Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8196 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (205 journals)
    - ANAESTHESIOLOGY (105 journals)
    - CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (334 journals)
    - CHIROPRACTIC, HOMEOPATHY, OSTEOPATHY (19 journals)
    - COMMUNICABLE DISEASES, EPIDEMIOLOGY (227 journals)
    - DENTISTRY (266 journals)
    - DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY (162 journals)
    - EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (121 journals)
    - ENDOCRINOLOGY (149 journals)
    - FORENSIC SCIENCES (43 journals)
    - GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (178 journals)
    - GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (125 journals)
    - HEMATOLOGY (160 journals)
    - HYPNOSIS (4 journals)
    - INTERNAL MEDICINE (177 journals)
    - LABORATORY AND EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE (90 journals)
    - MEDICAL GENETICS (58 journals)
    - MEDICAL SCIENCES (2241 journals)
    - NURSES AND NURSING (331 journals)
    - OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (199 journals)
    - ONCOLOGY (355 journals)
    - OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OPTOMETRY (135 journals)
    - ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (150 journals)
    - OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY (76 journals)
    - PATHOLOGY (96 journals)
    - PEDIATRICS (254 journals)
    - PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION (153 journals)
    - PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGY (800 journals)
    - RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE (182 journals)
    - RESPIRATORY DISEASES (109 journals)
    - RHEUMATOLOGY (76 journals)
    - SPORTS MEDICINE (77 journals)
    - SURGERY (388 journals)
    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (151 journals)

EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (121 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 124 of 124 Journals sorted alphabetically
AACN Advanced Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Academic Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 90)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acute and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Acute Cardiac Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Acute Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Neonatal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
AINS - Anasthesiologie - Intensivmedizin - Notfallmedizin - Schmerztherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Annals of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 126)
Annals of Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Annals of the American Thoracic Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Archives of Academic Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Australian Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Bangladesh Critical Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Burns Open     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Respiratory, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Acute Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Case Reports in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Chronic Wound Care Management and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Clinical Intensive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 74)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Critical Care Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Critical Care Explorations     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Critical Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 279)
Critical Care Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Current Emergency and Hospital Medicine Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current Opinion in Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Egyptian Journal of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
EMC - Urgenze     Full-text available via subscription  
Emergency Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Emergency Medicine (Medicina neotložnyh sostoânij)     Open Access  
Emergency Medicine Australasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Emergency Medicine International     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Emergency Medicine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Emergency Medicine News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Emergency Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Enfermería Intensiva (English ed.)     Full-text available via subscription  
European Burn Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
European Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Frontiers in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Global Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Indian Journal of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Intensive Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Intensive Care Medicine Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intensivmedizin up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Paramedic Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Iranian Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access  
Irish Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal Européen des Urgences et de Réanimation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Acute Care Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Cardiac Critical Care TSS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal Of Cardiovascular Emergencies     Open Access  
Journal of Concussion     Open Access  
Journal of Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Education and Teaching in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Emergency Medical Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Emergency Medicine, Trauma and Acute Care     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Emergency Practice and Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Intensive Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Intensive Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Stroke Medicine     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Intensive Care Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Journal of Translational Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
La Presse Médicale Open     Open Access  
Médecine de Catastrophe - Urgences Collectives     Hybrid Journal  
Medicina Intensiva     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medicina Intensiva (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Mediterranean Journal of Emergency Medicine & Acute Care : MedJEM     Open Access  
Notfall + Rettungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
OA Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
OA Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Access Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Palliative Care : Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Prehospital Emergency Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Research and Opinion in Anesthesia and Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Resuscitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Resuscitation Plus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Saudi Critical Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Shock : Injury, Inflammation, and Sepsis : Laboratory and Clinical Approaches     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Sklifosovsky Journal Emergency Medical Care     Open Access  
The Journal of Trauma Injury Infection and Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transplant Research and Risk Management     Open Access  
Trauma Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Visual Journal of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Western Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
 AEM Education and Training : A Global Journal of Emergency Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Current Opinion in Critical Care
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.382
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 73  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1070-5295 - ISSN (Online) 1531-7072
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [297 journals]
  • Editorial introductions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Protein metabolism in critical illness

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chapple; Lee-anne S.; van Gassel, Rob J.J.; Rooyackers, Olav
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review Critically ill patients experience skeletal muscle wasting that may contribute to the profound functional deficits in those that survive the initial injury. Augmented protein delivery has the potential to attenuate muscle loss, yet the ability for dietary protein to improve patient outcomes is reliant on effective protein metabolism. This review will discuss the recent literature on protein delivery and digestion, amino acid absorption, and muscle protein synthesis (MPS) in critically ill adults.Recent findings Critically ill patients are prescribed protein doses similar to international recommendations, yet actual delivery remains inadequate. The majority of trials that have achieved higher protein doses have observed no effect on muscle mass, strength or function. Critically ill patients have been observed to have minimal deficits in protein digestion and amino acid absorption when delivery bypasses the stomach, yet postprandial MPS is impaired. However, the literature is limited due to the complexities in the direct measurement of protein handling.Summary Postprandial MPS is impaired in critically ill patients and may exacerbate muscle wasting experienced by these patients. Studies in critically ill patients require assessment not only of protein delivery, but also utilization prior to implementation of augmented protein doses.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Update on vitamin C administration in critical illness

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Fujii; Tomoko; Lankadeva, Yugeesh R.; Bellomo, Rinaldo
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review Several studies have recently explored the effects of intravenous vitamin C in sepsis. We aimed to summarize their findings to provide perspectives for future research.Recent findings Sepsis trials examined 6 g/day of intravenous vitamin C with or without the thiamine and/or hydrocortisone compared with placebo or hydrocortisone. Network meta-analysis reported that intravenous vitamin C, thiamine, hydrocortisone, or combinations of these drugs was not proven to reduce long-term mortality. However, the component network meta-analysis suggested an association of high-dose (>6 g/day) and very-high dose vitamin C (>12 g/day) and decreased mortality but with low certainty. The preclinical investigations have, however, advanced to much higher doses of intravenous vitamin C therapy since a scoping review on harm reported that mega-doses of intravenous vitamin C (50–100 g/day) had been administered without any conclusive adverse effects. In a Gram-negative sheep model, renal tissue hypoperfusion was reversed, followed by improvements in kidney function when a mega-dose of vitamin C (150 g/day equivalent) was administered.Summary The effect of intravenous vitamin C in critically ill patients has yet to be determined and might be dose-dependent. Clinical studies of very high or mega doses of vitamin C are justified by preclinical data.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Intermittent feeding and circadian rhythm in critical illness

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kouw; Imre W.K.; Heilbronn, Leonie K.; van Zanten, Arthur R.H.
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review Circadian rhythms, i.e., periodic oscillations in internal biological processes, modulate metabolic processes such as hormonal signalling, nutrient absorption, and xenobiotic detoxification. Meal timing is a strong entraining cue for peripheral clocks in various organs, and eating out of circadian phases can impair glucose, gastrointestinal, and muscle metabolism. Sleep/wake cycles and circadian rhythms are extremely disrupted during critical illness. Timing of nutritional support may help preserve circadian rhythms and improve post-Intensive Care Unit (ICU) recovery. This review summarises circadian disruptors during ICU admission and evaluates the potential benefits of intermittent feeding on metabolism and circadian rhythms.Recent findings Rhythmic expression of core clock genes becomes rapidly disturbed during critical illness and remains disturbed for weeks. Intermittent, bolus, and cyclic enteral feeding have been directly compared to routine continuous feeding, yet no benefits on glycaemic control, gastrointestinal tolerance, and muscle mass have been observed and impacts of circadian clocks remain untested.Summary Aligning timing of nutritional intake, physical activity, and/or medication with circadian rhythms are potential strategies to reset peripheral circadian rhythms and may enhance ICU recovery but is not proven beneficial yet. Therefore, selecting intermittent feeding over continuous feeding must be balanced against the pros and cons of clinical practice.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Update on glucose control during and after critical illness

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Deane; Adam M.; Plummer, Mark P.; Ali Abdelhamid, Yasmine
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review There is a complex bidirectional relationship between critical illness and disordered glucose metabolism. This review aims to provide a comprehensive summary of the recent evidence focused on the relationship between critical illness and disordered glucose metabolism through the distinct phases of prior to, during, and after an acute illness that requires admission to the intensive care unit (ICU).Recent findings Recent data suggest that preexisting glucose metabolism affects the optimal blood glucose target during critical illness, with preliminary data suggesting that glucose targets should be ‘personalized’ based on preexisting glycemia. Because of the close association between critical illness and disordered glucose metabolism, there is a need to optimize glucose monitoring in the ICU with rapid, precise, and cost-efficient measurements at the bedside. Recent studies have evaluated the use of various methodologies, with a focus on the use of near-continuous glucose monitoring. For those patients with preexisting diabetes who survive ICU, nocturnal hypoglycemia may be an unrecognized and important issue when discharged to the ward. There is increasing evidence that patients with high blood glucose during their acute illness, so called ‘stress hyperglycemia’, are at increased risk of developing diabetes in the years following recovery from the inciting event. Critically ill patients with COVID-19 appear at greater risk.Summary There have been important recent insights in the approach to glucose monitoring and glucose targets during critical illness, monitoring and administration of glucose-lowering drugs on discharge from the ICU, and longitudinal follow-up of patients with stress hyperglycemia.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Nutrition before, during and after critical illness

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ridley; Emma J.; Lambell, Kate
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review This review describes considerations preintensive care unit (ICU), within ICU and in the post-ICU period regarding nutrition management and the current state of the literature base informing clinical care.Recent findings Within ICU, studies have focussed on the first 5–7 days of illness in mechanically ventilated patients who are heterogeneous and with minimal consideration to premorbid nutrition state. Many evidence gaps in the period within ICU remain, with the major ones being the amount of protein to provide and the impact of longer-term nutrition interventions. Personalised nutrition and nutrition in the post-ICU period are becoming key areas of focus.Summary Nutrition for the critically ill patient should not be viewed in isolated time periods; what happens before, during and after ICU is likely important to the overall recovery trajectory. It is critical that the impact of nutrition on clinical and functional outcomes across hospitalisation is investigated in specific groups and using interventions in ways that are biologically plausible to impact. Areas that show promise for the future of critical care nutrition include interventions delivered for a longer duration and inclusion of oral nutrition support, individualised nutrition regimes, and use of emerging bedside body composition techniques to identify patients at nutritional risk.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Challenges and advances in nutrition for the critically ill child

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Albert; Ben D.; Martinez, Enid E.
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review Malnutrition remains prevalent in critically ill children and is associated with worse clinical outcomes. Conversely, nutrition provision has been associated with improved survival. Nutritional challenges must be addressed to guide best nutrition practices for the critically ill child. In this narrative review, we summarize findings from research published between July 2020 and January 2022 on nutrition in critically ill children. Findings from these articles build on previous work to guide next steps in both research and clinical practice in this cohort.Recent findings A comprehensive literature review was performed. We identified the following common themes for research published between July 2020 and January 2022-metabolism, enteral nutrition, including timing, dosing, protein prescription and delivery in special populations, gastrointestinal function, and enteral nutrition adjunctive therapies.Summary Research continues to support early initiation and advancement of enteral nutrition. Achieving nutritional adequacy is challenging, but research associated with the timing and dosing of enteral nutrition, alternative methods of enteral nutrition delivery and the use of adjuncts are expanding our understanding of best practices for this cohort. Areas for further research continue to be the use of measured energy requirements, protein dosing and inclusion of functional outcomes to assess the benefit of nutritional interventions.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Poor physical recovery after critical illness: incidence, features, risk
           factors, pathophysiology, and evidence-based therapies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Boelens; Yente Florine Niké; Melchers, Max; van Zanten, Arthur Raymond Hubert
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review To summarize the incidence, features, pathogenesis, risk factors, and evidence-based therapies of prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) acquired weakness (ICU-AW). We aim to provide an updated overview on aspects of poor physical recovery following critical illness.Recent findings New physical problems after ICU survival, such as muscle weakness, weakened condition, and reduced exercise capacity, are the most frequently encountered limitations of patients with postintensive care syndrome. Disabilities may persist for months to years and frequently do not fully recover. Hormonal and mitochondrial disturbances, impaired muscle regeneration due to injured satellite cells and epigenetic differences may be involved in sustained ICU-AW. Although demographics and ICU treatment factors appear essential determinants for physical recovery, pre-ICU health status is also crucial. Currently, no effective treatments are available. Early mobilization in the ICU may improve physical outcomes at ICU-discharge, but there is no evidence for benefit on long-term physical recovery.Summary Impaired physical recovery is observed frequently among ICU survivors. The pre-ICU health status, demographic, and ICU treatment factors appear to be important determinants for physical convalescence during the post-ICU phase. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved are poorly understood, thereby resulting in exiguous evidence-based treatment strategies to date.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Editorial: Idolatry in cardiogenic shock: are we coming to a state of
           emergence

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hibbert; Benjamin
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Inotrope and vasopressor use in cardiogenic shock: what, when and why'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hu; Kira; Mathew, Rebecca
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review Despite increasing interest in the management of cardiogenic shock (CS), mortality rates remain unacceptably high. The mainstay of supportive treatment includes vasopressors and inotropes. These medications are recommended in international guidelines and are widely used despite limited evidence supporting safety and efficacy in CS.Recent findings The OptimaCC trial further supports that norepinephrine should continue to be the first-line vasopressor of choice in CS. The CAPITAL DOREMI trial found that milrinone is not superior to dobutamine in reducing morbidity and mortality in CS. Two studies currently underway will offer the first evidence of the necessity of inotrope therapy in placebo-controlled trials: CAPITAL DOREMI2 will randomize CS patients to inotrope or placebo in the initial resuscitation of shock to evaluate the efficacy of inotrope therapy and LevoHeartShock will examine the efficacy of levosimendan against placebo in early CS requiring vasopressor therapy.Summary Review of the current literature fails to show significant mortality benefit with any specific vasopressor or inotropic in CS patients. The upcoming DOREMI 2 and levosimendan versus placebo trials will further tackle the question of inotrope necessity in CS. At this time, inotrope selection should be guided by physician experience, availability, cost, and most importantly, individual patients’ response to therapy.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Transcatheter edge-to-edge repair in patients with mitral regurgitation
           and cardiogenic shock: a new therapeutic target

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jung; Richard G.; Simard, Trevor; Di Santo, Pietro; Hibbert, Benjamin
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review Cardiogenic shock with significant mitral regurgitation portends a poor prognosis with limited therapeutic options. Herein, we review the available evidence regarding the patient characteristics, management, impact of transcatheter edge-to-edge repair (TEER) on hemodynamics, and clinical outcomes of patients with cardiogenic shock and mitral regurgitation.Recent findings Several observational studies and systematic reviews have demonstrated the feasibility and safety of TEER in cardiogenic shock complicated by degenerative or functional mitral regurgitation. Surgical interventions for mitral regurgitation remain limited owing to the risk profile of patients in cardiogenic shock. TEER has been studied in both degenerative and functional mitral regurgitation and remains feasible in the critically ill population. Moreover, TEER is associated with reduction in mitral regurgitation and improvement in-hospital and long-term mortality.Summary TEER remains a promising therapeutic option in cardiogenic shock complicated by significant mitral regurgitation, but additional research is required to identify patient and procedural characteristics, hemodynamic parameters, and the optimal time for intervention. Moreover, future randomized controlled trials are in progress to evaluate the potential benefit of TEER against medical management in cardiogenic shock and mitral regurgitation.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Mechanical circulatory support in the treatment of cardiogenic shock

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Fernando; Shannon M.; Price, Susanna; Mathew, Rebecca; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Combes, Alain; Brodie, Daniel
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review Cardiogenic shock is a condition that is characterized by end-organ hypoperfusion secondary to reduced cardiac output, and is associated with substantial mortality. The mainstay of therapy for cardiogenic shock is reversal of the underlying cause, and concomitant supportive care with vasoactive medications (vasopressors and inotropes). Patients who continue to deteriorate despite these measures may require mechanical circulatory support (MCS). Here, we review the devices available for MCS, and their associated benefits and risks.Recent findings Despite growing use worldwide, there is little randomized evidence supporting the routine use of any specific device for MCS in cardiogenic shock. A large randomized trial of the intra-aortic balloon pump did not demonstrate short- or long-term improvement in mortality. The TandemHeart and Impella devices which assist in left ventricular unloading have only been evaluated in small randomized trials, which showed an increase in adverse events without improvement in mortality. Finally, venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (provides both circulatory and respiratory support) and is currently being evaluated in large randomized clinical trials.Summary Various devices for MCS in cardiogenic shock are available, but routine use is not supported by high-quality randomized evidence. Given the resources required for initiation of MCS, use of these treatments should be limited to centers experienced in advanced cardiac care, and future research should focus on what role (if any) these devices have in clinical practice.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Outcomes in cardiogenic shock: the role of surrogate endpoints

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kosyakovsky; Leah B.; Marbach, Jeffrey A.; Nguyen, Khoa; Mukundan, Srini; Chweich, Haval; Kapur, Navin K.
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review Early revascularization, invasive hemodynamic profiling, and initiation of temporary mechanical circulatory support (MCS) have all become routine components of cardiogenic shock (CS) management. Despite this evolution in clinical practice, patient selection and timing of treatment initiation remain a significant barrier to achieving sustained improvement in CS outcomes. Recent efforts to standardize CS management, through the development of treatment algorithms, have relied heavily on surrogate endpoints to drive therapeutic decisions. The present review aims to provide an overview of the basis of evidence for those surrogate endpoints commonly employed in clinical trials and CS management algorithms.Recent findings Recent publications from both observational and randomized cohorts have demonstrated the utility of surrogate endpoints in risk stratifying patients with CS. In particular, invasive hemodynamics using pulmonary artery catheters to guide initiation and weaning of MCS, biochemical markers that portend imminent end-organ failure, and clinical risk scores that combine multiple hemodynamic and laboratory parameters have demonstrated an ability to prognosticate outcomes in patients with CS.Summary Although further validation is necessary, multiple clinical, hemodynamic, and biochemical markers have demonstrated utility as surrogate endpoints in CS, and will undoubtedly assist physicians in clinical decision-making.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Staffing models in the cardiac intensive care unit

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Quien; Mary; Thomas, Alexander; Ludmir, Jonathan; Miller, P. Elliott
      Abstract: imagePurpose of review The modern cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) has evolved into a high-intensity unit that cares for critically ill patients. Despite this transformation, changes to the staffing model and organizational structure in these specialized units have only recently begun to meet these challenges. We describe the most recent evidence which will inform future CICU staffing models.Recent findings In the United States, the majority of CICUs are open as opposed to closed units, yet recent data suggests that transition to a closed staffing model is associated with a decrease in mortality. These reductions in mortality in closed CICUs are most pronounced in the most critically ill populations, such as patients with mechanical circulatory support, cardiac arrest, and respiratory failure. In addition, one study has shown that transition to a cardiac intensivist staffed CICU was associated with a reduction in mortality. Finally, multidisciplinary and protocolized teams imbedded within the CICU, specifically 'shock teams,’ have recently been developed and may reduce mortality in this particularly sick patient population.Summary Although the preponderance of data suggests improved outcomes with a closed, intensivist staffed CICU model, future multicenter studies are needed to better define the ideal staffing models for the contemporary CICU.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 35.172.223.251
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-