Subjects -> AGRICULTURE (Total: 981 journals)
    - AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS (93 journals)
    - AGRICULTURE (680 journals)
    - CROP PRODUCTION AND SOIL (120 journals)
    - DAIRYING AND DAIRY PRODUCTS (30 journals)
    - POULTRY AND LIVESTOCK (58 journals)

AGRICULTURE (680 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4     

Showing 201 - 263 of 263 Journals sorted alphabetically
Economic Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Economic and Industrial Democracy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Economic Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Economic Record     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Egyptian Journal of Biological Pest Control     Open Access  
Emirates Journal of Food and Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Empirical Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Encuentro     Open Access  
Energy Nexus     Open Access  
Ensaios e Ciência : Ciências Biológicas, Agrárias e da Saúde     Open Access  
Environment and Development Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Eppo Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ethiopian Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Ethiopian Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access  
Ethiopian Journal of Sciences and Sustainable Development     Open Access  
Ethology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
EU Agrarian Law     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Euphytica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Eurochoices     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Agronomy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
European Journal of American Culture     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal of Health Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
European Journal of Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
European Review of Agricultural Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
EvoDevo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Farm Engineering and Automation Technology Journal     Open Access  
Fave : Sección ciencias agrarias     Open Access  
Fitosanidad     Open Access  
Florea : Jurnal Biologi dan Pembelajarannya     Open Access  
Folia Horticulturae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Folia Oecologica     Open Access  
Food and Agricultural Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food and Ecological Systems Modelling Journal     Open Access  
Food and Energy Security     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Food and Environment Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Food Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Food Economics - Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section C     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Fronteiras : Journal of Social, Technological and Environmental Science     Open Access  
Frontiers in Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Fundamental and Applied Agriculture     Open Access  
Future Foods     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Future of Food : Journal on Food, Agriculture and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Gema Agro     Open Access  
Geoderma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ghana Journal of Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Global Approaches to Extension Practice : A Journal of Agricultural Extension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Global Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Global Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Journal of Biology, Agriculture & Health Sciences     Open Access  
Gontor Agrotech Science Journal     Open Access  
Hacquetia     Open Access  
Health Economics, Policy and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Heliyon     Open Access  
Hereditas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Horticultural Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Huria : Journal of the Open University of Tanzania     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
IDESIA : Revista de Agricultura en Zonas Áridas     Open Access  
Indian Horticulture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Indian Journal of Animal Nutrition     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Extension Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Horticulture     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge (IJTK)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Agricultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Information Processing in Agriculture     Open Access  
Innovare Journal of Agricultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Innovations in Agriculture     Open Access  
Interciencia     Open Access  
International Advances in Economic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Dairy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal for Parasitology : Parasites and Wildlife     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Agricultural and Life Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Agricultural Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agricultural Management and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Agricultural Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Agricultural Research, Innovation and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Agricultural Resources, Governance and Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Agricultural Science and Food Technology     Open Access  
International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Agriculture Innovation, Technology and Globalisation     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Agriculture, Environment and Food Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Applied Agriculture and Apiculture Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Dairy Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Dairy Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Food Science and Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Fruit Science     Open Access  
International Journal of Green Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Hydrology Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Intercultural Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Pest Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Postharvest Technology and Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Poultry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Recycling of Organic Waste in Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Secondary Metabolite     Open Access  
International Journal of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Management and Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of the Economics of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Tropical Veterinary and Biomedical Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Vegetable Science     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal on Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources : IJ-FANRES     Open Access  
International Letters of Natural Sciences     Open Access  
International Multidisciplinary Research Journal     Open Access  
International Review of Applied Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Review of Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Scientific Journal of Engineering and Technology (ISJET)     Open Access  
Invertebrate Reproduction & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Irrigation and Drainage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Irrigation Australia: The Official Journal of Irrigation Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Italian Journal of Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal (Australian Native Plants Society. Canberra Region)     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal de la Recherche Scientifique de l'Universite de Lome     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal für Kulturpflanzen     Open Access  
Journal of Advances in Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Agrarian Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural & Food Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Agricultural and Marine Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural Chemistry and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Agricultural Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Agricultural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural Production     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural Research and Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Agricultural Research and Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Agricultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural, Biological & Environmental Statistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Agriculture     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture and Ecology Research International     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture and Food Research     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture and Food Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture and Natural Resources Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agriculture and Rural Development in the Tropics and Subtropics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Agriculture and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal Of Agrobiotechnology     Open Access  
Journal of Agromedicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Animal Science and Products     Open Access  
Journal of Animal Science, Biology and Bioeconomy     Open Access  
Journal of Apicultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Applied Communications     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 205)
Journal of Arid Land     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Asia-Pacific Entomology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biological Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Biology, Agriculture and Healthcare     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Biosystems Engineering     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Buffalo Science     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Cereal Research     Open Access  
Journal of Cereal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Citrus Pathology     Open Access  
Journal of Competition Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Cotton Research     Open Access  
Journal of Dairy Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Dairy Science     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Economic Surveys     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Environmental and Agricultural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part B: Pesticides, Food Contaminants, and Agricultural Wastes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Essential Oil Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Extension Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Family and Economic Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Food Protection(R)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Food Security     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Food Security and Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Halal Product and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Horticultural Science and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Horticultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Horticulture and Postharvest Research     Open Access  
Journal of Industrial Hemp     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Integrative Agriculture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Kerbala for Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Land and Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Modern Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Natural Resources and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Natural Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Nepal Agricultural Research Council     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4     

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International Journal of Social Economics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.225
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0306-8293 - ISSN (Online) 1758-6712
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • Examining the role of sub-national level leadership in the implementation
           of cash transfer programs: evidence from Ghana

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      Authors: Adam Salifu , Kennedy Makafui Kufoalor
      Abstract: Although the last two decades have witnessed the implementation of several poverty reduction strategies in developing countries, many have failed to achieve their goal partly because of defective implementation strategies. This paper examines the implementation of one of Ghana’s flagship poverty reduction programs, the Livelihood Empowerment Against Poverty (LEAP), with a focus on how leadership at the sub-national level influences the implementation of the program. Using qualitative research approach, the study selected research participants from two Municipal Assemblies in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana. Using a combination of Focus Group Discussions, Key Informant Interviews and Participant Observation, data were collected from a total of 44 respondents including beneficiaries, officials from the local government (district) and community level actors. The paper shows that leaders at the sub-national level were more reactionary than proactive, thereby playing passive roles in the implementation of the LEAP program. It shows that the interaction between LEAP beneficiaries and district officials is rather low, which among others limits the effective utilization of the cash grant by the beneficiaries. It maintains that, for the LEAP program to achieve its overall goal of reducing poverty, leaders at the sub-national level ought to deploy more transformational leadership tendencies to incite beneficiaries to leap out of poverty through skill and human capital development. The empirical literature is largely silent on the role of leadership in the implementation of cash transfer programs, such as Ghana’s LEAP program at the sub-national level. This study therefore explains the extent to which district level leaders contribute to the effective utilization of cash transfer grants and the human capital development of LEAP beneficiaries in Ghana.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-05-18
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-11-2021-0667
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The impact of cash saving on the food security status of smallholder
           coffee farmers: evidence from southwest Ethiopia

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      Authors: Hawi Gemechu Dinegde , Adugna Eneyew Bekele , Akalu Dafisa Sima
      Abstract: Ethiopia suffers from structural food insecurity due to its low food production, low purchasing power, and climatic shocks such as drought. Coffee is Ethiopia's primary source of foreign earnings, and 95% of it is produced by smallholder farmers. Coffee also provide better income to smallholder farmers than other crops. However, it is unclear how much smallholder coffee producers participate in cash savings and if their savings help them attain food security. In this study, the authors aim to assess the impact of cash savings on the food security of smallholder coffee farmers in Ethiopia. Using cross-sectional quantitative data from 336 randomly selected households and qualitative data from the local community, this study examines the impact of cash savings on household food security. Logistic regression and propensity score matching models were used to analyze the impact of cash savings on households' food security. About, 43.5% of coffee farmers did not participate in cash savings during the study period, while 50.6% had no access to credit. The major factors that limit households' likelihood of participating in cash saving were the gender of household head and family size. Approximately, 38.4 and 27.1% of coffee farmers were food poor based on calorie intake and consumption scores, respectively. Households' participation in saving increases their ability to meet dietary energy requirements and consume diverse foods. To the knowledge of the author, empirical studies that examined the impact of cash saving on the food security status of smallholder farmers in the study area are limited. Therefore, this study brings original contribution and fills research gap on coffee farmers' cash saving and food security; that received little attention from previous researchers in Ethiopia.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-12-2020-0800
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Going organic or staying traditionalistic' The role of agriculture
           information system

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      Authors: Doanh Nguyen Khanh , Ngoc Quynh Nguyen , Thi Tuan Linh Pham
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine how use of agriculture information systems could impact farmers' intention to convert from traditional to organic agriculture production in the mountainous areas of Northern Vietnam, based on a research framework developed from integrating Diffusion of Innovation Theory and Theory of Planned Behavior. Specifically, the authors aim to test the direct impact of use of agriculture information systems on converting intention and the interaction between use of agriculture information systems and perceived economic benefits, perceived non-economic benefits of organic production and market access on the formation of converting intention. Data were collected from a sample survey that included 634 agriculture-producing households in Thai Nguyen, Tuyen Quang and Cao Bang provinces of Northern Vietnam. The logistic regression was used for data analysis. Research findings indicate that perceived economic benefits, non-economic benefits, market access and use of agriculture information systems positively support the converting intention. Moreover, the use of information systems strengthens the links between the converting intention and perceived economic benefits, perceived non-economic benefits and market access. This research is innovative in incorporating the use of agriculture information systems as both direct contributor and moderator in converting decisions.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-05-16
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-11-2021-0720
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Impact of E-commerce adoption on business performance of SMEs in Sri
           Lanka; moderating role of artificial intelligence

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      Authors: Kapila Fonseka , Adam Amril Jaharadak , Murali Raman
      Abstract: With the rapid development of technology in the 21st century, an ever-growing number of organisations are adopting digitalised technologies. The global economy connected with digitalisation is moving towards sustainable development. Individual firms adopt innovative technological strategies to consolidate their position in the competitive market. The study aimed to examine the management perception of the impact of E-commerce adoption (EC) on business performance (BP) – the moderating role of using artificial intelligence (AI). A quantitative study using the deductive approach and the data collected from senior managers of the small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Sri Lanka, and 389 samples were collected using a simple random sampling method. EC, BP and AI were named as the independent, dependent and moderating variables in the model. Porters' generic strategies and resource-based views (RBVs) were applied as the foundation of the study. The independent and moderating variables significantly influenced the BP. Managers' age, gender, education level and job position affect their perception. The global economy is moving towards sustainable development using digitalisation. The firms should blend their strategies with digitalised platforms to survive in the competitive market. The peer review history for this article is available at the following link: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/IJSE-12-2021-0752
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-05-16
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-12-2021-0752
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Do comprehensive labor measures reduce the severity of the pandemic'
           Evidence from India

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      Authors: Sandeep Kumar Kujur , Diti Goswami
      Abstract: As a developing country, India initiated several labor measures to contain the Covid-19 pandemic. This study analyzes the impact of the Covid-19-induced comprehensive labor measures by Indian states on the Case Fatality Ratios and Recovery Rates. Such an analysis will provide deeper insights into the importance of labor measures during a health emergency. It will also be a reality check to the existing National Health Policy. The study examines the four major aspects of labor measures on migration, social security, state-specific needs and health and human rights. The authors use these to formulate a composite labor measure index to comprehend the Covid-19-induced various labor measures. Additionally, the authors apply pooled ordinary least squares and panel random-effects models with the state-wise monthly data to examine the impact of Covid-19-induced labor measures on the severity of the pandemic. Covid-19-induced comprehensive labor measures reduce fatalities and increase recovery rates. In particular, the measures on labor migration, state-specific needs and health and human rights adopted by the Indian states successfully reduce the Covid-19 fatalities and improve the recovery rates. However, the measures taken to address social security have been ineffective in reducing the severity of the pandemic. The study results are robust to various other specifications. The time period covered in this research is very brief and does not account for the qualitative impact of labor measures on the severity of the pandemic. This study specifically addresses the number of Covid-19-induced labor measures and not the resources allocated to their implementations or the number of people who benefited from the measures. This study emphasizes the need for subnational comprehensive labor measures to reduce the severity of the pandemic in developing countries. The study confirms the need for effective Covid-19-induced social security measures to cope with the pandemic in India. This study also ascertains the beneficial impact of the measures on migration, state-specific needs and health and human rights. The authors make a composite labor measure index that captures state-level Covid-19-induced labor measures on diverse aspects, namely migration, social security, state-specific need and health and human rights, hitherto unexplored. In addition, the authors analyze the impact of these labor measures on the severity of the pandemic.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-05-03
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-04-2021-0241
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The effect of international remittances on labour supply in Jordan: an
           empirical investigation

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      Authors: Ghazi Al-Assaf
      Abstract: The purpose of the current study is to examine the effect of international remittances on the labour market participation of women and men left behind in Jordan. The study particularly focuses on the labour supply side for both women and men. The study draws on micro-data from the Jordan Labour Market Panel Survey (JLMPS) in 2010, a nationally representative survey, and addresses the endogeneity of receiving remittances through an Instrumental Variable (IV) approach. The empirical results indicate that remittances are found to have a negative and significant impact on labour supply of both women and men. On average, women who live in remittance receiving household are about 5% points less likely to perform any market work, 3% points less likely to be in wage employment and about 8% points less likely to be engaged in own work. While, men who live in remittance receiving household are about 25% points less likely to perform any market work, 5% points less likely to be in wage employment and about 10% points less likely to be engaged in own work. When the author instruments for remittance receipt of the household, the effect of remittances on likelihood to work is found larger for both women and men. Workers' remittances are considered as one of the vital financial sources for many households in labour exporting countries, most of the investigation on the effects of such financial flows concentrate on the macroeconomic effects. It is therefore important to conduct empirical investigation to fairly and accurately evaluate the impact of these flows on the Jordanian labour market at a microeconomic level.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-05-03
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-06-2020-0384
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Personal finance behaviour: a reasoned action approach

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      Authors: Philomina Araba Sam , Siaw Frimpong , Stephen Kendie
      Abstract: This study sought to examine the impact of financial knowledge, financial attitude, locus of control and income on financial behaviour. The study employed the reasoned action approach framework by Fishbein and Ajzen (2010), with formal sector workers in three districts of Ghana as the population. Questionnaires were used to collect data and analysed using partial least squares structural equation model (PLS-SEM). The results of the study revealed that perceived financial knowledge, financial attitude and locus of control had a significant positive relationship with financial behaviour intention. The assertion that actual financial knowledge and income influence actual financial behaviour was not supported by the findings. However, income moderated significantly the intention–actual financial behaviour relationship. The findings imply that having financial knowledge or earning a higher income in itself does not guarantee the good financial behaviour of people. It is recommended that financial education must focus on developing good financial attitudes and beliefs to enhance the needed behavioural change. To the best of the researcher's knowledge, there is no study of financial behaviour that adopts the methodology and variables used in this research in Ghana.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-02-2021-0097
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Interpreting emotional insights and behavioral intentions of travelers
           based on push and pull motivations during Covid-19

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      Authors: Lopamudra Pattanayak , Lalatendu Kesari Jena , Kalpana Sahoo
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to interpret the travel motivations of travelers in India amidst the coronavirus pandemic. It takes into consideration the “push and pull motivational forces” of travelers, translating their emotional insights and behavioral intentions based on these forces. The research design consists of a mixed-mode approach of study inclusive of semi-directive interviews of 231 participants from India. The statistical computing language R has been used to conduct sentiment analysis. The results obtained show that “fear” and “sadness” are the prevalent emotions among the travelers due to the coronavirus outbreak based on the results of sentiment analysis. While, positive emotions of “trust” and “joy” were missing comparatively. These emotions along with other traveling constraints amidst coronavirus acted as the intrinsic push factors and extrinsic pull factors affecting their travel motivations. The study throws light on the practical and theoretical implications of such travel motivations, emotions affecting these motivations, leading to travelers' behavioral intentions. The work adds to the limited works of tourism literature amidst the coronavirus outbreak.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-26
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-08-2021-0481
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Determinants of indebtedness and institutional credit to rural
           agricultural households: an empirical evidence from South India

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      Authors: Manogna R.L. , Aswini Kumar Mishra
      Abstract: This article attempts to understand the pattern of credit (loan) among agricultural households and identify the correlates of their access to institutional credit for policy imperatives. It also focuses on the inclusivity of institutional credit and debt pattern in terms of outstanding loan in the southern region of India. This study employs the Tobit model along with the Heckman selection model to study the impact of various factors on the institutional borrowing and the amount outstanding. The findings reveal that the access to credit is strongly associated with the socio-economic and demographic characteristics of agricultural households in South India. Asset position of households and size of holding are positively related with the probability of household having access to institutional credit. Education and family size are also found to be associated with higher access to formal credit. On the other hand, the socially disadvantaged households have lower access to formal credit. Similarly, other variables – assets, holding size and education – are associated with higher credit per household. The findings indicate that the strategies to develop agriculture in southern India must encompass efforts to bring the small and marginal farmers under the coverage of institutional credit. There are very few studies that have explored the credit access in South India from the perspective of land class despite the government’s attempts to include small and marginal farmers in the ambit of formal financial services.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-26
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-09-2020-0614
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Wealth-induced child labour: evidence from Ethiopia

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      Authors: Ziade Hailu , Tilahun Girma
      Abstract: This study aims to empirically test the variation in household assets and the incidence of child labour using data from Ethiopia. The study was cross-sectional in design and used a sample of 3,500 observations (children aged 5–17 years) collected from 2,231 households in the rural and urban areas of Amhara and Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples' regions in Ethiopia. The logistic regression model was used to estimate the extent to which predictor variables are associated with the incidence of child labour. The results indicate statistically significant child labour participation by those households who own assets than those who do not. The findings suggest that parents who own assets such as land, livestock and other endowments are likely to employ children in labour than the opposite, i.e. child labour increases with household asset ownership. However, this study did not investigate child labour response to wealth increment at the individual household level. Any initiative to reduce child labour needs to be accompanied by parental awareness and compulsory schooling as one of the key policy tools. This is one of those studies that question the poverty assumption as a cause of child labour and suggests parental selfishness playing a role in accentuating child labour.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-26
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-09-2020-0647
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Vietnamese living habits, wellbeing and working adaptation in face of
           COVID-19's strictest lockdown

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      Authors: Dao Le Trang Anh , Quang Thi Thieu Nguyen , Christopher Gan , Tung Duy Thai , Tu-Anh Nguyen
      Abstract: This study explores the impacts of COVID-19's strictest lockdown on Vietnamese citizens' living habits, wellbeing and work-from-home effectiveness. The study uses a survey questionnaire to gather relevant data from Vietnamese adults during the most recent, strictest lockdown in their cities/provinces since July 2021. The study employs ordinal regression and mediation models to examine the effects of the strict lockdown difficulties on the changes in living habits, wellbeing and work effectiveness of Vietnamese respondents. The empirical result demonstrates that the strictest lockdown adversely affected the living habits of Vietnamese citizens, thus impacting people's wellbeing. Work-from-home lockdown difficulties led to unexpected health issues that bring produce lower working effectiveness. This is the first study to investigate the changes in citizens' living habits, health and working conditions in adherence to Vietnam's strictest COVID-19 lockdown. This is also the first study to examine the impacts of lockdown difficulties on human wellbeing with the mediating effect of changes in living habits, and the influence of work-from-home lockdown difficulties on work effectiveness, with the mediating effect of lower wellbeing based on the literature. Our study suggests solutions to improve Vietnamese people's health and working productivity during and after a strict lockdown.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-22
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-11-2021-0723
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The effects of ethnicity, gender and parental financial socialisation on
           financial knowledge among Gen Z: the case of Sarawak, Malaysia

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      Authors: Lynn Ling Min Wee , Siew Ching Goy
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between financial socialisation experiences, socio-economic factors, demographic characteristics and the financial knowledge of first year undergraduate students. Using a questionnaire, data were collected from a sample of 450 first year university students from both private and public universities. A multivariate regression method was adopted to examine the influence of financial socialisation among respondents of different ethnic groups and their social backgrounds on the individual's financial knowledge. The findings indicate that: firstly, financial knowledge is low among first-year university students in Sarawak. Secondly, male respondents outperform female counterparts in terms of financial knowledge. Thirdly, parental financial socialisation remains the main source of financial knowledge among the students. Fourthly, there are significant differences in financial knowledge across ethnic groups. It is paramount to implement financial education programmes to elevate the financial literacy for both youth and parents since parents remain the primary source of financial socialisation for young adults. The study suggests that financial knowledge varies according to gender and ethnicity. Hence, financial education programmes should be designed to accommodate the differences between groups based on ethnicity and gender to achieve the best outcome. This is the first study that draws a representative sample of university students in Sarawak that examines the effects of ethnicity, gender and parental financial socialisation on financial knowledge among first year university students.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-02-2021-0114
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Understanding the learning gaps between private schools and public schools
           in Ghana

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      Authors: Emmanuel Adu Boahen
      Abstract: The objective of this paper is to evaluate the learning gap between private and public school children in primary school, and ascertain the part of the private–public school learning gap that is due to differences in observables and the part that can be attributed to private school effect. The paper utilized a household survey data from Ghana that assessed children on numeracy and literacy in both English and local languages. The primary methodology for this study is non-linear Oaxaca decomposition. The study also utilized Welch's t-statistics to test if there are any differences in the private–public school learning gaps across several sub-groups. Findings from this study show a substantial gain for private school attendance on both numeracy and literacy. The results show that a little over 60% of the total learning gap in numeracy and literacy in English is explained by observable characteristics. However, observable characteristics almost explain all the learning gaps in the reading and writing of local languages. Evidence from the study suggests that the private school effect is homogeneous across several sub-groups. The results reveal years of education, expenditure on extra classes, religion and urbanicity as the most important variables explaining the gap that is caused by differences in observables. Despite the belief that private school children in Ghana have better learning outcomes, there has not been any study to quantify this learning gap in the country and this study fills this gap. While there is literature on the differences in the learning outcomes between public and private schools, those studies have focused on the differences that are attributable to the private school effect. This article does not only present the differences in the learning outcomes but also shows the proportion that is due to observable characteristics and the part that can be attributed to the private school effect.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-06-2021-0326
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Overcoming barriers to financial inclusion: empirical evidence from India

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      Authors: Dilip Ambarkhane , Ardhendu Shekhar Singh , Bhama Venkataramani , Zericho Marak
      Abstract: This paper attempts to measure the state-wise impact of Prime Minister's Jan Dhan Yojana (PMJDY) in 30 states and 6 union territories of India for the years 2016, 2017 and 2018; and tries to develop a state-wise plan for geographical expansion of outlets optimizing the overall impact of the scheme. The state-wise impact factor is calculated using demographic penetration of the scheme in rural areas, demographic penetration of the scheme in urban areas, percentage of accounts with Rupay cards and average balance in these accounts. The impact factor is postulated to be a linear function of literacy, per capita GDP, demographic and geographic penetration of banks and the number of poor people. The weights for the sub-parameters are derived through principal component analysis. A generalized linear model with heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation consistency method for estimation of the equation with robust standard errors is used. It is found that the scheme has been more effective in the states with higher levels of illiteracy which is contrary to the findings of existing studies where illiteracy is identified as a barrier to financial inclusion. A state-wise plan for geographical expansion of outlets is proposed with a view to optimizing the overall impact of the scheme, along with suggestions for improvement. The data for ATMs and bank mitras are available for some of the years, for some states and hence missing data were estimated using extrapolation or on an average basis. Furthermore, the panel data are available for three years making the period of panel small. These aspects might have affected the efficacy of our estimates. The paper evaluates the newly launched ambitious program PMJDY by the Government of India (GoI), it will have far reaching impact on financial inclusion.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-15
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-04-2020-0254
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Addressing homelessness with the “human ecology economics” framework:
           the role of the business community in California

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      Authors: Roy Evan Allen , Caroline Burns , Saroja Subrahmanyan
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to provide a human ecology economics (HEE) framework for understanding and addressing homelessness, especially as it exists in California and the San Francisco Bay Area. The role of business and private “stakeholders of the homeless” is emphasized. The HEE approach relies on evolutionary and complex systems processes, and it incorporates interdisciplinary material from the humanities. Within HEE, an early-stage exploratory research method is used. In-depth interviews with 16 long-term residents who are also managers in various organizations help to identify private-sector perceptions including how businesses can engage with and support the homeless. In the current balance between needed supplies of “production capital,” which includes affordable housing, shelter beds, food, clothing, medical supplies and so on and “transaction capital,” which is an interacting mix of social capital, informational capital and financial capital, the authors find that the business community needs to pay greater attention to deficits in “transaction capital.” It is beyond the scope of this paper, and beyond the current ability of complex system modeling, to prioritize the best interventions across various types of homeless communities. However, for early-stage research, the authors have provided a useful ontology of the human ecology of homelessness that might inform further research and policy initiatives. Follow-on research might then investigate, with more rigorous methods, the narrower causalities between subcomponents of one’s ontology. Scholars, policymakers and business community activists might appreciate the more comprehensive and accessible interdisciplinary framework for understanding the causes and possible responses to homelessness.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-15
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-08-2021-0490
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Role of social sustainability for financial inclusion and stability among
           Asian countries

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      Authors: Arsalan Haneef Malik , Mohamad Bin Jais , Abu Hassan Md Isa , Awais Ur Rehman
      Abstract: Asia is the largest and most densely inhabited region in the world. Despite exhibiting an extremely expeditious economic growth, the majority of the world population categorized as poor resides in Asia, with more than a billion people financially excluded. This study aims to assess how social sustainability (SS) may increase financial inclusion (FI) and maintain financial stability (FS) in Asia. Established on the stakeholder theory, the study analyzed the association among SS, FI and FS in Asia, employing a generalized method of moment’s estimation. The mediation of FI was also investigated in the relationship between SS and FS. Moreover, this study has analyzed the alternative proxies for the variables of interest to ensure dynamic results. The findings point toward a positive association among SS, FI and FS. Furthermore, FI is observed to be undertaking a partial mediating role between SS and FS. This study emphasizes that both SS and FI have individual parts in the amelioration of FS in Asia, whereas previous studies implied that FI is a mere tool for stimulating SS. Hence, Asian policymakers must keep these outcomes in mind due to their simultaneous contribution to FS. The relationship between SS, FI and FS has received little attention in the literature. No previous study has deduced that increasing SS may instigate an increase in FI and FS. Additionally, quite contrary to previous studies that relied on narrow indicators, this study develops a broad measurement of SS by considering a wide range of crucial indicators for a sustainable society.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-12
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-08-2021-0458
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • How household consumption has changed after an economic crisis

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      Authors: Miguel A. Martínez , Angeles Camara
      Abstract: This work analyzes the economic impact of an economic crisis on consumption in Spanish households, detecting inequalities in household consumption according to the age of the main breadwinner and changes in consumption patterns. In particular, the effects of the financial crisis of 2008 on household consumption are studied and divided according to the main breadwinner's age group to obtain the economic impact of the fall in consumption in young households. The input–output tables of the Spanish economy during the years 2005 and 2015 and data on household consumption based on age group have been used. Economic impact is estimated through multisector modeling, specifically a demand model expressed in monetary terms. This model allows us to obtain the direct impact on the sectors offering the demanded services and the indirect impact due to increase in intermediate demand from these sectors on the rest of them. The results obtained show the changes in household consumption and its effects on different productive sectors, highlighting the following sectors: real estate activities, electricity, gas, steam and air conditioning supply, accommodation and food service activities and manufacturing. This study measures the impact of an economic crisis on the consumption of young households, analyzing all groups of households according to the main breadwinner's age, with the added value of studying the impact of this variation on household consumption and quantifying the positive and negative impact on the different sectors of activity of the Spanish economy.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-06
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-08-2021-0509
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Internet penetration, financial access and new business formation:
           evidence from developing economies

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      Authors: Hazwan Haini , Wei Loon Pang
      Abstract: This study examines whether Internet penetration has a complementary effect on the relationship between financial access and new business formation in 57 developing economies from 2006 to 2018. Using the generalised least squares estimator, the authors employ a framework that allows us to distinguish between the marginal impact of financial access on new business formation in developing economies with high and low levels of Internet penetration rates. Furthermore, the authors distinguish between financial institutions and financial markets. The authors find that increased accessibility for financial institutions promotes entrepreneurial activity, while financial market access has a negative relationship with new business formation. Furthermore, the authors find that the marginal impact of financial institution access increases in magnitude as Internet penetration increases. The effect does not hold for financial markets. The major limitation lies in the measurement of new business formation, as it focuses on the formal entrepreneurial sector and overlooks the informal economy and entrepreneurs operating as sole proprietors. Policymakers should continue to promote the development of the information communication and technology sector and digitalisation policy while increasing financial accessibility in the financial system. This study provides new empirical evidence on the greasing role of technology to leverage the impact of financial access on new business formation. Furthermore, the study distinguishes this effect by differentiating between financial institutions and markets.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-05
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-09-2021-0527
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Determinants of the risk perception of farmer–herder conflicts:
           evidence from rural Nigeria

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      Authors: Amaka Nnaji
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine the social, economic and demographic determinants of rural households' risk perception of farmer–herder (FH) conflicts in Nigeria. The paper also investigates two aspects of FH conflict risk perception relating to food production and physical insecurity. A FH conflict risk perception model is constructed and tested using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), ordinary least squares (OLS) and seemingly unrelated regression equation (SURE) models. The study uses cross-sectional data from 401 rural households in Nigeria. Results show that in addition to economic determinants like farm size, land ownership and crop diversity, socio-demographic variables like age and number of languages spoken are significant predictors of household risk perception of FH conflict. Second, although gender and frequency of FH conflict have no significant effect on the risk perception of FH conflict, there is a significant moderating effect of frequency of FH conflicts on the influence of gender on the risk perception of FH conflict. Third, findings also highlight the important predictors of the risk perception of FH conflicts relating to food production and physical insecurity. Findings give insight into policies targeted at influencing the risk behaviour of rural households. This is important to aid the development of efficient risk management initiatives.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-05
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-10-2021-0578
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Regional well-being in Romania: assessment after a decade of EU
           accession

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      Authors: Dorina Lazar , Cristian Marius Litan
      Abstract: This paper aims to study through a comprehensive set of socioeconomic indicators the regional level of well-being achieved in Romania, and monitor the improvements and disparities in well-being after a decade of accession to the European Union. A dashboard of 20 socioeconomic indicators for measuring nine dimensions of well-being for Romanian counties is proposed. Using the Adjusted Mazziotta-Pareto method are built composite indicators, which allow us to assess the trend of overall welfare scores for each county. The data are collected at the county level, for 42 counties, and each year from 2006 to 2017, from administrative sources. The overall well-being index has an increasing trend for all counties, but the growth rate varies from one county to another. The economic factors, geographic location and share of the urban population matter. For most counties, the evolution of well-being scores is below that recorded at the country level. Romania has registered significant improvements in health, housing, income and access to public utilities dimensions. The counties are ranked by level of well-being. Some empirical measures suggest a slight tendency of socioeconomic disparities to increase over time. The paper attempts to fill some gaps in measuring the level and disparities of welfare in a fast-growing emerging economy. The Romanian regional context is to a lesser extent explored in a multidimensional approach, from spatial and temporal points of view.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-04
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-08-2021-0480
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Gender achievement gap in the national secondary education examination in
           Ethiopia

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      Authors: Melaku Abegaz , Hossein Eftekari
      Abstract: This paper examines the gender achievement gap in the Ethiopian secondary education system using tenth-grade national examination results for the period 2002/03–2013/14. Statistical tests are employed to determine equality of the average male and female GPAs (grade point average), and equality of the proportions of female and male test-takers in the upper and lower achievement distributions. Further, a panel fixed effects model is used to evaluate factors that affect the regional average GPAs by gender and to determine whether those factors could explain observed gender achievement gaps. Results indicate statistically significant gender achievement gaps in all regional states and the capital city. The gap has been persistent with a minor declining trend and will not be closed if continued at the current trend. The authors also find that the regional average male and female test scores could be explained partially by factors such as pupil-teacher ratio, the proportion of rural students and access to secondary schools. These factors, however, cannot explain the observed gender achievement gap. The study uses regional data collected from the annual educational abstracts published by the Ethiopian ministry of education. It investigates the trends of the gender achievement gaps across the regional states and overtime at the tenth-grade level. It depicts the persistence of the gap hindering girls from furthering their education.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-30
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-09-2021-0564
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Air pollution trajectories and life expectancy in Nigeria

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      Authors: Stanley Emife Nwani
      Abstract: The purpose of the study is to examine the relationship between air pollution and life expectancy considering the roles of institutional quality, agricultural output, foreign direct investment (FDI) and other socio-economic variables in Nigeria from 1981Q1 to 2019Q4. The study employed spliced quarterly data from annual series collected from the World Bank development indicators and Central Bank of Nigeria. The dynamic multivariate models were analysed using the vector error correction mechanism (VECM), variance decomposition and Granger causality techniques. The VECM result indicated a statistically significant adverse effect of air pollution on life expectancy. However, institutional quality, gross domestic product per capita, agricultural output, government social expenditure and school enrolment rate ameliorate the adverse health effects of air pollution, while FDI had mixed effects on life expectancy at different significance levels and at varying lag lengths. The Granger causality result revealed a uni-directional causality from air pollution to life expectancy; bidirectional causal chain between agriculture, FDI, government social expenditure and life expectancy, while a uni-directional causal linkage run from life expectancy to income per head and from school enrolment to life expectancy respectively. However, there is no evidence of causation between institutional quality and life expectancy due to weak institutional quality, but foreign direct invest causes carbon emission in a uni-directional manner in line with pollution haven hypothesis. The study's modelling is limited by not considering the resource curse variable in the model due to paucity of data. Nigeria is the biggest crude oil exporter in Africa and ranks 13th globally with daily output of about 2.4 m barrels. Thus, the negation of resource curse in air pollution–life expectancy nexus de-emphasises the effectiveness of rich resources on health and environment. Future studies could address this limitation by incorporating resource curse in environmental-health models for Nigeria. It is imperative for the country to adopt stringent anti-air pollution strategies that would establish a balance between FDI attraction and agricultural expansion to the benefits of her citizens' longevity. Also, education should be considered as a strategic action to enhance life expectancy through expansion in the provision, accessibility and affordability to improved school enrolment rate. The choice of quarterly time series over annual data helped to establish the current relationship between air pollution and life expectancy using efficient estimators. The study contributes to literature by disaggregating yearly series into quarterly series, which has implications for the efficiency of the estimates, unlike earlier studies which ignored this fundamental process. The result of this study produced reliable policy direction for improvement in life expectancy in an emerging economy since quarterly estimates are more robust and reliable for forecasting than its yearly counterpart. The outcome of the study extended the original tenets of the Grossman's health stock theory using the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) and pollution haven hypotheses (PHH).
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-28
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-06-2021-0351
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Microfinance and entrepreneurship: the enabling role of social capital
           amongst female entrepreneurs

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      Authors: Abiola Ayopo Babajide , Demola Obembe , Helen Solomon , Kassa Woldesenbet
      Abstract: This paper examines mechanisms through which social capital strengthens microfinance impact on fostering female entrepreneurial success. Specifically, the study focuses on how, and to what extent, resources embedded in social networks determine MF impact on entrepreneurial success. Survey data were collected from 276 female micro-institutions entrepreneurs using multi-stage stratified random sampling across 80 MF institutions in three South-Western Nigerian states. Hypotheses were tested using ordinal regression analysis. The study found that relational and network social capital had a positive and significant influence on female entrepreneurial success. Specifically, intra-group trust and productive network ties amongst female entrepreneurs in poor communities predicated the positive impact of MF on entrepreneurial success. Also, resources embedded in networks are more positively correlated to education level and marital status. Furthermore, MF could have more positive impact for borrowers with sustainable relationships with loan officers who organise MF provisions and understand the entrepreneurs’ context. The research provides empirical evidence for the relationship dynamics between female entrepreneurs and MF institutions, by emphasising the importance of deploying different forms of social capital in sustaining MF impact on female entrepreneurial success.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-25
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-11-2020-0745
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Quantile analysis of the aspirational middle class in Malaysia: spending
           behaviour emulation or dissociation'

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      Authors: Jan-Jan Soon
      Abstract: This paper focusses on how the educated and less-educated middle class react differently to income increases, against an intertwined literature backdrop of Engel's law, quality of life, aspirational and conspicuous consumption. The paper seeks to answer two main questions: Is there evidence of the middle class, particularly the educated, trying to emulate the upper class by shifting towards aspirational consumption' Is there any distinct expenditure behaviour amongst the middle class' Combining the Malaysian 2016 Household Expenditure Survey (HES) and the 2016 Consumer Price Indices datasets, quantile estimations are applied on the merged dataset of 14,326 households. There is evidence of the educated middle class emulating the upper class in terms of food share, home furnishing and starchy produce expenditure behaviour. The less-educated middle class exhibits a predilection for home furnishing expenditures when income increases, whilst the educated shows signs of dissociating themselves from such material acquisitions. The paper concludes that the middle class is collectively an aspirational class, but with diverging paths towards upward social mobility between the educated and less-educated households. Aspirational consumption of the middle class has not been given detailed empirical treatment at the household micro-level in the literature, especially for upper-middle income countries like Malaysia. The paper starts off by detecting an anomaly in the Engel's food share coefficients, where the middle class sees unexpected larger declines in food share than those of the upper class. This is the paper's departure point from the literature.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-15
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-06-2021-0367
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Trust and beliefs about robots in Latin America

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      Authors: Andres Marroquin , Antonio Saravia
      Abstract: The goal of this paper is to study the factors that determine individuals' beliefs about robots in Latin America. The authors highlight the role of interpersonal trust in shaping these beliefs. The authors use data from 2018 Latinobarómetro survey in 18 Latin American countries. The analysis includes an empirical strategy that reduces overt bias and weighs hidden bias. Robots are not generally supported or positively perceived in Latin America. However, people are less negative about robots when they (1) trust others, (2) are male, (3) are single, (4) are more educated, (5) support democracy and (6) favor free imports. Interpersonal trust is the most consistent covariate. The results provide support to the idea that trusting robots can be the result of trusting humans working in the technological sector (Coeckelbergh, 2012). This study faces some limitations. The first one relates to the standard caveats associated with the use of survey data – interviewees may not express their true beliefs. Another limitation is that this study examines data for only one year (the 2018 Latinobarómetro survey). Finally, although propensity score matching allow to control for endogeneity due to observable characteristics and the authors perform a sensitivity test regarding hidden characteristics, the nature of the data does not allow to guarantee that there is a causal effect from interpersonal trust to beliefs about robots. The authors find that the positive relationship between trust and beliefs about robots is particularly strong in the area of health. Medical companies could consider these findings when designing and promoting robots. Negative views about robots may delay the adoption of new technology in the region. To facilitate the adoption of new technologies, stakeholders should pay attention to the prevalent levels of interpersonal trust in society. This is especially important in developing countries. To the authors’ knowledge this is the first study that empirically links beliefs about robots and interpersonal trust.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-15
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-08-2021-0504
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Job satisfaction in telecommunications industry: empirical study in
           Uzbekistan

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      Authors: Sitora Inoyatova , Olmas Kuchkarovich Isakov
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to investigate the level of job satisfaction among employees in the telecommunications company in Uzbekistan and assess the effects of demographic and work-related variables on job satisfaction. A survey questionnaire method was used to obtain the data from 403 employees working in the telecommunications company in Uzbekistan. The data were collected using the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire short-form. The results of the study indicated a significant effect of age and tenure on the job satisfaction. Age was found to be positively associated with the job satisfaction and intention to stay. The older employees are more likely to be satisfied and stay with the current company for the next 5 years. The tenure was also found to be positively correlated with the overall job satisfaction and intrinsic job satisfaction. It also has been revealed that male employees are less likely than female employees to stay in the company for the next 5 years ceteris paribus. According to the survey results, there was no significant impact of education level, gender, marital status or job field on the job satisfaction of the employees. The results of the study demonstrate interesting job satisfaction findings of employees working in the telecommunications company in Uzbekistan, which can draw attention of the senior management and human resource departments to increase the level of job satisfaction levels among employees and start implementing the job satisfaction measures within the companies in Uzbekistan in order to create effective human resource management systems and retain qualified employees.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-15
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-09-2021-0528
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Potential demand for Islamic banking: examining the Islamic consumer
           behavior as driving factor

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      Authors: Hesi Eka Puteri , Baginda Parsaulian , Heru Aulia Azman
      Abstract: This study aims to examine the impact of Islamic consumer behavior on the potential demand for Islamic banking by using the Islamic religiosity approach. By classifying the potential demand into the high, middle and low categories, this study attempts to examine whether the level of potential demand is influenced by aspects of social, cultural, psychological and personal considerations. This research was a quantitative study based on a survey on 18 regions in West Sumatera, Indonesia in 2019. Data were collected from 1818 respondents and analyzed by using multinomial logistic regression. The findings reveal that the increasing factor of social and personal causes the tendency of the community to be in the high potential group as an Islamic bank customer by 1,661 times and 1,592 times as compared to in the low potential group. Psychological aspects also increase the probability of the community being in the medium demand potential as an Islamic bank customer. Although this study has attempted to elaborate on the consumers’ behavior variable with an Islamic religiosity perspective, theoretically this concept is not yet well established and still requires many applications in future research. Future studies are expected to enrich this analysis by examining more cases with communities that have different socio-demographic characteristics. This study also limits the exogenous variables used as predictors. This study aims to assist managers of Islamic banks to formulate strategies for developing Islamic banks based on Islamic consumer behavior because the facts showed that understanding of Islamic law and religious education in the family, Islamic lifestyle and also religious beliefs affected the potential demand for Islamic banks. From a policy perspective, this finding can be a consideration for Islamic banks, that the expansion of the market share of Islamic banks will be more appropriately directed to Muslim groups with indications of high adherence to Islamic values, those with Islamic lifestyles, and the Muslim community groups with Islamic understanding backgrounds and good religious education. This study measures the impact of Islamic religiosity on the probability of people being in the high, medium or low potential group in adopting Islamic bank services, and these findings are important in the development of Islamic banking in Muslim-majority countries.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-15
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-10-2021-0614
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Gender differences in extractive activities: evidence from Ghana

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      Authors: William Baah-Boateng , Eric Kofi Twum , Emmanuel Kwaku Akyeampong
      Abstract: The study seeks to examine women’s participation in Ghana’s extractive growth-driven economy and the quality of this participation in terms of employment status and earnings relative to their male counterparts and establish whether these differences constitute discrimination for policy attention. The study adopts both quantitative and qualitative methodological approaches to assess the extent of gender inequality in employment and earnings in the Ghanaian extractive sector and the sources of these differences. It computes three segregation indices to ascertain the degree of unequal gender distribution of employment based on nationally representative labour force and living standards surveys followed by quantitative analysis of gender earnings differences using Oaxaca–Blinder decomposition technique. This is complemented by the results of Focus Group Discussion to go behind the numbers and examine the sources of the employment and earnings differences between men and women in extractive activities. The authors observe lower participation of women in the extractive sector, with a considerable degree of gender segregation and existence of gender earnings gap in favour of men due to differences in observable characteristics such as age, education and occupational skills. There is also evidence of existence of discrimination against women and indication of barriers that impede women’s involvement in high-earning extractive activities in Ghana. The study suggests measures to remove these barriers and improve women’s education particularly in science, technology, engineering and mathematics to address the gender imbalance in extractive activities in Ghana. Women’s low involvement in the strong extractive growth-driven process has implication for undermining the effort of empowering women economically. The study draws argument from the literature and adopts a combination of quantitative and qualitative techniques to establish gender in terms of employment distribution and earnings in favour of males in the Ghanaian extractive sector. This has the effect of undermining women’s economic empowerment and exacerbating gender inequality in the country.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-10
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-05-2021-0283
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Partnership building between NGOs and Indonesian local governments: a case
           study of integrative leadership immersing itself in innovativeness

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      Authors: Sumiyana , Wivaqussaniyyah , Muhadjir Darwin , Agus Heruanto Hadna
      Abstract: This study investigates partnership building between non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and the regencies of Gunung Kidul, Bantul, Sleman, Yogyakarta Province and Indonesia's central government. This study focuses on the perspective of the collaboration theory to reflect the usefulness of different leadership types. Furthermore, this study identifies the impact of partnership building on program effectiveness. This study uses an instance case study with thirteen informants who are NGO activists or members of the village, district and provincial governments. This study concludes that NGOs and local government partnerships have reached a collaborative level, characterised by their stakeholders' unity, regular communication, mutual trust and consensus in decision-making. This collaborative relationship also shows the integrative leadership style, characterised by openness and active networks with all external parties. Furthermore, this study identifies that partnership building positively impacts and increases the outcomes, especially in capacity building and commitment. Finally, this research proposes a series of innovative policies through stakeholder mapping, forming joint forums, sharing responsibilities and accentuating intimate partnerships. This research is unique in the following ways: First, this study argues that partnership building occurs due to a specific social contract between a local government and an NGO. The authors show that this contract occurs when a local government possesses innovativeness. Local governments know which programs are not financed from the central budget. They accent their innovativeness for increasing society's welfare by collaborating with an NGO. Second, local governments realise that building partnerships with NGOs is no longer an option but an obligation. This study considers the similarity objectives of providing the best services they can to the community, with the differentiation of the capacities and resources owned by both. Third, this study demonstrates that partnerships between NGOs and governments positively impact communities' development in emerging economies with all the obstacles that exist.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-10
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-07-2021-0377
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Confident or captured' Commercial producers in South Africa

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      Authors: Kandas Cloete , Stefan Mann , Marion Delport
      Abstract: Among the many things that land reform in South Africa suffers from is the lack of scientific attention paid to the willingness of commercial producers to exit or contract. This research aims to contribute to literature on this phenomenon. The interplay between the business confidence and the opportunity costs of a farming enterprise represented in a survey sample of 450 commercial farm owners is investigated, paying special attention to owners who want to, but cannot exit. The regression analysis suggests that both forces have a strong influence on structural change, as they depict the rather complex interplay between the two main factors that may keep farms in business, one of which is a positive business climate and the other the capital invested. A subsequent cluster analysis indicates that there is a major cluster of producers who are pessimistic about the prospects of their farming business, but who are unable or unwilling to leave their farms. A limitation of our study is the fairly small sample size (91 exiters in the sample), so caution is advised in generalising the results. Another limitation is the overrepresentation of the Western Cape. It is likely that the productivity of South African agriculture could improve if some of these producers caught in the “system” could leave farming to create new opportunities for entrepreneurial entrants. The importance of a captured state has been neglected both in theoretical frameworks and in practical concepts of commercial agriculture in South Africa.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-03
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-08-2021-0510
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Carbon emissions, inequalities and economic freedom: an empirical
           investigation in selected South Asian economies

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      Authors: Megha Jain , Simrit Kaur
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to analyze and empirically test the impact of Economic Freedom [(EF) measured by size of the government] and inequality on environmental pollutants in addition to macroeconomic variables like per capita GDP, governance indicators, etc. along with existence of non-linear (Kuznets) postulation between economic growth and per capita emissions. The paper examines the select Asian nations' data attributes, first qualitatively using correlation data technique, followed by empirical testing using differenced Generalized Methods of Moments (GMM). Using the data of selected Asian countries for the period from 1981 to 2016, the authors have applied a dynamic panel technique. The key findings that emerge from the study are as follows: first, there is weak evidence for the existence of the Kuznets curve based on the empirical results; second, the results indicate that increased EF (by lower government size) could enable to contain carbon emissions; third, there is a negative relationship between democracy and environmental quality (corroborating to the existing studies on carbon emissions); and fourth, there is a strong statistical evidence that increasing income inequality pairs with greater emissions in the middle range of Gini. The paper conforms to the universally held conviction that government interventions are essentially less productive and the desirability of a reduced size of the government in realizing sustainable green growth with equity. In an era of liberalization and privatization, it is argued that the role of the government needs to be redefined if not necessarily truncated. The current paper incorporates Gini (inequality measure) through its intercountry range dummies to study the differential effect of Gini on carbon emissions. Also, in some of the recent studies, distributional issues have surfaced explicitly in the discussion of income–climatic change relationship, but EF largely remains missing. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the same empirically.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-02-2021-0108
      Issue No: Vol. 49 , No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Impact of cooperative entrepreneurship on territorial human development in
           Morocco – Spatial analysis

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      Authors: Aomar Ibourk , Soukaina Raoui
      Abstract: This paper deals with the spatial impact of cooperative entrepreneurship on territorial human development in Morocco. Within the background of the new development model in Morocco, this study aims to explore how the social and solidarity economy (SSE) through the cooperative model can reduce territorial inequalities by promoting economic dynamics in territories with suboptimal human development. The empirical material is compiled from a database of 75 provinces in Morocco. After establishing a typology of the SSE in these territories, a test of the spatial effect of some indicators, such as the rate of urbanization and female employment, was undertaken. Moreover, a spatial impact study of the cooperatives' entrepreneurship and the local human development index will be carried out among the cooperatives' numbers and the share of their members. This study's results indicate a diversity in the participation of the SSE in the regulation of territories. First, there is a heterogeneous relationship in the Moroccan space. Then, the cooperative model in Morocco shows that it plays a central role in readjusting social and spatial inequalities, pointing territories with suboptimal human development. Although our theoretical contribution covers the impact of the three components of the SSE on territorial human development in Morocco. The empirical work of this study is limited to only one component of the SSE which are the cooperatives. The future perspectives of this work are to follow the impact of the three components after the implementation of the new development model in Morocco. The main implication of this study is to map out the spatial role of cooperatives in territorial planning in Morocco. Policy makers still need to consolidate the implication of the cooperatives as a tool for promoting spatial equity, through the governance and the convergence between the different support and accompaniment programs for cooperatives in areas of human development deprivation. The originality of this work comes from the exploration of the spatial dimension for the analysis of the role of the cooperatives for the promotion of a territorial human development. The SSE typologies described in the Moroccan provinces can allow actors to develop a business plan for the implementation of SSE initiatives.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-15
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-03-2021-0145
      Issue No: Vol. 49 , No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Putting participation into praxis: the struggle with Karol Wojtyla's

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      Authors: Noe Montaño Santillan
      Abstract: This paper scrutinizes the relevance of Karol Wojtyla's Laborem Exercens. In doing so, the endeavor employs participatory method for workers to do the following: identify problems experienced or observed in unionism, determine what/who causes hindrance in achieving the union's aim, describe the future of unionism if the problems are not addressed and draw possible solutions. Even though the Catholic Church had issued encyclicals that deal with workers' rights and had maintained in its social teachings affirmative arguments for workers, these must be seen yet in the Philippines where unionists are vilified and red-tagged, needing the prophetic role of Church leaders affirming workers' rights. Human work is not only personal but also social, political and economic; it is a collective act. Though Wojtyla affirmed workers' rights, the workers can hardly feel the presence of the Church. AMA Sugbo – KMU (Alyansa sa mga Mamumuo sa Sugbo – Kilusang Mayo Uno/Workers' Alliance in Cebu – May 1 Movement), a Cebu-based labor group, needs the role of the Church in asserting rights to unionize and launch strikes, but, as Marx maintained, relies on the workers' dedication to arouse, organize and mobilize because many of the workers, as Althusser argued, view social institutions as state apparatuses; hence, there's a need to review the participation of the Church with Wojtyla's Laborem vis-à-vis neoliberal mode of production.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-11
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-12-2021-0727
      Issue No: Vol. 49 , No. 6 (2022)
       
  • The locational and gendered impacts of Livelihood Empowerment Against
           Poverty (LEAP) on children education in Ghana

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      Authors: Franklin N. Mabe , Dominic Tasila Konja , Maame Dokua D. Addo , Joseph A. Awuni
      Abstract: This study seeks to identify locational and gendered determinants of inclusion of households in Livelihood Empowerment Against Poverty (LEAP) and estimate the respective impacts of LEAP on children education enrolment of beneficiary households in Ghana. The study used secondary data of the Ghana Living Standard Survey Round 7 and employed the propensity score matching (PSM) model for the analysis of the objectives. The PSM results established that different factors determine the inclusion of households in LEAP in rural and urban areas. Similarly, different factors determine the inclusion of male-headed and female-headed households in the programme. The impact of LEAP on children education is higher in urban areas compared to rural areas. The impact of LEAP on children's education is 10.4% higher in urban areas than in rural areas. Lastly, female-headed households are better at using the cash received from LEAP to take care of their wards' education relative to male-headed households. The study recommends that different selection criteria should be used in selecting male-headed and female-headed as well as urban and rural poor households for inclusion in the LEAP programme. Female-headed households should be prioritised for benefiting from LEAP. The social welfare department disbursing the LEAP funds in rural areas should intensify education on the need for LEAP beneficiary households to enrol their wards in schools. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that household inclusiveness of LEAP is influenced by locational and gendered factors. Also, the impact of LEAP on children education enrolment is relatively higher in urban areas than rural areas. Lastly, female-headed households relatively educate their wards with LEAP benefits than male-headed households.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-11
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-10-2021-0596
      Issue No: Vol. 49 , No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Natural resource effect on child health outcomes in a multifactor health
           production model in developing countries

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      Authors: Azmat Gani
      Abstract: This study investigates if wealth from natural resources impacts child health in developing countries. The methodology includes testing the effect of rents from natural resources on under-five mortality rates using a multifactor health production model for 57 developing nations. The panel estimation procedure was applied to data covering 2002 to 2017, disaggregated by non-renewable and renewable resources and low and medium human development countries. The results provide strong evidence that wealth from total natural resources has not been associated with reductions in under-five mortality rates. However, disaggregation of the sample countries by natural resource constituents revealed that only the wealth of non-renewable is strongly inversely associated with under-five mortality rates. Further disaggregation of countries by the low and medium human development constituents revealed a statistically insignificant negative correlation of non-renewable resources wealth and under-five mortality in the low human development countries. In contrast, the results of the medium human development countries revealed that wealth from natural resources (both non-renewable and renewable) had not been associated with any reductions in under-five mortality rates. The results also confirm that immunization levels, nutrition, private spending on health care, air quality, urban living and countries closer to the equator are other strong correlates of under-five mortality rates in low human development countries. The findings here have implications for the timely achievement of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 3 (to reduce under-five deaths to around 25 per 1,000 live births by 2030). Governments ought to ensure that incomes from the extractive sector are aligned in forms that promote and feed into improving child health wellbeing. This research creates a shift from aggregate health wellbeing research agenda to investigate how specific aspects of human development can be linked to wealth from non-renewable and renewable natural resources in developing nations. It adds new knowledge and provides health and natural resources policymakers opportunities to combine their policies and synergize efforts to improve child health outcomes.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-07
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-06-2021-0332
      Issue No: Vol. 49 , No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Achieving SDG 5, gender equality and empower all women and girls, in
           developing countries: how aid for trade can help'

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      Authors: Chandan Kumar Roy , Huang Xiaoling
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to investigate whether aggregate and sectoral disbursement of aid for trade (AfT) facilitates achieving gender equality and women empowerment in aid-recipient developing countries for the period 2005–2019. The study develops static and dynamic panel data and empirical specifications and employs fixed effects and generalised method of moments (GMM) estimation techniques to estimate the impact of aggregate AfT and different categories of AfT on women empowerment. The study uses the Gender Inequality Index (GII) and Global Gender Gap Index (GGI) as the proxy measures of SDG-5, where the higher (lower) value of GII (GGI) implies higher gender disparities and lower women empowerment, and vice versa. The study finds that aggregate AfT and aid disbursement for the development of economic infrastructure, productive capability building and trade policy and regulations contribute significantly to achieve women empowerment by reducing gender inequalities concerning the labour force and political participation, education enrolment and better healthcare and by increasing gender gap index in relation to economic participation, educational attainment, health and survival and political empowerment. The impact of aggregate AfT and its different categories is found significant only in low- and lower-middle-income developing countries. The findings also indicate that the impact of AfT is not noticeably different across different regions of the world as well as the religious belief of the developing countries. The study recommends that more allocation of gender-responsive AfT, whether aggregated or disaggregated, significantly helps women empowerment and assists developing economies to achieve SDG-5. This study is one of the few that investigate the impact of aggregate AfT on gender inequality and women empowerment. This is the foremost study that examines the effects of each individual category of AfT on women empowerment vis-à-vis SDG-5.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-02
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-12-2020-0813
      Issue No: Vol. 49 , No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Spatial disparity in gender pay gap and female workforce participation: a
           sub-national level study in Indian manufacturing sector

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      Authors: Simontini Das , Rhyme Mondal
      Abstract: The paper intends to identify the factors that determine the variations in the gender pay gap and female workforce participation at low-skill manufacturing job across Indian states over the time period 2006–2014. Gender pay gap is measured in two ways: one is scale insensitive and second one is scale sensitive. To construct scale-sensitive gender pay gap measure wage discrimination index is used. For main analysis, a panel framework is used. Fixed effect model and random effect model are estimated along with all relevant diagnostic tests. Empirical analysis elucidates that male literacy rate, female literacy rate and gender parity index are important factors in explaining the variation in gender pay gap and women workforce participation at sub-national level in India. Female literacy rate significantly reduces the crude pay gap; however, it has insignificant effect on scale-sensitive gender pay gap in low-skill manufacturing sector. Educational enrolment widens up the crude wage gap but narrows down the other one. In case of workforce participation educational attainment and school enrolment both reduce women workforce participation in low-skill manufacturing job. The present research suffers from two major limitations. Due to lack of information, the paper is unable to study the impacts of female representation in trade unions, availability of supporting infrastructure like day-care facilities for working mothers, etc. in explaining the variation in gender pay gap and women workforce participation. The second limitation is that the research fails to address the issue related to selection into employment. The present paper uses the macro-level state-specific statistics instead of micro-level data; hence the imputed wage for unemployed but potential workers cannot be calculated. The paper is unique in the sense that it highlights gender pay gap and female workforce participation issue in low-skill manufacturing sector at Indian sub-national level. There are no such papers that highlight these issues in the context of Indian manufacturing sector. Another contribution is that the present paper considers the scale-sensitive gender pay gap, whose determinants are different than crude gender pay gap.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-02-25
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-08-2021-0469
      Issue No: Vol. 49 , No. 6 (2022)
       
  • An exploratory study of workers in the residential aged care sector of New
           Zealand: what drives them to stay or leave'

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      Authors: Arlene Garces-Ozanne , Ma. Reinaruth Carlos
      Abstract: This study analyses the different factors contributing to the retention and turnover of local- and overseas-born workers in the elderly care sector as an integral part of ensuring a stable workforce and quality care for the growing elderly population. Using a respondent-driven sampling method, a sample of individuals who worked or are working in residential aged care facilities in Dunedin, New Zealand were surveyed. The factors associated with intention to stay or leave are not necessarily the same factors influencing workers to leave. Policies need to consider how to make workers want to stay and address the issues that make workers leave the aged care sector. Results of this study can be used to develop more relevant labour and migration policies that reflect a more grounded insight into the experiences of those who are directly and personally affected by these policies. There are limited international or national empirical studies on the economics of care worker migration and the labour market. This study can provide practical policy advice to help improve recruitment and retention strategies for care workers in countries dependent on global labour markets for health workers. In New Zealand, changes in policies concerning remuneration and immigration highlight the importance of ensuring that care worker needs are met both financially and in terms of institutional support.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2022-02-23
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-09-2021-0544
      Issue No: Vol. 49 , No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Socioeconomic wellbeing of women domestic workers in Pune: an exploratory
           study

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      Authors: Hima Gupta
      Abstract: Household chores are one of the most essential aspects of each individual's daily routine. The author has observed people from middle and upper socioeconomic backgrounds, outsourcing women domestic workers to perform these household tasks. Even though these women domestic workers make up a significant portion of the total working class, they remain a socially and financially vulnerable section of society. The job of working in other people's private spaces comes with little or no regulation, social protection and no guarantee of decent work standards. The major aim of this study is to find out the social wellbeing of part-time domestic workers of Pune. For this purpose, the researchers have interviewed 167 women working in the Pune region of Maharashtra, India from the period of October 2020 to January 2021. Descriptive methods and factor analysis have been used to analyze the collected data, so that socioeconomic wellbeing correlated with the significant factors explored. Further, the factors identified that Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFAs) are further validated through reliability analysis (Cronbach’s alpha for economic wellbeing and social wellbeing index for social wellbeing). With the help of this study, researchers have tried to explore the significant factors to the social and economic wellbeing of domestic workers. The qualitative facts collected during the interview time have substantiated the findings got in EFA. The paper aims to provide ground-level insights to policymakers focusing on the domestic work sector, and the gaps identified in the research will help the policymakers to frame the guidelines for the betterment of these informal domestic workers.
      Citation: International Journal of Social Economics
      PubDate: 2021-08-11
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSE-01-2021-0031
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • International Journal of Social Economics

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