Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8186 journals)
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EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (121 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 102 of 102 Journals sorted alphabetically
AACN Advanced Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Academic Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 101)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acute and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Acute Cardiac Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Acute Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Neonatal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
African Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Annals of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 153)
Annals of Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Annals of the American Thoracic Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Archives of Academic Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Australian Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Bangladesh Critical Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Burns Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Respiratory, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Case Reports in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Chronic Wound Care Management and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 78)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Critical Care Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Critical Care Explorations     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Critical Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 329)
Critical Care Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Current Emergency and Hospital Medicine Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Opinion in Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Egyptian Journal of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
EMC - Urgenze     Full-text available via subscription  
Emergency Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Emergency Medicine (Medicina neotložnyh sostoânij)     Open Access  
Emergency Medicine Australasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Emergency Medicine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Emergency Medicine News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Emergency Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Enfermería Intensiva (English ed.)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Burn Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Hong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Intensive Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Intensive Care Medicine Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intensivmedizin up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Paramedic Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Iranian Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access  
Irish Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Acute Care Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Cardiac Critical Care TSS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal Of Cardiovascular Emergencies     Open Access  
Journal of Concussion     Open Access  
Journal of Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Journal of Education and Teaching in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Emergency Medicine, Trauma and Acute Care     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Emergency Practice and Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Intensive Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Stroke Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the Intensive Care Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
La Presse Médicale Open     Open Access  
Médecine de Catastrophe - Urgences Collectives     Hybrid Journal  
Medicina Intensiva     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medicina Intensiva (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Mediterranean Journal of Emergency Medicine & Acute Care : MedJEM     Open Access  
Notfall + Rettungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Open Access Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Palliative Care : Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Prehospital Emergency Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Resuscitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Resuscitation Plus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Shock : Injury, Inflammation, and Sepsis : Laboratory and Clinical Approaches     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
The Journal of Trauma Injury Infection and Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transplant Research and Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Visual Journal of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Western Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
 AEM Education and Training : A Global Journal of Emergency Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Palliative Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.29
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 58  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0269-2163 - ISSN (Online) 1477-030X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Research methods in palliative care

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Luc Deliens
      Pages: 606 - 607
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Volume 38, Issue 6, Page 606-607, June 2024.

      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-06-06T12:00:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241254937
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 6 (2024)
       
  • What are we planning, exactly' The perspectives of people with
           intellectual disabilities, their carers and professionals on end-of-life
           care planning: A focus group study

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      Authors: Andrea Bruun, Amanda Cresswell, Leon Jordan, Richard Keagan-Bull, Jo Giles, Sarah L Gibson, Rebecca Anderson-Kittow, Irene Tuffrey-Wijne
      Pages: 669 - 678
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Volume 38, Issue 6, Page 669-678, June 2024.
      Background:Deaths of people with intellectual disabilities are often unplanned for and poorly managed. Little is known about how to involve people with intellectual disabilities in end-of-life care planning.Aim:To explore the perspectives of people with intellectual disabilities, families, health and social care professionals and policy makers on end-of-life care planning within intellectual disability services.Design:A total of 11 focus groups and 1 semi-structured interview were analysed using qualitative framework and matrix analysis. The analysis was conducted inclusively with co-researchers with intellectual disabilities.Setting/participants:A total of 60 participants (14 people with intellectual disabilities, 9 family carers, 21 intellectual disability professionals, 8 healthcare professionals and 8 policy makers) from the UK.Results:There were differences in how end-of-life care planning was understood by stakeholder groups, covering four areas: funeral planning, illness planning, planning for living and talking about dying. This impacted when end-of-life care planning should happen and with whom. Participants agreed that end-of-life care planning was important, and most wanted to be involved, but in practice discussions were postponed. Barriers included issues with understanding, how or when to initiate the topic and a reluctance to talk about dying.Conclusions:To develop effective interventions and resources aiding end-of-life care planning with people with intellectual disabilities, clarity is needed around what is being planned for, with whom and when. Research and development are needed into supporting intellectual disability staff in end-of-life care planning conversations. Collaboration between intellectual disability staff and palliative care services may facilitate timely end-of-life care planning and thus optimal palliative end-of-life care.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-06-06T12:00:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241250218
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 6 (2024)
       
  • ‘It was never about me’: A qualitative inquiry into the experiences of
           psychological support and perceived support needs of family caregivers of
           people with high-grade glioma

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      Authors: Katarzyna M Lion, Anthony Jamieson, Abigail Billin, Stephanie Jones, Mark B Pinkham, Tamara Ownsworth
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Family caregivers of people with high-grade glioma often report high rates of psychological distress, which has been attributed to the unique aspects of the disease and onerous care demands. Clinical practice guidelines advocate for caregiver support from diagnosis through to end-of-life and bereavement. Yet, research has identified that caregivers’ support needs are often overlooked.Aim:To explore caregivers’ experiences of psychological support and perceptions of what constitutes optimal psychological support for caregivers in the context of high-grade glioma.Design:Qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews with data analysed using reflexive thematic analysis.Setting/participants:Eighteen current (n = 11) and bereaved (n = 7) family caregivers (73% female, aged 33–69 years) of adults with high-grade glioma participated. Interviews explored caregivers’ perceptions of psychological support.Results:Two major themes were generated. The first theme, ‘It was never about me’, reflected caregivers prioritise for people with high-grade glioma to be well supported despite experiencing their own unmet psychological support needs. The second theme, ‘Continuous, coordinated and personalised support’, highlighted the importance of timely and tailored interventions addressing caregivers’ practical, educational and emotional support needs throughout the illness journey.Conclusions:Caregivers commonly prioritise the support needs of people with high-grade gliomas; yet, have their own distinct needs that vary throughout the illness. Primary care providers have a potential role in facilitating timely access to palliative care, practical support and brain tumour-specific psychological support to meet caregivers’ diverse needs across the care continuum in the context of high-grade glioma.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-06-25T12:44:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241261211
       
  • Views on advance care planning of family members of older adults with
           Turkish and Moroccan backgrounds: An exploratory interview study

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      Authors: Hakki Demirkapu, Wael Edally, Aline De Vleminck, Lieve Van den Block, Stéphanie De Maesschalck, Dirk Devroey
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Significantly fewer individuals with migration backgrounds than native-born individuals undertake advance care planning. Older adults with Turkish and Moroccan backgrounds represent one of the largest ageing non-Western minority groups in Europe. Their relatives could play important roles in facilitating or hindering advance care planning, but their views remain underexplored.Aim:To explore advance care planning knowledge, experience, views, facilitators and barriers among older Turkish and Moroccan adults’ relatives in Belgium.Design:Qualitative thematic analysis of semi-structured interview data.Setting/participants:Twenty-two relatives of older Turkish and Moroccan adults in Brussels, Mechelen and Antwerp, recruited via general practitioners.Results:Participants had limited advance care planning knowledge and had not discussed it with healthcare professionals. Some found discussing end-of-life preferences with relatives beneficial; others opposed the discussion of specific topics or felt discussions were unnecessary, as they felt responsible for caregiving and trusted by their relatives to make future decisions. Barriers included personal and relational characteristics, emotional difficulty and perceived non-urgency. Facilitators included information in older adults’ native languages, general practitioners’ cautious initiation and the involvement of several family members.Conclusions:Relatives of older people with Turkish and Moroccan backgrounds are unfamiliar with advance care planning and have highly variable views on it. People should be given opportunities to discuss advance care planning in a culturally appropriate manner, and the diversity of perspectives regarding whether and how to engage in such planning should be recognised.ClinicalTrials.gov no. NCT05241301.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-06-25T12:38:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241261207
       
  • Factors influencing deprescribing in primary care for those towards the
           end of life: A qualitative interview study with patients and healthcare
           practitioners

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      Authors: Maike S van der Waal, Saskia CCM Teunissen, Allegonda G Uyttewaal, Cathelijne Verboeket-Crul, Hanneke Smits-Pelser, Eric CT Geijteman, Matthew P Grant
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:For people with limited lifetime expectancy, the benefit of many medications may be outweighed by their potential harms. Despite the relevance of reducing unnecessary medication use, deprescribing is poorly enacted in primary care practice.Aim:This study aims to describe factors, as identified by primary care professionals and patients, that influence deprescribing in the last phase of life.Design:Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using a thematic approach.Setting/participants:This study was performed in primary care settings, including general practices, hospices and community care teams in The Netherlands. Purposefully identified primary care professionals (general practitioners, pharmacists, nurses) and patients with limited lifetime expectancy due to advanced chronic illness or cancer and their caretakers were interviewed.Results:Three themes emerged detailing factors influencing deprescribing in the last phase of life in primary care: (1) non-maleficence, the wish to avoid additional psychological or physical distress; (2) reactive care, the lack of priority and awareness of eligible patients; and (3) discontinuity of care within primary care and between primary care and specialty care.Conclusions:Deprescribing is an incremental process, complicated by the unpredictability of life expectancy and attitudes of patients and health care professionals that associate continued medication use with clinical stability. Opportunities to facilitate the deprescribing process and its acceptance include the routinely systematic identification of patients with limited life expectancy and potentially inappropriate medications, and normalisation of deprescribing as component of regular primary care, occurring for all patients and continuing into end-of-life care.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-06-25T12:34:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241261202
       
  • The cost of providing care by family and friends (informal care) in the
           last year of life: A population observational study

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      Authors: Miriam J Johnson, David C Currow, Jade Chynoweth, Helen Weatherly, Gamze Keser, Ann Hutchinson, Annie Jones, Laurie Dunn, Victoria Allgar
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Little is known about replacement costs of care provided by informal carers during the last year of life for people dying of cancer and non-cancer diseases.Aim:To estimate informal caregiving costs and explore the relationship with carer and decedent characteristics.Design:National observational study of bereaved carers. Questions included informal end-of-life caregiving into the 2017 Health Survey for England including estimated recalled frequency, duration and intensity of care provision. We estimated replacement costs for a decedent’s last year of life valuing time at the price of a substitutable activity. Spearman rank correlations and multivariable linear regression were used to explore relationships with last year of life costs.Setting/participants:Adult national survey respondents – England.Results:A total of 7997 adults were interviewed from 5767/9612 (60%) of invited households. Estimated replacement costs of personal care and other help were £27,072 and £13,697 per carer and a national cost of £13.2 billion and £15.5 billion respectively. Longer care duration and intensity, older age, death at home (lived together), non-cancer cause of death and greater deprivation were associated with increased costs. Female sex, and not accessing ‘other care services’ were related to higher costs for other help only.Conclusion:We provide a first adult general population estimate for replacement informal care costs in the last year of life of £41,000 per carer per decedent and highlight characteristics associated with greater costs. This presents a major challenge for future universal care coverage as the pool of people providing informal care diminish with an ageing population.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-06-22T10:31:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241259649
       
  • Development of the TIFFIN recommendations for co-producing palliative and
           end-of-life care research with individuals with lived experience of
           homelessness: A qualitative study

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      Authors: Jodie Crooks, Kate Flemming, Caroline Shulman, Emma Casey, Briony Hudson
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Palliative care for people experiencing homelessness is a complex field. Due to the intricate nuances and heterogeneity in the experience of palliative care for people without secure housing, it is essential that research is informed by people with lived experience of homelessness. However, as homelessness is often associated with loss, trauma and high levels of exposure to death, any co-production of research, particularly in the field of palliative and end-of-life-care, must be trauma-informed.Aim:To produce recommendations for co-producing palliative and end-of-life-care research with people with lived experience of homelessness.Design:A qualitative study comprising semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Data were analysed using iterative, reflexive thematic analysis.Setting/participants:Twenty-seven participants were recruited. Sixteen professionals with experience of co-producing research with people with lived experience of homelessness; eleven people with lived experience of homelessness.Results:Six key themes were developed: transparency, importance of engagement and rapport, facilitating equitable involvement via person centred approach, financial recognition of involvement, involvement and growth through a trauma-informed approach and navigating institutional resistance and attitudes. Recommendations corresponding to the core themes were developed (TIFFIN recommendations).Conclusions:Co-production of palliative care research with people with lived experience of homelessness is essential, but must be done carefully and sensitively. As a population with high levels of premature morbidity and mortality yet low access to palliative care, the TIFFIN recommendations could help to support the involvement of people with lived experience of homelessness in palliative and end-of-life-care care research.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-06-20T05:28:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241259667
       
  • Psychological health in Palliative Care: Thematic analysis of a
           psychiatrist’s and an art therapist’s clinical reflexive journals

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      Authors: Wen Phei Lim, Roxanne Jia Yu Chew, Clare O’Callaghan
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Patients receiving palliative care often face psychological distress, which can be challenging for clinicians to manage. Therefore, reflexive and visual journaling can be used as powerful techniques for clinician selfreflection and personal development. These journals are a form of practice wisdom, providing insights into psychological health in palliative care.Aim:This study aims to describe how patients receiving palliative care experience psychological health, explore the meaning of a palliative care clinician’s work and contribute to the understanding of psychological health in palliative care through the reflexive and visual journals of clinicians.Design:Using Gibb’s reflective cycle as a framework for journaling, this study employs reflexive and visual journaling through the lenses of a psychiatrist and an art therapist. Journal data were analysed using a thematic analysis approach.Setting/participants:The two first authors journaled 107 clinical encounters and created 36 pieces of response art detailing encounters with patients and their families, and clinical conversations in two palliative care centres.Results:Patient attributes and the clinical environment were observed to influence psychological health in palliative care. The patient’s ability to navigate dying, maintain personhood, exert resilience and experience satisfying relationships contribute to psychological health. A clinical environment comprising clinicians with holistic competencies, systems promoting interdisciplinary collaborations and a values-based culture that promotes patient centricity strengthens the delivery of psychological care.Conclusions:Good psychological health in palliative care extends beyond psychopathology and is influenced by the cardinal elements of being human, value systems and systemic elements in the therapeutic environment.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-06-20T05:26:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241259632
       
  • A systematic review on the impact of financial insecurity on the physical
           and psychological well-being for people living with terminal illness

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      Authors: Ross Walker-Pow, Andrea Bruun, Nuriye Kupeli, Alessandro Bosco, Nicola White
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:People living with terminal illness are at higher risk of experiencing financial insecurity. The variance in definitions of financial insecurity, in addition to its impact on the well-being of this population has not yet been systematically analysed.Aim:To understand the definition, prevalence and impact of financial insecurity on the physical and psychological well-being of people living with terminal illness.Design:A systematic review with a narrative synthesis (prospectively registered; CRD42023404516).Data sources:Medline, Embase, CINAHL, AMED, PsycINFO, ProQuest Central and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, from inception to May 2023. Included studies had to measure or describe the impact of financial insecurity on an aspect of participants’ physical or mental well-being. Study quality was assessed using the Hawker tool.Results:A total of 26 studies were included in the review. Financial insecurity was defined using many different definitions and terminology. Out of 4824 participants, 1126 (23%) reported experiencing high levels of financial insecurity. Nine studies reported 21 unique analyses across three domains of physical well-being. Out of those 21 analyses, 10 (48%) reported a negative result (an increase in financial insecurity was reported with a decrease in physical well-being). Twenty-one studies reported 51 unique analyses across nine domains of psychological well-being. Out of these analyses, 35 (69%) reported a negative result (an increase in financial insecurity was reported with a decrease in psychological well-being).Conclusions:People living with terminal illness require support with their financial situation to ensure their well-being is not negatively impacted by financial insecurity.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-06-05T06:04:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241257583
       
  • Electronic symptom monitoring for home-based palliative care: A systematic
           review

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      Authors: Suning Mao, Liu Liu, Cheng Miao, Tianyi Wang, Yue Chen, Zhishen Jiang, Chengge Hua, Chunjie Li, Yubin Cao
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Coordination and communication challenges in home-based palliative care complicate transitions from hospital care. Electronic symptom monitoring enables real-time data collection, enhancing patient-provider communication. However, a systematic evaluation of its effectiveness in home-based palliative care is lacking.Aim:To analyze the feasibility, effectiveness, and limitations of electronic symptom monitoring in home-based palliative care, assess the evidence quality, identify the evidence gap, and suggest implications for future research and practice.Design:This study uses systematic review, meta-analysis, and narrative synthesis (CRD42023457977) to analyze relevant studies until September 2023.Data sources:Electronic searches in MEDLINE, CENTRAL, and Embase until September 2023, complemented by hand-searching of references and citations.Results:This study included twenty studies. The majority of patients positively engage in electronic symptom monitoring, which could improve their quality of life, physical and emotional well-being, and symptom scores without a significant increase in costs. However, firm conclusions about the effects of electronic symptom monitoring on outcomes like survival, hospital admissions, length of stay, emergency visits, and adverse events were limited due to significant variability in the reported data or inadequate statistical power.Conclusion:Introducing electronic symptom monitoring in home-based palliative care holds potential for enhancing patient-reported outcomes, potentially decreasing hospital visits and costs. However, inconsistency in current studies arising from diverse monitoring systems obstructs comparability. To advance, future high-quality research should employ standardized follow-up periods and established scales to better grasp the benefits of electronic symptom monitoring in home-based palliative care.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-06-05T05:58:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241257578
       
  • Bispectral Index monitoring of palliative sedation for home withdrawal of
           tracheostomy ventilation: A case report

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      Authors: Greg Barclay, Michael Barbato, Rachel Yerbury, Laura Harnish, Nilda Miranda
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Tracheostomy ventilation in motor neurone disease is an uncommon life-sustaining treatment. Best practice is having a plan for ventilation withdrawal, but the literature to guide practice is limited. Case reports have documented standard doses of opioids and benzodiazepines used for sedation in such cases.Case:A 49-year-old man was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in 2016. He commenced tracheostomy ventilation in 2018. In 2022 and 2023, planning was undertaken, at the patient’s request, for withdrawal of tracheostomy ventilation at home, when he was no longer able to communicate with technology.Case planning:Planning included Bispectral Index monitoring prior to cessation of ventilation, ensuring this only occurred when deep sedation was achieved. After ventilation withdrawal in 2023, a retrospective review of medications given and his level of sedation on monitoring was undertaken, with family consent.Outcome:Ventilation withdrawal was initiated after deep sedation was achieved, 6 h after commencing subcutaneous infusions of morphine, midazolam, clonazepam and phenobarbital.Lessons:Doses required to achieve acceptable sedation exceeded literature reports. Achieving deep sedation was a longer than expected process.Conclusion:More research using an objective measure of sedation is required, as clinical assessment of sedation in this context is compromised.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-06-05T05:46:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241257580
       
  • “Collateral beauty.” Experiences and needs of professionals caring for
           parents continuing pregnancy after a life-limiting prenatal diagnosis: A
           grounded theory study

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      Authors: Konstanze Wiesner, Kerstin Hein, Gian Domenico Borasio, Monika Führer
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Caring for parents continuing pregnancy after learning about a severe life-limiting condition in their unborn is challenging. Most existing studies focus on affected families, whereas research on the subjective experience of care professionals is scarce.Aim:We aimed to (1) explore experiences and needs of involved care professionals, (2) obtain information about existing care structures, and (3) identify requirements for a structured perinatal palliative care program.Design:Grounded Theory study using theoretical sampling. Data was collected by semi-structured interviews and analyzed following the principles of grounded theory coding and situational analysis.Setting:A total of 18 professionals from 12 different services in Munich and surroundings participated in the study: 8 physicians, 3 midwives, 2 nurses, 1 each pregnancy counselor, grief counselor, chaplain, clinical psychologist, and undertaker.Results:Several organizations provide support for affected parents, but inter-institutional communication is scarce. Due to the lack of a dedicated perinatal palliative care program, professionals make immense and partly unpaid efforts to support concerned parents. Providers experience “collateral beauty” in their work despite all the suffering and grief. This includes the development of a humble attitude and feelings of gratitude toward life, the feeling of having a meaningful task and professional as well as personal growth. Requirements for a structured perinatal palliative care program include: fostering peer support, ensuring regular supervision, and enhancing interdisciplinary exchange.Conclusions:Perinatal palliative care demands a high level of personal engagement but is experienced as highly rewarding by care professionals.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-05-30T09:19:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241255509
       
  • Views of patients with progressive illness and carers about the role of
           digital advance care planning systems to record and share information: A
           qualitative study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jacqueline Birtwistle, Matthew J Allsop, Andy Bradshaw, Pablo Millares Martin, Katherine E Sleeman, Maureen Twiddy, Catherine J Evans
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Digital approaches are being explored internationally to support the elicitation, documentation and sharing of advance care planning information. However, the views and experiences of patients and carers are little understood, impeding the development and impact of digital approaches to strengthen palliative and end-of-life care.Aim:To explore perspectives of patients with progressive illness and their carers on digital approaches to advance care planning, anticipated impact from their use and expectations for their future development.Design:A qualitative study employing thematic framework analysis of data collected from focus groups and semi-structured interviews.Setting/participants:Purposive sample of 29 patients and 15 current or bereaved carers in London and West Yorkshire from hospice settings, non-governmental support and advocacy groups, and care home residents.Results:Four generated themes included: 1. ‘Why haven’t you read what’s wrong with me'’; uncertainty around professionals’ documenting, sharing and use of information; 2. The art of decision-making relies on the art of conversation; 3. The perceived value in having ‘a say in matters’: control and responsibility; 4. Enabling patient and carer control of their records: ‘custodianship is key’.Conclusions:Lived experiences of information sharing influenced trust and confidence in digital advance care planning systems. Despite scepticism about the extent that care can be delivered in line with their preferences, patients and carers acknowledge digital systems could facilitate care through contemporaneous and accurately documented wishes and preferences. There remains a need to determine how independent patient and public-facing advance care planning resources might be integrated with existing digital health record systems.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-05-30T09:12:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241255511
       
  • Integration of primary care and palliative care services to improve
           equality and equity at the end-of-life: Findings from realist stakeholder
           workshops

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      Authors: Sarah Mitchell, Nicola Turner, Kate Fryer, Justin Aunger, Jude Beng, Emilie Couchman, Isabel Leach, Joanne Bayly, Clare Gardiner, Katherine E Sleeman, Catherine J Evans
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Inequalities in access to palliative and end of life care are longstanding. Integration of primary and palliative care has the potential to improve equity in the community. Evidence to inform integration is scarce as research that considers integration of primary care and palliative care services is rare.Aim:To address the questions: ‘how can inequalities in access to community palliative and end of life care be improved through the integration of primary and palliative care, and what are the benefits'’Design:A theory-driven realist inquiry with two stakeholder workshops to explore how, when and why inequalities can be improved through integration. Realist analysis leading to explanatory context(c)-mechanism(m)-outcome(o) configurations(c) (CMOCs).Findings:A total of 27 participants attended online workshops (July and September 2022): patient and public members (n = 6), commissioners (n = 2), primary care (n = 5) and specialist palliative care professionals (n = 14). Most were White British (n = 22), other ethnicities were Asian (n = 3), Black African (n = 1) and British mixed race (n = 1). Power imbalances and racism hinder people from ethnic minority backgrounds accessing current services. Shared commitment to addressing these across palliative care and primary care is required in integrated partnerships. Partnership functioning depends on trusted relationships and effective communication, enabled by co-location and record sharing. Positive patient experiences provide affirmation for the multi-disciplinary team, grow confidence and drive improvements.Conclusions:Integration to address inequalities needs recognition of current barriers. Integration grounded in trust, faith and confidence can lead to a cycle of positive patient, carer and professional experience. Prioritising inequalities as whole system concern is required for future service delivery and research.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-05-11T07:06:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241248962
       
  • “Walk me through the final day”: A thematic analysis study on the
           family caregiver experience of the Medical Assistance in Dying procedure
           day

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      Authors: Rinat Nissim, Paige Chu, Alison Stere, Eryn Tong, Ekaterina An, Debbie Selby, Sally Bean, Elie Isenberg-Grzeda, Gary Rodin, Madeline Li, Sarah Hales
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Legalization of assisted dying is progressively expanding worldwide. In Canada, the Medical Assistance in Dying Act became law in 2016. As assisted dying regulations evolve worldwide, comprehending its subjective impact and broader consequences, especially on family members, becomes pivotal for shaping practice, policy, and training.Aim:The goal of this study is to understand the experience of family caregivers on the assisted dying procedure day.Design:Qualitative, thematic analysis, research using semi-structured interviews.Setting/participants:Family caregivers of patients who received assisted dying in two hospitals in Canada were recruited. Interviews were conducted at least 6 months after patient death. Conceptual saturation was achieved after analyzing 18 interviews.Results:While caregivers expressed gratitude for the availability of Medical Assistance in Dying, they also described the procedure day as potentially jarring and unsettling. We identified five aspects that shaped their experience: attuned support from the clinical team; preparation for clinical details; congruence between the setting and the importance of the event; active participation and ceremony; and pacing and timing of the procedure. Together, these aspects impacted the level of uneasiness felt by caregivers on the procedure day.Conclusions:This study emphasized the importance of a family-centered approach to delivering Medical Assistance in Dying. It underscored recognizing the needs of family caregivers during the procedure day and offering strategies to ease their experience. Healthcare providers in jurisdictions where assisted dying is legal or deliberated should consider the applicability of these findings to their unique context.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-05-09T07:31:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241248725
       
  • Cognitive testing of the Children’s Palliative Outcome Scale (C-POS)
           with children, young people and their parents/carers

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      Authors: Lucy Coombes, Debbie Braybrook, Daney Harðardóttir, Hannah May Scott, Katherine Bristowe, Clare Ellis-Smith, Lorna K Fraser, Julia Downing, Myra Bluebond-Langner, Fliss EM Murtagh, Richard Harding
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The Children’s Palliative Outcome Scale (C-POS) is being developed using best methodological guidance on outcome measure development, This recommends cognitive testing, an established method of item improvement, prior to psychometric testing.Aim:To cognitively test C-POS within the target population to establish comprehensibility, comprehensiveness, relevance and acceptability.Design:Cross-sectional cognitive interview study following COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) methodology and Rothrock guidance on outcome measure development. Cognitive interviews were conducted using ‘think aloud’ and verbal probing techniques.Setting/participants:Children 5–⩽17 years old with life-limiting conditions and parents/carers of children with life-limiting conditions were recruited from 14 UK sites.Results:Forty-eight individuals participated (36 parents; 12 children) in cognitively testing the five versions of C-POS over two to seven rounds. Content and length were acceptable, and all questions were considered important. Refinements were made to parent/carer versions to be inclusive of non-verbal children such as changing ‘share’ to ‘express’ feelings; and ‘being able to ask questions’ to ‘having the appropriate information’. Changes to improve comprehensibility of items such as ‘living life to the fullest’ were also made. Parents reported that completing an outcome measure can be distressing but this is anticipated and that being asked is important.Conclusion:Cognitive interviewing has facilitated refinement of the C-POS, especially for non-verbal children who represent a large proportion of those with a life-limiting condition. This study has enhanced the face and content validity of the measure and provided preliminary evidence for acceptability for use in routine practice.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-05-06T11:05:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241248735
       
  • The effectiveness of out-of-hours palliative care telephone advice lines:
           A rapid systematic review

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      Authors: Therese Johansson, Rachel L. Chambers, Thomas Curtis, Sophie Pask, Sarah Greenley, Molly Brittain, Anna E. Bone, Lynn Laidlaw, Ikumi Okamoto, Stephen Barclay, Irene J. Higginson, Fliss E.M. Murtagh, Katherine E. Sleeman
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:People with palliative care needs and their carers often rely on out-of-hours services to remain at home. Policymakers have recommended implementing telephone advice lines to ensure 24/7 access to support. However, the impact of these services on patient and carer outcomes, as well as the health care system, remains poorly understood.Aim:To evaluate the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of out-of-hours palliative care telephone advice lines, and to identify service characteristics associated with effectiveness.Design:Rapid systematic review (PROSPERO ID: CRD42023400370) with narrative synthesis.Data sources:Three databases (Medline, EMBASE and CINAHL) were searched in February 2023 for studies of any design reporting on telephone advice lines with at least partial out-of-hours availability. Study quality was assessed using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool, and quantitative and qualitative data were synthesised narratively.Results:Twenty-one studies, published 2000–2022, were included. Most studies were observational, none were experimental. While some evidence suggested that telephone advice lines offer guidance and reassurance, supporting care at home and potentially reducing avoidable emergency care use in the last months of life, variability in reporting and poor methodological quality across studies limit our understanding of patient/carer and health care system outcomes.Conclusion:Despite their increasing use, evidence for the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of palliative care telephone advice lines remains limited, primarily due to the lack of robust comparative studies. There is a need for more rigorous evaluations incorporating experimental or quasi-experimental methods and longer follow-up, and standardised reporting of telephone advice line models and outcomes, to guide policy and practice.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-05-06T11:03:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241248544
       
  • Primary palliative care in low- and middle-income countries: A systematic
           review and thematic synthesis of the evidence for models and outcomes

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      Authors: Anna Peeler, Oladayo Afolabi, Michael Adcock, Catherine Evans, Kennedy Nkhoma, Dorothee van Breevoort, Lindsay Farrant, Richard Harding
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Serious health-related suffering is predicted to double in low- and middle-income countries by 2060. Primary care offers the best opportunity to meet Universal Health Coverage in an equitable way. Primary palliative care growth should be evidence-based to ensure provision is feasible, acceptable and culturally congruent.Aim:To identify the current evidence related to primary palliative care and to describe how primary palliative is defined in this setting, dominant typologies of care and meaningful outcome measures in LMICs.Design:A systematic review and thematic synthesis was conducted. We described the nature, extent and distribution of published literature on primary palliative care in low- and middle-income countries, use thematic synthesis to characterize typologies of primary palliative care and design a process model for care delivery in low- and middle-income countries.Data sources:Medline, Psychinfo, Global Health, Embase and CINAHL.Results:Thirty-five publications were included. Nearly half took place in Asia (n = 16, 45.7%). We identified five dominant typologies of primary palliative care, including delivery in primary care clinics by multidisciplinary healthcare teams and palliative care specialists, in people’s homes by healthcare professionals and volunteers and in tertiary healthcare facilities by generalists. We designed a process model for how these models operate within larger health systems and identified barriers and facilitators to implementing primary palliative care in this context.Conclusion:Evidence supporting primary palliative care in low- and middle-income countries is limited, and much of the published literature comes from Asia and southern Africa. Health systems in low- and middle-income countries have unique strengths and needs that affect primary palliative care services that should guide how services evolve to meet future need.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-05-02T05:59:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241248324
       
  • WITHDRAWAL – Administrative Duplicate Publication: Tribute to Derek
           Doyle and Cynthia Goh

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-04-22T10:38:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241243121
       
  • Development of a palliative paramedicine framework to standardise best
           practice: A Delphi study

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      Authors: Madeleine L Juhrmann, Phyllis N Butow, Paul Simpson, Mark Boughey, Meredith Makeham, Josephine M Clayton
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Growing global demand for palliative care services has prompted generalist clinicians to provide adjunct support to specialist teams. Paramedics are uniquely placed to respond to these patients in the community. However, embedding palliative care principles into their core business will require multifactorial interventions at structural, healthcare service and individual clinician and consumer levels.Aim:To develop a palliative paramedicine framework suitable for national implementation, to standardise best practice in Australia.Design:Delphi study utilising questionnaire completion; each round informed the need for, and content of, the next round. Free text comments were also sought in Round 1. Two rounds of Delphi were undertaken.Setting/participants:Sixty-eight participants took part in Round 1, representing six countries, and 66 in Round 2. Participants included paramedics, palliative care doctors and nurses, general practitioners, researchers and carers with lived experience and expertise in palliative paramedicine.Results:Seventeen of the original 24 components gained consensus; 6 components were modified; and 9 new components arose from Round 1. All modified and new components gained consensus in Round 2. Only one original component did not gain consensus across both rounds and was excluded from the final 32-component framework.Conclusion:This study has developed a comprehensive national framework addressing the macro-, meso- and micro-level interventions required to standardise palliative paramedicine across Australia. Future research ought to engage a multidisciplinary team to create an implementation strategy, addressing any perceived barriers, facilitators and challenges for applying the framework into policy and practice.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-03-14T12:10:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241234004
       
  • Supporting best practice in reflexive thematic analysis reporting in
           Palliative Medicine: A review of published research and introduction to
           the Reflexive Thematic Analysis Reporting Guidelines (RTARG)

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      Authors: Virginia Braun, Victoria Clarke
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Reflexive thematic analysis is widely used in qualitative research published in Palliative Medicine, and in the broader field of health research. However, this approach is often not used well. Common problems in published reflexive thematic analysis in general include assuming thematic analysis is a singular approach, rather than a family of methods, confusing themes and topics, and treating and reporting reflexive thematic analysis as if it is atheoretical.Purpose:We reviewed 20 papers published in Palliative Medicine between 2014 and 2022 that cited Braun and Clarke, identified using the search term ‘thematic analysis’ and the default ‘relevance’ setting on the journal webpage. The aim of the review was to identify common problems and instances of good practice. Problems centred around a lack of methodological coherence, and a lack of reflexive openness, clarity and detail in reporting. We considered contributors to these common problems, including the use of reporting checklists that are not coherent with the values of reflexive thematic analysis. To support qualitative researchers in producing coherent and reflexively open reports of reflexive thematic analysis we have developed the Reflexive Thematic Analysis Reporting Guidelines (the RTARG; in Supplemental Materials) informed by this review, other reviews we have done and our values and experience as qualitative researchers. The RTARG is also intended for use by peer reviewers to encourage methodologically coherent reviewing.Key learning points:Methodological incoherence and a lack of transparency are common problems in reflexive thematic analysis research published in Palliative Medicine. Coherence can be facilitated by researchers and reviewers striving to be knowing – thoughtful, deliberative, reflexive and theoretically aware – practitioners and appraisers of reflexive thematic analysis and developing an understanding of the diversity within the thematic analysis family of methods.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-03-12T11:20:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241234800
       
  • Creating more comparable cohorts in observational palliative care studies:
           A proposed framework to improve applicability and replicability of
           research

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      Authors: Slavica Kochovska, Fliss EM Murtagh, Meera Agar, Jane L Phillips, Deborah Dudgeon, Sanja Lujic, Miriam J Johnson, David C Currow
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Palliative care is characterised by heterogeneous patient and caregiver populations who are provided care in different health systems and a research base including a large proportion of observational, mostly retrospective studies. The inherent diversity of palliative care populations and the often inadequate study descriptions challenge the application of new knowledge into practice and reproducibility for confirmatory studies. Being able to define systematically study populations would significantly increase their generalisability and effective translation into practice.Proposal:Based on an informal consensus process by active palliative care researchers challenged by this problem and a review of the current evidence, we propose an approach to creating more comparable cohorts in observational (non-randomised) palliative care studies that relies on defining the study population in relation to a fixed, well-defined event from which analyses are built (‘anchoring’). In addition to providing a detailed and complete description of the study population, anchoring is the critical step in creating more comparable cohorts in observational palliative care studies. Anchoring can be done with respect to a single or multiple data points, and can support both prospective and retrospective data collection and analysis.Discussion:Anchoring the cohort to reproducible data points will help create more comparable cohorts in palliative care whilst mitigating its inherent heterogeneity. This, in turn, will help optimise the generalisability, applicability and reproducibility of observational palliative care studies to strengthen the evidence base and improve practice.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-03-08T05:18:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163241234227
       
  • Feasibility and effectiveness of a two-tiered intervention involving
           training and a new consultation model for patients with palliative care
           needs in primary care: A before-after study

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      Authors: Carlos Seiça Cardoso, Filipe Prazeres, Bárbara Oliveiros, Cátia Nunes, Pedro Simões, Carolina Aires, Patrícia Rita, Joana Penetra, Paulo Lopes, Sara Alcobia, Sara Baptista, Carla Venâncio, Barbara Gomes
      Abstract: Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Evidence suggests that involving General Practitioners in the care of patients with palliative care needs may improve patient outcomes.Aim:To evaluate whether a two-tiered intervention involving training in palliative care and a new consultation model in primary care for patients with palliative care needs is feasible and could reduce patients’ symptom burden.Design:Before-after study including an internal pilot.Setting/participants:Nine general practitioners working in a health region in Portugal and 53 patients with palliative care needs from their patient lists were recruited. General Practitioners received training in palliative care and used a new primary palliative care consultation model, with medical consultations every 3 weeks for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was physical symptom burden, self-reported using the Integrated Palliative care Outcome Scale (IPOS) patient version (min.0–max.1000). Secondary outcomes included emotional symptoms (min.0–max.400) and communication/practical issues (min.0–max.300).Results:Of the 35/53 patients completed the 12-week intervention (mean age 72.53 years, SD = 13.45; 54.7% female). All had advanced disease: one third had cancer (n = 13), one third had congestive heart failure (n = 12); others had chronic kidney disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. After the 12 weeks of intervention, there was a reduction in physical symptom burden [mean difference from baseline of 71.42 (95%CI 37.01–105.85) with a medium-large effect size (0.71], and in emotional symptom burden [mean difference 42.86 (95%CI 16.14–69.58), with a medium effect size (0.55)]. No difference was found for communication/practical issues.Conclusions:Our intervention can be effective in reducing patients’ physical and emotional symptoms.Trial registration:ClinicalTrials.gov ID – NCT05244590. Registration: 14th February 2022.
      Citation: Palliative Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-01-16T09:58:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02692163231219682
       
 
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Showing 1 - 102 of 102 Journals sorted alphabetically
AACN Advanced Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Academic Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 101)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acute and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Acute Cardiac Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Acute Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Neonatal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
African Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Annals of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 153)
Annals of Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Annals of the American Thoracic Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Archives of Academic Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Australian Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Bangladesh Critical Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Burns Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Respiratory, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Case Reports in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Chronic Wound Care Management and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 78)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Critical Care Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Critical Care Explorations     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Critical Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 329)
Critical Care Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Current Emergency and Hospital Medicine Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Opinion in Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Egyptian Journal of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
EMC - Urgenze     Full-text available via subscription  
Emergency Care Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Emergency Medicine (Medicina neotložnyh sostoânij)     Open Access  
Emergency Medicine Australasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Emergency Medicine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Emergency Medicine News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Emergency Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Enfermería Intensiva (English ed.)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Burn Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Hong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Intensive Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Intensive Care Medicine Experimental     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intensivmedizin up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Paramedic Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Iranian Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access  
Irish Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Acute Care Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Cardiac Critical Care TSS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal Of Cardiovascular Emergencies     Open Access  
Journal of Concussion     Open Access  
Journal of Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Journal of Education and Teaching in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Emergency Medicine, Trauma and Acute Care     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Emergency Practice and Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Intensive Care     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Intensive Care Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Stroke Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the Intensive Care Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
La Presse Médicale Open     Open Access  
Médecine de Catastrophe - Urgences Collectives     Hybrid Journal  
Medicina Intensiva     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medicina Intensiva (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Mediterranean Journal of Emergency Medicine & Acute Care : MedJEM     Open Access  
Notfall + Rettungsmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Open Access Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Palliative Care : Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Prehospital Emergency Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Resuscitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Resuscitation Plus     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Shock : Injury, Inflammation, and Sepsis : Laboratory and Clinical Approaches     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
The Journal of Trauma Injury Infection and Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transplant Research and Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Visual Journal of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Western Journal of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
 AEM Education and Training : A Global Journal of Emergency Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

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