Subjects -> LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (Total: 2147 journals)
    - LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (954 journals)
    - LANGUAGES (276 journals)
    - LITERARY AND POLITICAL REVIEWS (201 journals)
    - LITERATURE (GENERAL) (180 journals)
    - NOVELS (13 journals)
    - PHILOLOGY AND LINGUISTICS (500 journals)
    - POETRY (23 journals)

LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (954 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 127 of 127 Journals sorted alphabetically
Studia Romanica Posnaniensia     Open Access  
Studia Rossica Gedanensia     Open Access  
Studia Scandinavica     Open Access  
Studia Slavica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Studia theodisca     Open Access  
Studien zur deutschen Sprache und Literatur     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Studies in African Languages and Cultures     Open Access  
Studies in American Indian Literatures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Applied Linguistics & TESOL (SALT)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Studies in Canadian Literature / Études en littérature canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Studies in ELT and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Studies in Scottish Literature     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Studies in the Age of Chaucer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Studies in the Novel     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
SubStance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Suomalais-Ugrilaisen Seuran Aikakauskirja : Journal de la Société Finno-Ougrienne     Open Access  
Sustainable Multilingualism     Open Access  
Swedish Journal of Romanian Studies     Open Access  
Sylloge epigraphica Barcinonensis : SEBarc     Open Access  
symploke     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sztuka Edycji     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Tabuleiro de Letras     Open Access  
Teksty Drugie     Open Access  
Telar     Open Access  
Telondefondo : Revista de Teoría y Crítica Teatral     Open Access  
Temps zero     Open Access  
Tenso     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Teoliterária : Revista Brasileira de Literaturas e Teologias     Open Access  
Terminàlia     Open Access  
Territories : A Trans-Cultural Journal of Regional Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Texas Studies in Literature and Language     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Text Matters     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Textual Cultures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Textual Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Texturas     Open Access  
The BARS Review     Open Access  
The CLR James Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
The Comparatist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Eighteenth Century     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
The Explicator     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The F. Scott Fitzgerald Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
The Highlander Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Hopkins Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Lion and the Unicorn     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
The Literacy Trek     Open Access  
The Mark Twain Annual     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The New Yorker     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
The Vernal Pool     Open Access  
Tirant : Butlletí informatiu i bibliogràfic de literatura de cavalleries     Open Access  
Tolkien Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
TradTerm     Open Access  
Traduire : Revue française de la traduction     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
TRANS : Revista de Traductología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transalpina     Open Access  
Transfer : e-Journal on Translation and Intercultural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Translation and Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Translation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Translation Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Translationes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Transversal     Open Access  
Trasvases Entre la Literatura y el Cine     Open Access  
Trípodos     Open Access  
Tropelías : Revista de Teoría de la Literatura y Literatura Comparada     Open Access  
Tsafon : Revue Interdisciplinaire d'études Juives     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Turkish Review of Communication Studies     Open Access  
Tutur : Cakrawala Kajian Bahasa-Bahasa Nusantara     Open Access  
Tydskrif vir Letterkunde     Open Access  
Uncommon Culture     Open Access  
Unidiversidad     Open Access  
Urdimento : Revista de Estudos em Artes Cênicas     Open Access  
US Latino & Latina Oral History Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Valenciana     Open Access  
Variants : Journal of the European Society for Textual Scholarship     Open Access  
Verba : Anuario Galego de Filoloxía     Full-text available via subscription  
Verba Hispanica     Open Access  
Vertimo studijos (Translation Studies)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Via Panorâmica : Revista de Estudos Anglo-Americanos     Open Access  
Victorian Literature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Victorian Poetry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Vilnius University Open Series     Open Access  
Vision : Journal for Language and Foreign Language Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Vita Latina     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Voice and Speech Review     Hybrid Journal  
Voix et Images     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Vox Romanica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Wacana     Open Access  
Wacana : Journal of the Humanities of Indonesia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wasafiri     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Werkwinkel : Journal of Low Countries and South African Studies     Open Access  
Western American Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
WikiJournal of Humanities     Open Access  
William Carlos Williams Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Word Structure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Writing Systems Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Written Language & Literacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
WSQ: Women's Studies Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Year's Work in English Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Yearbook of Ancient Greek Epic Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Yearbook of Langland Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Zeitschrift fuer deutsches Altertum und Literatur     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Zeitschrift für Interkulturellen Fremdsprachenunterricht     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Literaturwissenschaft und Linguistik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Wortbildung / Journal of Word Formation     Full-text available via subscription  
Zeszyty Cyrylo-Metodiańskie     Open Access  
Zibaldone : Estudios Italianos     Open Access  
Zutot     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Œuvres et Critiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Известия Южного федерального университета. Филологические науки     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Tydskrif vir Letterkunde
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.235
Number of Followers: 0  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0041-476X - ISSN (Online) 2309-9070
Published by SciELO Homepage  [672 journals]
  • Relational ontology and posthuman subjectivity in Pieter Odendaal's
           poetry debut

    • Abstract: In Pieter Odendaal's debut, asof geen berge ooit hier gewoon het nie (as if no mountains ever lived here), the poet expands the complex question "re mang'" (who are we') into an important theme and utilises it as a structural element by building the different sections of the volume around various conceptions of 'us'. In this article, I argue that Odendaal's poetry should be read in terms of relational ontology, seeing as relationality and interconnectedness are important themes in the text. The poetry creatively introduces a posthumanist way of looking at subjectivity and intersubjectivity. The text problematises the position of humankind on earth and in the larger universe, and asks questions regarding the basic ways in which we understand the concept of 'us', our existence and the ways in which we relate to every other inhabitant of the planet (human or non-human; living or non-living). In the process the Cartesian view of humankind is deconstructed and the human's ontological position is decentralised. Everything on earth is placed on equal ontological footing as part of a never-ending network of interactions, associations, and influences. This kind of posthumanist and relational ontological thinking is foregrounded throughout asof geen berge ooit hier gewoon het nie. I analyse this foregrounding in poems which explore the following themes and topics: interpersonal relationships between people that experience life differently because of differing backgrounds (but also between family members and lovers); the relationship between humans and nature (in the broadest sense of the word); time, and the inevitability of finitude and death that connects everything; and the difficulty of dialogue aimed at finding justice, reconciliation, acceptance and appreciation, by means of a realisation of posthuman interdependence.
       
  • Conscience, transformation and memory on the Red Square

    • Abstract: In this article, I rely on a number of theoretical approaches to reflect on the possibility of the transformation of universities, in particular the University of the Free State (UFS). A starting point is the role of public space in a transforming society with emphasis on universities as public spaces. A 'site of conscience' approach, namely an approach to public space that endorses a critical and active engagement with the past to reflect on enduring injustice, is followed to reflect on the Red Square (the nickname derived from the red brick with which the 'President's Square' was built), a prominent space on the campus of the UFS. Suggestions on how the space can be re-interpreted are considered. "Reconciliation" as featured in the work of Hannah Arendt and "Reflective nostalgia" (Boym) are relied on to contemplate the potential of the Red Square as a space of transformation and as a space of conscience. The potential of reconciliation to create a shared world that makes a plural cohabitance possible is considered. I am not arguing that reconciliation could or should take place but that conversations on what reconciliation may entail could be of value. Reflective nostalgia embraces the ambivalence of belonging and provides for multiple homes. I suggest the idea of reflective nostalgia as a possible way by which the past and figures from the past can be remembered in a critical way as it discloses multiple narratives and embraces conflicting perspectives.
       
  • African speculative fiction as Indigenous remembering: Contrasting stories
           by Jonathan Dotse and Masima Musodza

    • Abstract: How to understand what uniquely African contribution speculative fiction created by African authors makes is a vexed question. Drawing on concepts of the geopolitics of knowledge and locus of enunciation, from the South American tradition of decolonial theory, I argue that the term "Indigenous" must be retained to specify works that speak from epistemic locations within Indigenous African cultures. Such fiction does important remembering work by recovering, renewing, and extending Indigenous knowledge traditions and so claiming the right to imagine futures in Indigenous terms. This remembering is obscured if such fiction is examined in terms such as Afrofuturism, which primarily focuses on race, or Africanfuturism, which focuses on geographical location. Indigenous remembering works from a specific Indigenous locus of enunciation and uses this episteme to explain the present and imagine the future. Such remembering must be distinguished from works that reduce Indigenous knowledge and knowers to tokens of their culture, as the "Other" to Eurocentric knowledge and its claim of universality. I illustrate this distinction by discussing two stories, "The writing in the stars" by Jonathan Dotse and "Herbert wants to return home" by Masima Musodza, showing how Musodza's story is told from within a specific Indigenous framework, the Shona conception of personhood known in Shona as hunhu, whereas Dotse's tale speaks about Malian astrophysics but from outside it. It is this distinction, a vital colonial difference, that the term Indigenous African speculative fiction aims to capture.
       
  • Stories of Fathers, Stories of the Nation: Fatherhood and Paternal Power
           in South African Literature

    • Abstract: How to understand what uniquely African contribution speculative fiction created by African authors makes is a vexed question. Drawing on concepts of the geopolitics of knowledge and locus of enunciation, from the South American tradition of decolonial theory, I argue that the term "Indigenous" must be retained to specify works that speak from epistemic locations within Indigenous African cultures. Such fiction does important remembering work by recovering, renewing, and extending Indigenous knowledge traditions and so claiming the right to imagine futures in Indigenous terms. This remembering is obscured if such fiction is examined in terms such as Afrofuturism, which primarily focuses on race, or Africanfuturism, which focuses on geographical location. Indigenous remembering works from a specific Indigenous locus of enunciation and uses this episteme to explain the present and imagine the future. Such remembering must be distinguished from works that reduce Indigenous knowledge and knowers to tokens of their culture, as the "Other" to Eurocentric knowledge and its claim of universality. I illustrate this distinction by discussing two stories, "The writing in the stars" by Jonathan Dotse and "Herbert wants to return home" by Masima Musodza, showing how Musodza's story is told from within a specific Indigenous framework, the Shona conception of personhood known in Shona as hunhu, whereas Dotse's tale speaks about Malian astrophysics but from outside it. It is this distinction, a vital colonial difference, that the term Indigenous African speculative fiction aims to capture.
       
  • Surfacing: On Being Black and Feminist in South Africa.

    • Abstract: How to understand what uniquely African contribution speculative fiction created by African authors makes is a vexed question. Drawing on concepts of the geopolitics of knowledge and locus of enunciation, from the South American tradition of decolonial theory, I argue that the term "Indigenous" must be retained to specify works that speak from epistemic locations within Indigenous African cultures. Such fiction does important remembering work by recovering, renewing, and extending Indigenous knowledge traditions and so claiming the right to imagine futures in Indigenous terms. This remembering is obscured if such fiction is examined in terms such as Afrofuturism, which primarily focuses on race, or Africanfuturism, which focuses on geographical location. Indigenous remembering works from a specific Indigenous locus of enunciation and uses this episteme to explain the present and imagine the future. Such remembering must be distinguished from works that reduce Indigenous knowledge and knowers to tokens of their culture, as the "Other" to Eurocentric knowledge and its claim of universality. I illustrate this distinction by discussing two stories, "The writing in the stars" by Jonathan Dotse and "Herbert wants to return home" by Masima Musodza, showing how Musodza's story is told from within a specific Indigenous framework, the Shona conception of personhood known in Shona as hunhu, whereas Dotse's tale speaks about Malian astrophysics but from outside it. It is this distinction, a vital colonial difference, that the term Indigenous African speculative fiction aims to capture.
       
  • Hullo, Bu-Bye, Koko, Come In

    • Abstract: How to understand what uniquely African contribution speculative fiction created by African authors makes is a vexed question. Drawing on concepts of the geopolitics of knowledge and locus of enunciation, from the South American tradition of decolonial theory, I argue that the term "Indigenous" must be retained to specify works that speak from epistemic locations within Indigenous African cultures. Such fiction does important remembering work by recovering, renewing, and extending Indigenous knowledge traditions and so claiming the right to imagine futures in Indigenous terms. This remembering is obscured if such fiction is examined in terms such as Afrofuturism, which primarily focuses on race, or Africanfuturism, which focuses on geographical location. Indigenous remembering works from a specific Indigenous locus of enunciation and uses this episteme to explain the present and imagine the future. Such remembering must be distinguished from works that reduce Indigenous knowledge and knowers to tokens of their culture, as the "Other" to Eurocentric knowledge and its claim of universality. I illustrate this distinction by discussing two stories, "The writing in the stars" by Jonathan Dotse and "Herbert wants to return home" by Masima Musodza, showing how Musodza's story is told from within a specific Indigenous framework, the Shona conception of personhood known in Shona as hunhu, whereas Dotse's tale speaks about Malian astrophysics but from outside it. It is this distinction, a vital colonial difference, that the term Indigenous African speculative fiction aims to capture.
       
  • Nomadiese sterre

    • Abstract: How to understand what uniquely African contribution speculative fiction created by African authors makes is a vexed question. Drawing on concepts of the geopolitics of knowledge and locus of enunciation, from the South American tradition of decolonial theory, I argue that the term "Indigenous" must be retained to specify works that speak from epistemic locations within Indigenous African cultures. Such fiction does important remembering work by recovering, renewing, and extending Indigenous knowledge traditions and so claiming the right to imagine futures in Indigenous terms. This remembering is obscured if such fiction is examined in terms such as Afrofuturism, which primarily focuses on race, or Africanfuturism, which focuses on geographical location. Indigenous remembering works from a specific Indigenous locus of enunciation and uses this episteme to explain the present and imagine the future. Such remembering must be distinguished from works that reduce Indigenous knowledge and knowers to tokens of their culture, as the "Other" to Eurocentric knowledge and its claim of universality. I illustrate this distinction by discussing two stories, "The writing in the stars" by Jonathan Dotse and "Herbert wants to return home" by Masima Musodza, showing how Musodza's story is told from within a specific Indigenous framework, the Shona conception of personhood known in Shona as hunhu, whereas Dotse's tale speaks about Malian astrophysics but from outside it. It is this distinction, a vital colonial difference, that the term Indigenous African speculative fiction aims to capture.
       
  • Swatland

    • Abstract: How to understand what uniquely African contribution speculative fiction created by African authors makes is a vexed question. Drawing on concepts of the geopolitics of knowledge and locus of enunciation, from the South American tradition of decolonial theory, I argue that the term "Indigenous" must be retained to specify works that speak from epistemic locations within Indigenous African cultures. Such fiction does important remembering work by recovering, renewing, and extending Indigenous knowledge traditions and so claiming the right to imagine futures in Indigenous terms. This remembering is obscured if such fiction is examined in terms such as Afrofuturism, which primarily focuses on race, or Africanfuturism, which focuses on geographical location. Indigenous remembering works from a specific Indigenous locus of enunciation and uses this episteme to explain the present and imagine the future. Such remembering must be distinguished from works that reduce Indigenous knowledge and knowers to tokens of their culture, as the "Other" to Eurocentric knowledge and its claim of universality. I illustrate this distinction by discussing two stories, "The writing in the stars" by Jonathan Dotse and "Herbert wants to return home" by Masima Musodza, showing how Musodza's story is told from within a specific Indigenous framework, the Shona conception of personhood known in Shona as hunhu, whereas Dotse's tale speaks about Malian astrophysics but from outside it. It is this distinction, a vital colonial difference, that the term Indigenous African speculative fiction aims to capture.
       
  • Kosmos en komete

    • Abstract: How to understand what uniquely African contribution speculative fiction created by African authors makes is a vexed question. Drawing on concepts of the geopolitics of knowledge and locus of enunciation, from the South American tradition of decolonial theory, I argue that the term "Indigenous" must be retained to specify works that speak from epistemic locations within Indigenous African cultures. Such fiction does important remembering work by recovering, renewing, and extending Indigenous knowledge traditions and so claiming the right to imagine futures in Indigenous terms. This remembering is obscured if such fiction is examined in terms such as Afrofuturism, which primarily focuses on race, or Africanfuturism, which focuses on geographical location. Indigenous remembering works from a specific Indigenous locus of enunciation and uses this episteme to explain the present and imagine the future. Such remembering must be distinguished from works that reduce Indigenous knowledge and knowers to tokens of their culture, as the "Other" to Eurocentric knowledge and its claim of universality. I illustrate this distinction by discussing two stories, "The writing in the stars" by Jonathan Dotse and "Herbert wants to return home" by Masima Musodza, showing how Musodza's story is told from within a specific Indigenous framework, the Shona conception of personhood known in Shona as hunhu, whereas Dotse's tale speaks about Malian astrophysics but from outside it. It is this distinction, a vital colonial difference, that the term Indigenous African speculative fiction aims to capture.
       
  • Simoelégri: Stad van onrus

    • Abstract: How to understand what uniquely African contribution speculative fiction created by African authors makes is a vexed question. Drawing on concepts of the geopolitics of knowledge and locus of enunciation, from the South American tradition of decolonial theory, I argue that the term "Indigenous" must be retained to specify works that speak from epistemic locations within Indigenous African cultures. Such fiction does important remembering work by recovering, renewing, and extending Indigenous knowledge traditions and so claiming the right to imagine futures in Indigenous terms. This remembering is obscured if such fiction is examined in terms such as Afrofuturism, which primarily focuses on race, or Africanfuturism, which focuses on geographical location. Indigenous remembering works from a specific Indigenous locus of enunciation and uses this episteme to explain the present and imagine the future. Such remembering must be distinguished from works that reduce Indigenous knowledge and knowers to tokens of their culture, as the "Other" to Eurocentric knowledge and its claim of universality. I illustrate this distinction by discussing two stories, "The writing in the stars" by Jonathan Dotse and "Herbert wants to return home" by Masima Musodza, showing how Musodza's story is told from within a specific Indigenous framework, the Shona conception of personhood known in Shona as hunhu, whereas Dotse's tale speaks about Malian astrophysics but from outside it. It is this distinction, a vital colonial difference, that the term Indigenous African speculative fiction aims to capture.
       
  • 'n Baie lang brief aan my dogter

    • Abstract: How to understand what uniquely African contribution speculative fiction created by African authors makes is a vexed question. Drawing on concepts of the geopolitics of knowledge and locus of enunciation, from the South American tradition of decolonial theory, I argue that the term "Indigenous" must be retained to specify works that speak from epistemic locations within Indigenous African cultures. Such fiction does important remembering work by recovering, renewing, and extending Indigenous knowledge traditions and so claiming the right to imagine futures in Indigenous terms. This remembering is obscured if such fiction is examined in terms such as Afrofuturism, which primarily focuses on race, or Africanfuturism, which focuses on geographical location. Indigenous remembering works from a specific Indigenous locus of enunciation and uses this episteme to explain the present and imagine the future. Such remembering must be distinguished from works that reduce Indigenous knowledge and knowers to tokens of their culture, as the "Other" to Eurocentric knowledge and its claim of universality. I illustrate this distinction by discussing two stories, "The writing in the stars" by Jonathan Dotse and "Herbert wants to return home" by Masima Musodza, showing how Musodza's story is told from within a specific Indigenous framework, the Shona conception of personhood known in Shona as hunhu, whereas Dotse's tale speaks about Malian astrophysics but from outside it. It is this distinction, a vital colonial difference, that the term Indigenous African speculative fiction aims to capture.
       
  • Vier susters

    • Abstract: How to understand what uniquely African contribution speculative fiction created by African authors makes is a vexed question. Drawing on concepts of the geopolitics of knowledge and locus of enunciation, from the South American tradition of decolonial theory, I argue that the term "Indigenous" must be retained to specify works that speak from epistemic locations within Indigenous African cultures. Such fiction does important remembering work by recovering, renewing, and extending Indigenous knowledge traditions and so claiming the right to imagine futures in Indigenous terms. This remembering is obscured if such fiction is examined in terms such as Afrofuturism, which primarily focuses on race, or Africanfuturism, which focuses on geographical location. Indigenous remembering works from a specific Indigenous locus of enunciation and uses this episteme to explain the present and imagine the future. Such remembering must be distinguished from works that reduce Indigenous knowledge and knowers to tokens of their culture, as the "Other" to Eurocentric knowledge and its claim of universality. I illustrate this distinction by discussing two stories, "The writing in the stars" by Jonathan Dotse and "Herbert wants to return home" by Masima Musodza, showing how Musodza's story is told from within a specific Indigenous framework, the Shona conception of personhood known in Shona as hunhu, whereas Dotse's tale speaks about Malian astrophysics but from outside it. It is this distinction, a vital colonial difference, that the term Indigenous African speculative fiction aims to capture.
       
  • Dreaming in Colour

    • Abstract: How to understand what uniquely African contribution speculative fiction created by African authors makes is a vexed question. Drawing on concepts of the geopolitics of knowledge and locus of enunciation, from the South American tradition of decolonial theory, I argue that the term "Indigenous" must be retained to specify works that speak from epistemic locations within Indigenous African cultures. Such fiction does important remembering work by recovering, renewing, and extending Indigenous knowledge traditions and so claiming the right to imagine futures in Indigenous terms. This remembering is obscured if such fiction is examined in terms such as Afrofuturism, which primarily focuses on race, or Africanfuturism, which focuses on geographical location. Indigenous remembering works from a specific Indigenous locus of enunciation and uses this episteme to explain the present and imagine the future. Such remembering must be distinguished from works that reduce Indigenous knowledge and knowers to tokens of their culture, as the "Other" to Eurocentric knowledge and its claim of universality. I illustrate this distinction by discussing two stories, "The writing in the stars" by Jonathan Dotse and "Herbert wants to return home" by Masima Musodza, showing how Musodza's story is told from within a specific Indigenous framework, the Shona conception of personhood known in Shona as hunhu, whereas Dotse's tale speaks about Malian astrophysics but from outside it. It is this distinction, a vital colonial difference, that the term Indigenous African speculative fiction aims to capture.
       
  • The Pride of Noonlay

    • Abstract: How to understand what uniquely African contribution speculative fiction created by African authors makes is a vexed question. Drawing on concepts of the geopolitics of knowledge and locus of enunciation, from the South American tradition of decolonial theory, I argue that the term "Indigenous" must be retained to specify works that speak from epistemic locations within Indigenous African cultures. Such fiction does important remembering work by recovering, renewing, and extending Indigenous knowledge traditions and so claiming the right to imagine futures in Indigenous terms. This remembering is obscured if such fiction is examined in terms such as Afrofuturism, which primarily focuses on race, or Africanfuturism, which focuses on geographical location. Indigenous remembering works from a specific Indigenous locus of enunciation and uses this episteme to explain the present and imagine the future. Such remembering must be distinguished from works that reduce Indigenous knowledge and knowers to tokens of their culture, as the "Other" to Eurocentric knowledge and its claim of universality. I illustrate this distinction by discussing two stories, "The writing in the stars" by Jonathan Dotse and "Herbert wants to return home" by Masima Musodza, showing how Musodza's story is told from within a specific Indigenous framework, the Shona conception of personhood known in Shona as hunhu, whereas Dotse's tale speaks about Malian astrophysics but from outside it. It is this distinction, a vital colonial difference, that the term Indigenous African speculative fiction aims to capture.
       
  • A Hibiscus Coast

    • Abstract: How to understand what uniquely African contribution speculative fiction created by African authors makes is a vexed question. Drawing on concepts of the geopolitics of knowledge and locus of enunciation, from the South American tradition of decolonial theory, I argue that the term "Indigenous" must be retained to specify works that speak from epistemic locations within Indigenous African cultures. Such fiction does important remembering work by recovering, renewing, and extending Indigenous knowledge traditions and so claiming the right to imagine futures in Indigenous terms. This remembering is obscured if such fiction is examined in terms such as Afrofuturism, which primarily focuses on race, or Africanfuturism, which focuses on geographical location. Indigenous remembering works from a specific Indigenous locus of enunciation and uses this episteme to explain the present and imagine the future. Such remembering must be distinguished from works that reduce Indigenous knowledge and knowers to tokens of their culture, as the "Other" to Eurocentric knowledge and its claim of universality. I illustrate this distinction by discussing two stories, "The writing in the stars" by Jonathan Dotse and "Herbert wants to return home" by Masima Musodza, showing how Musodza's story is told from within a specific Indigenous framework, the Shona conception of personhood known in Shona as hunhu, whereas Dotse's tale speaks about Malian astrophysics but from outside it. It is this distinction, a vital colonial difference, that the term Indigenous African speculative fiction aims to capture.
       
  • The Promise

    • Abstract: How to understand what uniquely African contribution speculative fiction created by African authors makes is a vexed question. Drawing on concepts of the geopolitics of knowledge and locus of enunciation, from the South American tradition of decolonial theory, I argue that the term "Indigenous" must be retained to specify works that speak from epistemic locations within Indigenous African cultures. Such fiction does important remembering work by recovering, renewing, and extending Indigenous knowledge traditions and so claiming the right to imagine futures in Indigenous terms. This remembering is obscured if such fiction is examined in terms such as Afrofuturism, which primarily focuses on race, or Africanfuturism, which focuses on geographical location. Indigenous remembering works from a specific Indigenous locus of enunciation and uses this episteme to explain the present and imagine the future. Such remembering must be distinguished from works that reduce Indigenous knowledge and knowers to tokens of their culture, as the "Other" to Eurocentric knowledge and its claim of universality. I illustrate this distinction by discussing two stories, "The writing in the stars" by Jonathan Dotse and "Herbert wants to return home" by Masima Musodza, showing how Musodza's story is told from within a specific Indigenous framework, the Shona conception of personhood known in Shona as hunhu, whereas Dotse's tale speaks about Malian astrophysics but from outside it. It is this distinction, a vital colonial difference, that the term Indigenous African speculative fiction aims to capture.
       
  • Transnational unlaagering

    •  
  • In-between spaces in Klara du Plessis's Ekke: Identity, language
           and art

    • Abstract: In this review article, we focus on the depiction of the transnational and translingual as a state of being in-between in Klara du Plessis's debut poetry collection, Ekke (2018). This in-between state has implications for how identity, place and visual art feature in the collection. Ekke contains fragments of German and French, but consists mainly of English interspersed with Afrikaans. The creation of meaning through this linguistic slippage reflects the idea of identity as always in-process that comes to the fore throughout the collection. Ekke also represents an intervention in South African urban literature, as Bloemfontein, a city not much featured in literature, is represented in several poems. In these poems, the poet-speaker struggles to situate Bloemfontein and its surrounding areas' histories and symbolism in the transnational networks that she is a part of. The conception of identity and language being constantly in-progress is also conveyed in the collection's poems about visual art. In these poems, meaning is created through the interaction of language with visual art, a process the poet calls 'intervisuality'.
       
  • Plaasfeminism in Ronelda S. Kamfer's Kompoun (2021)

    • Abstract: This review article explores how Ronelda S. Kamfer's novel Kompoun (2021) deconstructs and diversifies the white patriarchal space of the plaas (farm) by reinscribing it with a highly situated 'plaasfeminism' emerging from the female characters in the novel. This critical reinscription through the lives of the McKinney women from the Overberg is necessary, but certainly not triumphant. For Nadia, the protagonist, the idyll of the plaas consists of her admiration of and longing for her maternal forebears and thus provides a source of strength and personhood, but the plaas is also quite literally the scene of a crime from which her family fails to protect her. Kompoun complicates mainstream notions of feminist resistance by charting the internal contradictions of female subjectivity and highlighting the vulnerable position of the McKinney children, who grow up in a community where both adult men and women pose a threat of emotional and physical abandonment and abuse. Yet, in times of need, Nadia manages to mobilise her personal image of the plaas's beauty as motherly and the women who live there as tough as coping strategies that suspend her imprisonment in the harmful dynamics around her.
       
  • Die soeke na 'n onbegrensdheid van verbeelding: 'n Onderhoud met Alfred
           Schaffer

    • Abstract: This review article explores how Ronelda S. Kamfer's novel Kompoun (2021) deconstructs and diversifies the white patriarchal space of the plaas (farm) by reinscribing it with a highly situated 'plaasfeminism' emerging from the female characters in the novel. This critical reinscription through the lives of the McKinney women from the Overberg is necessary, but certainly not triumphant. For Nadia, the protagonist, the idyll of the plaas consists of her admiration of and longing for her maternal forebears and thus provides a source of strength and personhood, but the plaas is also quite literally the scene of a crime from which her family fails to protect her. Kompoun complicates mainstream notions of feminist resistance by charting the internal contradictions of female subjectivity and highlighting the vulnerable position of the McKinney children, who grow up in a community where both adult men and women pose a threat of emotional and physical abandonment and abuse. Yet, in times of need, Nadia manages to mobilise her personal image of the plaas's beauty as motherly and the women who live there as tough as coping strategies that suspend her imprisonment in the harmful dynamics around her.
       
  • Alfred Schaffer, Shaka en die transnasionalisme

    • Abstract: In this article, I read the Dutch poet Alfred Schaffer's volume of poetry Mens dier ding (Man animal thing) against the background of transnationalism. I employ transnationalism as critical or hermeneutic perspective and focus on the identity of the author, the themes worked out in the volume and the use of anachronism and metapoetical references as literary strategies in support of the transnational nature of the text. Reference is made to the way in which Schaffer's biography (his Dutch-Aruban descent, his movement between the Netherlands and South Africa, his views on poetry) facilitates a transnational reading of his volume Mens dier ding based on the history of the Zulu king Shaka as depicted in Thomas Mofolo's novel Chaka (published in 1925). The article also reads Mens dier ding against the background of the idea that transnational literature is a particular kind of literature that emerges at a specific point in history and deals with issues and themes associated with imperialism, colonisation, decolonisation and globalisation such as migration, displacement, cultural hybridity, identity, citizenship and the status of refugees. This reading is prompted by the fact that Schaffer displaces the historical Shaka to the present and eventually also represents him as an asylum seeker in an unnamed country. I discuss the volume's formal features, the transnational conversation with Mofolo's novel, the use of anachronism and the insertion of metapoetical elements in the text as literary strategies to deal with transnational issues such as migration, displacement, racial hierarchies, inequality and refugee experience.
       
  • &rft.title=Tydskrif+vir+Letterkunde&rft.issn=0041-476X&rft.date=&rft.volume=">The Alps, anime and Afrikaans: "Heidi" as transnational text and
           culture product

    • Abstract: The name "Heidi" is known and loved all over the world, due to Swiss author, Johanna Spyri's works, Heidis Lehr- und Wanderjahre (1880) and Heidi kann brauchen, was es gelernt hat (1881), which form part of the classic international children's literature canon. These stories have since crossed national boarders, by manifesting transnationally in several culture products. The focus of this article lies on the transnational traffic between the original Heidi (1881) and its adaptations. Because "Heidi" as a cultural phenomenon contains universal themes, the product was able to spread globally. This journey stretches from the Swiss Alps, to Japan and finally finds a home in South Africa and Afrikaans. Included in the article is an overview of how the Heidi text manifested in several cultures and its transnational movement, spanning time and place. The popularity of the animation series in South Africa among Afrikaans speaking people is analysed, along with suggestions for possible reasons for this big following and prevalence . The central argument of the article is that "Heidi" as cultural product has had a transnational journey from the Alps, to anime and Afrikaans.
       
  • The construction of split whiteness in the queer films Kanarie (2018) and
           Moffie (2019)

    • Abstract: After the end of formal apartheid, a number of South African feature films have explored queer white men in conservative social settings, with a particular focus on Afrikaans-speaking gay men. These films have reflected strict heteropatriarchal values within white Afrikaner culture where homosexuality is still often seen as a taboo topic. In this article I discuss two feature films with gay white male protagonists, Kanarie (2018) by Christiaan Olwagen and Moffie (2019) by Oliver Hermanus. These films both feature young men conscripted to fight in the South African Border War in the 1980s, but differ greatly in terms of genre, plot, and style. I argue that, while many scholars discuss whiteness as a general construct that affords privilege, the films demonstrate a split whiteness that is effected through the composition of particular shots and scenes as well as through the films' processes of production and reception. Whiteness is split into an invisibilised, assumedly critical perspective on the one hand, with transnational links to the Global North, and a hypervisibilised, reified, and criticised racial identity on the other hand, located specifically in the heteropatriarchal Afrikaner male. Queer characters in both films are able to split their identities and dissociate from uncomfortable parts of their whiteness, taking on an assumed criticality that highlights their own oppression and exclusion. The films thus dismiss the protagonists' complicity in white supremacy, and allow audiences to dissociate from their own complicity in anti-black violence and oppression.
       
  • grond/Santekraam and bientang: Situated in global black oceanic routes

    • Abstract: The Afrikaans poetry collections grond/Santekraam (2011) by Ronelda S. Kamfer and bientang (2020) by Jolyn Phillips both centralise the ocean and both deal with attempts at recovering repressed black histories. Apart from figuring as a source of spiritual fulfilment and connected to figures in the collection's livelihoods, the ocean is represented in these collections as the bringer of European colonisers and of slaves to South Africa. In this article I contend that references to slavery and colonialism and the use of words in languages brought to South Africa through slave networks position these collections as products of the transnational Black Atlantic tradition, as theorised by Paul Gilroy. The fact that the narratives of both collections take place in the Overstrand region, near the meeting place of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, gives an indication of how Gilroy's theory needs to be adapted to be applicable to Afrikaans literature: as many English-language South African theorists have argued, oceanic literary studies in South Africa should pay as much attention to routes in the Indian Ocean as to Atlantic routes. The emphasis in both collections on not only a history of slavery, but also one of the displacement of and violence against the people already inhabiting the area when colonisers alighted, further serves to indicate what an Afrikaans black aquatic literature looks like. When taking into account these differences between Afrikaans and other versions of black aquatic art, reading grond/Santekraam and bientang as part of a global black aesthetics allows the researcher to identify the ways in which these collections are characterised by a hermeneutics of suspicion (an interpretation of contemporary life that recognises the ways in which it is structured and functions in anti-black ways) and a hermeneutics of memory (an interpretation of this anti-black contemporary as a continuation of the history of the dehumanisation of black people).
       
  • The Garment Workers' Union Pageant of Unity (1940) as manifestation of
           transnational working-class culture

    • Abstract: In this article, I examine the Garment Workers' Union's theatre as a manifestation of transnational working-class culture in the 1940s. Analysing Pageant of Unity (1940), a play in which Afrikaans and English alternate to express the equality of Afrikaans- and English-speaking workers in the face of exploitation, I offer an attempt to escape the confines of a national literature as linked to a single language. I demonstrate how the political pageant-a genre typical of socialist propaganda and international trade unionism-was adapted to a South African context. This drama is, therefore, viewed as a product of cultural mobility between Europe, the United States, and South Africa. Assuming the 'follow the actor' approach of Bruno Latour's Actor-Network Theory, I identify a network of interconnections between the nodes formed by human (drama practitioners and theoreticians, socialist organisers) and nonhuman actors (texts representing socialist drama conventions, in particular agitprop techniques). Tracing the inspirations and adaptations of conventions, I argue that Pageant of Unity most evidently realises the prescriptions outlined by the Russian drama theoretician Vsevolod Meyerhold whose approach influenced Guy Routh, one of the pageant's creators. Thus, I focus on how this propaganda production utilises certain features of the Soviet avant-garde theatre, which testifies to the transnational character of South African working-class culture.
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.238.98.39
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-