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EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (121 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 124 of 124 Journals sorted alphabetically
AACN Advanced Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Academic Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 90)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acute and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Acute Cardiac Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Acute Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Neonatal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
AINS - Anasthesiologie - Intensivmedizin - Notfallmedizin - Schmerztherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Annals of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 122)
Annals of Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Annals of the American Thoracic Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Archives of Academic Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Australian Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Bangladesh Critical Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Burns Open     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Respiratory, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Acute Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Case Reports in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Chronic Wound Care Management and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Clinical Intensive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 74)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Critical Care Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Critical Care Explorations     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Critical Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 267)
Critical Care Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Current Emergency and Hospital Medicine Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current Opinion in Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Egyptian Journal of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
EMC - Urgenze     Full-text available via subscription  
Emergency Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Emergency Medicine (Medicina neotložnyh sostoânij)     Open Access  
Emergency Medicine Australasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Emergency Medicine International     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Emergency Medicine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Emergency Medicine News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Emergency Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Enfermería Intensiva (English ed.)     Full-text available via subscription  
European Burn Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Frontiers in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Global Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Indian Journal of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Intensive Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Intensive Care Medicine Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intensivmedizin up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Paramedic Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Iranian Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access  
Irish Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal Européen des Urgences et de Réanimation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Acute Care Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Cardiac Critical Care TSS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal Of Cardiovascular Emergencies     Open Access  
Journal of Concussion     Open Access  
Journal of Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Journal of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Education and Teaching in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Emergency Medical Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Emergency Medicine, Trauma and Acute Care     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Emergency Practice and Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Intensive Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Intensive Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Stroke Medicine     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Intensive Care Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Journal of Translational Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
La Presse Médicale Open     Open Access  
Médecine de Catastrophe - Urgences Collectives     Hybrid Journal  
Medicina Intensiva     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medicina Intensiva (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Mediterranean Journal of Emergency Medicine & Acute Care : MedJEM     Open Access  
Notfall + Rettungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
OA Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
OA Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Access Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Open Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Palliative Care : Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Prehospital Emergency Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Research and Opinion in Anesthesia and Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Resuscitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Resuscitation Plus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Saudi Critical Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Shock : Injury, Inflammation, and Sepsis : Laboratory and Clinical Approaches     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Sklifosovsky Journal Emergency Medical Care     Open Access  
The Journal of Trauma Injury Infection and Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transplant Research and Risk Management     Open Access  
Trauma Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Visual Journal of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Western Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
 AEM Education and Training : A Global Journal of Emergency Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Shock : Injury, Inflammation, and Sepsis : Laboratory and Clinical Approaches
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.331
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1073-2322 - ISSN (Online) 1540-0514
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [297 journals]
  • A Comprehensive Appraisal of Risk Prediction Models for Cardiogenic Shock

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      Authors: Bhat; Anusha G.; van Diepen, Sean; Katz, Jason N.; Islam, Ashequl; Tehrani, Benham N.; Truesdell, Alexander G.; Kapur, Navin K.; Holmes, David R. Jr; Menon, Venugopal; Jaber, Wissam A.; Nicholson, William J.; Zhao, David X.; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra
      Abstract: imageDespite advances in early revascularization, percutaneous hemodynamic support platforms, and systems of care, cardiogenic shock (CS) remains associated with a mortality rate higher than 50%. Several risk stratification models have been derived since the 1990 s to identify patients at high risk of adverse outcomes. Still, limited information is available on the differences between scoring systems and their relative applicability to both acute myocardial infarction and advanced decompensated heart failure CS. Thus, we reviewed the similarities, differences, and limitations of published CS risk prediction models and herein discuss their suitability to the contemporary management of CS care.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Influence of Immune Cell Subtypes on Mitochondrial Measurements in
           Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells From Children with Sepsis

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      Authors: Weiss; Scott L.; Henrickson, Sarah E.; Lindell, Robert B.; Sartori, Laura F.; Zhang, Donglan; Bush, Jenny; Farooqi, Sumera; Starr, Jonathan; Deutschman, Clifford S.; McGowan, Francis X. Jr; Becker, Lance; Tuluc, Florin; Wherry, E. John; Picard, Martin; Wallace, Douglas C.
      Abstract: imageIntroduction: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are commonly used to compare mitochondrial function in patients with versus without sepsis, but how these measurements in this mixed cell population vary by composition of immune cell subtypes is not known, especially in children. We determined the effect of changing immune cell composition on PBMC mitochondrial respiration and content in children with and without sepsis.Methods: PBMC mitochondrial respiration and citrate synthase (CS) activity, a marker of mitochondrial content, were measured in 167 children with sepsis at three timepoints (day 1–2, 3–5, and 8–14) and once in 19 nonseptic controls. The proportion of lymphocytes and monocytes and T, B, and NK cells was measured using flow cytometry. More specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets were measured from 13 sepsis patients and 6 controls. Spearman's correlation and simple and mixed effects linear regression were used to determine the association of PBMC mitochondrial measures with proportion of immune cell subtypes.Results: PBMC mitochondrial respiration and CS activity were correlated with proportion of monocytes, lymphocytes, T B, and NK cells in controls, but not in sepsis patients. PBMC mitochondrial respiration was correlated with CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets in both groups. After controlling for differences in immune cell composition between groups using linear regression models, PBMC respiration and CS activity remained lower in sepsis patients than controls.Conclusions: Mitochondrial measurements from PBMCs varied with changes in immune cell composition in children with and without sepsis. However, differences in PBMC mitochondrial measurements between sepsis patients and controls were at least partially attributable to the effects of sepsis rather than solely an epiphenomena of variable immune cell composition.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Association between Vitamin D deficiency and Neurologic Outcomes in
           Patients after Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

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      Authors: Chae; Bora; Shin, Yo Sep; Kim, Sang Min; Hong, Seok-In; Kim, Youn-Jung; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Kim, Won Young
      Abstract: imageAim: We investigated the association between vitamin D deficiency and neurologic outcomes after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.Method: Data from the prospective cardiac arrest registry in the emergency department between October 2019 and April 2021 were retrospectively analyzed. Blood samples were obtained during cardiopulmonary resuscitation wherein 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum levels were analyzed; deficiency was defined as levels
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Temperature Trajectory Sub-phenotypes and the Immuno-Inflammatory Response
           in Pediatric Sepsis

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      Authors: Yehya; Nadir; Fitzgerald, Julie C.; Hayes, Katie; Zhang, Donglan; Bush, Jenny; Koterba, Natalka; Chen, Fang; Tuluc, Florin; Teachey, David T.; Balamuth, Fran; Lacey, Simon F.; Melenhorst, Jan Joseph; Weiss, Scott L.
      Abstract: imageObjective: Heterogeneity has hampered sepsis trials, and sub-phenotyping may assist with enrichment strategies. However, biomarker-based strategies are difficult to operationalize. Four sub-phenotypes defined by distinct temperature trajectories in the first 72 h have been reported in adult sepsis. Given the distinct epidemiology of pediatric sepsis, the existence and relevance of temperature trajectory-defined sub-phenotypes in children is unknown. We aimed to classify septic children into de novo sub-phenotypes derived from temperature trajectories in the first 72 h, and compare cytokine, immune function, and immunometabolic markers across subgroups.Methods: This was a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort of 191 critically ill septic children recruited from a single academic pediatric intensive care unit. We performed group-based trajectory modeling using temperatures over the first 72 h of sepsis to identify latent profiles. We then used mixed effects regression to determine if temperature trajectory-defined sub-phenotypes were associated with cytokine levels, immune function, and mitochondrial respiration.Results: We identified four temperature trajectory-defined sub-phenotypes: hypothermic, normothermic, hyperthermic fast-resolvers, and hyperthermic slow-resolvers. Hypothermic patients were less often previously healthy and exhibited lower levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Hospital mortality did not differ between hypothermic children (17%) and other sub-phenotypes (3–11%; P = 0.26).Conclusions: Critically ill septic children can be categorized into temperature trajectory-defined sub-phenotypes that parallel adult sepsis. Hypothermic children exhibit a blunted cytokine and chemokine profile. Group-based trajectory modeling has utility for identifying subtypes of clinical syndromes by incorporating readily available longitudinal data, rather than relying on inputs from a single timepoint.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • The Differences of CPR duration between Shockable and Nonshockable Rhythms
           in Predicting the Benefit of Target Temperature Management

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      Authors: Lin; Jr-Jiun; Huang, Chien-Hua; Chien, Yu-San; Hsu, Chih-Hsin; Chiu, Wei-Ting; Wu, Cheng-Hsueh; Wang, Chen-Hsu; Tsai, Min-Shan
      Abstract: imageBackground: Among cardiac arrest (CA) survivors, whether the combination of duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and shockable/nonshockable rhythms during resuscitation can help predict the benefit of targeted temperature management (TTM) remains un-investigated.Materials and methods: This multicenter retrospective cohort study enrolled 479 nontraumatic adult CA survivors with TTM and CPR duration 
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Neutropenic Sepsis: A Multicenter
           Cohort Study

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      Authors: Na; Soo Jin; Oh, Dong Kyu; Park, Sunghoon; Lee, Yeon Joo; Hong, Sang-Bum; Park, Mi-Hyun; Ko, Ryoung-Eun; Lim, Chae-Man; Jeon, Kyeongman
      Abstract: imageBackground: Sepsis is a leading cause of mortality in patients with neutropenia; however, data on whether neutropenic sepsis is associated with distinct clinical characteristics and outcomes are limited. Thus, this study was designed to clarify the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with neutropenic sepsis compared with those of patients without neutropenic sepsis diagnosed based on the Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock criteria.Methods: We analyzed data from the Korean Sepsis Alliance, a nationwide prospective multicenter cohort study evaluating the clinical characteristics, management, and outcomes of patients with sepsis from September 2019 to February 2020. Eligible patients were divided into the neutropenic (absolute neutrophil count of less than 1,500/mL) and non- neutropenic groups. The characteristics and outcomes were compared between the two groups.Results: During the study period, 2,074 patients were enrolled from 16 tertiary referral or university-affiliated hospitals. Of them, 218 (10.5%) had neutropenia. The neutropenia group was younger and had a lower proportion of patients with chronic diseases compared with the non-neutropenia group. However, solid tumors (50.0% vs. 34.1%; P  > 0.001) and hematological malignancies (40.8% vs. 3.8%; P 
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Provides a Predictive Performance
           of Septic Acute Kidney Injury

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      Authors: Li; Tianlong; Zhang, Jiahao; Long, Minghui; Jiang, Xiaofang; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Fengqin; Su, Lianjiu; Peng, Zhiyong
      Abstract: imageBackground: Septic acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common condition in ICU with poor outcomes. Septic AKI patients have a progressively decreased urine output and increased serum creatinine. However, urine volume and serum creatinine showed poor sensitivity to early diagnosis of septic AKI. Searching for potential biomarkers to early detect AKI is crucial in day-to-day clinical practice. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), primarily released by renal tubular epithelial cells, vascular endothelial cells, and immune cells, was found to be closely associated with the inflammatory response in sepsis. MIF may be used as a biomarker of septic AKI indicating aggravation of systemic inflammatory response.Methods: Our study included sepsis patients admitted to the ICU. The KDIGO guideline was used to confirm the diagnosis and staging of septic AKI. Blood samples were collected and tested, as well as clinical data were recorded. Independent risk factors were selected via logistic regression analysis. By drawing the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, the area under the ROC curves (AUC) was computed. The relationship between serum MIF level and mortality of septic AKI was analyzed using Cox regression analysis.Results: With high serum MIF level at ICU admission, the patients were more likely to develop AKI. The AUC of serum MIF (MIFAUC = 0.797) was found to be a good predictor of septic AKI. In addition, higher serum MIF levels corresponded to more severe AKI as well as a higher mortality rate.Conclusions: Serum MIF might be a biomarker for predicting the occurrence, development, and outcomes of septic AKI. This conclusion will need to be confirmed by more robust investigations in the future.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Inflammasome-related Markers upon ICU Admission do not Correlate with
           Outcome in Critically Ill COVID-19 Patients

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      Authors: Adamik; Barbara; Ambrożek-Latecka, Magdalena; Dragan, Barbara; Jeznach, Aldona; Śmiechowicz, Jakub; Gożdzik, Waldemar; Skirecki, Tomasz
      Abstract: imagePurpose: The development of targeted biological therapies for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) requires reliable biomarkers that could help indicate how patients are responding. The hyperactivation of inflammasomes by the SARS-CoV2 virus is hypothesized to contribute to a more severe course of the COVID-19 disease. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of several inflammasome-related cytokines and proteins upon admission to the intensive care unit (ICU).Patients and Methods: We performed a prospective cohort study. Plasma samples were obtained from 45 critically ill COVID-19 patients and 10 patients without any signs of infection (traumatic brain injury [TBI]) on admission to the ICU. Concentrations of IL-1a, IL-1β, IL-18, IL-1RA, galectin-1, apoptosis-associated speck-like proteins, LDH, ferritin, and gasdermin D were analyzed. A cell-free caspase-1 plasma assay was done by inhibitor-based immunoprecipitation followed by a Western Blot. Demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded.Results: Inhospital mortality in COVID-19 patients was 62%. Galectin-1 was 1.8-fold lower in COVID-19 than in TBI patients (17101.84 pg/mL vs. 30764.20 pg/mL, P = 0.007), but other inflammasome-related biomarkers had similar concentrations. Patients with a Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score of> 9 on admission who were at high risk of death had significantly higher galectin-1 but lower IL-1RA in comparison with low-risk patients (25551.3 pg/mL vs. 16302.7 pg/mL, P = 0.014; 14.5 pg/mL vs. 39.4pg/mL, P = 0.04, respectively). Statistically significant correlations were observed between: IL-1a and platelets (r = –0.37), IL-1 β and platelets (r = –0.36), ferritin and INR (r = 0.39). Activated caspase-1 p35, whose presence was related to higher fibrinogen and lower D-dimers, was detected in 12 out of 22 COVID-19 patients and in none of the TBI patients. Moreover, densitometric analysis showed a significantly higher amount of p35 in patients with a SOFA score> 9.Conclusion: We found that the systemic markers of activation of inflammasomes in critically ill COVID-19 patients were not directly related to outcome. Therefore, potential interventions aimed at the inflammasome pathway in this group of patients may be of limited effectiveness and should be biomarker-guided.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Extracorporeal Life-support for Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest: A
           Nationwide Multicenter Study

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      Authors: Jeong; Daun; Lee, Gun Tak; Park, Jong Eun; Chang, Hansol; Kim, Taerim; Cha, Won Chul; Yoon, Hee; Hwang, Sung Yeon; Shin, Tae Gun; Sim, Min Sub; Jo, IkJoon; Lee, Seung-Hwa; Shin, Sang Do; Choi, Jin-Ho
      Abstract: imageBackground: Despite potential clinical roles of extracorporeal life support (ECLS) for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) compared to that of conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CCPR), use of ECLS for OHCA is not strongly endorsed by current clinical guidelines.Objective: The purpose of this study is to investigate the clinical roles of extracorporeal life support (ECLS) compared with that of conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CCPR) for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients.Methods: The outcomes of OHCA between 2015 and 2020, enrolled in the Korean Cardiac Arrest Research Consortium (KoCARC), a multicenter OHCA patient registry including 65 participating hospitals throughout the Republic of Korea (ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT03222999). Differences in clinical features were adjusted by matching the propensity for ECLS. The primary outcome was 30-day neurologically favorable survival with cerebral performance category of 1 or 2. Restricted mean survival time (RMST) was used to compare outcomes between groups.Results: Of 12,006 patients included, ECLS was applied to 272 patients (2.2%). The frequency of neurologically favorable survival was higher in the ECLS group than the CCPR group (RMST difference, 5.5 days [95% CI, 4.1–7.0 days], P 
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Candidate Biomarkers for Sepsis-Associated Acute Kidney Injury Mechanistic
           Studies

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      Authors: Odum; James D.; Standage, Steve; Alder, Matthew; Zingarelli, Basilia; Devarajan, Prasad; Wong, Hector R.
      Abstract: imageIntroduction: Sepsis-associated acute kidney injury (SA-AKI) is a frequent complication of sepsis, yet the pathophysiologic mechanisms of SA-AKI are incompletely understood. PERSEVERE is a clinically validated serum biomarker panel with high sensitivity in predicting mortality from sepsis, and recent evidence suggests it can also predict severe, persistent SA-AKI at day 3 of hospitalization among septic children. We developed a murine model of PERSEVERE (mPERSEVERE) to further interrogate the sepsis-related biological underpinnings of SA-AKI using candidate biomarkers within mPERSEVERE.Methods: Eight-week-old C57BL/6 male mice underwent induction of sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). mPERSEVERE biomarkers were collected at 8-hours and kidneys were harvested at 24-hours post-CLP Classification and regression tree analysis (CART) was used to generate a SA-AKI predictive model. Kidney gene expression levels of candidate biomarkers were quantified using real time polymerase chain reaction.Results: Thirty- five mice underwent CLP Among mice identified by mPERSEVERE as high-risk for mortality, 70% developed SA-AKI at 24-hours compared to 22% of low-risk mice. CART analysis identified two mPERSEVERE biomarkers—C-C motif chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3) and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC)—as most predictive for SA-AKI with an area under the receiver operating curve of 0.90. In mice that developed SA-AKI, renal expression of KC was significantly increased compared to mice without SA-AKI (p  = 0.013), whereas no difference was seen in renal expression of CCL3 in mice with SA-AKI vs. no SA-AKI. KC and CCL3 localized to renal tubule epithelial cells as opposed to infiltrating immune cells by immunohistochemistry.Conclusions: The combination of plasma CCL3+KC can predict SA-AKI development in mice at 24-hours following CLP Of these two biomarkers, only renal expression of KC is increased in mice with SA-AKI. Further studies are required to determine if KC directly contributes to the underlying pathobiology of SA-AKI.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Inhibition of Ferroptosis Attenuates Glutamate Excitotoxicity and Nuclear
           Autophagy in a CLP Septic Mouse Model

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      Authors: Xie; Zhenxing; Xu, Mang; Xie, Jie; Liu, Tao; Xu, Xie; Gao, Wei; Li, Zhanfei; Bai, Xiangjun; Liu, Xinghua
      Abstract: imageSepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) often manifests in severe diffuse cerebral dysfunction due to an aberrant systemic immune response to infection. The underlying pathophysiology of SAE is not entirely understood but is likely a multifactorial process that involves disruption in cell death mechanism. Ferroptosis is a novel form of programmed cell death characterized by iron accumulation and lipid peroxidation, leading to inflammatory cascade and glutamate release. We hypothesized that ferroptosis is involved in the glutamate-mediated excitotoxic neuron injury during the uncontrolled neural inflammatory process of SAE. Inhibiting ferroptosis with ferrostatin-1 (Fer-1) could alleviate glutamate excitotoxicity and reduce neuron death of SAE, potentially improving prognosis. We found that in the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) sepsis model, ferroptosis occurred increasingly in the cerebrum, characterized by glutathione-dependent antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4) inactivation, transferrin upregulation, mitochondria shrink and malondialdehyde (MDA) increased. Fer-1 treatment downregulated cerebral ferroptosis and alleviated glutamate excitotoxicity via dampening system xc-(SXC) and glutamate receptor N-methyl-D-asperate receptor subunit 2. Combined with an observed reduction in calcium transporter PLCG and PLCB activation, these processes ultimately protected the integrities of synapses and neurons during SAE. Fer-1 treatment also rescued sepsis-induced nuclear autophagy and improved the behaviors of tail suspension test and novel object recognition test in septic mice. Conclusively, our results suggested that inhibition of ferroptosis could attenuate glutamate excitotoxicity and SAE outcomes.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Contribution of IL-38 in Lung Immunity during Pseudomonas
           Aeruginosa-induced Pneumonia

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      Authors: Wei; Qiang; Chen, Xi; Chen, Xia; Yuan, Zhongzhen; Wang, Chuanjiang
      Abstract: imageObjective: Interleukin-38 (IL-38), a new type of cytokine, is involved in processes such as tissue repair, inflammatory response, and immune response. However, its function in pneumonia caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is still unclear.Methods: In this study, we detected circulating IL-38 and cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10 in adults affected by early stage pneumonia caused by P. aeruginosa. Collected clinical data of these patients, such as the APACHE II score, levels of PCT, and oxygenation index when they entering the ICU. Using P. aeruginosa-induced pneumonia WT murine model to evaluate the effect of IL-38 on Treg differentiation, cell apoptosis, survival, tissue damage, inflammation, and bacterial removal.Results: In clinical research, although IL-38 is significantly increased during the early stages of clinical P. aeruginosa pneumonia, the concentration of IL-38 in the serum of patients who died with P. aeruginosa pneumonia was relatively lower than that of surviving patients. It reveals IL-38 may insufficiently secreted in patients who died with P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Besides, the serum IL-38 level of patients with P. aeruginosa pneumonia on the day of admission to the ICU showed significantly positive correlations with IL-10 and the PaO2/FiO2 ratio but negative correlations with IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17, TNF-α, APACHE II score, and PCT In summary, IL-38 might be a molecule for adjuvant therapy in P. aeruginosa pneumonia. In experimental animal models, first recombinant IL-38 improved survival, whereas anti-IL-38 antibody reduced survival in the experimental pneumonia murine model. Secondly, IL-38 exposure reduced the inflammatory response, as suggested by the lung injury, and reduced cytokine levels (IL-1β, IL-6, IL- 17A, TNF-α, and IL-8, but not IL-10). It also increased bacterial clearance and reduced cell apoptosis in the lungs. Furthermore, IL-38 was shown to reduce TBK1 expression in vitro when naive CD4+ T lymphocytes were differentiated to Tregs and played a protective role in P. aeruginosa pneumonia.Conclusions: To summarize, the above findings provide additional insights into the mechanism of IL-38 in the treatment of P. aeruginosa pneumonia.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • MicroRNA-136-5p from Endothelial Progenitor Cells-released Extracellular
           Vesicles Mediates TXNIP to Promote the Dissolution of Deep Venous
           Thrombosis

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      Authors: Feng; Yaping; Lei, Bo; Zhang, Huan; Niu, Luyuan; Li, Xiangtao; Luo, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Fuxian
      Abstract: imageObjective: Endothelial progenitor cells-released extracellular vesicles (EPCs-EVs) have previously been reported to promote the dissolution of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) through delivery of microRNA (miR). Given that, this research was projected to search the relative action of EPCs-EVs transferring of miR-136-5p in DVT.Methods: From EPCs transfected with miR-136-5p agomir or antagomir, EVs were extracted and then injected into DVT mice. Meanwhile, based on the treatment with EPCs-EVs loading miR-136-5p antagomir, silenced thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) lentivirus was injected into DVT mice to perform the rescue experiments. Afterwards, the length and weight of venous thrombosis, EPC apoptosis and inflammatory factors, plasmin, fibrinogen, and thrombin-antithrombin were measured. miR-136-5p and TXNIP expression in DVT mice, and their targeting relationship were evaluated.Results: miR-136-5p expression was suppressed and TXNIP expression was elevated in DVT mice. EPCs-EV reduced the length and weight of venous thrombosis, suppressed cell apoptosis and inflammatory reaction, as well as elevated level of plasmin, and reduced levels of fibrinogen and thrombin-antithrombin in DVT mice. Restored miR-136-5p loaded by EPCs-EV further attenuated DVT but EPCs-EV transfer of depleted miR-136-5p resulted in the opposite consequences. miR-136-5p targeted TXNIP and silenced TXNIP rescued the effect of EPCs-EV transfer of depleted miR-136-5p on DVT.Conclusion: miR-136-5p from EPCs-EV suppresses TXNIP expression to reduce the thrombus size in DVT, offering a promising treatment target for DVT
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Platelets Derived Transthyretin Participate in The Development of Sepsis
           Associated Acute Kidney Injury by Inducing Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis
           of Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells

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      Authors: Lv; Diyu; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Chunmei; Gu, Yi; Zhang, Yang; Li, Xiuhua
      Abstract: imageThe pathophysiology of sepsis-associated acute kidney injury (S-AKI) is not well elucidated. Platelets have been reported to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of AKI, but the true mechanism remains unknown. Herein, we established a mouse model of S-AKI by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Ticagrelor was given 24 h before and after CLP by gastric gavage. Platelets were isolated and analyzed by the label-free proteome approach to identify platelet-derived damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Our results demonstrated that, among all differentially expressed proteins (DEPs), platelet-derived transthyretin (TTR) exerted effects in S-AKI. To examine the direct effects of platelet TTR on human renal proximal tubule epithelial (HK2) cells damage, platelets were co-cultured with HK2 cells. The results indicated that platelet TTR can cause reactive oxygen species production and apoptosis in HK2 cells. Further research found that platelet TTR can also result in increased levels of mRNA and protein for protein kinase B (AKT), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and extracellular regulated protein kinase (ERK), as analyzed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blotting. In conclusion, platelet-derived TTR may be one kind of DAMPs that plays an important role in the development of S-AKI.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Targeted Regional Optimization in Action: Dose-dependent End-organ
           Ischemic Injury with Partial Aortic Occlusion in the Setting of Ongoing
           Liver Hemorrhage

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      Authors: Ronaldi; Alley E.; Lauria, Alexis L.; Paterson, Jeanette E.; Kersey, Alexander J.; Leung, Lai Yee; Burmeister, David M.; Baer, David G.; White, Paul W.; Rasmussen, Todd E.; White, Joseph M.
      Abstract: imageIntroduction: Targeted regional optimization (TRO) describes partial resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta strategy that allows for controlled distal perfusion to balance hemostasis and tissue perfusion. This study characterized hemodynamics at specific targeted distal flow rates in a swine model of uncontrolled hemorrhage to determine if precise TRO by volume was possible.Methods: Anesthetized swine were subjected to liver laceration and randomized into TRO at distal flows of 300 mL/min (n = 8), 500 mL/min (n = 8), or 700 mL/min (n = 8). After 90 min, the animals received damage control packing and were monitored for 6 h. Hemodynamic parameters were measured continuously, and hematology and serologic labs obtained at predetermined intervals.Results: During TRO, the average percent deviation from the targeted flow was lower than 15.9% for all cohorts. Average renal flow rates were significantly different across all cohorts during TRO phase (P 
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Endovascular Perfusion Augmentation for Critical Care Decreases
           Vasopressor Requirements while Maintaining Renal Perfusion

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      Authors: Patel; Nathan T.P.; Gaffley, Michaela; Leblanc, Mathias J.R.; Lane, Magan R.; Kratky, Lauren E.; Hoareau, Guillaume L.; Johnson, M. Austin; Jordan, James E.; Neff, Lucas P.; Williams, Timothy K.
      Abstract: imageBackground: Ischemia reperfusion injury causes a profound hyperdynamic distributive shock. Endovascular perfusion augmentation for critical care (EPACC) has emerged as a hemodynamic adjunct to vasopressors and crystalloid. The objective of this study was to examine varying levels of mechanical support for the treatment of ischemiareperfusion injury in swine.Methods: Fifteen swine underwent anesthesia and then a controlled 30% blood volume hemorrhage followed by 30 min of supra-celiac aortic occlusion to create an ischemia-reperfusion injury Animals were randomized to standardized critical care (SCC), EPACC with low threshold (EPACC-Low), and EPACC with high threshold (EPACC-High). The intervention phase lasted 270 min after injury Hemodynamic markers and laboratory values of ischemia were recorded.Results: During the intervention phase, SCC spent 82.4% of the time avoiding proximal hypotension (>60 mm Hg), while EPACC-Low spent 97.6% and EPACC-High spent 99.5% of the time avoiding proximal hypotension, P 
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Nano-chemically Modified Tetracycline-3 (nCMT-3) Attenuates Acute Lung
           Injury via Blocking sTREM-1 Release and NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation

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      Authors: Meng; Qinghe; Wang, Xiaojing; Guo, Dandan; Shi, Changying; Gu, Raymond; Ma, Julia; Nieman, Gary; Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Luo, Juntao; Cooney, Robert N.
      Abstract: imageBackground: Intratracheal (IT) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) causes severe acute lung injury (ALI) and systemic inflammation. CMT-3 has pleiotropic anti-inflammatory effects including matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibition, attenuation of neutrophil (PMN) activation, and elastase release. CMT-3's poor water solubility limits its bioavailability when administered orally for treating ALI. We developed a nano-formulation of CMT-3 (nCMT-3) to test the hypothesis that the pleiotropic anti-inflammatory activities of IT nCMT-3 can attenuate LPS-induced ALI.Methods: C57BL/6 mice were treated with aerosolized IT nCMT-3 or saline, then had IT LPS or saline administered 2 h later. Tissues were harvested at 24 h. The effects of LPS and nCMT-3 on ALI were assessed by lung histology, MMP level/activity (zymography), NLRP3 protein, and activated caspase-1 levels. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cell counts, PMN elastase, and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myelocytes-1 (sTREM-1) levels, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18, and BALF protein levels were also measured.Results: LPS-induced ALI was characterized by histologic lung injury (PMN infiltration, alveolar thickening, edema, and consolidation) elevated proMMP-2, -9 levels and activity, increased NLRP-3 protein and activated caspase-1 levels in lung tissue. LPS-induced increases in plasma and BALF levels of sTREM-1, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18, PMN elastase and BALF protein levels demonstrate significant lung/systemic inflammation and capillary leak. nCMT-3 significantly ameliorated all of these LPS-induced inflammatory markers to control levels, and decreased the incidence of ALI.Conclusions: Pre-treatment with nCMT3 significantly attenuates LPS-induced lung injury/inflammation by multiple mechanisms including: MMP activation, PMN elastase, sTREM-1 release, and NLRP3 inflammasome/caspase-1 activation.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Thromboelastography for Predicting Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation
           (DIC) in Sepsis

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      Authors: Muzaffar; Syed Nabeel; Azim, Afzal; Siddiqui, Suhail Sarwar
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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