Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8196 journals)
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EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (121 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 124 of 124 Journals sorted alphabetically
AACN Advanced Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Academic Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 90)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acute and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Acute Cardiac Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Acute Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Neonatal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
AINS - Anasthesiologie - Intensivmedizin - Notfallmedizin - Schmerztherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Annals of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 122)
Annals of Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Annals of the American Thoracic Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Archives of Academic Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Australian Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Bangladesh Critical Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Burns Open     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Respiratory, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Acute Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Case Reports in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Chronic Wound Care Management and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Clinical Intensive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 74)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Critical Care Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Critical Care Explorations     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Critical Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 267)
Critical Care Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Current Emergency and Hospital Medicine Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current Opinion in Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Egyptian Journal of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
EMC - Urgenze     Full-text available via subscription  
Emergency Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Emergency Medicine (Medicina neotložnyh sostoânij)     Open Access  
Emergency Medicine Australasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Emergency Medicine International     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Emergency Medicine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Emergency Medicine News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Emergency Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Enfermería Intensiva (English ed.)     Full-text available via subscription  
European Burn Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Frontiers in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Global Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Indian Journal of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Intensive Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Intensive Care Medicine Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intensivmedizin up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Paramedic Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Iranian Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access  
Irish Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal Européen des Urgences et de Réanimation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Acute Care Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Cardiac Critical Care TSS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal Of Cardiovascular Emergencies     Open Access  
Journal of Concussion     Open Access  
Journal of Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Journal of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Education and Teaching in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Emergency Medical Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Emergency Medicine, Trauma and Acute Care     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Emergency Practice and Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Intensive Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Intensive Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Stroke Medicine     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Intensive Care Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Journal of Translational Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
La Presse Médicale Open     Open Access  
Médecine de Catastrophe - Urgences Collectives     Hybrid Journal  
Medicina Intensiva     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medicina Intensiva (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Mediterranean Journal of Emergency Medicine & Acute Care : MedJEM     Open Access  
Notfall + Rettungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
OA Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
OA Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Access Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Open Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Palliative Care : Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Prehospital Emergency Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Research and Opinion in Anesthesia and Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Resuscitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Resuscitation Plus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Saudi Critical Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Shock : Injury, Inflammation, and Sepsis : Laboratory and Clinical Approaches     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Sklifosovsky Journal Emergency Medical Care     Open Access  
The Journal of Trauma Injury Infection and Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transplant Research and Risk Management     Open Access  
Trauma Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Visual Journal of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Western Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
 AEM Education and Training : A Global Journal of Emergency Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Advances in Neonatal Care
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.438
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 43  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1536-0903 - ISSN (Online) 1536-0911
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [297 journals]
  • Nurse Authorship in Advances in Neonatal Care

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      Authors: McGrath; Jacqueline M.; Brandon, Debra
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Join Us Live or Virtually for NANN's 38th Annual Conference

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      Authors: Cardinale; Olivia
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Using a Plastic Drape to Reduce Hypothermia in Premature Neonates During
           Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Placement

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      Authors: Phan; Huong (Kelle T.; McIntyre, Teresa M.
      Abstract: imageBackground: Premature neonates require assisted heating devices for thermoregulation in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Traditional use of a cloth blanket and cloth towels during peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) placement may hinder heat transfer from the assisted heating mechanisms, increasing the risk for neonatal hypothermia.Purpose: This quality improvement project's goal was to reduce the hypothermia rate in very low birth-weight (VLBW) neonates by replacing cloth blanket/towels with a plastic drape during PICC placement.Methods: The FOCUS-PDSA method was used to implement the intervention (plastic drape) over 3 months, during 58 PICC procedures in a level 3 NICU. A pre-/posttest design was used to evaluate the impact of the intervention on hypothermia rates compared with a baseline cloth group and a concurrent cloth cohort.Results: After the 3-month implementation period, the hypothermia rate for the intervention group was lower than that for the baseline cloth group (5.2% and 11.3%, respectively), but this difference was not statistically significant. Post-PICC hypothermia rates were significantly lower for the intervention group than for the concurrent cloth cohort (P = .004).Implications for Practice: Preliminary evidence demonstrated the plastic drape reduced the hypothermia rate in the NICU for VLBW neonates during PICC placement compared with cloth blanket/towels. A plastic drape shows promise in improving nursing practice by providing improved thermoregulation for premature neonates during PICC placement.Implications for Research: Further research is recommended to replicate findings with larger samples of PICC insertions, using a plastic drape in the operating room and other NICU procedures.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • A Quality Improvement Initiative to Provide Timely Central Vascular Access
           in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

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      Authors: Kristoff; Kimberly; Wang, Rui; Munson, David; Dysart, Kevin; Stracuzzi, Lauren; Wade, Kelcey; Birnbaum, Shira
      Abstract: imageBackground: Timely central venous access is essential in the care of critically ill neonates. Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are the preferred form of central venous access when umbilical venous catheters cannot be placed or are discontinued. However, time delays increase risk for injury from peripheral intravenous lines and may contribute to inconsistent delivery of necessary fluids and medications.Purpose: The aim of this quality improvement project was to decrease wait times for PICC placement in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).Methods: A unit-based PICC team was developed consisting of NICU nurses and attending neonatologists and implemented in 2 phases. Data were collected from chart reviews before, during, and after implementation of the team. We tracked time between PICC order and placement and number of attempts. Hospital metrics on peripheral intravenous line infiltrations and central line–associated blood stream infection were also monitored. At the end of the project, we continued tracking outcomes to determine whether gains would be sustained past the project period.Results: Implementation of a unit-based interdisciplinary specialty team led to a 50% reduction in mean PICC wait times from 1.2 days to 0.58 days. Benefits of the initiative were sustained past the initial project period.Implications for Practice: The development of a dedicated, local team played a key role in improving vascular access in the NICU.Implications for Research: Proximity of specialized teams provides a solution to address gaps in care in the NICU.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Multifocal Mesenchymal Hamartoma of the Newborn: A Case Study

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      Authors: Fregeolle; Angela
      Abstract: imageBackground: A mesenchymal hamartoma is a rare benign tumor of the chest wall seen prenatally or at birth. Typically arising from one or more ribs, this tumor will have a rapid growth between weeks 28 and 36 of gestation, followed by a plateau and a spontaneous regression, usually within the first year of life.Clinical Findings: A 37-week 2-day, 3.48-kg female infant was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit with a prenatally diagnosed left chest mass with a large pleural effusion and respiratory failure.Primary Diagnosis: The infant was referred to our institution with multiple chest masses on the left side, resulting in the thorax's marked deformity. Imaging studies confirmed the presence of a multifocal mesenchymal hamartoma.Interventions: At laparotomy, 3 mesenchymal hamartomas were found. The lateral mass, encompassing ribs 5 and 6, resulted in an en bloc resection. The ribs cephalad and caudal were bowed and displaced but not involved in the mesenchymal hamartoma. Complete excision of the lateral mass was done, and histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of mesenchymal hamartoma.Outcomes: After resection of the largest mass, the left lung reinflated appropriately, and within a few weeks, the infant was discharged home without supplemental oxygen support.Practice Recommendations: Symptomatic patients with cardiorespiratory compromise are best treated with surgical resection. In asymptomatic patients, it is best to proceed with serial imaging and conservative management with watchful waiting. Due to the rarity of the condition, data on long-term follow-up and outcomes are needed.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Neonatal Care Provider Tasks in the NICU and Delivery Room

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      Authors: Smith; Misty; Bosque, Elena
      Abstract: imageBackground: Decreased availability of pediatric residents in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) has created demand for other neonatal medical care providers. No recent publications exist about how to approach the organization of tasks involved in that care.Purpose: The purpose of this article is to present a structure and resources to guide the organization of tasks in the care of sick and premature infants in the NICU.Methods: The methods included a literature review to develop evidenced-based practice resources. The literature was reviewed regarding the relevant history and resources to support task organization during patient rounds and care in the NICU, and for delivery attendance by skilled providers. The goal, to establish a reference to support education about these approaches, is based upon evidence, which appears to be rooted in tradition.Findings: Evidence-based resources include documentation templates, problem list in order of systems, and provider tasks for NICU and delivery attendance.Implication for Research: Future studies can measure mentor or learner perceptions of the value of these resources, critical thinking improvement, safety, and clinical outcomes.Implication for Practice: These resources may provide structure for learners and providers who have studied the physiology, pathophysiology, and problem management concepts, but need to learn how to execute their responsibilities in these busy environments.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • A Systematic Review of the Effects of Skin-to-Skin Contact on Biomarkers
           of Stress in Preterm Infants and Parents

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      Authors: Forde; Dorothy; Fang, Min Lin; Miaskowski, Christine
      Abstract: imageBackground: Premature infants and their parents experience significant stress related to separation and lifesaving procedures. While evidence suggests that skin-to-skin contact (SSC) is a stress-reducing intervention for both neonates and parents, the mechanisms that underlie its efficacy are not well understood.Objective: Purpose of this systematic review is to summarize the current state of knowledge on changes in biomarkers (ie, oxytocin [OT], cortisol, hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid, and allantoin), associated with SSC in premature infants and parents, that may reflect physiologic responses to stress.Methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted from 1990 to 2020. Studies were selected using prespecified inclusion and exclusion criteria.Results: Of the 175 studies identified, only 19 are included in this review. Ten studies evaluated only infants, 2 evaluated only parents, and 7 evaluated for changes in biomarkers in both infants and parents. Cortisol was the most common biomarker evaluated. While changes in infants' cortisol levels were highly variable, in 55% of the parent studies, parent cortisol levels decreased following SSC. In both parents and infants, OT levels decreased following SSC. Only 1 study found that allantoin levels were significantly lower in infants who received SSC.Implications for Practice and Research: While evidence suggests the numerous benefits of SSC, additional research is needed to identify the optimal biomarker to determine the mechanisms that underlie these effects. The use of novel biomarkers (eg, gene expression changes microbiome) may provide new insights into the mechanisms that underlie the efficacy of SSC.Video Abstract available at:https://journals.lww.com/advancesinneonatalcare/Pages/videogallery.aspx?autoPlay=false&videoId=48
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Pulse Oximetry Saturation (Spo2) Monitoring in the Neonatal Intensive Care
           Unit (NICU): The Challenge for Providers: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Falsaperla; Raffaele; Giacchi, Valentina; Saporito, Marco Andrea Nicola; Pavone, Piero; Puglisi, Federica; Ruggieri, Martino
      Abstract: imageBackground: In the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), maintaining an oxygenation level that avoids both hypoxemia and hyperoxemia is challenging. Pulse oximetry has become fundamental for noninvasive monitoring of saturation of peripheral oxygen (Spo2) in preterm newborns.Purpose: The aim of this systematic review is to determine Spo2 target values in order to avoid hypoxemia or hyperoxemia and complications arising from these.Method and Search Strategy: For this systematic review, articles were audited from 2010 to 2020 using the PRISMA guidelines. PubMed, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases were used, and search terms were related to use of pulse oximetry in the NICU.Results: The result showed that 12 of 20 (60%) studies focused on target values but without a unanimous agreement on values, although 5 of 12 studies (41.66%) suggested a lower value target of 85% and 4 of 12 studies (33.33%) recommended 95% as the higher target value. Other authors showed no difference in the incidence of adverse events comparing different target values and focused the importance more on the fluctuation of the value than on the target value itself.Implication for Practice: Reaching a balance in the oxygen administration so as to avoid potential complications associated with hypoxemia or hyperoxemia is a challenge for the clinicians.Implication for Research: Further studies on fluctuation of Spo2 comparing different starting targets could better clarify the role of fluctuations and the absolute target values.Video Abstract available at:https://journals.na.lww.com/advancesinneonatalcare/Pages/videogallery.aspx?autoPlay=false&videoId=49
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Elucidating the Relationship Between Maternal Diabetes and Neonatal
           Abstinence Syndrome: A 2017-2018 Project WATCH Study in Rural Appalachia

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      Authors: Jennings; Arin; John, Collin; Lilly, Christa; Hamilton, Candice; Umer, Amna
      Abstract: imageBackground: Previous research indicated that diabetes during pregnancy results in a more permeable placenta. Based on this data, we hypothesized that women with maternal diabetes were more likely to have infants who developed neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS).Purpose: The purpose of the study was to examine the association between maternal diabetes and NAS in a cohort of women reporting substance use during pregnancy.Methods: This study used data from a population-based cohort of all newborns born in 2017 and 2018 (N = 36,974) in the state of West Virginia and restricted the analysis to those infants with intrauterine substance exposure (14%, n = 5188). Multiple logistic regression was performed to analyze the adjusted relationship between maternal diabetes and NAS while controlling for maternal and infant covariates.Results: Just over 28% of women with diabetes had an infant who developed NAS, whereas 34.8% of women without diabetes had an infant who developed NAS. The adjusted odds ratio of infants developing NAS born to women with diabetes was 0.70 (95% confidence interval: 0.51, 0.94) compared with those born to mothers without diabetes after controlling for covariates. Contrary to our hypothesis, the study suggests that maternal diabetes during pregnancy is associated with a decreased risk of an infant developing NAS.Implications for Practice: Future research generating from this hypothesis may lead to potential implications for practice for infants born to mothers with substance use during pregnancy and diabetes.Implications for Research: More research should be conducted to investigate the relationship between glucose metabolism and NAS.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Evaluation of the Premature Infant Pain Profile-Revised (PIPP-R)
           e-Learning Module: Immediate and Sustained Competency

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      Authors: Campbell-Yeo; Marsha; Carrier, Leah; Benoit, Britney; Kim, Theresa; Bueno, Mariana; Rao, Megha; Riahi, Shirine; Stevens, Bonnie
      Abstract: imageBackground Electronic health (e-health) learning is a potential avenue to educate health professionals about accurately using infant pain assessment tools, although little is known about the impact of e-health interventions on clinical competence.Purpose: To evaluate whether an e-health learning module for teaching the accurate use of the Premature Infant Pain Profile-Revised (PIPP-R) pain assessment tool results in immediate and sustained competency to assess infant pain.Methods: Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses who participated in a larger study across 2 tertiary NICUs in Canada examining the implementation and clinical utility of the PIPP-R e-learning module completed 2 follow-up evaluations at 1 week and 3 months. Participants were asked to view a video recording of an infant undergoing a painful procedure and to assess the infant's pain intensity response using the PIPP-R measure. Immediate and sustained competency was assessed via interrater consensus of participant-reported PIPP-R scores compared with those of an experienced trained coder.Results: Of the 25 eligible nurses, 22 completed 1-week and 3-month follow-up evaluations. At the 1-week follow-up, 84% of nurses scored the video accurately compared with 50% at 3 months. Behavioral pain indicators were more likely to be scored incorrectly than physiological indicators.Implications for Practice: Follow-up training after completion of the initial e-learning module training may improve competency related to the clinical use of the PIPP-R tool to assess infant pain over time.Implications for Research: Additional study regarding the need and timing of e-health training to optimize sustained competency in infant pain assessment is warranted.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Milk Volume Outcomes in Pump-Dependent Mothers of Critically Ill Infants

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      Authors: Bendixen; Marion M.; Weaver, Michael T.; Parker, Leslie A.
      Abstract: imageIntroduction: Mother's own milk improves health outcomes in infants of all gestational ages. Although pump-dependent mothers of extremely premature infants are at risk of insufficient milk production, whether mother's milk production is impacted by gestational age and pump dependency in mothers of more mature critically ill infants is unknown.Purpose: To determine whether there is a relationship between gestational age, milk production, and time to secretory activation in mothers delivering a critically ill infant.Methods: A convenience sample of 136 pump-dependent mothers whose infants were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit was enrolled between 2013 and 2016 as part of a quality improvement project. Group 1 (early preterm) delivered infants at 30 to 33 weeks of gestation (n = 41), group 2 (late preterm) 34 to 36 weeks (n = 48), and group 3 (term) 37 weeks and more (n = 47). Milk volume on days 1 to 7 was measured by weighing each vial of expressed milk and compared using general linear mixed-model analysis. Time to the onset of secretory activation was compared using censored regression analysis.Results: Main effect for gestational age controlling for day was statistically significant (P = .0234). The early preterm group produced more milk over the 7-day study than the term (P = .01) and late preterm (P = .02) groups. The early preterm group achieved secretory activation earlier than the late preterm group (adjusted P = .039).Implications for Practice: Pump-dependent mothers of all infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit may be at risk of inadequate milk production and delayed secretory activation and may therefore benefit from early milk production monitoring and lactation support.Implications for Research: Further studies should examine targeted interventions to increase milk production in pump-dependent mothers.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Barriers to Kangaroo Care in the NICU: A Qualitative Study Analyzing
           Parent Survey Responses

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      Authors: Saltzmann; April M.; Sigurdson, Krista; Scala, Melissa
      Abstract: imageBackground: Despite its benefits, parents in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) face significant barriers to kangaroo care (KC). Clinician-reported barriers to KC include staff education, environment, and equipment among others; however, parent-perceived barriers are underexplored.Purpose: To examine parental understanding of KC, parental perception of experiences with KC, and parental views on the key factors that help or hinder KC.Methods: This is an observational, mixed-methods study that used an author-developed survey to assess parental feelings, perceived importance, and barriers to KC. Likert scale responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Free-text responses were analyzed using thematic analysis. A comparison of results was made between parents receiving and not receiving infant mental health services.Results: Fifty (N = 50) parents completed surveys. Eighty percent of parents stated they wanted more information on KC. Common barriers to KC were reported by parents, such as issues with space/environment. The most frequently reported barrier when asked openly was fear of hurting their infant. Ninety-six percent of parents believed that KC helped their emotional well-being. Parents receiving mental health services reported more fear but results did not reach significance.Implications for Practice and Research: The frequency with which factors are reported as important to parents may allow a prioritization of barriers to KC, which may help focus quality improvement initiatives. The results of this study underscore the vital role nurses play in supporting KC. Additional attention needs to be given to the mental health of NICU parents and its impact on care practices.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Cyanoacrylate Securement in Neonatal PICC Use: A 4-Year Observational
           Study

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      Authors: van Rens; Matheus; Nimeri, Abdelghafar M. A.; Spencer, Timothy R.; Hugill, Kevin; Francia, Airene L. V.; Olukade, Tawa Olayemi; Mahmah, Mohamad Adnan
      Abstract: imageBackground: Within every neonatal clinical setting, vascular access devices are considered essential for administration of fluids, nutrition, and medications. However, use of vascular access devices is not without danger of failure. Catheter securement adhesives are being evaluated among adult populations, but to date, studies in neonatal settings are scant.Purpose: This research describes the prevalence of peripherally inserted central catheter failure related to catheter securement before and after the introduction of tissue adhesive for catheter securement. The identified modifiable risks might be used to evaluate efficacy, to innovate neonatal practice and support future policy developments.Method and Setting: This was a retrospective observational analysis of routinely collected anonymized intravenous therapy-related data. The study was carried out at the tertiary neonatal intensive care unit (112 beds) of the Women's Wellness and Research Center of Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.Results: The results showed that the use of an approved medical grade adhesive for catheter securement resulted in significantly less therapy failures, compared with the control group. This remains significant after adjusting for day of insertion, gestational age, birth weight, and catheter type.Implications for Practice and Research: In parallel with currently published international literature, this study's findings support catheter securement with an octyl-based tissue adhesive in use with central venous catheters. When device stabilization is most pertinent, securement with tissue adhesive is a safe and effective method for long-term vascular access among the neonatal population.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • NCPD Test for Evaluation of the Premature Infant Pain Profile-Revised
           (PIPP-R) e-Learning Module: Immediate and Sustained Competency

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • NANN Research Summit 2022

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      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Secondary Traumatic Stress and Vigor Among Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
           Personnel: The Moderator Role of Coping Flexibility

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      Authors: Nissanholtz Gannot; Rachel; Hamama Raz, Yaira; Stein, Iris; Hochwald, Ori
      Abstract: imageBackground: The demanding and highly stressful work environment of the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has led to the identification of a possible psychological stress reaction among NICU nurses and physicians, termed secondary traumatic stress (STS).Purpose: The current study aimed to explore the association between vigor at work (as an energy resource) and STS, while considering their association with the professional role (nurses/physicians—as a condition resource) as well as with coping flexibility (as a personal resource).Methods: In this cross-sectional study physicians and nurses working in NICUs across Israel completed a questionnaire comprising sections on demographics and professional characteristics, self-rated health, STS, coping flexibility, and vigor.Results: Of 280 physicians and nurses approached, 70% (195) completed the questionnaire. No significant differences between nurses and physicians were found in STS adjusted for gender, being in a committed relationship, and seniority in the NICU. Vigor was negatively correlated with STS—both in the entire sample and for each professional role alone. Coping flexibility was a statistically significant moderator between vigor and STS, whereas the interaction between vigor and professional role was not significant. Specifically, the negative relationship between vigor and STS was significant when coping flexibility was more than 10.10 (61% of the participants) but not significant at lower values.Implications for Practice and Research: The understanding of the relationship between vigor and STS, with coping flexibility as its moderator, encourages an intervention aimed at reducing stress by increasing these resources.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • The Needs of NICU Fathers in Their Own Words: A Qualitative Descriptive
           Study

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      Authors: Merritt; Linda; Maxwell, Jazmine; Urbanosky, Cameryn
      Abstract: imageBackground: Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses need a better understanding of fathers' needs and perceptions in order to provide more family holistic care. Previous research aimed at exploring fathers' experiences in the NICU resulted in identifying some needs; however, these studies mostly occurred outside the United States where practices may differ. Therefore, research is needed to explore NICU fathers' needs within the United States.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the needs of fathers who previously had a premature infant in the NICU.Methods: This qualitative descriptive study used semistructured interviews collected to obtain in-depth knowl-edge of fathers' needs in the NICU. Twenty-eight fathers were recruited through 3 parent support organizations: Hand to Hold, NICU Parent Support Network, and March of Dimes.Results: Results revealed 3 themes: need for support, clarity and to be recognized.Implications for Practice: Fathers have specific needs in the NICU that need to be addressed and that may differ from mothers. Awareness of addressing fathers' needs promotes more holistic care to fathers, supports coping within the NICU environment and the multifaceted impact of the experience, and helps them engage in the care of their infant.Implications for Research: Further research is needed to explore the needs of fathers from diverse backgrounds and those who perceive to be or are less involved in their infant's care as well as their experiences and needs related to the recent COVID-19 pandemic. Comparative research is also needed to identify differences between mothers' and fathers' needs in order to determine interventions that promoting more holistic, family-centered care.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Screening for Postpartum Depression in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

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      Authors: Brownlee; Maggie Hughes
      Abstract: imageBackground: Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common mental health condition that affects approximately 13% of postpartum women in the United States. However, the prevalence in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has been shown to be higher. Routine screening for maternal PPD is recommended at infant primary care well-child visits up to 6 months of age. The absence of a routine PPD screening program in a level IV NICU created a large gap in screening in an at-risk population.Purpose: To develop and implement a screening program in the NICU to increase the identification of maternal PPD symptoms and to develop both a referral algorithm for NICU staff to follow and a referral resource packet to be given to mothers with positive PPD screenings.Methods: Mothers with infants in the NICU were screened for PPD using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Bedside nurses administered the screening tool and used a referral algorithm to determine appropriate follow-up. EPDS scores of 10 or more were considered positive and indicated a need for referral.Results: The overall EPDS screening compliance was 66% with a positive rate of 26%. Nurses followed the referral algorithm appropriately 100% of the time. It was confirmed that 93% of the mothers with positive EPDS screenings sought help from a mental health provider.Implications for Practice and Research: Routine maternal PPD screening should be implemented in all NICU settings. Postpartum mental health issues should not be the sole responsibility of obstetricians, mental health providers, or maternal primary care providers.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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