Subjects -> AGRICULTURE (Total: 981 journals)
    - AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS (93 journals)
    - AGRICULTURE (680 journals)
    - CROP PRODUCTION AND SOIL (120 journals)
    - DAIRYING AND DAIRY PRODUCTS (30 journals)
    - POULTRY AND LIVESTOCK (58 journals)

AGRICULTURE (680 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4     

Showing 201 - 263 of 263 Journals sorted alphabetically
Economic Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Economic and Industrial Democracy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Economic Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Economic Record     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Egyptian Journal of Biological Pest Control     Open Access  
Emirates Journal of Food and Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Empirical Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Encuentro     Open Access  
Energy Nexus     Open Access  
Ensaios e Ciência : Ciências Biológicas, Agrárias e da Saúde     Open Access  
Environment and Development Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Eppo Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ethiopian Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Ethiopian Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access  
Ethiopian Journal of Sciences and Sustainable Development     Open Access  
Ethology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
EU Agrarian Law     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Euphytica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Eurochoices     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Agronomy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
European Journal of American Culture     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal of Health Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
European Journal of Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
European Review of Agricultural Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
EvoDevo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Farm Engineering and Automation Technology Journal     Open Access  
Fave : Sección ciencias agrarias     Open Access  
Fitosanidad     Open Access  
Florea : Jurnal Biologi dan Pembelajarannya     Open Access  
Folia Horticulturae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Folia Oecologica     Open Access  
Food and Agricultural Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food and Ecological Systems Modelling Journal     Open Access  
Food and Energy Security     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Food and Environment Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Food Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Food Economics - Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section C     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Forest@ : Journal of Silviculture and Forest Ecology     Open Access  
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Fronteiras : Journal of Social, Technological and Environmental Science     Open Access  
Frontiers in Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Fundamental and Applied Agriculture     Open Access  
Future Foods     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Future of Food : Journal on Food, Agriculture and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Gema Agro     Open Access  
Geoderma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ghana Journal of Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Global Approaches to Extension Practice : A Journal of Agricultural Extension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Global Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Global Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Journal of Biology, Agriculture & Health Sciences     Open Access  
Gontor Agrotech Science Journal     Open Access  
Hacquetia     Open Access  
Health Economics, Policy and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Heliyon     Open Access  
Hereditas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Horticultural Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Huria : Journal of the Open University of Tanzania     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
IDESIA : Revista de Agricultura en Zonas Áridas     Open Access  
Indian Horticulture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Indian Journal of Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Extension Education     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian Journal of Horticulture     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge (IJTK)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Agricultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Information Processing in Agriculture     Open Access  
Innovare Journal of Agricultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Innovations in Agriculture     Open Access  
Interciencia     Open Access  
International Advances in Economic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Dairy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal for Parasitology : Parasites and Wildlife     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Agricultural and Life Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Agricultural Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agricultural Management and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Agricultural Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Agricultural Research, Innovation and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Agricultural Resources, Governance and Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Agricultural Science and Food Technology     Open Access  
International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Agriculture Innovation, Technology and Globalisation     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Agriculture, Environment and Food Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Applied Agriculture and Apiculture Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Dairy Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Dairy Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Food Science and Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Fruit Science     Open Access  
International Journal of Green Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Hydrology Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Intercultural Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Pest Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Postharvest Technology and Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Poultry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Recycling of Organic Waste in Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Secondary Metabolite     Open Access  
International Journal of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Management and Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of the Economics of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Tropical Veterinary and Biomedical Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Vegetable Science     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal on Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources : IJ-FANRES     Open Access  
International Letters of Natural Sciences     Open Access  
International Multidisciplinary Research Journal     Open Access  
International Review of Applied Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Review of Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Scientific Journal of Engineering and Technology (ISJET)     Open Access  
Invertebrate Reproduction & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Irrigation and Drainage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Irrigation Australia: The Official Journal of Irrigation Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Italian Journal of Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal (Australian Native Plants Society. Canberra Region)     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal de la Recherche Scientifique de l'Universite de Lome     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal für Kulturpflanzen     Open Access  
Journal of Advances in Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Agrarian Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural & Food Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Agricultural and Marine Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural Chemistry and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Agricultural Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Agricultural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural Production     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural Research and Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Agricultural Research and Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Agricultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural, Biological & Environmental Statistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Agriculture     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture and Ecology Research International     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture and Food Research     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture and Food Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture and Natural Resources Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agriculture and Rural Development in the Tropics and Subtropics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Agriculture and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal Of Agrobiotechnology     Open Access  
Journal of Agromedicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Animal Science and Products     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Animal Science, Biology and Bioeconomy     Open Access  
Journal of Apicultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Applied Communications     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 211)
Journal of Arid Land     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Asia-Pacific Entomology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Biological Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Biology, Agriculture and Healthcare     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Biosystems Engineering     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Buffalo Science     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Cereal Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Cereal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Citrus Pathology     Open Access  
Journal of Competition Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Cotton Research     Open Access  
Journal of Dairy Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Dairy Science     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Economic Surveys     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Environmental and Agricultural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part B: Pesticides, Food Contaminants, and Agricultural Wastes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Essential Oil Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Extension Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Family and Economic Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Food Protection(R)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Food Security     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Food Security and Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Halal Product and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Horticultural Science and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Horticultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Horticulture and Postharvest Research     Open Access  
Journal of Industrial Hemp     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Integrative Agriculture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Kerbala for Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Land and Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Modern Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Natural Resources and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Natural Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Nepal Agricultural Research Council     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4     

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Economic and Industrial Democracy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.195
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0143-831X - ISSN (Online) 1461-7099
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Editorial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lars Magnusson, Jan Ottosson
      Pages: 497 - 500
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Volume 43, Issue 2, Page 497-500, May 2022.

      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T11:58:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221090816
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Why and when job insecurity hinders employees’ taking charge behavior:
           The role of flexibility and work-based self-esteem

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yijing Lyu, Chia-Huei Wu, Ho Kwong Kwan, Cynthia Lee, Hong Deng
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      Job insecurity is negatively associated with employees’ extra-role behavior. Studies of this negative impact often use a social exchange or stress–strain perspective to explain how job insecurity impairs employees’ extra-role behavior. This study offers an alternative account. Based on a conservation of resources perspective, the authors propose that job insecurity denotes a threat of loss of resources, which will motivate individuals to focus on how to protect what they have and reduce further loss. Such conservation of resources will limit one’s flexibility, or the ability to consider alternatives and change a course of action in response to environmental changes, and thus undermine employees’ extra-role behavior for pursuing constructive changes at work (i.e., taking charge). The authors also propose that the impact of job insecurity on flexibility can be more detrimental to employees higher in work-based self-esteem (i.e., domain-specific self-esteem) due to the experience of self-concept dissonance. The results, obtained from 188 employees in 19 teams of a manufacturing company, supported the hypotheses, while mechanisms suggested by a social exchange perspective (i.e., felt obligation to organizations) and a stress–strain perspective (i.e., vigor) were taken into account. This investigation extends understanding of how and why job insecurity influences employees’ work behavior, as well as who is most vulnerable to job insecurity.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T06:11:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221100852
       
  • The multidimensional configuration of platform work: A mixed-methods
           analysis of the Argentinian case

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Julieta Haidar
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this article is to make a contribution to understanding platform work in a comprehensive and geographically situated way, and thus to consider comprehensive responses to its precarising character. The author proposes an analytical framework in which platform work is the result of the articulation of three dimensions: technological-organisational, institutional and ideological. In turn, this framework is applied in depth to a case study: delivery platform work in Argentina. To that end a mixed methodology is employed which combines in-depth interviews and surveys responded to by 401 delivery workers.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T06:09:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221099663
       
  • Underemployment due to overeducation: An analysis of worker cooperatives
           versus conventional firms

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lidia Valiente-Palma, María del Carmen Pérez-González
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      This research study analyses overeducation in worker cooperatives (WCs) compared to conventional firms (CFs) to determine whether there is any evidence to suggest that underemployment due to overeducation is less probable in WCs (where decisions are made democratically by worker members to maximise collective wellbeing) than in CFs in Spain. A total sample of 945 workers (315 worker members from WCs, 315 non-member workers from WCs and 315 workers from CFs) taken from the Continuous Working Life Sample from the Spanish Ministry of Inclusion, Social Security and Migration was used. The methods applied in the study include regression line comparison between WCs and CFs and logistic regression analysis. The results show that the probability of underemployment due to overeducation may be lower in worker members from WCs than in workers from CFs. Nevertheless, this is not the case for non-member workers in WCs, who display a similar level of underemployment due to overeducation as workers in CFs. This study lays the foundation for research into underemployment due to overeducation in WCs, a topic which has not yet been explored.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-06-16T12:54:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221099662
       
  • The impact of job quality on organizational commitment and job
           satisfaction: The moderating role of socioeconomic status

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: KonShik Kim
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      This study analyzes the effects of each of three dimensions of job quality on organizational commitment and job satisfaction. The interactions between job quality and socioeconomic status also are examined to understand the relationship between job quality and organizational commitment and job satisfaction. This study found that all three dimensions of job quality – quality of income, job security, and working environment – have linear effects on organizational commitment and job satisfaction. In addition, the relationship between job quality as a whole and organizational commitment and job satisfaction varies depending on socioeconomic status. This study showed the dual role of socioeconomic status in that the relationship between job quality and organizational commitment and job satisfaction is more accelerated for workers with high socioeconomic status, while the effects of job quality and socioeconomic status on organizational commitment and job satisfaction offset each other where job quality is lower than average.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-06-16T12:52:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221094875
       
  • Commitment issues' Analysing the effect of preference deviation and
           social embeddedness on member commitment to worker cooperatives in the gig
           economy

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      Authors: Damion Jonathan Bunders, Agnes Akkerman
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      As enterprises that are owned and governed by workers themselves for their mutual benefit, worker cooperatives are currently re-emerging as a promising antidote against precarity and economic dependence in the gig economy. Considering the social and geographic fragmentation of gig workers, it remains unclear whether cooperatives can count on the member commitment necessary to survive. This study investigates whether preference deviation and social disembeddedness stifle the commitment of gig workers to such cooperatives. A cross-sectional survey was used to gather data from members of four interconnected cooperatives in Italy that consist of gig workers in the cultural, ICT and education sectors (n = 425). The results show that members with more deviating preferences and less social embeddedness among fellow members have a lower commitment towards their cooperative. These findings demonstrate the conditions for gig workers’ commitment to cooperatives, being a key factor in cooperative longevity.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-06-11T07:07:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221101425
       
  • Sex, breadwinner status, and perceived job insecurity: A comparative
           analysis in Europe

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Clotilde Coron, Géraldine Schmidt
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research has produced contradictory results about the relationship between sex and perceived job insecurity (JI). The male-breadwinner ideology has been put forward to explain the fact that women often report less JI. In addition, previous research on JI has highlighted the importance of the national socioeconomic context, and gender studies have underlined the need to take gender dimensions into account when studying national socioeconomic contexts. This article contributes to those debates by measuring the effect of sex on JI and the moderating effect of breadwinner status in different groups of countries characterized by homogeneous socioeconomic and gender-related contexts. To do so, the authors use the 2015 EWCS survey, and add macro indicators for the national contexts. The results show that when controlling for breadwinner status, sex has no significant effect regardless of the national context; in addition, breadwinner status moderates the relationship between sex and perceived JI in some national contexts.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T10:41:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221100849
       
  • Towards what end' Collective bargaining and the making and unmaking of
           the working class

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zaad Mahmood, Supurna Banerjee
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      In contemporary literature, bargaining is often construed as an instrument in the hands of the employer, a practice that is sustained by undermining worker solidarity and promoting interests of privileged unionized workers at the expense of other workers. This article challenges such narratives by foregrounding the idea of solidarity and highlighting the complex interplay of solidarity emanating from the multiple ways consciousness about worker identity plays out. Drawing on the literature on new social movements (NSM) and industrial relations (IR), the article shows that the relevance of bargaining is not merely confined to instrumental economic goals but extends to politically constitutive action. In the process of bargaining the political agency of workers and distinctive articulations of solidarity are identified. This article presents and classifies three kinds of solidarity that correspond to the three dimensions of political consciousness, namely critical solidarity, limited solidarity and absent solidarity across cases that are shaped by contextual realities of labour politics.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T06:38:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221096863
       
  • ‘Walking a fine line’: Union perspectives on partnership in nursing
           and midwifery workplaces

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cécile Guillaume, Gill Kirton
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on qualitative research in the main UK unions for nurses/midwives, this article explores union reps’ views of the functioning of workplace partnership in two feminized professions working in the English National Health Service (NHS). Through the investigation of two professional unions, which despite their vitality remain under-researched, the study offers an investigation of the interactions between formal and informal partnership arrangements at the workplace level, the ways in which they intersect with the professional nature of the union context, and the deterioration of working conditions. In doing so, this article contributes to reflections on the prospects of workplace partnership for professional trade unions.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T04:50:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221094871
       
  • Pressed to overwork to exhaustion' The role of psychological
           detachment and exhaustion in the context of teleworking

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jurgita Lazauskaitė-Zabielskė, Ieva Urbanavičiūtė, Arūnas Žiedelis
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to longitudinally investigate the undesirable effect of overwork climate and its underlying mechanism in the context of telework. Teleworkers have been known for intensive working and even overwork. Moreover, although some empirical evidence shows the adverse effects of overwork climate, its longitudinal effects and mechanism have been underexplored thus far. Consequently, this study expected overwork climate to be related to lower levels of psychological detachment that eventually leads to higher exhaustion, with this effect being more profound among full-time teleworkers. The authors base their analyses on a two-wave study with four-month time intervals, with a sample of 375 teleworkers. The results show that an overwork climate led to exhaustion four months later due to impaired ability to detach from work. Notably, this effect was more substantial among those teleworkers who worked from home full-time.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T06:49:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221095111
       
  • Membership in employers’ associations and collective bargaining
           coverage in Germany

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Uwe Jirjahn
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      While there is a strong overlap between membership in employers’ associations and collective bargaining coverage, the overlap is far from being perfect. Using unique firm-level data from Germany, this study estimates the determinants of the membership in employers’ associations and the coverage by industry-level or firm-level agreements. The analysis particularly focuses on the various constellations of membership and collective bargaining status. The results show that firm-level worker representation, foreign ownership, work organization, firm size, age and East–West differences are important determinants. Altogether, the analysis demonstrates that a more differentiated picture of industrial relations can be obtained by considering both membership in employers’ associations and collective bargaining coverage.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T06:41:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221092484
       
  • Robots and unions: The moderating effect of organized labour on
           technological unemployment

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      Authors: Henri Haapanala, Ive Marx, Zachary Parolin
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      This study analyses the moderating effect of union density on industrial employment and unemployment in advanced economies facing exposure to industrial robots. Applying random effects within-between regression models to a pseudo-panel of observations from 27 European countries and the United States over 1998–2019, the study finds that higher union density is associated with a greater decline in industry-sector employment for younger workers and workers with lower secondary education when robot exposure increases. It is also found that the unemployment rate declines more strongly in countries with low union density when robot exposure increases. These findings suggest that exposure to industrial robots promotes labour market dualization in strongly unionized countries, whereas workers with tertiary education and labour market tenure are the main beneficiaries from technological change.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T06:38:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221094078
       
  • Automation and the future of work: An intersectional study of the role of
           human capital, income, gender and visible minority status

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Búi K Petersen, James Chowhan, Gordon B Cooke, Ray Gosine, Peter J Warrian
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      This study extends prior research assessing the impacts of advancements in automation on employment by focusing on the effect on various population groups. Employing a human capital and intersectionality lens, and a moderated-mediation analysis of Canadian 2016 Census data, this study finds the effects of automation differ significantly depending on the intersections of income level, gender and visible minority status, differences that for the most part are explained (or mediated) by human capital, especially education. The article discusses several public policy implications related to the roles of individuals, employers and governments in addressing the resulting labour market challenges.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T05:13:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221088301
       
  • Self-employment experience effects on well-being: A longitudinal study

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      Authors: Nicholas Litsardopoulos, George Saridakis, Yannis Georgellis, Chris Hand
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      The notion that self-employed individuals are more satisfied with their jobs than wage-employees has found broad empirical support. Previous research exploring the well-being effects of self-employment typically relies on direct cross-sectional comparisons between wage-employees and self-employed or on longitudinal investigations of transitions in or out of self-employment. In this study, the authors use individuals’ employment status histories in British longitudinal data to examine how accumulated self-employment experience affects job satisfaction, satisfaction with leisure and satisfaction with income. The study finds that those with past work experience only as self-employed report higher levels of job satisfaction than those with experience only as wage-employees. However, individuals with mixed work experience profiles are the most satisfied. This suggests a non-monotonic relationship between self-employment and job satisfaction. Patterns of self-employment experience and other satisfaction domains, such as satisfaction with income or leisure, are more nuanced, differing across gender lines.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T04:26:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221086017
       
  • Trade unions facing a French industrial policy: The emergence of a medical
           imaging filière

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      Authors: Samuel Klebaner
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this article is to analyze the power of trade unions to influence a French industrial policy. The study examines the case of the medical imaging industry, in which a trade union managed to convince both the firms and the government to invest in a new innovation center. Through a qualitative study, the author highlights step by step the power resources this trade union used to deploy multi-level ‘political work’. Through this lobbying process involving various actors, resources and institutions, the study examines participation of stakeholders in industrial policy formulation and implementation, questioning the possibilities for a trade union to be decisive in economic development. It is found that the lack of trade union structural power and institutional power (including investment capabilities) makes it difficult to successfully put an industrial project on the agenda and even more difficult to participate in the investment phase.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T10:36:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221086315
       
  • Occupational change, computer use and the complementarity effect in the
           digital age: Evidence from Finland

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      Authors: Tuomo Alasoini, Seppo Tuomivaara
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the pattern of occupational change in Finland between 2013 and 2018 in light of hypotheses derived from skill- and routine-biased technological change arguments. As extensions to mainstream studies on occupational change, two alternative means of classifying occupations by skill level are used, and data from Statistics Finland’s Quality of Work Survey are combined with data from the Finnish Labour Force Survey. The analysis reveals a pattern of skill-biased change and indications of a digital divide between high-skilled and other occupations with no signs of job polarization. Reasons for country-wide differences in occupational change patterns and the implications of differences in the means of classifying occupations for the results are discussed with suggestions of topics for further studies.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-04-16T12:12:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221089665
       
  • Job satisfaction across Europe: An analysis of the heterogeneous temporary
           workforce in 27 countries

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      Authors: Leandro Iván Canzio, Felix Bühlmann, Jonas Masdonati
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      The consequences of temporary jobs for job satisfaction are not clear. This article examines the effect of two crucial moderators in the association between temporary contracts and job satisfaction: the reason for being a temporary worker and the duration of temporary contracts. Using the ad-hoc module of the 2017 EU Labour Force Survey (EU-LFS), this study examines 27 European countries separately. Results show that involuntary temporary workers (those who wanted a permanent contract but could not find one) tend to be less satisfied than permanent employees. However, voluntary temporary workers (those who prefer temporary over permanent jobs) and temporary workers in apprenticeships or probation periods are generally as satisfied as permanent employees. Shorter contracts frequently exert negative effects on job satisfaction, but only among involuntary temporary workers. Results differ between countries: the differences between temporary and permanent workers are insignificant in Scandinavian countries but large in the post-Socialist states.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T12:27:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221088306
       
  • The hidden layers of resistance to dominant HRM transfer: Evidence from
           Japanese management practice adoption in Indonesia

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      Authors: Joey Soehardjojo, Rick Delbridge, Guglielmo Meardi
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      While resistance to human resource management (HRM) practice transfers from multinationals has been widely researched in economically advanced countries, emerging economies are generally assumed to be institutionally more welcoming. This article contributes to debates on international HRM diffusion both by highlighting hitherto neglected arenas of host-country resistance and identifying the multiple levels at which this plays out. Specifically, this article examines the transfer of Japanese multinational corporations’ HRM practices into Indonesia. The study reveals that alongside apparently consensual micro-level (organization) relations between home- and host-country management, important political power games are occurring at the meso-level (subnational). These games involve competing notions of ‘best practice’ with host-country actors more powerful than deterministic models of diffusion would predict. The study shows how local actors seek to defend elements of the established Indonesian business system, while Japanese actors bypass host-country regulations by mobilizing corporate business associations. The findings extend current understanding of cross-border management practice transfer, highlighting contestation and negotiation at the meso-level.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T10:18:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221086019
       
  • Extending the boundaries of alternative dispute resolution: Private
           dispute resolution in Irish industrial relations

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      Authors: William K Roche
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the features and effectiveness of 11 ‘private dispute resolution arrangements’ (PDRAs) established by employers and unions in Ireland since the early 2000s to resolve collective disputes within organizations. These PDRAs are groundbreaking in redrawing the rules aligning internal dispute resolution with services provided by external state agencies. The article extends the boundaries of our knowledge of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) by highlighting the features of PDRAs and by identifying the conditions contributing to their evenhandedness, fairness and independence.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T11:15:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221086016
       
  • Trade union influence on innovation in the British private sector: Direct
           and indirect paths

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      Authors: Wen Wang, Jason Heyes, Roger Seifert
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines relationships between trade unions and firms’ innovation activity. Drawing on nationally representative data covering 1,384 firms in the UK, the article employs probit analysis to estimate the effect of trade union representation at the workplace on different types of innovation. The findings show significant and positive correlations between trade union representation and the introduction of new processes and new methods of marketing. The study also found a positive and moderately significant indirect effect on innovation arising from union influence on training provision and employee involvement practices. In addition, when unions are associated with shaping long-term oriented staffing practices, the positive indirect effects are strengthened.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T04:52:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221086015
       
  • Everything we do know (and don’t know) about collective bargaining: The
           Zeitgeist in the academic and political debate on the role and effects of
           collective bargaining

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      Authors: Bernd Brandl
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      This article provides an overview of academic and public policy debates on the role and effects of collective bargaining. The motivation behind this article is that the academic and political debate is – and ever was – characterized by many controversies. It is explained that these controversies often arise because of different disciplinary, theoretical and empirical approaches. It will also be outlined how the empirical and theoretical debates influenced the Zeitgeist in public policy making. Hence, the article provides an overview of the knowledge on the role and effects of collective bargaining as well as how this knowledge influenced and guided (or not) politically initiated institution building and reforms of collective bargaining systems.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T06:04:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221086018
       
  • Employer associations: Climate change, power and politics

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      Authors: Caleb Goods, Bradon Ellem
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      How employer associations deploy their power resources to frame and pursue members’ interests in the making of public policy is of marked importance in many economies. This is strikingly so in Australia where employer associations have, over a 30-year period, shaped a critically important industrial relations policy space – climate change. In exploring this issue, in this article the authors combine studies from industrial relations and political science to show that, despite suggestions of employer association decline, these organisations exert influence over policymaking in both ‘noisy’ and ‘quiet’ ways. These forms of influence can be understood as linked to specific sources of power – structural, associational, institutional, societal – as employer associations define and pursue members’ interests.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-03-12T07:08:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221081551
       
  • Qualitative job insecurity and extra-role behaviours: The moderating role
           of work motivation and perceived investment in employee development

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      Authors: Irina Nikolova, Marjolein CJ Caniëls, Magnus Sverke
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines how qualitative job insecurity, work motivation and perceived investment in employee development (PIED) are associated with employees’ contextual performance in terms of extra-role behaviours (ERBs). The authors propose a three-way interaction model and suggest that the way qualitative job insecurity relates to employees’ ERBs is contingent upon their work motivation and PIED. Results showed that there was a significant three-way interaction between job insecurity, PIED and intrinsic motivation (but not for extrinsic motivation) for ERBs. Employees who reported high qualitative job insecurity but had low intrinsic motivation engaged in more ERBs when they were given ample opportunities for development, while highly intrinsically motivated individuals exhibited fewer ERBs when the organization supported their professional development. This study contributes to the job insecurity and motivation literatures. To increase ERBs, organizations are advised to reduce qualitative job insecurity and to provide ample learning opportunities for employees who have low levels of intrinsic motivation.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-03-12T07:07:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221081167
       
  • Supervisor and customer incivility as moderators of the relationship
           between job insecurity and work engagement: Evidence from a new context

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      Authors: Fabian O Ugwu, Ike E Onyishi, Lawrence E Ugwu, Jens Mazei, Joy Ugwu, Josephine M Uwouku, Kwasedoo M Ngbea
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      Earlier studies on job insecurity tested job resources that may buffer the usual negative impact of job insecurity on job outcomes. The current study extends prior results by establishing that, given certain conditions, such as during an economic crisis that often gives rise to a dearth of employment opportunities and a precariousness of employment, perceived job insecurity could positively predict work engagement. Specifically, this study examined the relationship between perceived job insecurity and work engagement, and supervisor and customer incivility as moderators of this relationship. Cross-sectional data were collected from 1,200 volunteer mini-bus drivers from nine mass transit services companies in the Southeastern region of Nigeria. Results of a structural equation model (SEM) showed that job insecurity was positively related to work engagement. In turn, this positive relationship was weakened by supervisor incivility (but not by customer incivility). The results suggest that when supervisors are not supervised they could jeopardize employee effort.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T04:34:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221078887
       
  • Do participation structures affect workers’ voice'

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      Authors: Kristin Alsos, Sissel C Trygstad
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      Employees’ democratic right to participate is a core element of Nordic labour market models exercised both through representative and indirect participation as well as individual and direct participation. This article analyses representative participation and whether the form it takes matters: Is local trade union representatives’ assessment of influence at company level dependent on whether meetings with management are formal or informal' The question is important because institutional arrangements are on the decline in several European countries. Weaker trade unions and trade union representatives, due to falling unionisation rates, could affect strategic decisions by management when it comes to inviting trade union representatives into decision-making forums. Furthermore, individual-oriented management concepts may be strengthening this trend, in turn challenging the Nordic labour market models at company level. These issues are addressed through power resource perspectives by examining how such resources affect local trade union representatives’ capacity to influence decisions.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T05:08:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221076178
       
  • The fragmenting occupation of labour inspection and the degradation of
           regulatory and enforcement work inside the British state

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      Authors: Stephen Mustchin, Miguel Martínez Lucio
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      While union presence and joint regulation of work and employment has declined, the state maintains a key role in directly regulating employment standards in areas including health and safety, minimum wage enforcement and subcontracting. Based on an empirical study of enforcement agencies in Britain, this article argues that the nature of regulatory work and its reshaping by both exogenous and endogenous pressures ultimately influences the impact of regulation itself and how it is enforced. Major shifts in the skills, knowledge and networks critical to the nature of labour inspection work parallel developments within the workplaces they are responsible for regulating.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T04:36:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221078337
       
  • Unions in society, unions in the state: New forms of irregular workers’
           movements beyond the factory in South Korea

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      Authors: Cheol-Sung Lee, Hyung-Geun Yoo
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, the authors explore the ways that new forms of labor politics emerge in civil society in the era of flexible labor markets and fragmented workplaces (through outsourcing and subcontracting). First, a theoretical framework is developed that accounts for the formation processes of three modes of irregular, non-standard labor politics: politics of influence, politics of substitution, and politics of occupation. Each of these delineates positional politics of issue-specific threats and alliance, unions’ functional replacement of local civic governance, and unions’ takeover of the state’s institutional space. Then, using unique qualitative field interviews of labor activists and union leaders, a comparative case study is conducted to examine three instances of non-standard workers’ struggles against their employers in South Korean labor politics in the 2000s and the 2010s: the Hyundai Motors Irregular Workers’ Union, the Hope Union, and the Youth Community Union. The study highlights grassroots-based community activism and the institutionalized civil-society space within the state as newly arising forms of labor politics, and discusses their implications in relation to the state, civil society, and partisan politics.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T04:32:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221075648
       
  • The job insecurity of others: On the role of perceived national job
           insecurity during the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Mindy Shoss, Anahí Van Hootegem, Eva Selenko, Hans De Witte
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      Political scientists and sociologists have highlighted insecure work as a societal ill underlying individuals’ lack of social solidarity (i.e., concern about the welfare of disadvantaged others) and political disruption. In order to provide the psychological underpinnings connecting perceptions of job insecurity with societally-relevant attitudes and behaviors, in this article the authors introduce the idea of perceived national job insecurity. Perceived national job insecurity reflects a person’s perception that job insecurity is more or less prevalent in their society (i.e., country). Across three countries (US, UK, Belgium), the study finds that higher perceptions of the prevalence of job insecurity in one’s country is associated with greater perceptions of government psychological contract breach and poorer perceptions of the government’s handling of the COVID-19 crisis, but at the same time is associated with greater social solidarity and compliance with COVID-19 social regulations. These findings are independent of individuals’ perceptions of threats to their own jobs.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-02-16T04:31:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X221076176
       
  • Organizational change and psychosomatic symptoms: Exploring pathways
           through working conditions and assessing the moderating role of social
           support among European workers

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      Authors: Marine Coupaud
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      Building on the Job Demands–Resources (JD–R) model, this article sets out to analyze the mechanisms through which organizational change can affect workers’ health. The author carries out a moderated mediation analysis drawing on data from the European Working Conditions Survey conducted in 2015 with more than 44,000 European workers in 35 countries. Emotional labor, work intensity and physical strain are included as mediators of the relationship between organizational change and health, assessed by the self-declaration of psychosomatic symptoms. The study tests for the moderating role of social support, assessed as supervisor support and colleague support. It is shown that emotional labor mediates the relationship between organizational change and health alongside other work demands, with slight variations in the mechanisms depending on whether the reorganization involves staff cuts. There is evidence that social support from the hierarchy moderates the health effects of job demands.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-02-05T05:44:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X211069411
       
  • Digital Taylorism in China’s e-commerce industry: A case study of
           internet professionals

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      Authors: Hong Yu Liu
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      This article documents the working conditions and experiences of tech professionals at a leading Chinese e-commerce firm. Using intensive qualitative research methods, the author finds that digital management of tech professionals has accompanied and perhaps explains some of the Chinese tech industry’s much-heralded increases in efficiency and productivity. This management form can be understood as digital Taylorism, which has similar pathologies to the original Taylorism: a dehumanising effect on the workplace, increased work intensity, a higher income but proportionately lower share of the gains from increased productivity, and intensified competition among workers. It is hoped that this study will open up new avenues for evidence-based discussion about the future of work and the ethics of algorithm use in the workplace.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T05:20:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X211068887
       
  • Managerial ideology and identity in the nationalised British coal
           industry, 1947–1994

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      Authors: Andrew Perchard, Keith Gildart
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines managerial ideology and identity in the nationalised British coal industry. On nationalisation in 1947, the National Coal Board (NCB) – after 1987 the British Coal Corporation – became the largest socialised industry outside of the Communist bloc. Privatised in 1994, as part of liberal market reforms, the industry was a crucible for ideological clashes amongst managers. The article responds to interest in the impact of managerial ideologies and identities on organisations and in the search for illuminating historical case studies in different organisational settings. The authors position those ideological clashes, and distinctive managerial identities, within a moral economic framework.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-02-03T10:30:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X211069413
       
  • Perceived identity threat and organizational cynicism in the recursive
           relationship between psychological contract breach and counterproductive
           work behavior

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      Authors: Yannick Griep, Samantha D Hansen, Johannes M Kraak
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      Counterproductive work behavior toward the organization (CWB-O) or supervisor (CWB-S) is commonly treated as a consequence of psychological contract breach (PCB). However, drawing from Self-Consistency Theory, the authors in this article argue that the PCB–CWB relationship is recursive through two mediating mechanisms: self-identity threat and organizational cynicism. Furthermore, the authors predict that the relationship between feelings of violation and CWB-O (or CWB-S) would depend on the extent to which the victim attributed blame to the organization (or supervisor). Using weekly and daily survey data, the study found that identity threat was a stronger mediator for recursive CWB–PCB relationships. Moreover, it was found that PCB related positively to violation feelings, which in turn related positively to CWB-O and CWB-S over time. As predicted, the former was moderated by organizational blame attributions, whereas the latter was moderated by supervisor blame attributions. The authors discuss the theoretical implications and propose novel practical implications based on these reciprocal findings.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T07:25:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X211070326
       
  • Do robots really destroy jobs' Evidence from Europe

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      Authors: David Klenert, Enrique Fernández-Macías, José-Ignacio Antón
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      While citizen opinion polls reveal that Europeans are concerned about the labour market consequences of technological progress, our understanding of the actual significance of this association is still imperfect. In this article, the authors assess the relationship between robot adoption and employment in Europe. Combining industry-level data on employment by skill type with data on robot adoption and using different sets of fixed-effects techniques, the study finds that robot use is associated with an increase in aggregate employment. Contrary to some previous studies, the authors do not find evidence of robots reducing the share of low-skill workers across Europe. Since the overwhelming majority of industrial robots are used in manufacturing, the findings should not be interpreted outside of the manufacturing context. However, the results still hold when including non-manufacturing sectors and they are robust across a wide range of assumptions and econometric specifications.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T07:22:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X211068891
       
  • The condition of European economic democracy: A comparative analysis of
           individual and collective employment rights

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      Authors: Andrew Cumbers, Karen Bilsland, Robert McMaster, Susana Cabaço, Michael White
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      The condition of European economic democracy is generally recognised to be in a fragile state. Recent discussions have centred on pressures to converge towards an Anglo-American model of flexible and deregulated employment relations and systems, consonant with a broader neoliberal economic governance discourse. Existing approaches suggest an uneven experience between countries around a general trend of deterioration. In this article we offer two new contributions to these debates. First, we introduce findings from an Economic Democracy Index (EDI) we have developed. This goes beyond existing indices of employment and industrial democracy to allow us to examine the changing nature of individual employment rights as well as collective bargaining conditions between European countries. Second, we depart from existing studies of European employment relations, which tend to take a comparative national approach, by situating national employment relations and trajectories within a wider set of spatial and social relations. Qualitative analysis of three country cases (Denmark, Portugal and Slovenia) supplements our EDI analysis. Our evidence suggests the importance of multi-scalar relational and institutional dynamics between social actors at the national scale and those at higher scales such as the European Union in understanding variations in country performance on the EDI.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T07:20:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X211064919
       
  • Can labor-standards advocacy by transnational civil society organizations
           interact with the power of labor to improve labor standards in global
           supply chains' A case study of the Cambodian garment industry

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      Authors: Min Li, Xiaoli Hu
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      Recent research shows that the focus of labor-standards advocacy by transnational civil society organizations (CSOs) has shifted to building the organizational capacity of workers’ organizations in developing countries, suggesting cooperation between transnational CSOs and local trade unions potentially improving working conditions in global supply chains. However, scant attention has been paid to how the two actors interact in practice. Based on fieldwork in Cambodia, including in-depth interviews with garment sector stakeholders, this article examines the interaction between transnational CSOs and trade unions in improving working conditions in the garment industry. The data analysis shows that transnational CSOs and trade unions have distinct comparative advantages in improving working conditions. Rather than the conflicting relationship between CSOs and trade unions as suggested in the literature, this article demonstrates a complementary relationship between the two, indicating the significance of the cooperation between these actors in improving working conditions within global supply chains.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-01-06T10:47:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X211066129
       
  • Why does Germany abstain from statutory bargaining extensions'
           Explaining the exceptional German erosion of collective wage bargaining

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      Authors: Wolfgang Günther, Martin Höpner
      Abstract: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Ahead of Print.
      Against the European trend, German statutory collective bargaining extensions (SBEs) have decreased in the last two decades, contributing to the exceptional erosion of German wage-bargaining coverage. This article distinguishes between two liberalization dynamics: an intrasectoral dynamic that started with the introduction of employers’ association memberships outside the scope of collective agreements, and an intersectoral dynamic. The latter is the result of an abnormal German institutional feature, the veto power of the employers’ umbrella association in the committees that have to approve SBE applications. Activation of this veto enabled employers to promote collective bargaining erosion in sectors other than their own, in order to contain cost pressures. This intersectoral liberalization dynamic has been part of Germany’s transition into an asymmetrically export-driven growth regime and could be stopped by means of political reforms.
      Citation: Economic and Industrial Democracy
      PubDate: 2022-01-06T09:57:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143831X211065783
       
 
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