Subjects -> LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (Total: 2147 journals)
    - LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (954 journals)
    - LANGUAGES (276 journals)
    - LITERARY AND POLITICAL REVIEWS (201 journals)
    - LITERATURE (GENERAL) (180 journals)
    - NOVELS (13 journals)
    - PHILOLOGY AND LINGUISTICS (500 journals)
    - POETRY (23 journals)

LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (954 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 127 of 127 Journals sorted alphabetically
Studia Rossica Gedanensia     Open Access  
Studia Scandinavica     Open Access  
Studia Slavica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Studia theodisca     Open Access  
Studien zur deutschen Sprache und Literatur     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Studies in African Languages and Cultures     Open Access  
Studies in American Indian Literatures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Applied Linguistics & TESOL (SALT)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Studies in Canadian Literature / Études en littérature canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Studies in ELT and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Studies in Scottish Literature     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Studies in the Age of Chaucer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Studies in the Novel     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
SubStance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Suomalais-Ugrilaisen Seuran Aikakauskirja : Journal de la Société Finno-Ougrienne     Open Access  
Sustainable Multilingualism     Open Access  
Swedish Journal of Romanian Studies     Open Access  
Sylloge epigraphica Barcinonensis : SEBarc     Open Access  
symploke     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sztuka Edycji     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Tabuleiro de Letras     Open Access  
Teksty Drugie     Open Access  
Telar     Open Access  
Telondefondo : Revista de Teoría y Crítica Teatral     Open Access  
Temps zero     Open Access  
Tenso     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Teoliterária : Revista Brasileira de Literaturas e Teologias     Open Access  
Terminàlia     Open Access  
Territories : A Trans-Cultural Journal of Regional Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Texas Studies in Literature and Language     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Text Matters     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Textual Cultures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Textual Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Texturas     Open Access  
The BARS Review     Open Access  
The CLR James Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
The Comparatist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Eighteenth Century     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
The Explicator     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The F. Scott Fitzgerald Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
The Highlander Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Hopkins Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Lion and the Unicorn     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
The Literacy Trek     Open Access  
The Mark Twain Annual     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The New Yorker     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
The Vernal Pool     Open Access  
Tirant : Butlletí informatiu i bibliogràfic de literatura de cavalleries     Open Access  
Tolkien Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
TradTerm     Open Access  
Traduire : Revue française de la traduction     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
TRANS : Revista de Traductología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transalpina     Open Access  
Transfer : e-Journal on Translation and Intercultural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Translation and Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Translation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Translation Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Translationes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Transversal     Open Access  
Trasvases Entre la Literatura y el Cine     Open Access  
Trípodos     Open Access  
Tropelías : Revista de Teoría de la Literatura y Literatura Comparada     Open Access  
Tsafon : Revue Interdisciplinaire d'études Juives     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Turkish Review of Communication Studies     Open Access  
Tutur : Cakrawala Kajian Bahasa-Bahasa Nusantara     Open Access  
Tydskrif vir Letterkunde     Open Access  
Uncommon Culture     Open Access  
Unidiversidad     Open Access  
Urdimento : Revista de Estudos em Artes Cênicas     Open Access  
US Latino & Latina Oral History Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Valenciana     Open Access  
Variants : Journal of the European Society for Textual Scholarship     Open Access  
Verba : Anuario Galego de Filoloxía     Full-text available via subscription  
Verba Hispanica     Open Access  
Vertimo studijos (Translation Studies)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Via Panorâmica : Revista de Estudos Anglo-Americanos     Open Access  
Victorian Literature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Victorian Poetry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Vilnius University Open Series     Open Access  
Vision : Journal for Language and Foreign Language Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Vita Latina     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Voice and Speech Review     Hybrid Journal  
Voix et Images     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Vox Romanica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Wacana     Open Access  
Wacana : Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wasafiri     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Werkwinkel : Journal of Low Countries and South African Studies     Open Access  
Western American Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
WikiJournal of Humanities     Open Access  
William Carlos Williams Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Word Structure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Writing Systems Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Written Language & Literacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
WSQ: Women's Studies Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Year's Work in English Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Yearbook of Ancient Greek Epic Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Yearbook of Langland Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Zeitschrift fuer deutsches Altertum und Literatur     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Zeitschrift für Interkulturellen Fremdsprachenunterricht     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Literaturwissenschaft und Linguistik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Wortbildung / Journal of Word Formation     Full-text available via subscription  
Zeszyty Cyrylo-Metodiańskie     Open Access  
Zibaldone : Estudios Italianos     Open Access  
Zutot     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Œuvres et Critiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Известия Южного федерального университета. Филологические науки     Open Access  

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Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.101
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0732-7730 - ISSN (Online) 1936-1645
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • From the Editor

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Last year, Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature had the pleasure of publishing a special volume on Women and Archives, guest edited by Laura Engel and Emily Ruth Rutter, so it has been some time since I have had an opportunity to give an update on our office staff and editorial board. Since my last preface, our Subscriptions Manager, Danielle Calhoun, has graduated, and Jacob Crystal has stepped into her position. Jamie Walt has joined our team as Publicity Manager, taking over for Ciara Graham, who is currently training as our new Book Review Editor. She will take on the role full time at the end of the semester, as we say goodbye to her predecessor, Jennarae Niece, who will be much missed.I also have many outgoing ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Marginalia as Feminist Use of the Book: Hester Piozzi’s Spectator
           Annotations

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      Abstract: From 1790 until her death in 1821, Hester Lynch Piozzi energetically wrote in her books. Signed “H. L. P.,” her inscriptions collectively form an account of cultural change across the eighteenth century in ongoing dialogue with English writers, critics, editors, and taste-makers. 1 She annotated copiously on spiritual, social, and cultural topics, sometimes replying concisely (“True” to agree with Samuel Johnson on Joseph Addison’s civilizing influence; “certainly” to confirm Alexander Pope’s excellence as a gardener; “that’s gross” to censure a urinal in The Spectator), sometimes ruminating at length, and sometimes designing her writing as a kind of “calligraphy.” 2 Recognized by literary critics and historians ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Home for Hannah Crafts: Ecofeminism in The Bondwoman’s Narrative

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      Abstract: The foxes have holes, and the birds of the air have nests.The final scene of The Bondwoman’s Narrative, written in the 1850s by Hannah Crafts, occurs far from the oppressive plantations where the narrator had been enslaved and the woods that had offered her a haven as she escaped. Instead, the scene takes place at Hannah’s home, “a neat little Cottage,” where she lives with her husband and aging mother (p. 244).2 At the conclusion of this story about flight from slavery, Hannah describes her neighborhood of white cottages and domestic bliss, where husbands and wives dwell amidst cultivated vines, next door to the homes of old friends: “From the window where I sit, a tiny white cottage half-shaded in summer by ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Romance of Independence: Working Women in Nineteenth-Century Telegraph
           Literature

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      Abstract: If Henry James is to be believed, nineteenth-century women telegraph operators were a lonely lot. The heroine of his 1898 novella In the Cage is bitter, cynical, and above all, trapped: “It had occurred to her early that in her position—that of a young person spending, in framed and wired confinement, the life of a guinea-pig or magpie—she should know a great many persons without their recognizing the acquaintance.”1 James’s unnamed protagonist finds her job, her suitor, and her life dull and unsatisfying. Her only pleasures are vicarious, such as glimpses into the scandals of rich customers. Likewise, in “The Telegraph Girl,” a short story originally published in the December 1877 issue of Good Cheer, British ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Critical Insurgency of Austen’s Suffrage Afterlife: “I hope I
           shall not be accused of pride and prejudice”

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      Abstract: A March 2017 article in The Chronicle of Higher Education revealed an unsettling truth to many Jane Austen scholars and fans: Austen was being used as a political tool by the alt-right. 1 The article grapples with former Breitbert journalist Milo Yiannopoulos’s use of the opening lines of Pride and Prejudice (1813) to demean contemporary feminism: “As a Victorian novelist might have put it, it is a truth universally acknowledged that an ugly woman is far more likely to be a feminist than a hot one.” 2 Whether or not Yiannopoulos consciously transposed Austen from the Regency to Victorian era, it is clear that he recalled the nineteenth-century version of Austen as a representative of traditional conservatism and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Danger of the Domestic in Ireland: Bridget Cleary, Big House
           Modernism, and Tana French

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      Abstract: Angela Bourke’s groundbreaking study The Burning of Bridget Cleary: A True Story (2001) uses a true-crime story of domestic violence to expose the struggle between the modern and the primeval in the development of late nineteenth-century modernity in Ireland. Bourke details the story of a husband who burned his wife to death, claiming that fairy magic led him to do it. In his 2002 review of Bourke’s work, Cóilín Parsons points out that Bourke’s cultural history of late nineteenth-century Ireland “is a story of the failure of the modern state to provide adequate services, and, perhaps consequently, to construct a narrative of legitimization for itself.” 1 In his emphasis on the struggle of the British state to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Digital Subaltern Counterpublics and Muslim Women’s Resistance in Kamila
           Shamsie’s Home Fire and Samira Ahmed’s Internment

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      Abstract: Kamila Shamsie’s Home Fire (2017) and Samira Ahmed’s Internment (2019) feature young South Asian diasporic Muslim women protagonists who challenge xenophobic states in a post-9/11 world. As Aparajita De notes in South Asian Racialization and Belonging after 9/11: Masks of Threat (2016), the politics of racialization changed in the United States after 9/11, and “the thin veneer of multiracial solidarity collapsed . . . and revealed the fissures within and among working class, minority, and diaspora communities.” 1 This racialization was not limited to the United States, and with the declaration of a global war on terror, South Asian diasporic Muslims in the West experienced intensifying Islamophobia and found ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Writing Gender in Early Modern Chinese Women’s Tanci Fiction by Li
           Guo (review)

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      Abstract: Writing Gender in Early Modern Chinese Women’s Tanci Fiction by Li Guo calls attention to the historically understudied genre of tanci fiction. The conventional understanding of Chinese literary canon often excludes texts written by women and those associated with regional cultures; hence, many tanci were not preserved. Moreover, women-authored tanci, with their unique format of alternating between lyrics and prose, are lengthy volumes, requiring patient and careful reading. However, in recent decades, tanci has drawn rising attention. As a much-needed, timely study, Guo’s work explores how women writers redefined social values, gender norms, and nationhood in the imagined realm of tanci. In addition to theorizing ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • New Media and the Rise of the Popular Woman Writer, 1832–1860 by
           Alexis Easley (review)

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      Abstract: Deploying digital research methods but grounded in material archives, Alexis Easley’s New Media and the Rise of the Popular Woman Writer, 1832–1860 is a timely contribution to the growing body of work on celebrity women authors of the nineteenth century. It uses a carefully contextualized case study approach: chapters on individual authors such as Felica Hemans, Eliza Cook, George Eliot, the Brontës, and Frances Brown are set against detailed explorations of Chambers’s Edinburgh Journal and women’s scrapbooks. The career trajectory of each writer forms the basis of a wider exploration of literary trends to show how “rather than defining networks strictly as a system of relationships between individual actors, we ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Ethical Vision of George Eliot by Thomas Albrecht (review)

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      Abstract: George Eliot’s fiction is capacious enough to accommodate virtually any critical perspective and complex enough to have attracted generations of critics employing a variety of methodologies. Recent approaches have included historicist, formalist, and ethical criticisms. As its title announces, Thomas Albrecht’s The Ethical Vision of George Eliot falls into the latter camp. Study of the role of ethics in Eliot’s fiction has been stimulated by the recent publication of Clare Carlisle’s edition of Eliot’s translation of Baruch Spinoza’s Ethics (2020). Albrecht, however, is not interested in Eliot’s relationship to the philosophical tradition of ethics or in any aspect of historical context. Rather, he is concerned ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Lyrical Strains: Liberalism and Women’s Poetry in Nineteenth-Century
           America by Elissa Zellinger (review)

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      Abstract: Elissa Zellinger’s Lyrical Strains: Liberalism and Women’s Poetry in Nineteenth-Century America is an engaging account of the lyric in relation to “social experiments in selfhood” in the work of four women poets writing between 1820 and 1920 (p. 6). The volume begins and ends with discussion of the lyric, or “strains” of lyric, in relation to recent scholarship. Zellinger argues that “lyric existed in the nineteenth century as a reading practice whose social function included determining the boundaries of the self” and that it can be read as attempting to “achieve, critique, or reject the promise of the liberal subject” (p. 6). Following Yopie Prins, Virginia Jackson, and others, Zellinger understands the lyric ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Oceans at Home: Maritime and Domestic Fictions in Nineteenth-Century
           American Women’s Writing by Melissa Gniadek (review)

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      Abstract: In her introduction to Oceans at Home: Maritime and Domestic Fictions in Nineteenth-Century American Women’s Writing, Melissa Gniadek turns from stories of women’s extraordinary experiences at sea (as cross-dressing pirates, captains’ wives, or missionaries) and toward a rich archive of the oceanic found “notably, in the quotidian” (p. 7). This innovative study of the imaginative uses of the sea in women’s writing about home convincingly demonstrates how far-flung maritime tales “enabled women writers to negotiate domestic concerns ranging from violence against Indigenous peoples, imperial anxiety, personal grief, and the speculative nature of frontier settlements” (p. 5). Across its three well-researched and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • What a Library Means to a Woman: Edith Wharton and the Will to Collect
           Books by Sheila Liming (review)

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      Abstract: Even among writers, Edith Wharton was exceptionally bookish. Or, perhaps, more accurately, the legend of Edith Wharton—constructed by both Wharton herself and the biographers and critics who have lionized her—is one of extreme bookishness. The question of what a library means to a woman, to borrow the evocative title of Sheila Liming’s work, seems to me deeply related to the question of what it means to be bookish. Wharton’s bookishness is present in her own origin stories as a writer. Her two published autobiographies, A Backward Glance (1934) and “Life and I” (1920–1922), both place early narrative significance on a scene of a collection of books. Like Isabel Archer in Wharton’s close friend Henry James’s The ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Cather Among the Moderns by Janis P. Stout, and: Edith Wharton, Willa
           Cather, and the Place of Culture by Julie Olin-Ammentorp (review)

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      Abstract: Janis Stout’s Cather Among the Moderns and Julie Olin-Ammentorp’s Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, and the Place of Culture each offers a considerable contribution to Willa Cather studies and indeed to Edith Wharton studies in the case of the latter. Both books demonstrate exemplary scholarship in their blending of close literary analysis with historical and biographical insights. Stout and Olin-Ammentorp break new ground in the critical conceptualization of Cather in particular. Interestingly, both books approach their subjects as being deeply attuned to the cultures they occupied and deeply cognizant of the sociopolitical debates that they are often perceived as overlooking in favor of narratives of either ordinary ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Women, Literature, and the Arts of the Countryside in Early
           Twentieth-Century England by Judith W. Page and Elise L. Smith (review)

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      Abstract: In the early twentieth century, the English countryside was a site of nostalgia and continuity as well as a place of considerable change. In Women, Literature, and the Arts of the Countryside in Early Twentieth-Century England, Judith Page and Elise Smith have written a fascinating account of this tension and of the role played by landscapes, gardens, and the natural world across a range of media, both visual and literary.Page and Smith make what turns out to be a brilliant choice when it comes to organizing this book. It is structured biographically, around the lives of eight representative—and very different—women. The result is that we see vividly the importance that the countryside held in each of these women’s ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Cautiously Hopeful: Metafeminist Practices in Canada by Marie
           Carrière (review)

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      Abstract: Hoping to relaunch the term “metafeminism” to encompass a diverse set of analytical practices, a state of being, an ethos, and a style of both reading and writing by women, Marie Carrière’s Cautiously Hopeful: Metafeminist Practices in Canada explains that the prefix “meta” expands feminism (pp. 30–32). It embraces pluralism, paradoxes, internal dissonances, and ambivalence about previous forms of feminism. She attributes the origin of the term to Lori Saint-Martin’s 1992 essay, “Le métaféminisme et la nouvelle prose féminine au Québec” (Metafeminism and the new women’s prose in Québec), but there is no sustained analysis of the genealogy of the term from then to now. Carrière argues that metafeminism both recalls ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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