Subjects -> LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (Total: 2147 journals)
    - LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (954 journals)
    - LANGUAGES (276 journals)
    - LITERARY AND POLITICAL REVIEWS (201 journals)
    - LITERATURE (GENERAL) (180 journals)
    - NOVELS (13 journals)
    - PHILOLOGY AND LINGUISTICS (500 journals)
    - POETRY (23 journals)

LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (954 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 127 of 127 Journals sorted alphabetically
Studia Romanica Posnaniensia     Open Access  
Studia Rossica Gedanensia     Open Access  
Studia Scandinavica     Open Access  
Studia Slavica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Studia theodisca     Open Access  
Studien zur deutschen Sprache und Literatur     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Studies in African Languages and Cultures     Open Access  
Studies in American Indian Literatures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Applied Linguistics & TESOL (SALT)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Studies in Canadian Literature / Études en littérature canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Studies in ELT and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Studies in Scottish Literature     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Studies in the Age of Chaucer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Studies in the Novel     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
SubStance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Suomalais-Ugrilaisen Seuran Aikakauskirja : Journal de la Société Finno-Ougrienne     Open Access  
Sustainable Multilingualism     Open Access  
Swedish Journal of Romanian Studies     Open Access  
Sylloge epigraphica Barcinonensis : SEBarc     Open Access  
symploke     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sztuka Edycji     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Tabuleiro de Letras     Open Access  
Teksty Drugie     Open Access  
Telar     Open Access  
Telondefondo : Revista de Teoría y Crítica Teatral     Open Access  
Temps zero     Open Access  
Tenso     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Teoliterária : Revista Brasileira de Literaturas e Teologias     Open Access  
Terminàlia     Open Access  
Territories : A Trans-Cultural Journal of Regional Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Texas Studies in Literature and Language     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Text Matters     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Textual Cultures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Textual Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Texturas     Open Access  
The BARS Review     Open Access  
The CLR James Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
The Comparatist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Eighteenth Century     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
The Explicator     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The F. Scott Fitzgerald Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
The Highlander Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Hopkins Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Lion and the Unicorn     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
The Literacy Trek     Open Access  
The Mark Twain Annual     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The New Yorker     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
The Vernal Pool     Open Access  
Tirant : Butlletí informatiu i bibliogràfic de literatura de cavalleries     Open Access  
Tolkien Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
TradTerm     Open Access  
Traduire : Revue française de la traduction     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
TRANS : Revista de Traductología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transalpina     Open Access  
Transfer : e-Journal on Translation and Intercultural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Translation and Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Translation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Translation Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Translationes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Transversal     Open Access  
Trasvases Entre la Literatura y el Cine     Open Access  
Trípodos     Open Access  
Tropelías : Revista de Teoría de la Literatura y Literatura Comparada     Open Access  
Tsafon : Revue Interdisciplinaire d'études Juives     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Turkish Review of Communication Studies     Open Access  
Tutur : Cakrawala Kajian Bahasa-Bahasa Nusantara     Open Access  
Tydskrif vir Letterkunde     Open Access  
Uncommon Culture     Open Access  
Unidiversidad     Open Access  
Urdimento : Revista de Estudos em Artes Cênicas     Open Access  
US Latino & Latina Oral History Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Valenciana     Open Access  
Variants : Journal of the European Society for Textual Scholarship     Open Access  
Verba : Anuario Galego de Filoloxía     Full-text available via subscription  
Verba Hispanica     Open Access  
Vertimo studijos (Translation Studies)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Via Panorâmica : Revista de Estudos Anglo-Americanos     Open Access  
Victorian Literature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Victorian Poetry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Vilnius University Open Series     Open Access  
Vision : Journal for Language and Foreign Language Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Vita Latina     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Voice and Speech Review     Hybrid Journal  
Voix et Images     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Vox Romanica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Wacana     Open Access  
Wacana : Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wasafiri     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Werkwinkel : Journal of Low Countries and South African Studies     Open Access  
Western American Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
WikiJournal of Humanities     Open Access  
William Carlos Williams Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Word Structure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Writing Systems Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Written Language & Literacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
WSQ: Women's Studies Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Year's Work in English Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Yearbook of Ancient Greek Epic Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Yearbook of Langland Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Zeitschrift fuer deutsches Altertum und Literatur     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Zeitschrift für Interkulturellen Fremdsprachenunterricht     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Literaturwissenschaft und Linguistik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Wortbildung / Journal of Word Formation     Full-text available via subscription  
Zeszyty Cyrylo-Metodiańskie     Open Access  
Zibaldone : Estudios Italianos     Open Access  
Zutot     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Œuvres et Critiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Известия Южного федерального университета. Филологические науки     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

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Studies in the Age of Chaucer
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.24
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0190-2407 - ISSN (Online) 1949-0755
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Arts of Dying: Literature and Finitude in Medieval England by D. Vance
           Smith (review)

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      Abstract: Dying is bound up with the nature of literary art. This is the guiding insight of D. Vance Smith’s luminous new study Arts of Dying: Literature and Finitude in Medieval England. As Smith explores, the representation of death is consistently unsettled, circular, interminable—because “when it seems to appear, its absence of being calls into question the means by which it is supposedly represented” (14). Interminability is at the heart of how Arts of Dying defines literature as well, as a discourse that “is never definitive, never arrives at a unified meaning that can be transposed to some other, more useful, register” (5). Both the language of dying and the language of literature, then, “point toward a messianic ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Thomas Hoccleve: Religious Reform, Transnational Poetics, and the
           Invention of Chaucer by Sebastian J. Langdell (review)

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      Abstract: Like Thomas Hoccleve’s (1368–1426) own resistance to a “dichromatic mentality of error and correction” (15)—a social and political necessity in an early Lancastrian England that tied political legitimacy to religious orthodoxy—Sebastian Langdell’s book is one that resists simple characterization. As its title suggests, it works within several different strands of thought—fifteenth-century orthodoxy and heresy, Anglo-French political relations, and Chaucerian genealogies (i.e., poets who conceived of themselves as poetic heirs). As a study, however, Langdell’s book is not confined narrowly to those strands. Fundamentally, he offers a series of extended close readings primarily of Hoccleve’s major works (The Epistle ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • World of Echo: Noise and Knowing in Late Medieval England by Adin E. Lears
           (review)

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      Abstract: The field of sound studies is at once fertile and fraught for scholars of early periods. Lacking sound recording technology, how can we analyze the sounds of the past' In medieval studies, scholars including Bruce Holsinger, Katherine Zieman, Ardis Butterfield, and Andrew Albin have explored how “song,” the intersection of music, sound, and text, has a literary as well as bodily presence in medieval culture. Adin Lears’s new book advances the work of medieval song scholars in dialogue with contemporary poetics, New Formalism, and sound studies in order to explore the concept of noise in later medieval English literature. The book argues that noise, often used to represent lay modes of knowledge based on experience ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Talk and Textual Production in Medieval England by Marisa Libbon (review)

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      Abstract: Talk and Textual Production in Medieval England is an ambitious book. It proposes multiple interventions: in book history; in the excavation of “talk” as a literary category; and, most compellingly, in the Richard Coeur de Lion romance. In the first instance, the book proposes the recovery of talk and rumor, and the ways in which they have exercised a hitherto unrecognized shaping influence on the form and content of medieval literary production. However, this is largely a book about the afterlives of Richard the Lionheart, particularly as expressed in the group of texts that we have come to call Richard Coeur de Lion, and particularly as a response to the problem of a largely absent sovereign who was nevertheless ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Northern Memories and the English Middle Ages by Tim William Machan
           (review)

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      Abstract: Tim William Machan’s latest book explores Scandinavia’s impact on English national self-consciousness between the sixteenth and the late nineteenth century, with brief forays into earlier and later periods. Although the viking-era stage of this long-lived relationship has been studied often, much less has been written about its early modern and modern phases. Northern Memories fills this gap while contributing to ongoing and wide-ranging conversations about the modern afterlife of the medieval that have been enriched recently by Ian Wood, Geraldine Heng, Cord J. Whitaker, Donna Beth Ellard, Catherine Karkov, Matthew X. Vernon, and Miri Rubin, among others.The first chapter, “The Spectacle of History,” adumbrates ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Virgin Mary’s Book at the Annunciation: Reading, Interpretation, and
           Devotion in Medieval England by Laura Saetveit Miles (review)

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      Abstract: Laura Saetveit Miles’s The Virgin Mary’s Book at the Annunciation turns on a familiar image, Mary reading when Gabriel appeared to her. This iconography was so ubiquitous in later medieval art, Miles argues, that we cannot fully understand Marian devotion without accounting for the Virgin as a model for study and prayer. Scholarship has, however, neglected this learned aspect of Mary’s medieval persona, focusing instead on Mary as intercessor, especially for the unlettered (as in The Prioress’s Tale). From this premise, Miles builds a longitudinal study of Mary-as-reader that is also a deep dive into how medieval readers learned to pray meditatively. While Miles’s book is valuable for attending to this form of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Chaucer’s Prayers: Writing Christian and Pagan Devotion by Megan E.
           Murton (review)

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      Abstract: Megan E. Murton’s Chaucer’s Prayers presents an exacting critique of one of the last vestiges of that exceptionalism that, until recently, detached Chaucer from his historical context and contemporary English writing: the view of him as a fundamentally secular poet. In redressing the presentist bias behind a secular Chaucer, Murton makes a salient, and in some respects unconventional, case for Chaucer as a religious—specifically devotional—poet. She powerfully demonstrates how pivotal acts of prayer are to Chaucer’s literary corpus, from the early dream visions and the freestanding Marian An ABC to the Virgin, through the mid-career Troilus and Criseyde (which incorporates prayer perhaps most profoundly and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Periodical Abbreviations

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      Abstract: Anglia: Zeitschrift für Englische PhilologieAnglistik: Mitteilungen des Verbandes deutscher AnglistenANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes, and ReviewsArchiv für das Studium der Neueren Sprachen und LiteraturenArthurianaAtlantis: Revista de la Asociacion Española de Estudios Anglo-NorteamericanosAUMLA: Journal of the Australasian Universities Language and Literature AssociationBulletin des Anglicistes MédiévistesBulletin of the John Rylands University Library of ManchesterBulletin of the Society for Chaucer StudiesChristianity and LiteratureCarmina Philosophiae: Journal of the International Boethius SocietyCollege EnglishChaucer ReviewComparative Literature (Eugene, Ore.)CLIO: A Journal of Literature ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Charles d’Orléans’ English Aesthetic: The Form, Poetics, and Style of
           “Fortunes Stabilnes.” ed. by R. D. Perry and Mary-Jo Arn (review)

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      Abstract: This insightful and timely book directs new critical attention squarely toward an understudied but fascinating body of fifteenth-century English verse: the English-language poetry that Charles d’Orléans, poet, prince, and prisoner, left behind him when his twenty-five-year captivity in England came to an end in 1440. Charles’s French-language body of work, which he took back to France with him on his release, and which he added to over subsequent years, has long been the subject of detailed critical inquiry and justified appreciation: its formal, linguistic, philosophical, and social complexity is well known, as is the iconic “personal manuscript,” begun in England and continued throughout Charles’s life, in which ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Reading English Verse in Manuscript c. 1350–c. 1500 by Daniel Sawyer
           (review)

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      Abstract: Daniel Sawyer’s fine new book joins a host of codicological studies proliferating to the point that they begin to compete in sheer numbers with literary criticism. This state of affairs calls for new answers to an old question: what work does codicology do for the study of literature' Manuscript and textual scholars no longer lurk like trolls under the bridge of academic life, threatening unwary critics that their readings shall not pass; some of them now rank among the best known in the fellowship. Even undergraduates today are likely to attempt forays into the material culture of Middle English poetry along with their standard editions. All this exploration offers thick context and historical precision for ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Last Words: The Public Self and the Social Author in Late Medieval England
           by Sebastian Sobecki (review)

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      Abstract: In Last Words, Sebastian Sobecki brings together two fields of inquiry that have rarely if ever been linked: manuscript studies and philosophy of the mind. His overarching purpose is to reinvestigate the vexed question of the relationship between historical authors and the first-person speakers who appear in their works. Yet this inquiry is inseparable from extensive archival research leading to discoveries that might themselves have been presented as end results in their own right. Thus, he identifies Gower’s hand in the Trentham manuscript, establishes that Hoccleve had a significant connection to the Bedfordshire village of Hockliffe, makes a new and convincing case for Richard Caudrey’s authorship of The ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Reading Dives and Pauper in Lisbon, 1465

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      Abstract: One manuscript of the Middle English treatise Dives and Pauper (now New Haven, Beinecke Library, MS 228) concludes with a colophon proclaiming the circumstances of its production: “1465 Sancta katherina in lixboa.” This colophon locates the book’s making rather precisely at a “Saint Katherine in Lisbon,” yet the few tentative attempts by modern scholars to identify such a St. Katherine in fifteenth-century Lisbon have yielded no plausible candidates among the city’s parishes and monasteries.1 This St. Katherine in Lisbon, it would seem, was no brick-and-mortar religious institution, but a social one: the Confraria de Santa Catarina de Ribamar. In 1460, the brotherhood recorded its statutes in a document called a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Following Chaucer: Offices of the Active Life by Lynn Staley (review)

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      Abstract: Lynn Staley’s densely argued and erudite new book Following Chaucer derives its subtitle from De officiis (On Obligations) by the Roman philosopher Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 bce). De officiis was an enormously influential work of moral philosophy for early Christian writers such as Ambrose, Jerome, and Augustine. The Carolingian Renaissance laid the groundwork for its even greater popularity in the High Middle Ages. For twelfth-century Christian writers and thinkers, the study of ethics became a central concern in a society that witnessed the growing divergence between the ideals of Christianity and its increasingly corrupt reality. Ethical texts such as Cicero’s were increasingly incorporated into the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Behind Every Man(uscript) Is a Woman: Social Networks, Christine de Pizan,
           and Westminster Abbey Library, MS 21

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      Abstract: London, Westminster Abbey Library, MS 21 is a French lyric anthology of largely love poetry with several male names in its marginalia. The compilation’s earliest mark of ownership, contemporary or near-contemporary with the manuscript’s production in the early–mid-fifteenth century, belongs to Thomas Scales, who was a commander under John of Bedford in France in the 1420s and 1430s. Pointing to the presence of another name, “Strelley,” elsewhere in the manuscript’s margins, Carol Meale has suggested that the manuscript is linked to Bedford’s entourage, as a John Strelly was a valet-de-chambre of Bedford’s in 1431.1 This Bedford connection suggests that Westminster 21 was part of the large cache of French materials ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Clerk as Secular Cleric and Griselda as Ecclesiological Type

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      Abstract: At first glance, reading Griselda as a symbol of the Church seems like merely the unfinished business of exegetical criticism. What others have done for the boat in The Man of Law’s Tale (it’s the Church!), someone might as well (yawn) do for Griselda in The Clerk’s Tale (she’s the Church!).1 Indeed, reading women—in addition to boats—as ecclesiological types was, by far, the patristic hermeneutic most commonly applied to the Bible’s female characters. In the course of patristic interpretation, “All women of the Bible, without doubt, have been viewed as types of the Church, under one aspect or another.”2Yet missed chances for ecclesiological readings of Griselda abound. Marian readings appeared in earlier ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Meter and Modernity in English Verse, 1350–1650 by Eric Weiskott
           (review)

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      Abstract: This smart, inventive, and fastidiously researched book makes a case for a new relationship among meter, genre, and literary periodization in English poetry. Its central argument is that metrical choice and literary form go hand in hand. In particular, it offers a new taxonomy of English verse, where three major periods can be defined by their formal choices.These are, first, the age of tetrameter: a period, early in the history of the English vernacular, when four-stress, eight-syllable lines were used for romance, lyric, debate, vision, and satire. This is the age of the earliest English verse, from The Owl and the Nightingale through King Horn, from the most famous of the Harley Lyrics through Sir Orfeo. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Arts of Disruption: Allegory and “Piers Plowman.” by
           Nicolette Zeeman (review)

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      Abstract: Nicolette Zeeman’s ambitious new book is an apt sequel to her first, “Piers Plowman” and the Medieval Discourse of Desire (Cambridge, 2006). Here again Piers Plowman is the hub of a teeming intellectual and literary history that encompasses classical rhetoric and ethical writings, Latin pastoralia, and allegorical narratives in French and English. Also like the earlier book, Zeeman’s latest study uncovers the deep structural workings of the poem through careful attention to its recurrent forms and, crucially, by placing Langland’s poetic practice in a rich context of contemporary discourses. Piers Plowman, notoriously, challenges students and scholars alike to get a sense of their footing in the poem, to determine ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Mélusine Romance in Medieval Europe: Translation, Circulation, and
           Material Contexts by Lydia Zeldenrust (review)

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      Abstract: The figure of the metamorphic fairy Mélusine has formed the object of abundant critical scrutiny since Jacques Le Goff and Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie’s seminal article of 1971 revived scholarly interest in the medieval myth. Told in two late medieval French romances by Jean d’Arras in prose (about 1393) and by Coudrette in verse (1401), the story of Mélusine and her progeny was transmitted in multiple vernacular translations, including German, Castilian, Dutch, and English. In the last fifty years, the founding-mother figure and conquest narrative featuring the exploits of Mélusine’s sons have elicited scholarship from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including anthropology; art history; codicology; folklore; ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Abbreviations of Chaucer’s Works

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      Abstract: An ABCAdam ScriveynAnelida and ArciteA Treatise on the AstrolabeA Balade of ComplaintThe Book of the DuchessBoeceThe Envoy to BuktonThe Cook’s Tale, The Cook’s PrologueThe Clerk’s Tale, The Clerk’s Prologue, Clerk–Merchant LinkComplaynt d’AmoursThe Canterbury TalesThe Canon’s Yeoman’s Tale, The Canon’s Yeoman’s PrologueThe Equatorie of the PlanetisFortuneThe Former AgeThe Franklin’s Tale, The Franklin’s PrologueThe Friar’s Tale, The Friar’s Prologue, Friar–Summoner LinkGentilesseThe General PrologueThe House of FameThe Knight’s Tale, Knight–Miller LinkA Complaint to His LadyThe Legend of Good Women, The Legend of Good Women PrologueThe Manciple’s Tale, The Manciple’s PrologueThe Complaint of MarsThe Tale of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Female Desire in Chaucer’s “Legend of Good Women” and Middle English
           Romance by Lucy M. Allen-Goss (review)

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      Abstract: Lucy M. Allen-Goss has given us a book that we need. Of course, there are a great many books out there on Chaucer, but there are few that concentrate on The Legend of Good Women, and fewer still that focus exclusively on female desire. Allen-Goss begins with an author’s note (viii–ix) that is imperative to her project: in it, she explains why she has avoided using the word “queer.” Whether or not we personally agree with her decision, the careful way in which she has outlined her choice, particularly how it connects with her understanding of Alain de Lille, is appreciated. Similarly, her introduction judiciously defines “female desire,” which is the central idea of her book and thus all the more important to be ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • An Annotated Chaucer Bibliography, 2019

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      Abstract: Regular contributors:Mark Allen, University of Texas at San AntonioStephanie Amsel, Southern Methodist University (Texas)Tim Arner, Grinnell College (Iowa)Debra Best, California State University at Dominguez HillsThomas H. Blake, Austin College (Texas)Agnès Blandeau, Université de Nantes (France)Matthew Brumit, University of Mary (North Dakota)Margaret Connolly, University of St. Andrews (Scotland)Stefania D’Agata D’Ottavi, Università per Stranieri di Siena (Italy)Jamie C. Fumo, Florida State UniversityJames B. Harr III, North Carolina State UniversityDouglas W. Hayes, Lakehead UniversityAna Sáez Hidalgo, Universidad de Valladolid (Spain)Andrew James Johnston, Freie Universität Berlin (Germany)Yoshinobu Kudo ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • William Dunbar’s Liturgical Poetics

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      Abstract: In his petitionary poem “Off benefice, sir, at everie feist,” William Dunbar compares the distribution of benefices, over which his literary patron, King James IV, had some control, to the distribution of food and gifts at a banquet. Dunbar takes issue not with benefices per se, but rather with their uneven allotment. Calling himself a “syphir [cipher]” among the wealthy ecclesiasts who preside over the banquet, Dunbar laments that the rich get richer while the poor “petewouslie . . . luke [pitiously look],/Quhone [When] all the pelfe thai pairt amang thame.”1 In the third stanza, this metaphorical banquet appears as a saint’s feast day, with Dunbar in the role of a down-and-out liturgical performer:2Here Dunbar ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Author Index—Bibliography

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      Abstract: Adams, Jenny 285Aers, David 216Agbabi, Patience 40Ağıl, Nazmi 41Ahn, Joong-Eun 144Alber, Jan 237Allen, Ryan 230Allen-Goss, Lucy 23Amsel, Stephanie 1Amsler, Mark 79Anderson, Miranda 223Archibald, Elizabeth 147, 274Ariza-Barile, Raúl 87, 219Armenti, Daniel 161Barbaccia, Holly, 179Barlow, Gania 42Barootes, Benjamin S. W. 224Barr, Helen 269Barrington, Candace 88, 127, 275, 299, 310Batkie, Stephanie L. 31, 142Beal, Jane 226, 268Bennett, Alastair 186Bennett, Kristen Abbott 314Bennett, Robert Russell 267Bergvall, Caroline 43Bertolet, Anna Riehl 150Bertolet, Craig E. 89, 150, 201Besamusca, Bart 24, 115Bickley, John 231Black, Daisy 305Blatt, Heather (E.) 90, 276, 290Bleeth, Kenneth 277Blurton, Heather 202Boffey, Julia 279 ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “Un-English” Chaucer: Macaronic Verse and Codicological Form in
           Cambridge University Library, MS Gg.4.27

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      Abstract: In the early twentieth century, some 500 years after it was made, Cambridge University Library, MS Gg.4.27 (henceforth Gg) earned a belated reputation as an “un-English” book. Its idiosyncratic orthography or, to borrow Eleanor Hammond’s words, “un-English miswritings” prompted a series of philologists to attribute the manuscript’s production to a non-anglophone scribe.1 Walter Skeat was the first to explain some of these “eccentricities,” earlier noted by Frederick Furnivall, as evidence of language contact rather than dialectal variation, declaring them “a sure mark of Anglo-French influence.”2 Several decades later, John Manly and Edith Rickert suggested on the basis of these “strange spellings” that the scribe ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Bibliographical Citations and Annotations

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      Abstract: See nos. 177, 194, 196.See no. 121.See nos. 34, 166.See nos. 21, 34.[No entries]See no. 17.See nos. 24, 28, 37.See no. 134.See no. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Harley Manuscript Geographies: Literary History and the Medieval
           Miscellany by Daniel Birkholz (review)

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      Abstract: Now resting in the British Library, MS Harley 2253, as Daniel Birkholz recognizes in his new book, is a manuscript that modern scholarship has perennially recognized as important. Most people who have heard of it have done so because of the “secular” lyrics that it contains—lyrics that, for the most part, have not been preserved anywhere else. Harley 2253 has been thought important also because of the “political songs” (Thomas Wright’s designation of certain texts in the manuscript) that it contains, too, and because it is an expression of the “trilingual culture” of England in the centuries immediately following the Norman Conquest. Over the last twenty years or so, the manuscript has been the subject of a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Play Time: Gender, Anti-Semitism and Temporality in Medieval Biblical
           Drama by Daisy Black (review)

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      Abstract: Daisy Black closes her rich, engaging book, Play Time: Gender, Anti-Semitism and Temporality in Medieval Biblical Drama, with an epilogue musing on having written during the countdown to Brexit, a liminal time that brought her to identify with the temporally disruptive figures of her study: Joseph in his doubts, the mothers of the Innocents, Noah’s wife, and Mak and Gyll and the sheep they steal. Writing this review, I, too, feel with these characters as we emerge (or not) from the COVID pandemic. In Play Time, Black argues that late medieval biblical plays “supported multiple, co-existing and subjective experiences of time, and that these experiences were intimately connected to experiences of gender and race” ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Medieval Affect, Feeling, and Emotion ed. by Glenn D. Burger and Holly A.
           Crocker (review)

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      Abstract: Given the incredible scholarly energy responding to the affective turn—and the corresponding attention to affective piety in medieval studies—it is perhaps surprising that a book such as Medieval Affect, Feeling, and Emotion has not appeared before now. As the editors deftly argue, the evolving fields of affect theory and the history of emotions require nuanced consideration of their different effects and forces, and medieval literature not only enables critical reflection on contemporary affect theory but also generates new understandings of premodern affectivity and emotion. The introduction, anchored in a reading of Chaucer’s Book of the Duchess, takes up the distinction between the titular terms of inquiry. It ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Meditating Death in Medieval and Early Modern Devotional Writing: From
           Bonaventure to Luther by Mark Chinca (review)

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      Abstract: Philosophy, as Plato famously said, is meditation on death. The biblical author Jesus ben Sirach similarly wrote, “In all thy works remember thy last end, and thou shalt never sin” (Sir 7:40). Mark Chinca’s careful study traces select Christian attempts to obey that precept from the thirteenth century through the sixteenth, with a coda on Descartes. His method is partly rhetorical, partly psychological, as he parses the fine distinctions among various techniques for meditating. Beyond his specific focus on the four last things (death, judgment, hell, and heaven), Chinca examines modes of meditation per se as a devotional exercise.According to the jacket copy, meditating on death was an important premodern ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Classifications

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      Abstract: Bibliographies, Reports, and Reference 1–3Recordings and Films 4–5Chaucer’s Life 6–13Facsimiles, Editions, and Translations 14–22Manuscripts and Textual Studies 23–30Sources, Analogues, and Literary Relations 31–39Chaucer’s Influence and Later Allusion 40–72Style and Versification 73–78Language and Word Studies 79–86Background and General Criticism 87–126The Canterbury Tales—General 127–41CT—The General Prologue 142–43CT—The Knight and His Tale 144–49CT—The Miller and His Tale 150–54CT—The Reeve and His Tale 155–58CT—The Cook and His Tale 159CT—The Man of Law and His Tale 160–66CT—The Wife of Bath and Her Tale 167–76CT—The Friar and His Tale 177CT—The Summoner and His TaleCT—The Clerk and His Tale 178CT—The ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Chaucer’s “Ebrayk Josephus” and The House of Fame

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      Abstract: In Book III of Chaucer’s House of Fame, the dreamer Geffrey enters Fame’s palace to see an array of authors standing on imposing columns. On the first of seven columns described stands Flavius Josephus, a first-century Judeo-Roman historian:Twice emphasizing the adjective high, suggesting that Josephus towers vertiginously over Geffrey’s diminutive presence, this grand description befits Josephus the historical personage and his remarkable life. Born in Jerusalem in the early first century, Josephus served as a commander of Jewish forces during the Jewish Revolt of 66–70 ce. During this conflict he was captured by the Romans. There are pragmatic reasons why he was kept alive, not least his familiarity with ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Author, Scribe, and Book in Late Medieval England by Rory G. Critten
           (review)

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      Abstract: Scholarship on the history of authorship and literary criticism in the Middle Ages has long focused—understandably, given the wealth of source material—on scholastic theories of exegesis emerging from the medieval universities. Such scholarship recruits the rhetoric of accessus to Latin auctores, and extensive commentaries on both classical and scriptural texts as the foundation of the medieval understanding of authorship and the literary; this foundation has assumed primacy as the locus for studying the authorial self-styling of late medieval vernacular poets. Rory G. Critten’s Author, Scribe, and Book in Late Medieval England represents a welcome addition to this critical scene, approaching the subject of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Reading Chaucer in Time: Literary Formation in England and Italy by Kara
           Gaston (review)

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      Abstract: Kara Gaston’s Reading Chaucer in Time: Literary Formation in England and Italy is a welcome addition to the body of scholarship concerned with Chaucer’s relationship to his Italian sources. Gaston is an extraordinary close reader of poetry, which lends to her project a richness and depth that is not often seen in first books. Coupled with her extensive knowledge of Chaucer’s intertexts—both Italian and Latin—Gaston’s readerly skill produces genuinely new and original insights into a range of familiar Chaucerian poems. Therein lies the strength of the book: in local, particular readings of texts and their intertexts. For example, in Chapter 1, Gaston reads the final lines of Troilus and Criseyde in relation to their ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “Oute of mesure”: “Alone walkyng” and
           Syncategoremata

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      Abstract: The opening stanza of Wallace Stevens’s “The Snow Man” contends that “One must have a mind of winter/To regard the frost and the boughs/Of the pine-trees crusted with snow.” The crux in the first line is the seemingly unremarkable preposition “of,” implying that one “must” think “of” winter, as in keep winter in mind, but more strongly also that one’s mind ought to be “of” winter: it should also consist of winter. One must then also “have a mind” “[o]f the pine-trees crusted with snow.” In terms of the second meaning of “of,” “The Snow Man” suggests that the mind should equal, or, more strongly, have the same identity as, the natural world. Stevens proposes that this overlay of mind and world is necessary in order ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Margery Kempe’s Spiritual Medicine: Suffering, Transformation, and the
           Life-Course by Laura Kalas (review)

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      Abstract: This volume begins with an ending—specifically, the last page of London, British Library, Additional MS 61823, The Book of Margery Kempe. The manuscript’s final folio contains a heavily effaced annotation by a later reader: an English recipe for “dragges,” medicinal sweets commonly used as a digestive remedy. Its presence brings into focus the medical subtext that permeates Kempe’s narrative, which describes her own healing and offers the same to its readers. Drawing equally from theological and medical sources, Kalas suggests that Kempe utilized her aging female body as a locus for her experience of mysticism. The ultimate concern of the volume is the use of pain—particularly women’s pain—as a “productive force,” ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Medieval Nonsense: Signifying Nothing in Fourteenth-Century England by
           Jordan Kirk (review)

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      Abstract: Evidence of Jordan Kirk’s love of words is apparent everywhere in his engaging and enjoyable book, Medieval Nonsense: Signifying Nothing in Fourteenth-Century England. Readers would do well to keep on hand a notepad in which to jot down words such as recrudescence (n., a revival or rediscovery), sermocinal (adj., relating to speech), or tregetry (n., juggling, deception, trickery). However wonderful, these words are not the most interesting Kirk has to offer. That title must be given to a subset of words—including blottybus, blityri, coax, cra, garalus, hereceddy, kuboa, and skindapsos (to name a few)—that do not mean anything, at least not in any obvious way.Medieval Nonsense is about these words. More ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Biblical Commentary and Translation in Later Medieval England: Experiments
           in Interpretation by Andrew Kraebel (review)

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      Abstract: Andrew Kraebel has written a major study examining the treatment of the Bible in fourteenth-century England. This book explores a landscape of biblical commentary and translation that, it cogently argues, was more intellectually fruitful and less divided than has sometimes been thought. In particular, the argument (re)integrates academic commentary and “extramural” writings, including vernacular texts. It also explores how the biblical commentaries produced by Wyclif and by his followers fitted into and emerged from their intellectual context, rather than standing wholly at odds with it. The book is a diptych: the first two chapters examine biblical commentary within the university, and the following two graduate ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Wasps’ Nest: Antisemitism, Conspiracy Theory, and The
           Prioress’s Tale

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      Abstract: Anti-Semitism is the rumor about the Jews.In The Prioress’s Tale, Chaucer attributes the vicious murder of a child to demonic conspiracy: “Oure firste foo, the serpent Sathanas,/That hath in Jues herte his waspes nest” inspires Jews to kill the boy.2 Critics of The Prioress’s Tale have focused less on the tale’s depiction of conspiracy than they have on other details of the murder, such as the boy’s slashed throat and the defilement of his corpse.3 Chaucer’s representation of Jewish conspiracy, however, situates the tale within a tradition of Christian accusation against the Jews that extends well beyond the charges of murder. The centuries-long tradition of conspiracy theories about the Jews encompasses a range ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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