deep association with lamentation. Pain made manifest. For a medieval audience, the Christian Latin planctus, past participle of plangere, captures the salvific stakes of publicizing lament. Making pain manifest is contingent on pain's disclosure to another. According to the Dictionnaire du moyen français, the medieval French verb plaindre ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Readers Then and Now: Coerced Consent in Dame Sirith

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      Abstract: A major challenge in reading medieval texts about female sexuality is that the discourses we understand to have been dominant in the past can tend to merge with our own current assumptions as literary historians. Our analysis, then, can become a closed feedback loop, hearing only one voice—and then only listening for that voice. I will demonstrate the mechanics of this loop by analyzing Dame Sirith, one text from the "weeping bitch" tradition, which has been treated by scholars exclusively as a confirmation of medieval misogyny.1 In this tale, each plot development rotates on multiple, escalating expressions of coerced consent. I show the ways in which we as modern readers fail to separate ourselves from the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Response to Micah James Goodrich and Alice Raw

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      Abstract: Alice Raw and Micah James Goodrich reinterpret characters who have been characterized negatively for supposedly consenting to their own mistreatment, highlighting how their consent was coerced. In Raw's reading of Dame Sirith, Margery consents to unwanted sex under duress as an act of survival, rather than being an "ironically naive … dumb blonde," or a willing adulteress. Similarly, in Goodrich's reading of The Canon's Yeoman's Prologue, Chaucer's Yeoman is ground down by consent based on false promises and deception, rather than being a "negative, pessimistic, and childish" trainee.These reinterpretations are persuasive and timely: the #MeToo movement has similarly highlighted that consent coerced is not true ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Denying Consent and Manipulating Victimhood in "Come over the woodes fair
           and grene"

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      Abstract: The pastourelle "Come over the woodes fair and grene" (c. 1475) presents its readers with a challenge of discernment. Its generically paradigmatic narrative, an account of sexual negotiation and violation set against pastoral poetry's characteristic knitting together of landscape and power, offers a bifurcated account of the text's central encounter between a peasant maiden gathering flowers and the knight claiming ownership of the territory she occupies. Discovering the maiden by herself in the meadow, the knight attempts to persuade her to join him in a makeshift bower—recording his privileged status and sovereignty by situating himself as steward of the domesticated landscape (3–4).1 When she refuses, he ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Sans merci: Affect, Resistance, and Sociality in Courtly Lyric

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      Abstract: In medieval love lyric, the specter of the Cruel Lady looms large. Her refusal of a forlorn lover provokes male complaint and merits its own idiom of resistance: in The Romance of the Rose, for instance, hostile figures such as Dangier (Rebuff) impede the Lover, representing either external threats or internal misgivings. According to the conventions of fin'amors, a male lover seeks to win the affection of a distant lady. After a long period of faithful service, the courtly lady takes pity on the devoted lover and bestows her favor upon him, rewarding his suffering. By elevating female pity to an ennobling force, these conventions reinforce the discursive centrality of the male desiring subject. Such bodily ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Consent and Misogyny: Response to Sarah Baechle and Sara V. Torres

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      Abstract: Sarah Baechle's and Sara Torres's essays illuminate the relationship between medieval consent and misogyny. Misogyny, as Kate Manne describes it, enforces women's subordination in a patriarchal order, by punishing women who deviate from asymmetric gendered norms and rewarding those who affirm them.1 Often, according to Manne, misogyny compels the surrender of feminine-coded goods—such as deference, attention, sexual labor, and care—to powerful men.Normative expectations about women's responsiveness to men's demands structure the medieval texts that Baechle and Torres analyze. According to the knight in "Come over the woodes," "custome" demands the maiden's acquiescence to his sexual aggression, and in the Cruel ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Chaucer and the Fantasy of Retroactive Consent

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      Abstract: In the short comic "Trigger Warning: Breakfast," the artist describes cooking for a man who has assaulted her the evening before.1 "The morning after I was raped, I made my rapist breakfast," she explains. Eggs, medium well; toast; and bacon. Still, "there is another story that I like better" than the one with this ending, she notes. In this preferred version, she does not make her rapist breakfast, or prepare him eggs the way she herself likes them cooked. Instead, "I fight. I spit at him. I struggle." Attempting to change the devastating significance of the previous night by way of her own response to it—that is, by making him breakfast in the morning—the artist seeks a kind of revisionist agency: "I thought I ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "A kysse onely": The Problem of Female Socialization in William Caxton's
           Blanchardyn and Eglantine

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      Abstract: In 2018, Babe magazine's article "I Went on a Date with Aziz Ansari. It Turned into the Worst Night of My Life" told the story of a woman known only as "Grace" and her experience with the actor/comedian/self-proclaimed feminist. After rushing through dinner, Ansari brought Grace back to his home and made sexual advances. She resisted, both through body language and speech. The actor initially complied with her request, but he soon resumed his attempts until Grace went home. The experience highly unsettled her, though at first she did not understand why. It took discussions with other women for Grace to understand her feelings of violation fully. When she did, she communicated them to the actor; however, he felt ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Response to Leah Schwebel and Jennifer Alberghini

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      Abstract: Leah Schwebel and Jennifer Alberghini demonstrate how consent remains important, even to those who secure it coercively and retroactively. Women want it—or at least the tellers of these stories want women to have wanted it. However offensive, this narrative imperative disrupts present-day perceptions that female consent was utterly foreign to medieval cultures. Yet both authors demonstrate that consent alone does not ensure female empowerment. Their work aligns with Kate Manne's argument distinguishing misogyny from sexism. Sexism, Manne argues, "discriminate[s] between men and women, typically by alleging sexual differences."1 Misogyny, on the other hand, posits men and women's common humanity and potential for ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Global Response: Consent in the Long View

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      Abstract: These rich essays offer us a glimpse of how fervently medieval western Europe was obsessed with the theme of consent in romance, lyric, fabliau, hagiography, and so many other genres—as well as in legal records, charters, deeds, and all the documentary evidence of signature, property, and contract. Long before Hobbes, Locke, or Rousseau, the topic of consent saturated culture: in Sarah Baechle's phrase, it has "hypersignifying potency" (318). These essays reveal the explosive combination of outrage, wit, pleasure, shame, laughter, and distress evoked by staging medieval consent and its disabilities, infelicities, and misfires. In these centuries sexual relations became a template for the assessment of all political ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Global Response: Futures of Medieval Consent

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      Abstract: Studying consent in the medieval past presents a number of problems. Consent evades being defined, both in the sources and in our analysis. This stems in part from our hesitance to exist in that blurry liminal space between pleasurable, consensual sex and rape, because as feminist thinkers we strive for a future in which women's agency is no longer so limited as to render consent a mere ideal. Projects such as this colloquium, and our April 2021 conference "Medieval Consent: A Critical Symposium" allow scholars to begin to sketch out that blurry middle, illuminating it so that we no longer deny its existence out of idealism but instead confront it as part of our everyday practice.This colloquium crystallizes the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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