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EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (121 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 123 of 123 Journals sorted alphabetically
AACN Advanced Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Academic Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 100)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acute and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Acute Cardiac Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Acute Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Neonatal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
African Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
AINS - Anasthesiologie - Intensivmedizin - Notfallmedizin - Schmerztherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Annals of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 150)
Annals of Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Annals of the American Thoracic Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Archives of Academic Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Australian Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Bangladesh Critical Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Burns Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Respiratory, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Acute Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Case Reports in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Chronic Wound Care Management and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 78)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Critical Care Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Critical Care Explorations     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Critical Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 324)
Critical Care Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Current Emergency and Hospital Medicine Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Opinion in Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Egyptian Journal of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
EMC - Urgenze     Full-text available via subscription  
Emergency Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Emergency Medicine (Medicina neotložnyh sostoânij)     Open Access  
Emergency Medicine Australasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Emergency Medicine International     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Emergency Medicine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Emergency Medicine News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Emergency Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Enfermería Intensiva (English ed.)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Burn Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Frontiers in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Global Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Indian Journal of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Intensive Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 87)
Intensive Care Medicine Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intensivmedizin up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Paramedic Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Iranian Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access  
Irish Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal Européen des Urgences et de Réanimation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Acute Care Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Cardiac Critical Care TSS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal Of Cardiovascular Emergencies     Open Access  
Journal of Concussion     Open Access  
Journal of Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Journal of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Education and Teaching in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Emergency Medical Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Emergency Medicine, Trauma and Acute Care     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Emergency Practice and Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Intensive Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Stroke Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the Intensive Care Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Translational Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
La Presse Médicale Open     Open Access  
Médecine de Catastrophe - Urgences Collectives     Hybrid Journal  
Medicina Intensiva     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medicina Intensiva (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Mediterranean Journal of Emergency Medicine & Acute Care : MedJEM     Open Access  
Notfall + Rettungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
OA Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
OA Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Access Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Palliative Care : Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Prehospital Emergency Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Research and Opinion in Anesthesia and Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Resuscitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Resuscitation Plus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Saudi Critical Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Shock : Injury, Inflammation, and Sepsis : Laboratory and Clinical Approaches     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sklifosovsky Journal Emergency Medical Care     Open Access  
The Journal of Trauma Injury Infection and Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transplant Research and Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Visual Journal of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Western Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
 AEM Education and Training : A Global Journal of Emergency Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Emergency Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.416
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 9  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1865-1380 - ISSN (Online) 1865-1372
Published by SpringerOpen Homepage  [229 journals]
  • A case report of an accidental iatrogenic dexmedetomidine overdose in an
           adult

    • Abstract: Background Dexmedetomidine is a sedative drug with a wide safety margin. Case presentation We present a case of accidental iatrogenic dexmedetomidine overdose in an adult patient during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. This is the first case report of an adult patient receiving an intravenous push of dexmedetomidine. Overdose resulted in severe oversedation, but symptoms receded spontaneously over time. Conclusions Dexmedetomidine overdoses are infrequent, and they are usually the result of an administration error.
      PubDate: 2024-02-27
       
  • Physicians’ challenges when working in the prehospital environment - a
           qualitative study using grounded theory

    • Abstract: Background In the rapid development in prehospital medicine the awareness of the many challenges in prehospital care is important as it highlights which areas need improvement and where special attention during education and training should be focused. The purpose of this study is to identify challenges that physicians face when working in the prehospital environment. The research question is thus; what challenges do physicians face when working in prehospital care' Method This is a qualitative study with an inductive approach and is based on individual interviews. The interviews were analyzed using the Classic Grounded Theory (GT) method as an approach. The interviews were conducted as semi-structured interviews via the digital platform Zoom during winter / early spring 2022. Results Challenges for prehospital physicians can be understood as a process that involves a balancing act between different factors linked to the extreme environment in which they operate. This environment creates unique challenges not usually encountered in routine hospital practice, which results in trade-offs that they would not otherwise be faced with. Their individual situation needs to be balanced against organizational conditions, which means, among other things, that their medical decisions must be made based on limited information as a result of the constraints that exist in the prehospital environment. They must, both as individuals and as part of a team, manoeuvre in time and space for decision-making and practical tasks. This theory of balancing different entities is based on four themes; thus the theory is the relation between the four themes: leadership, environment, emotion management and organization. Conclusions With the help of previous studies and what we have found, it is reasonable to review what training is needed before starting to work prehospital as a physician. This should include components of the themes we have described: organization, environment, leadership and emotional management.
      PubDate: 2024-02-27
       
  • Impact of teaching on use of mechanical chest compression devices: a
           simulation-based trial

    • Abstract: Background The use of mechanical chest compression devices on patients in cardiac arrest has not shown benefits in previous trials. This is surprising, given that these devices can deliver consistently high-quality chest compressions without interruption. It is possible that this discrepancy is due to the no-flow time (NFT) during the application of the device. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate a reduction in no-flow time during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with mechanical chest compression devices following 10 min of structured training in novices. Methods 270 medical students were recruited for the study. The participants were divided as a convenience sample into two groups. Both groups were instructed in how to use the device according to the manufacturer’s specifications. The control group trained in teams of three, according to their own needs, to familiarise themselves with the device. The intervention group received 10 min of structured team training, also in teams of three. The participants then had to go through a CPR scenario in an ad-hoc team of three, in order to evaluate the training effect. Results The median NFT was 26.0 s (IQR: 20.0–30.0) in the intervention group and 37.0 s (IQR: 29.0–42.0) in the control group (p < 0.001). In a follow-up examination of the intervention group four months after the training, the NFT was 34.5 s (IQR: 24.0–45.8). This represented a significant deterioration (p = 0.015) and was at the same level as the control group immediately after training (p = 0.650). The position of the compression stamp did not differ significantly between the groups. Groups that lifted the manikin to position the backboard achieved an NFT of 35.0 s (IQR: 27.5–42.0), compared to 41.0 s (IQR: 36.5–50.5) for the groups that turned the manikin to the side (p = 0.074). Conclusions This simulation-based study demonstrated that structured training can significantly reduce the no-flow time when using mechanical resuscitation devices, even in ad-hoc teams. However, this benefit seems to be short-lived: after four months no effect could be detected.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
       
  • Demographics and clinical characteristics of carbon monoxide poisoning for
           patients attending in the emergency department at a tertiary hospital in
           Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    • Abstract: Background Carbon Monoxide (CO) is one of the most common environmental causes of acute intoxication globally. It can lead to the development of Delayed Neuropsychiatric Sequelae (DNS) which may develop in 2-40 days after remission of acute CO poisoning. DNS is defined by recurrent-transient neurological, cognitive, or psychological manifestations. This study was intended to describe the demographics and characteristics of CO poisoning patients attending at the Emergency Department (ED) and assess the association between CO intoxication and the development of DNS in a tertiary hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods A retrospective descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in subjects who were diagnosed with CO poisoning and attended to the ED at King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC) and King Abdullah Specialist Children’s Hospital (KASCH) in Riyadh during the period from January 2016 to December 2021. Patient demographics, vitals, diagnostic tests, and oxygen therapy at initial presentation were documented. Patient medical records were reviewed at 2-40 days following CO poisoning for development of DNS. Ethical approval was obtained from King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC). Results A total of 85 patients were diagnosed with CO poisoning and met the study inclusion criteria. Of those, 76% were adults with an average age of 32.36 (SD ± 15.20) and 51% were male adults. Five (6%) of the 85 patients developed DNS. Common symptoms included dizziness, nausea, and decreased visual acuity in 40% of the cases. The development of DNS manifestations was most likely (80%) to occur at 2 to 10 days after the initial incident. Inferential statistics showed that BMI (p-value = 0.021) and age group (p-value = 0.029) were significantly associated with COHb level, which was not the case for gender and the presence of clinical manifestation. Furthermore, Gender was significantly associated with the development of DNS (20% male vs. 80% female, p = 0.050). Conclusions The findings of this study are consistent with previous published studies showing low proportions of patients who were exposed to CO poisoning at risk of developing DNS. Further larger-scale multicenter studies are needed to assess the factors associated with the development of DNS for patients with CO poisoning.
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
       
  • How a broken vertebra can lead to a fatal hemorrhage: a case report

    • Abstract: Background Unintentional falls are common among the elderly and given the expected increase of the aging population, these falls contribute to a high number of admissions to the emergency department. Relatively low-energy trauma mechanisms can lead to serious injuries in the elderly, with contributing factors being comorbidities, medication use and degenerative abnormalities. Case presentation A 94-year-old female suffered an unintentional fall at home. Upon arrival of the ambulance at her house she was hemodynamically stable and mobilized to the gurney with assistance. During primary survey at the emergency department, her blood pressure and oxygen saturation decreased, she was not able to move her legs anymore and lost consciousness. A full-body CTA was performed, which showed a fracture through the vertebral body of L2 with significant dislocation and a large active bleeding of the corpus, extending to the retroperitoneum and the epidural space. Despite resuscitation, her vital signs deteriorated and given the severe abnormalities on CTA, it was decided to discontinue further treatment, after which she deceased. The performed CTA and an x-ray from 2016 suggested diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, which might have contributed to the severity and instability of the vertebral fracture. Mobilization after the fall might have increased the dislocation of the fracture. The use of oral anticoagulants worsened the subsequent bleeding and the extension to the epidural space caused the paralysis of the legs. Conclusions It is important to be aware of the possible serious consequences of unintentional falls in the elderly population and to provide strict immobilization of the spinal column until proper imaging.
      PubDate: 2024-02-23
       
  • Overview of best practices for buprenorphine initiation in the emergency
           department

    • Abstract: Abstract In recent decades, opioid overdoses have increased dramatically in the United States and peer countries. Given this, emergency medicine physicians have become adept in reversing and managing complications of acute overdose. However, many remain unfamiliar with initiating medication for opioid use disorder such as buprenorphine, a high-affinity partial opioid agonist. Emergency department-based buprenorphine initiation is supported by a significant body of literature demonstrating a marked reduction in mortality in addition to increased engagement in care. Buprenorphine initiation is also safe, given both the pharmacologic properties of buprenorphine that reduce the risk of diversion or recreational use, and previously published literature demonstrating low rates of respiratory depression, sedation, and precipitated withdrawal. Further, barriers to emergency department-based initiation have been reduced in recent years, with publicly available dosing and up-titration schedules, numerous publications overviewing best practices for managing precipitated withdrawal, and removal of USA policies previously restricting patient access and provider prescribing, with the removal of the X-waiver via the Medication Access and Training Expansion Act. Despite reductions in barriers, buprenorphine initiation in the emergency room remains underutilized. Poor uptake has been attributed to numerous individual and systemic barriers, including inadequate education, provider stigma, and insufficient access to outpatient follow-up care. The following practice innovation aims to summarize previously published evidence-based best practices and provide an accessible, user-friendly initiation guide to increase emergency physician comfortability with buprenorphine initiation going forward.
      PubDate: 2024-02-19
       
  • Diagnostic challenges between takotsubo cardiomyopathy and acute
           myocardial infarction—where is the emergency': a literature review

    • Abstract: Background Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is an emergency cardiovascular disease, with clinical and paraclinical manifestations similar to acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but it is characterized by reversible systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle (LV) in the absence (most of the time) of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). Management of patients with TC TC seems to be more frequent in post-menopausal women and it is triggered by emotional or physical stress. The diagnosis of TC is based on the Mayo Clinic criteria. Initially, patients with TC should be treated as those with AMI and carefully monitored in intensive care unit. Urgent clinical and paraclinical distinction between TC and AMI is mandatory in all patients, because of the different therapeutical management between the two diseases. Chest pain and dyspnea are the most common symptoms in TC. Paraclinical diagnosis is based on cardiac biomarkers, electrocardiogram (ST-segment elevation/T wave inversion in precordial leads without reciprocal ST-segment depression in inferior leads and absence of Q waves), echocardiography (LV systolic dysfunction, regional wall motion abnormalities extended in more than one coronary territory), cardiac magnetic resonance and in most of the cases the positive diagnosis is established by performing CA to exclude obstructive CAD. The prognosis of patients with TC is considered benign in most cases, with a complete LV function recovery, but severe complications may occur, such as cardiogenic shock, LV free wall rupture, life-threatening arrhythmia, and cardiac arrest. Postoperative TC may develop after any type of surgical intervention due to acute stress and it should be differentiated from postoperative AMI. The management of patients with TC is medical and it is based on supportive care and the treatment of heart failure, while patients with AMI require myocardial revascularization. Conclusions TC leads to transient LV dysfunction that mimics AMI from which it should be differentiated for a good therapeutic approach. Patients with TC should be carefully monitored during hospitalization because they have a high recovery potential if optimally treated.
      PubDate: 2024-02-15
       
  • Triage implementation in resource-limited emergency departments: sharing
           tools and experience from the Pacific region

    • Abstract: Abstract According to the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Emergency Care Systems Framework, triage is an essential function of emergency departments (EDs). This practice innovation article describes four strategies that have been used to support implementation of the WHO-endorsed Interagency Integrated Triage Tool (IITT) in the Pacific region, namely needs assessment, digital learning, public communications and electronic data management. Using a case study from Vila Central Hospital in Vanuatu, a Pacific Small Island Developing State, we reflect on lessons learned from IITT implementation in a resource-limited ED. In particular, we describe the value of a bespoke needs assessment tool for documenting triage and patient flow requirements; the challenges and opportunities presented by digital learning; the benefits of locally designed, public-facing communications materials; and the feasibility and impact of a low-cost electronic data registry system. Our experience of using these tools in Vanuatu and across the Pacific region will be of interest to other resource-limited EDs seeking to improve their triage practice and performance. Although the resources and strategies presented in this article are focussed on the IITT, the principles are equally relevant to other triage systems.
      PubDate: 2024-02-14
       
  • Chest tube placement in trauma patients: please use sonography

    • PubDate: 2024-02-13
       
  • Intentional intoxication with monkshood plant leading to atrioventricular
           dissociation and ventricular ectopy in a 17-year-old female: a case report
           

    • Abstract: Background Monkshood, a toxic plant containing a potent cardio- and neurotoxin called aconitine, can lead to a range of symptoms, including nausea, vomiting, dizziness, seizures, and cardiac arrhythmias. Mortality associated with this intoxication are due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias which are difficult to treat and often refractory in nature. Case presentation We present a case of a 17-year-old female patient who presented to the emergency department after intentionally ingesting a monkshood plant and developed atrioventricular dissociation and frequent ventricular ectopy. The patient was successfully treated with activated charcoal, supportive care, and cardiac monitoring. Conclusion This case highlights the importance of early recognition of aconitine poisoning and the need for prompt supportive care, cardiac rhythm monitoring, and preemptive antiarrhythmic treatment planning.
      PubDate: 2024-02-08
       
  • The first reported mortality from aluminum phosphide poisoning in Lebanon:
           a case report

    • Abstract: Background Aluminum phosphide is a commonly used pesticide, particularly in developing countries where uncontrolled insecticides and pesticides are commonly prevalent. Mortalities have been reported due to accidental and suicidal exposures to aluminum phosphide. To date, there has been no reported mortality case of aluminum phosphide in Lebanon. In addition, there is no specific antidote for aluminum phosphide toxicity and the treatment is mainly supportive. This is why awareness should be spread about this case to include it in the differential diagnoses and enhance prompt management and response in future encounters. Case presentation A previously healthy 37-year-old male, presented to the emergency department of Notre Dame des Secours University Hospital Center for a suicidal attempt after ingesting 5 tablets of pesticide containing 56% aluminum phosphide an hour prior to presentation. Shortly after the presentation, the patient began deteriorating and became clinically unstable. The patient was then intubated and was started on sodium bicarbonate along with aggressive fluid resuscitation. The patient remained hypotensive even after giving vasopressors. He was then later admitted to the intensive care unit for further management. However, the patient further decompensated and developed multiorgan failure. This is the first case of mortality in Lebanon from aluminum phosphide toxicity. Conclusions Emergency physicians should include aluminum phosphide toxicity in the differential diagnosis when dealing with patients ingesting unknown pesticides especially when they smell the characteristic garlic-like odor. The toxicity from ALP leads to multiorgan failure and death rapidly. Thus, it is of utmost importance to start early, and aggressive resuscitation given that there is no specific antidote.
      PubDate: 2024-02-06
       
  • Using design research and human-centered design to address growing pains
           in a busy, urban emergency department: a faculty, clinician, and student
           collaboration between nursing, design, and medicine

    • Abstract: Abstract In 2021, a large urban university-based hospital transitioned to a new two-floor emergency department. Despite the new environment, there were usability and workflow challenges with the space. The authors of this paper created a multidisciplinary, human-centered design collaborative of clinicians, university faculty, and students in an effort to increase emergency department efficiency. After thorough design-research and clinician-focused collaboration, the authors and design team identified the need to improve medical supply retrieval time, which directly impacts patient care and clinician satisfaction. The primary interventions consisted of a redesign that is as follows: (a) created standardized icons related to organ system, (b) increased visibility of supply labels, and (c) reorganized supplies based on usage data. Although a successful project, it was not without several barriers discussed in this article, including design researcher and clinician-level setting and engagement, academic/institutional policies, and conflicting schedules. In addition, the lessons learned from implementing human-centered design concepts into clinical workflow sets forth future research opportunities and inspiration for other institutions to collaborate.
      PubDate: 2024-02-05
       
  • A case report on ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis with a right
           parasternal approach: a novel in-plane lateral-to-medial technique

    • Abstract: Introduction Emergency pericardiocentesis is a life-saving procedure that is performed to aspirate fluid from the pericardial space in patients who have severe pericardial effusion that is causing hemodynamic compromise. The current gold standard for pericardial fluid aspiration is ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis. Echocardiography with a low-frequency transducer has generally been used in pericardiocentesis, but this method lacks real-time visualization of the needle trajectory, leading to complications. Therefore, we describe a case involving an ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis method using a novel in-plane technique with a lateral-to-medial approach via the right parasternal and a high-frequency probe. The method was performed for an infant with cardiac tamponade. Case presentation We present a case of a 14-month-old male infant who was brought to the emergency room with a history of cough, shortness of breath, and fever following recurrent chest infections. Despite prior treatments, his condition deteriorated, and signs of cardiac tamponade were evident upon examination. Cardiopulmonary point-of-care ultrasound confirmed the presence of a large pericardial effusion with tamponade. Emergency pericardiocentesis was performed using the novel in-plane technique, resulting in successful fluid aspiration and stabilization of the patient’s condition. Technique description The proposed technique involves positioning a high-frequency ultrasound probe over the right parasternal area to obtain real-time visualization of the needle trajectory and surrounding structures, including the sternum, right internal thoracic vessels, pleural sliding end point, pericardial effusion, and myocardium. The needle is inserted laterally to medially at a 45-degree angle, ensuring safe passage between the pleural sliding endpoint and the right internal thoracic vessels while reaching the pericardial effusion. Conclusion The presented technique provides real-time visualization of the needle and surrounding structures, which may potentially help to avoid complications and improve accuracy. The proposed technique may potentially enable access for emergency pericardiocentesis and for loculated pericardial effusion that has formed around the right atrium. Nevertheless, further studies with large patient populations are needed.
      PubDate: 2024-02-01
       
  • Strategies for improving ED-related outcomes of older adults who seek care
           in emergency departments: a systematic review

    • Abstract: Background Despite constituting 14% of the general population, older adults make up almost a quarter of all emergency department (ED) visits. These visits often do not adequately address patient needs, with nearly 80% of older patients discharged from the ED carrying at least one unattended health concern. Many interventions have been implemented and tested in the ED to care for older adults, which have not been recently synthesized. Methods A systematic review was conducted to identify interventions initiated in the ED to address the needs of older adults. Embase, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane CENTRAL, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and grey literature were searched from January 2013 to January 18, 2023. Comparative studies assessing interventions for older adults in the ED were included. The quality of controlled trials was assessed with the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool for randomized trials, and the quality of observational studies was assessed with the risk of bias in non-randomized studies of interventions tool. Due to heterogeneity, meta-analysis was not possible. Results Sixteen studies were included, assessing 12 different types of interventions. Overall study quality was low to moderate: 10 studies had a high risk of bias, 5 had a moderate risk of bias, and only 1 had a low risk of bias. Follow-up telephone calls, referrals, geriatric assessment, pharmacist-led interventions, physical therapy services, care plans, education, case management, home visits, care transition interventions, a geriatric ED, and care coordination were assessed, many of which were combined to create multi-faceted interventions. Care coordination with additional support and early assessment and intervention were the only two interventions that consistently reported improved outcomes. Most studies did not report significant improvements in ED revisits, hospitalization, time spent in the ED, costs, or outpatient utilization. Two studies reported on patient perspectives. Conclusion Few interventions demonstrate promise in reducing ED revisits for older adults, and this review identified significant gaps in understanding other outcomes, patient perspectives, and the effectiveness in addressing underlying health needs. This could suggest, therefore, that most revisits in this population are unavoidable manifestations of frailty and disease trajectory. Efforts to improve older patients’ needs should focus on interventions initiated outside the ED.
      PubDate: 2024-02-01
       
  • The diagnostic accuracy of point-of-care ultrasound parameters for airway
           assessment in patients undergoing intubation in emergency department—an
           observational study

    • Abstract: Background Endotracheal intubation is an essential resuscitative procedure in the emergency setting. Airway assessment parameters such as the Mallampati classification are difficult to perform in an emergency setting. As point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) assessment of airway parameters does not require patients to perform any mandatory action, ultrasound may become the potential first-line noninvasive airway assessment tool in the emergency department (ED). The use of POCUS in the ED has not been sufficiently studied. Using POCUS in airway assessment for predicting difficult intubation may be the next step in successful airway management. Methodology The study was an observational study conducted at the ED of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (Rishikesh). The treating emergency physician recorded the patient history and systemic examination along with an indication for intubation. The POCUS assessment of airway parameters pre-epiglottis to epiglottic vocal cord ratio (Pre-E/E-VC), tongue thickness, hyomental distance, and distance from skin to the hyoid bone was performed by the study investigator. During laryngoscopy, Cormack-Lehane (CL) grading was assessed. The data was entered and analyzed. Results Seventy patients who required intubation in the ED were enrolled in the study. Among the study population, 48.6%, 28.6%, 14.3%, 1.4%, and 7.1% were classified with the following CL grading: 1, 2a, 2b, 3a, and 3b, respectively. At a cutoff of ≥ 1.86, Pre-E/E-VC predicts difficult laryngoscopy (AUC 0.835) with a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 94%. At a cutoff of ≥ 5.98 cm, tongue thickness predicts difficult laryngoscopy (AUC 0.78) with a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 88%. At a cutoff of hyomental distance ≤ 6 cm, it predicts difficult laryngoscopy with a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 88%. All parameters can act as a promising tool for predicting difficult laryngoscopy, with the single best parameter being Pre-E/E-VC. Conclusion Assessment of the airway with POCUS may be helpful to the emergency physician when the clinical airway assessment parameters fail to predict difficult laryngoscopy as most patients requiring intubation are uncooperative. Assessment of the parameters in our study Pre-E/E-VC, tongue thickness, and hyomental distance can act as a promising tool for predicting difficult laryngoscopy in the emergency scenario.
      PubDate: 2024-01-29
       
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of the pre‑hospital trauma life support
           (PHTLS) program for the management of trauma patients in the pre-hospital
           emergency based on Kirkpatrick’s evaluation model

    • Abstract: Background Pre-hospital trauma life support (PHTLS) training courses have been developed and widely adopted to enhance the proficiency of pre-hospital personnel in handling trauma patients. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the educational program for managing trauma patients in the pre-hospital emergency setting, utilizing Kirkpatrick’s educational evaluation model. Methods This is an observational approach, consisting of four sub-studies. The PHTLS course was conducted over a 2-day period, encompassing both theoretical and practical components. For this study, we selected pre-hospital personnel from three emergency aid stations using a convenient sampling method. These personnel underwent their first-ever PHTLS course training, and we subsequently analyzed the effectiveness of the training program using Kirkpatrick’s four levels of evaluation: satisfaction, learning, behavior, and results. Results The study conducted on Kirkpatrick’s first-level analysis revealed that participants expressed a high level of satisfaction with the quality of all aspects of the course. Moving on to the second and third levels, namely learning and behavior, significant improvements were observed in the average scores of various skills that were examined both immediately after the course and 2 months later (P < 0.05). However, when it comes to the fourth level and the impact of the course on indicators such as mortality rate and permanent disability, no significant changes were observed even after an average of 3 months since the course was introduced. Conclusion The implementation of PHTLS has been linked to the enhancement of participants’ skills in treating trauma patients, leading to the application of acquired knowledge in real-life scenarios and a positive change in participants’ behavior. The evaluation of PHTLS courses in Iran, as in other countries, highlights the need for specialized training in pre-hospital trauma care. To ensure the continued effectiveness of the PHTLS course, it is advisable for managers and policymakers to encourage regular participation of PHTLS employees in the program.
      PubDate: 2024-01-29
       
  • Successfully conservative management of the uterus in acute pulmonary
           embolism during cesarean section for placenta previa: a case report
           from Tu Du Hospital, Vietnam and literature review

    • Abstract: Background Cardiopulmonary collapse is a catastrophic event in cesarean section, which leads to adverse outcomes for both the mother and the fetus. Pulmonary embolism is one of the rare etiologies of this entity. We herein reported the successful management of acute embolism pulmonary associated with cesarean delivery on a healthy pregnant woman at our tertiary referral hospital. Case presentation A full-term pregnant woman hospitalized for planned cesarean delivery due to placenta previa without cardiorespiratory diseases. She was scheduled uneventfully for a planned cesarean section. After placental delivery, the patient spontaneously fell into cardiopulmonary collapse and her vital signs deteriorated rapidly. The obstetricians promptly completed the cesarean section and performed all procedures to prevent the PPH and preserve the uterus. At the same time, the anesthesiologists continued to carry out advanced heart-lung resuscitation in order to control her vital signs. After surgery, the multidisciplinary team assessed the patient and found a thrombus in her pulmonary circulation. Therefore, the patient was managed with therapeutic anticoagulation. The patient recovered in good clinical condition and was discharged after 2 weeks without any complications. Conclusions The diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism is extremely difficult due to uncommon occurrence, sudden onset, and non-specific presentation. Awareness of this life-threatening pathology during cesarean delivery should be raised. Interdisciplinary assessment must be essentially established in this life-threatening condition. After the whole conventional management, uterine conservation may be acceptable where applicable. Further data is required to encourage this finding.
      PubDate: 2024-01-29
       
  • History of emergency medicine in Bhutan

    • Abstract: Abstract Emergency medicine in Bhutan has made significant progress in the past few decades and continues to evolve. In this article, we provide valuable insights into the history of emergency medicine at Jigme Dorji Wangchuck National Referral Hospital (JDWNRH) and in Bhutan and highlight some of the future challenges we face as we move forward to meet the demands of increased patient volume and complexity.
      PubDate: 2024-01-22
       
  • Development of prehospital emergency care in Singapore

    • Abstract: Abstract This review paper describes the development of the pre-hospital system in Singapore from the pre-war days. Every country’s prehospital community needs a deep understanding of how they developed over the years, factors that played a part, and the aspirations their community and government have set for this. This can guide future evolution of the services to ensure that care provided is relevant, applicable and in keeping with the community’s needs. Countries with similar contextual circumstances, but at a different stage of development of their PECs, may learn from these.
      PubDate: 2024-01-22
       
  • Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm discovered by pocket-sized ultrasound
           in a low resource setting: a case report

    • Abstract: Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a life-threatening condition characterized by the weakening and dilation of the abdominal aorta. AAA primarily affects men, smokers, and the elderly, with rupture being a fatal complication. While point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is valuable in diagnosing AAA, the role of using pocket-sized ultrasound in a low resource setting remains less explored. This case report presents a unique instance of a suspected ruptured AAA diagnosed using pocket-sized ultrasound in an emergency department (ED) situated in a low resource setting where ultrasound machines are absent, and emergency physicians lack proficiency in ultrasound usage. Case presentation A 78-year-old man with a history of hypertension and bladder cancer presented to the ED with suprapubic pain. Initial evaluation showed no concerning findings. However, the next day, he collapsed, became unconscious, and experienced a cardiac arrest. Despite resuscitation efforts, the patient’s condition deteriorated. POCUS revealed an 8-cm dilated abdominal aorta with an intimal flap, indicative of a dissecting AAA and a substrate for AAA rupture. Unfortunately, the patient died despite resuscitation efforts. Conclusion This case highlights the importance of considering AAA in patients with risk factors and abdominal pain in a low resource setting. POCUS using a pocket-sized ultrasound can aid in early AAA detection, potentially preventing rupture through preemptive vascular intervention. Emergency departments should prioritize ultrasound availability, and emergency physicians should be proficient in its use.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17
       
 
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  Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8186 journals)
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EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (121 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 123 of 123 Journals sorted alphabetically
AACN Advanced Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Academic Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 100)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acute and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Acute Cardiac Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Acute Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Neonatal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
African Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
AINS - Anasthesiologie - Intensivmedizin - Notfallmedizin - Schmerztherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Annals of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 150)
Annals of Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Annals of the American Thoracic Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Archives of Academic Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Australian Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Bangladesh Critical Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Burns Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Respiratory, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Acute Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Case Reports in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Chronic Wound Care Management and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 78)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Critical Care Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Critical Care Explorations     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Critical Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 324)
Critical Care Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Current Emergency and Hospital Medicine Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Opinion in Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Egyptian Journal of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
EMC - Urgenze     Full-text available via subscription  
Emergency Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Emergency Medicine (Medicina neotložnyh sostoânij)     Open Access  
Emergency Medicine Australasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Emergency Medicine International     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Emergency Medicine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Emergency Medicine News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Emergency Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Enfermería Intensiva (English ed.)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Burn Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Frontiers in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Global Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Indian Journal of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Intensive Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 87)
Intensive Care Medicine Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intensivmedizin up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Paramedic Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Iranian Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access  
Irish Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal Européen des Urgences et de Réanimation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Acute Care Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Cardiac Critical Care TSS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal Of Cardiovascular Emergencies     Open Access  
Journal of Concussion     Open Access  
Journal of Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Journal of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Education and Teaching in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Emergency Medical Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Emergency Medicine, Trauma and Acute Care     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Emergency Practice and Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Intensive Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Stroke Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the Intensive Care Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Translational Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
La Presse Médicale Open     Open Access  
Médecine de Catastrophe - Urgences Collectives     Hybrid Journal  
Medicina Intensiva     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medicina Intensiva (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Mediterranean Journal of Emergency Medicine & Acute Care : MedJEM     Open Access  
Notfall + Rettungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
OA Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
OA Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Access Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Palliative Care : Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Prehospital Emergency Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Research and Opinion in Anesthesia and Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Resuscitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Resuscitation Plus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Saudi Critical Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Shock : Injury, Inflammation, and Sepsis : Laboratory and Clinical Approaches     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sklifosovsky Journal Emergency Medical Care     Open Access  
The Journal of Trauma Injury Infection and Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transplant Research and Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Visual Journal of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Western Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
 AEM Education and Training : A Global Journal of Emergency Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

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