Subjects -> AGRICULTURE (Total: 981 journals)
    - AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS (93 journals)
    - AGRICULTURE (680 journals)
    - CROP PRODUCTION AND SOIL (120 journals)
    - DAIRYING AND DAIRY PRODUCTS (30 journals)
    - POULTRY AND LIVESTOCK (58 journals)

AGRICULTURE (680 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4     

Showing 201 - 263 of 263 Journals sorted by number of followers
Biodiversity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Agriculture & Food Security     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Future of Food : Journal on Food, Agriculture and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Nature Plants     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Agricultural History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Biological Agriculture & Horticulture : An International Journal for Sustainable Production Systems     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Land and Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Life Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Agriculture and Food Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Agricultural Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Indian Horticulture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aceh International Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Invertebrate Reproduction & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
New Journal of Botany     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Acta Scientiarum. Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Advances in Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
EvoDevo     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Cereal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Acta Agrobotanica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Italian Journal of Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Agricultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
EU Agrarian Law     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Australian Garden History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Agriculture and Rural Development in the Tropics and Subtropics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Tanzania Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Modern Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Agriculture and Natural Resources Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the Ghana Science Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Biocatalysis and Agricultural Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sustainable Agriculture Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Food and Energy Security     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Agricultural Research, Innovation and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Applied Agriculture and Apiculture Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agra Europe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural Chemistry and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Universitatis Sapientiae, Alimentaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Essential Oil Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Diatom Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Food Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Parasitology : Parasites and Wildlife     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agricultura Tropica et Subtropica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Apicultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Agricultural Management and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Cubana de Ciencia Agrícola     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Agriculture and Food Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tropical Agricultural Research and Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Biology, Agriculture and Healthcare     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agro-Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Journal of Agricultural Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Tropical Agricultural Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Sustainable Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Food Security     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Agricultural Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Huria : Journal of the Open University of Tanzania     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Berkala Ilmiah Pertanian     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RIA. Revista de Investigaciones Agropecuarias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Veteriner     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos de Zootecnia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Natural Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca : Food Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wartazoa. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Research in Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
COCOS : The Journal of the Coconut Research Institute of Sri Lanka     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Emirates Journal of Food and Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Approaches to Extension Practice : A Journal of Agricultural Extension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Chemical and Biological Technologies for Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Progressive Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Folia Horticulturae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Rivista di Studi sulla Sostenibilità     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Science Foundation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Avances en Investigacion Agropecuaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Management and Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bangladesh Journal of Agricultural Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu dan Kesehatan Hewan (Veterinary Science and Medicine Journal)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arquivos do Instituto Biológico     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Recycling of Organic Waste in Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agricultural Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Innovare Journal of Agricultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agriculture System     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Technologica Agriculturae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Plant Knowledge Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Higiene e Sanidade Animal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian Journal of Technological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Social and Natural Sciences Journal     Open Access  
Jurnal Agroteknologi     Open Access  
Perspectivas Rurales Nueva Época     Open Access  
Organic Farming     Open Access  
Research Ideas and Outcomes     Open Access  
Jurnal Udayana Mengabdi     Open Access  
Landtechnik : Agricultural Engineering     Open Access  
International Letters of Natural Sciences     Open Access  
Agrociencia Uruguay     Open Access  
Heliyon     Open Access  
Ciência e Técnica Vitivinícola     Open Access  
Oilseeds and fats, Crops and Lipids     Open Access  
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Pastura : Journal Of Tropical Forage Science     Open Access  
Journal of Citrus Pathology     Open Access  
Revista Iberoamericana de las Ciencias Biológicas y Agropecuarias     Open Access  
Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports     Open Access  
International Journal of Secondary Metabolite     Open Access  
Scientia Agropecuaria     Open Access  
Pelita Perkebunan (Coffee and Cocoa Research Journal)     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Cogent Food & Agriculture     Open Access  
Fave : Sección ciencias agrarias     Open Access  
Revista de Ciências Agrárias     Open Access  
Review of Agrarian Studies     Open Access  
Nigerian Journal of Biotechnology     Open Access  
Nigeria Agricultural Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Annales des Sciences Agronomiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of the Bangladesh Agricultural University     Open Access  
Journal of Buffalo Science     Hybrid Journal  
Revista de Ciências Agroveterinárias     Open Access  
Tropical Grasslands - Forrajes Tropicales     Open Access  
Research in Plant Sciences     Open Access  
World Journal of Agricultural Research     Open Access  
Universal Journal of Agricultural Research     Open Access  
Research & Reviews : Journal of Agriculture Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Revue Marocaine des Sciences Agronomiques et Vétérinaires     Open Access  
Nativa     Open Access  
SAARC Journal of Agriculture     Open Access  
West African Journal of Applied Ecology     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural Research and Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal de la Recherche Scientifique de l'Universite de Lome     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Agrosearch     Open Access  
Agronomie Africaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Professional Agricultural Workers Journal     Open Access  
Interciencia     Open Access  
Nepal Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access  
Journal of the Saudi Society of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Information Processing in Agriculture     Open Access  
Sabaragamuwa University Journal     Open Access  
Ceiba     Open Access  
Research in Sierra Leone Studies : Weave     Open Access  
The Agriculturists     Open Access  
La Calera     Open Access  
Selçuk Tarım ve Gıda Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Revista de la Universidad del Zulia     Open Access  
Journal of Arid Land     Hybrid Journal  
Rangifer     Open Access  
Encuentro     Open Access  
Journal Of Agrobiotechnology     Open Access  
Coffee Science     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Scientific Research     Open Access  
Landbohistorisk Tidsskrift     Open Access  
Biotecnología en el Sector Agropecuario y Agroindustrial     Open Access  
Walailak Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access  
Universidad y Ciencia     Open Access  
Tropical and Subtropical Agroecosystems     Open Access  
Terra Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Revista Iberoamericana de Tecnologia Postcosecha     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Ciências Agrárias     Open Access  
Multiciencias     Open Access  
Ensaios e Ciência : Ciências Biológicas, Agrárias e da Saúde     Open Access  
Bioagro     Open Access  
Agroalimentaria     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Agrícolas     Open Access  
Revista U.D.C.A Actualidad & Divulgación Científica     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias Técnicas Agropecuarias     Open Access  
Revista Chapingo. Serie horticultura     Open Access  
Pastos y Forrajes     Open Access  
Fitosanidad     Open Access  
Cultivos Tropicales     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Desarrollo Rural     Open Access  
Ciencia e Investigación Agraria     Open Access  
Agronomía Mesoamericana     Open Access  
Agronomía Costarricense     Open Access  
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Agrivita : Journal of Agricultural Science     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4     

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Journal of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1597-1074
Published by African Journals Online Homepage  [261 journals]
  • Evaluation of Plant Materials for the Control of Leafworm (Acraea
           terpsicore L.) On Jute Mallow (Corchorus olitorius L.) in Lapai Southern
           Guinea Savannah of Nigeria

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      Authors: Solomon Danjuma, Salihu Yusuf, Mundi Mahmud Musa
      Pages: 1 - 9
      Abstract: Jute mallow, (Corchorus olitorius L.) is an important vegetable grown in most part of subsaharan Africa and classified as Neglected and Underutilized Species (NUS). But insect pests are serious hindrance to its production. The present research was conducted at the teaching and research farm of Ibrahim Badamasi Babangida University, Lapai, Niger State in the growing season of 2017 - 2018. The research aimed at evaluating the efficacy of three plant materials (alligator pepper (Aframomum melegueta K. Schum,), black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) and neem seed (Azadirachta indica A. Juss.) for the control of Acraea terpsicore (L.) (Leaf worm) on jute mallow. The plant materials were grounded separately into powder and weighed into 100g per litre of water. A day to spraying, the materials were soaked in water separately for 24hours and thereafter sieved with a muslin cloth and further filtered with Whatman filter paper to remove all fine particles. The extracts were then transferred in to the sprayer for onward spraying of the plant. Before spraying, the number of leafworms were counted, the count was repeated a day after spraying. The spraying was done at 3days interval. The numbers of damaged leaves were also counted at 4, 6 and 8 week after planting (WAP). At the end of the research, neem seed extract caused significantly highest mortality after each spray and the least number of damaged leaves at 4, 6 and 8 WAP, followed by black pepper. But contrarily, alligator pepper, on the other hand, had no significant effect on the leaf worm. The control presents the highest number of leaf worms and highest number of damaged leaves at 4, 6 and 8 WAP. Conclusively, with further research, neem seed extracts can be encouraged to be used in the control of vegetable insect pests as this is cheaper than synthetic pesticides and not toxic to man and his environment.
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.1
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Fungal Endophytes in Shelf Life Extension of Tomato (Solanum
           lycopersicum
    L.) Fruits

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      Authors: O.H. Obiazikwor, G.O. Oribhabor, A. S. Omokpagha
      Pages: 10 - 22
      Abstract: Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is one of the most popular and widely consumed vegetables worldwide. However, tomato fruits are of a highly perishable nature, with a short shelf life of between 12 to 72 hours. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of fungal endophytes in shelf-life extension of tomato fruits. Fungal endophytes were isolated from healthy leaves and fruits of tomato and identified. Shelf life extension of the tomato fruits was carried out by soaking the fruits in the broth cultures of the test endophytes for an hour. The control reatment was soaked in sterile distilled water. The isolated fungal endophytes were identified as Aspergillus ochraceus (from fruit) and Aspergillus niger (from leave). The results obtained show that the endophytes have potential in shelf life extension of the treated fruits. At day 2, all the fruits treated with the test endophytes were very marketable compared to the control that had 66.6 % moderately marketable and 33.3 % of the fruits marketable. At day 4, all (100 %) of the fruits treated with Aspergillus niger were very marketable and very firm compared to the other treatments. The findings from this study suggest that the isolated endophytes have potential in the shelf life extension of tomato fruits. Sample B (Aspergillus niger) seems to be more effective than Sample A (Aspergillus ochraceus) in extending the shelf life of the fruits. The mode of action of the test endopohytes should be further investigated. Quality and safety assessment of fruits preserved using endophytes should be further investigated. Future research should aim at extracting bioactive compounds from endophytes that can be used in shelf life extension of fruits.
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.2
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Microbiological Safety of Toasted Ukwa (African Breadfruit) Snack Sold in
           Aba, South-Eastern Nigeria

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      Authors: D.C. Arukwe, F.C. Onugha, E. A. Ike
      Pages: 23 - 31
      Abstract: A microbiological assay was conducted to assess consumer safety of toasted ukwa (African breadfruit) snack in the Aba metropolis, South-eastern Nigeria. The microbial loads, isolation and identification were carried out by the spread plate agar dilution method. Results indicated that the counts of bacteria ranged from 3.12-7.22x103cfu/g. The fungal counts ranged from 2.11- 5.48x103cfu/g while coliforms were detected in some of the market samples with values ranging from 0.00-0.16x103cfu/g. Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus spp., Streptococcus spp Klebsiella spp. were bacteria isolated from the samples. Aspergillus niger, Fusarium spp., Mucor spp. and Aspergillus flavus were the isolated fungi. No Escherichia coli or other significant pathogens produced by food were identified from the samples. Coliform (Aerobic colony counts) were lower than the International Food Standards (≥ 105cfu/g) and the absence of microbial food-borne pathogens makes these ukwa samples safe for consumption.
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.3
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Effect of Induced Ageing on Nutrients Content of some Selected Castor
           Seeds Genotypes

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      Authors: B.O. Apuyor, F.I. Ossamalu, B.Z. Salihu, A.U. Okere, D.J. Nwosu, M.A. Kabaraini, M.S. Salahu, A.A. Onwukwe
      Pages: 32 - 44
      Abstract: Castor is an important oilseed crop with great utilitarian value in industrial, pharmaceutical and agricultural sectors, the major constituents of the seeds are the lipids, carbohydrates, proteins and, of course, the nucleic acids. Seed deterioration is associated with various cellular, metabolic and chemical alterations to the seed constituents. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of induced ageing on the nutrient content of castor seeds. The study was carried out by subjecting castor seeds of various accessions to induced ageing by placing the seeds in an incubator at a temperature of 40OC and 100% relative humidity for 0, 2, 4 and 6 days. A total of twelve (12) castor accessions were used for the study. Percentage total fats, total protein, total reducing sugar was determined in the aged seeds using standard biochemical procedures. The result showed a progressive decrease in fats, protein and reducing sugar content with increased ageing time which became significant at (p < 0.05) on day four in all parameters measured. The percentage decrease of fats ranged from 38.01% in NCRI-P-007 to 9.0% NCRICAS036, protein 57.98% in NCRI-P-40 to 54.10% NCRICAS019 and reducing sugar 39.93% in NCRI-P-39 to 14.55% in NCRICAS036. The result has led to the conclusion that castor seeds lose its nutrients content with storage time.
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.4
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Nutritional Assessment of Fermented and Roasted Tamarindus indica
           Seeds from Lapai, Nigeria

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      Authors: M. Musah, J. T. Mathew, Y. Azeh, N. C. Nwakife, Z. Abdulhamid, A. Mohammed
      Pages: 45 - 59
      Abstract: This work studied the proximate, mineral and phytochemical content of fermented and roasted Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seed nuts, using standard analytical methods. The seeds were divided into two; one portion was roasted at temperature 85 - 100 oC for 15 mins while the second portion was fermented for 48 hours in the presence of yeast. The proximate analysis of the roasted and fermented samples revealed the values of moisture, ash, crude lipid, Crude protein, crude fibre, carbohydrate and calorific values of the fermented sample were 10.70±0.21 %, 3.06±0.71 %, 2.30±0.19 %, 19.25±0.16 %, 5.75±0.33 %, 58.94±0.23% and 301.29±0.31kcal/100g while values for the roasted sample were 2.00±0.82 %, 3.34±0.53 %, 7.60±0.43 %, 23.63±0.11 %, 5.22±0.74 %, 58.21±0.17 % and 329.08±0.92 kcal/100g respectively. Mineral elements present were K (336.75±0.31 mg/100g), Mg (166.90±0.37 mg/100g), P (106.42±0.65 mg/100g), Na (186.52±0.09 mg/100g) and Ca (10.33±0.15 mg/100g) for the fermented sample and values obtained for K, Mg, P, Na and Ca in roasted sample were 784.95±0.43, 187.65±0.17, 122.38±0.29, 54.36±0.13 and 12.65±0.11 mg/100g respectively. Results of phytochemical content showed that fermented Tamarindus indica contained tannin (64.61±0.43 mg/100 g), saponnins (127.33±0.79 mg/100 g), flavonoid (3.53±0.18 mg/100 g) and alkaloid (23.56±0.37 mg/100 g) while phytochemicals in the roasted sample were 40.97±0.21, 94.69±0.29, 1.96±0.51 and 14.33±0.12 mg/100g for tannins, saponins, flavonoid and alkaloids respectively, and were significantly lower than those in the fermented sample. Correlation analysis indicate a correlation exist between nutritional content of fermented and roasted samples of T. indica. The high crude protein, carbohydrate, calorific value and mineral content in fermented and roasted T. indica seeds indicate that the seeds could be good source of nutrient.
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.5
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Physiochemical and Sensory Evaluation of Cookies Produced from Composite
           Flours of Wheat, Bambara Nut and Orange Fleshed Sweet Potato

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      Authors: S. C. Ubbor, D. C. Arukwe, M. E. Ejechi, J. I. Ekeh
      Pages: 60 - 77
      Abstract: This study aimed at investigating the use of wheat, Bambara nut and orange fleshed sweet potato composite flours in the production of cookies. Enriched cookies were produced using wheat, Bambara nut and Orange Fleshed Sweet Potato flour blends in the ratios: 100:0:0, 90:5:5, 90:0:10, 80:10:10 and 80:5:15 and were labeled BVB, ACC, LVG, BCN and CFC respectively. Sample BVB (100% wheat flour) served as the control. The functional properties of the flour blends were determined, as well as the proximate and beta-carotene (pro-vitamin A) composition of the cookies. Also, the physical parameters and sensory qualities of the enriched cookies were evaluated. The moisture content, protein, fat, fibre, ash and carbohydrate ranged from 5.70 to 8.57%, 9.62 to 11.93%, 11.02 to 13.02%, 2.33 to 4.03%, 1.23 to 1.54% and 63.33 to 68.79% respectively. The energy value ranged from 405.46 to 420.03 k/cal. There were significant differences (p<0.05) in the functional properties of the flour blends. The result also revealed that the β-carotene (pro-vitamin A) increased with increase in substitution of orange fleshed sweet potato. The results showed significant differences (p<0.05) in physical properties of the cookies in weight, diameter, break strength, density and volume while there were no significant differences (p>0.05) in thickness and spread ratio. The sensory analysis indicated that all the samples had high level of acceptability in their sensory attributes, but sample BVB and ACC had the best overall acceptability ratings of 7.50 and 7.10 respectively. Therefore, enriched cookies produced from the blends were acceptable. 
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.6
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Production and Quality Evaluation of Herbal Tea from Moringa Leaves
           and Lemon Peel Powder

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      Authors: S. C. Ubbor, J. I. Ekeh, J. Ndife, B. N. Iguh
      Pages: 78 - 90
      Abstract: Tea is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world next to water. It is made from tea leaves of Camellia sinensis. Herbal teas on the other hand, are tea variants not made from Camellia sinensis but from other plants, herbs, roots and plant extract. This study therefore, investigated the quality and acceptability of herbal teas made from dried Moringa leaves and lemon peel powder. Herbal teas were made from 100% dried Moringa leaves, 100% dried lemon peel powder and blends of Moringa leaves and lemon peel powder in the ratios of 50:50, 30:70 and 60:40. A total of five formulations were obtained. Using standard analytical methods, the proximate composition, vitamin content, phytochemical contents, chemical and sensory properties of all the tea formulations were investigated. Results obtained were compared to the control which was the Lipton Yellow brand tea. The result of the proximate composition revealed that the herbal teas formulated, compared favourably with the control (Lipton Yellow brand tea). The vitamin contents of all herbal tea formulated were relatively high compared to that obtained in the control. The phytochemical contents of the tea samples showed that the herbal teas contained significant levels of alkaloids, phenols, flavonoids and phytates. Tea made from 100% Moringa leaves was generally accepted and preferred over the control. It was concluded that
      herbal tea from 100% Moringa leaves and lemon peel powder has therapeutic potentials and high nutritional value and therefore can thrive commercially in the tea market. 
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.7
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Mathematical Modelling of Potassium Meta-Bisulphite Treated Mango
           (Mangifera indica) Slices cv Dasheri

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      Authors: M.M. Nasiru, E.F. Boateng, A.T. Mustapha, A.J. Kelechi, J.D. Raj
      Pages: 91 - 110
      Abstract: Fresh and ripe mango (Mangifera indica) slices cv Dasheri were dehydrated in a cabinet dryer at drying air temperatures of 50, 60, and 70 oC at a slice thickness of 5 mm. Before dehydration, the mango slices were pre-treated with potassium meta-bisulphite (KMS) at three levels (0.5 %, 1.0 %, and 1.5 % KMS, respectively). Five semi-theoretical and empirical thin-layer drying models (Newton [Lewis], Logarithmic, Demir et al. 2004, Henderson & Pabis, and Wang & Singh) were employed to select the best model that describes the drying process. Moisture diffusivity and activation energy of the mango slices were also evaluated. It was observed that the drying took place in the falling rate period. Demir et al. 2004 and Logarithmic models were found to satisfactorily describe the drying process of the mango slices using R2, x2, SSE, and RMSE as the criteria for selecting the best model. The mango slices' moisture diffusivity and activation energy range from 6.79 to 10.02×10-8 m2/s and 10.03 to 14.73 kJ/mol. Thus, KMS pre-treatment can minimise the mango slices' drying duration and drying cost. 
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.8
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Strengthening Nigeria’s Weak Economy; Does Agricultural Exports Really
           Matter' Evidence from Cotton Seed Exports

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      Authors: A. S. Akenbor, S. A. Esheya
      Pages: 111 - 124
      Abstract: Following recent weakness in Nigeria’s economy, this paper examines how to possibly strengthen the weak economy through agricultural exports particularly cotton seed exports. The paper combines data on yearly cotton seed exports in Nigeria over 46 years (1970-2015) with data on the determinants to examine the relevant variables. Co-integration approach was used in analyzing the data to examine the presence of a co-integrating relationship between the variables in the short and long run. There are two main results from the study. First, the export of cotton seed in Nigeria within the study period was low and fluctuating apart from the 70s when it was high and stable. Second, there was Co-integration relationship between cotton seed export and macroeconomic factors during the study period in Nigeria as it indicated that producers’ price, exchange rate and output are long-run determinants of cotton seed exports. The results therefore indicate that commitments to policies and programmes that can favour
      determinants of cotton seeds exports in Nigeria are calls certainly in the right direction to strengthen its weak economy. These include the provision of export incentives such as removal of stamp duties from export trade, provision of explicit export bonuses, aligning producer price with export price as well as encouraging private sector inclusion through the provision of an enabling environment for the private sector to flourish and get involved in the strengthening of the weak economy. The paper has contributed to agricultural development policy implications connected with agricultural export programs for the government, investors, exporters and farmers in Nigeria.
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.9
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Agroforestry Technology: A Climate Change Mitigation Measure for
           Sustainable Food Security in Niger Delta Region of Nigeria

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      Authors: Glory N. Ben-Chendo, Emma .I. Ogueri, Anaeto F.C.
      Pages: 125 - 134
      Abstract: Oil and Gas production in Nigeria are domiciled in the Niger Delta. Agroforestry technologies were introduced as mitigation strategies against food insecurity as land management technique due to constant litigation on accusation of emissions, increase climate change and environmental devastation. Objectives were to determine reasons for agroforestry practice by rural women and identify effects of agroforestry technologies on income in the oil and gas rich Niger Delta. A total of 270 respondents in Bayelsa, Imo and Rivers States were selected using purposive and random sampling techniques. Data were collected with questionnaires and focus group discussion. Descriptive statistics and Discriminating index were used for analysis. Results showed a mean age of 51years, 38% completed secondary school, 77% married, household size of 6 and 3-4 years’ experience. A discriminating index of 2.5, food production (2.8*), Income generation (3.4*), raw materials production (3.3*), Nutrient replenishing (3.1*) and soil quality (2.9*) topped reasons for agroforestry practice. It was concluded that Agroforestry technology should be advocated through extension education to meet food needs of Niger Delta to addressing the reputations of Multinational Oil and Gas companies in Nigeria. This study recommends that Multinational Oil and Gas companies should assist primary stakeholders to establish agroforestry farms as part of its corporate social responsibility addressing food insecurity and unemployment.
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.10
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Knowledge and Perception of Consumers on Microbiological Meat Safety,
           Antibiotic Resistance and Residues in Tema Metropolis, Ghana

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      Authors: I.A. Anachinaba, F. Adzitey, G.A. Teye, C.A. Brown, E.F. Boateng
      Pages: 135 - 153
      Abstract: This study assessed the knowledge and perception of consumers on microbiological meat safety, antibiotic resistance and residues in Tema Metropolis, Ghana. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect information from 384 randomly selected meat consumers on their knowledge and perception of meat safety and antibiotics. Data obtained was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20 and Chi Square was used to determine relationships among some parameters. The results revealed that 56% were males, with the majority (54%) aged between 21-40 years. Most (51%) of the respondents had basic education. For consumption, most of the respondents preferred chicken (53%) to beef (32%) and pork (14%), mostly because of taste (50%), followed by accessibility (39%) and price (11%). Majority (80%) of the respondents agreed (slightly to strongly agree) that meat consumption is associated with hypertension/high cholesterol and diabetics. Also, most of the respondents had heard about microbiological meat safety (64%) mostly from their teachers in school (62%) and the media (25%). They had also heard about antibiotic resistance (55%) and antibiotic residues (53%), mostly from their teachers in school (56% and 58%, respectively). Generally, most of the respondents did not know much about antibiotic resistance and antibiotic residues, although they had heard about them. The findings of the study warrant the need to educate consumers on food safety and antibiotic related issues.
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.11
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Competitiveness of Nigerian Palm Oil in the World Market: An Econometric
           Analysis

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      Authors: A.O. Busari, T.O. Agboola, O.K. Akintunde, L.O. Jimoh
      Pages: 154 - 167
      Abstract: The dependence on crude oil exports as a dominant source of foreign exchange earnings has retarded the growth of agricultural export and earnings in Nigeria. The steady decline of competitiveness in the foreign agricultural export market has been of great concern. The study investigated competitiveness of Nigerian palm oil in the global market. Annual time-series data obtained from Food and Agriculture Organization Statistics (FAOSTAT) databases were used in the study. The time trend analysis was used to examine the trends in the movement of production, export supply and competitiveness (market share) of palm oil in the world market. Cointegration and error correction analysis was used to understand the relationship between the competitiveness (market share) of palm oil and its selected determinants. Results revealed an increasing trend in the domestic production of palm oil over the study period. The average domestic production of palm oil over the study period was 77632.40 tonnes. The export supply and market share of palm oil fluctuated over the period of the study reaching an average of 5762.41 tonnes and 36.09 percent respectively Results of error correction analysis revealed that the exchange rate, export tax, the interest rate on the agricultural loan, and the inflation rate negatively affect the market share of palm oil. However, technological progress in agriculture positively affects the market share of palm oil. 
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.12
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Measuring Farm Households’ Resilience Capacity in times of Pandemic
           Crisis: Evidence from Nigeria

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      Authors: J.C. Odozi, A.G. Adeyonu, G.E. Fanifosi
      Pages: 168 - 178
      Abstract: Literature documents a correspondence between production of risk and the management of risk in a local context. Quantifying the relative importance of resilience indicators is therefore at a premium in policy circles. We propose a practical methodology for estimating the ex-ante resilience capacity of farm households. We propose an index of resilience capacity that can be estimated at the household level. The composite index is constructed from indicators sourced from Nigeria’s COVID-19 National Longitudinal Phone Survey (NLPS) data set. 3,000 households were selected from the frame of 4,934 households with contact details. Various household welfare indicators were analyzed using the factor component analysis and the generalized family of distance measures used for household ranking. The estimated Resilience Capacity Index (RCI) of a mean distance of 5 points and a +-1.5 standard deviation revealed a moderate farm households resilience capacity. Taken as a whole, the results from this study show that programs that build on absorptive, adaptive and transformation capacities will go a long way to strengthen the ability of agricultural households to recover from a pandemic shock. Based on these findings, the research highlights the need for development actors interested in promoting resilience in Nigeria to increase investments in strengthening access to essential services and functions like electricity, quality housing and livelihood strategies. Notwithstanding some of the analytical limitation, the essentials of resilience capacity framework have been advanced to motivate further research.
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.13
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Analysis of Wellbeing Status of Contract Rice Farmers in Niger State of
           Nigeria

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      Authors: K.M. Yisa, M. Lawal, P. N. Kolo, K. O. Arowolo, J.J. Pelemo, O.A. Adeyemi
      Pages: 179 - 190
      Abstract: size of one hundred and seventy rice farmers (170) were selected using multi-stage sampling method. Structured questionnaire complimented with interview scheduled were used for data collection. Data collected were analyzed using wellbeing status index, ordered logit regression and factor analysis. The findings revealed that rice farmers were satisfied with community connectedness (X̅ =6.94), personal relationship (X̅ =6.67), life achievement (X̅ =6.26), spiritual/religious activities (X̅ =6.23), standard of living (X̅ =5.84) and future security (X̅ =5.06). The coefficient of rice farm size (-1.295823), educational level (0.4637844), sources of labour (1.534896), training (0.2329947) and income after contract farming (4.23e-06) farmers’ participation in contract farming. The most associated with farmer’s participation in contract farming were breach of contract by the farmers (0.9522), diversion of inputs by contract farmers (0.9326) and political interference (0.9372). It is recommended that contract farmers should be properly monitored by the contracting firms in order to reduce diversion of input in the study area, contracting firms should abolish all forms of politicking associated with inputs distribution.
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.14
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Extraction and Quality Evaluation of Raffia Palm (Raffia hookeri) and Ofo
           (Detarium microcarpum) Gums

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      Authors: Ekeocha Peace, Ihemeje Austin, Ubbaonu Collins
      Pages: 191 - 200
      Abstract: Extraction, purification and quality evaluation of raffia palm (Raffia hookeri) and ofo (Detarium microcarpum) gum extracts were carried out. Gum was extracted from both raffia palm exudate and ofo seed. The gums were respectively purified and analysed for functional properties, antinutrients and mineral contents of the gum samples. The mineral analysis of the gums revealed that magnesium contents of ofo and raffia gums were 7.94mg/100g and 9.37mg/100g respectively. Calcium contents were 16.03mg/100g and 101.40mg/100g for ofo and raffia respectively and they were significantly (p<0.05) different from each other. Iron content was 2.09mg/100g and 4.66mg/100g for ofo and raffia respectively. Potassium contents were 8.05mg/100g (ofo) and 5.06mg/100g (raffia) while sodium contents were 3.26mg/100g and 3.72mg/100g each for raffia and ofo gum. No significant (p>0.05) difference was observed between the bulk density for raffia (0.86g/ml) and ofo (0.84g/ml). Water absorption capacity of ofo gum was 65.23 water/100g while that of raffia gum was 68.64 water/100g. The oxalate contents were 2.11mg/100g and 2.6mg/100g for raffia and ofo gums respectively. Phytate concentration was 2.75 and 3.26% each for raffia and ofo and there was significant (p<0.05) difference between the samples. Saponin level was 1.44 and 1.84% for raffia and ofo respectively while alkaloid content was 0.93% and 1.05% each for raffia and ofo gum. Significant (p<0.05) difference was observed between the gums in terms of the antinutrients. The percentage gum yield from raffia exudates was 50% while that of ofo seed was 79%. The results proved that both ofo gum and raffia gum could be incorporated in food formulation if incorporated. 
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Cassava [Manihot Esculenta (Crantz)] Germplasm for Effective
           Conservation

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      Authors: K.F. Egbadzor
      Pages: 201 - 207
      Abstract: An experiment was conducted to characterize the cassava germplasm of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Plant Genetic Resources Research Institute (CSIR-PGRRI), Ghana to help in effective conservation. A total of 210 cassava accessions being conserved at the field genebank of the CSIR – PGRRI were used for the experiment in October, 2014 and data collected in October, 2015 on five morphological traits comprising of plant height, growth type, height of first branch, levels of branching and branch angle. The five traits revealed variability among the cassava accessions. Based on the variability, the 210 accessions were classified into four categories namely short-spreading, tall-spreading, short-non-spreading and tall-nonspreading. Four different planting distances were suggested for the different groups for effective conservation. The recommended planting distances were 75 x 75 cm, 75 x 100 cm, 100 x 100 cm and 100 x 150 cm groups based on height and spreading nature of the cassava accessions. Cassava accessions from different planting distances groups should not be planted adjacent each other to avoid suppressing of weaker ones.
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.16
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Efficacy of Bacteriocin Producing Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Ugba
           and Okpiye Against some Selected Bacterial Food Spoilage Agents

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      Authors: A.E. Ajiboye, C.A. Anaele, R.A. Olawoyin
      Pages: 208 - 217
      Abstract: Numerous food products owe their production and characteristics to the fermentative activities of microorganisms. Bacteriocins are antimicrobial proteins produced by bacteria that kill or inhibit the growth of other related species. Lactic acid producing bacteria were isolated from Ugba and Okpiye using standard methods. The test organisms used were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (VRFPA04) and Escherichia coli (ST2747) Fifty (50) samples of Ugba and Okpiye were collected and evaluated for the presence of bacteriocin lactic acid producers using a selective medium; De Mann Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) agar. A total of 288 isolates was isolated from the two traditional food condiments; 148 from ugba and 140 from Okpiye. It was observed that the total lactic acid bacterial count in Ugba ranges from 5.80 x 104 to 1.7 x 107 cfu/ml on MRS medium; while that of Okpiye ranges from 5.0 x 104 to 2.0 x 107 cfu/ml on MRS medium. Lactic acid bacterial count was higher in Ugba than in Okpiye
      considering the mode of storage in the market. The highest inhibitory activity was demonstrated against E. coli in Ugba sample while the least activity was demonstrated against P. aeuroginosa, also a significant high level of inhibition was shown against S. aureus while P. aeuroginosa and E. coli had little or no inhibitory activities recorded for Okpiye samples. The bacteriocin producers isolated from Ugba and Okpiye (U5, U6, OK1, OK2, OK3 and OK4) were identified as Lactobacillus sp and Lactococcus sp based on their morphological and biochemical characteristics. The antibacterial activity of the bacteriocins produced by the lactic acid bacteria has potential for use in biopreservation of condiments against food spoilage agents.
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.17
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Aflatoxin Determination in Selected Spices in The Greater Accra Region,
           Ghana

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      Authors: E. Samari, N. Opoku, M. Lawal
      Pages: 218 - 226
      Abstract: This research was carried out to determine the level of aflatoxin present in common spices sold in Nima, Agbogbloshie and Tema Central markets in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana. Spices are used in everyday food preparation to enhance food properties and for medicinal and traditional purposes. The aflatoxin concentration was determined using the Neogen Reveal Q+test kit and the mobile assay. Aflatoxin was present in all the cloves, cumin, negro pepper and calabash nutmeg spice samples used for the study. 100% of the spices sampled in this study recorded concentrations above the EU acceptable aflatoxin concentration limit which is below 5ppb. Calabash nutmeg spice recorded the highest mean aflatoxin concentration (78.4ppb) while clove spice recorded the lowest mean aflatoxin concentration (11.2ppb). Tema Central market recorded the highest aflatoxin mean concentration (55.0ppb) followed by the Agbogbloshie market (27.6ppb) and Nima market (21.3ppb). The study identifies a major threat to food safety and calls for attention to good handling and storage of spices to reduce health hazards associated with aflatoxins in the Greater Accra Region.
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.18
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Effects of Soil Texture and Nutrients Application On Soybean Nutrient
           Uptake, Growth and Yield Response

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      Authors: M. Bashir, A. M. Adam, B. M. Shehu, M. S. Abubakar
      Pages: 227 - 241
      Abstract: Soybean is a good source of protein and calories and therefore important for food security. Soybean yields in small scale farmers field stand at less than 1.0 t ha-1 against a potential of 3 to 3.6 t ha-1. This has been attributed to low soil fertility. Although a lot of work has been carried out on Soybean nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) nutrition, but research findings indicate that yields are still low, raising suspicion that other nutrients could also be limiting. To investigate this, a nutrient omission trial was used in the greenhouse to find out the nutrients that limit soybean production in four distinct soil textures - clay loam, sandy clay loam, sandy clay and sandy loam following the recommended rate of 20:40:20:5:20 Kg/ha for N,P,K,Zn, and S respectively. Similarly we applied 1 ton/ha of poultry manure with thirty six treatments combinations arranged in a completely randomized design. The results revealed that soybean performance and nutrient uptake varied significantly (p<0.05) between the soil texture and
      nutrients application. Sandy clay loam and sandy loam textures respond significantly to nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and manure application whereas zinc and NPK nutrients limits soybean performance and uptake in sandy clay and clay loam soils. In conclusion, to increase soybean production in sandy loam and clay loam of Sudan savanna of Nigeria, fertilizer formulations containing N, P, K and Zn should be used. Manure may be used to improve soybean production in sandy clay and sandy clay loam together with application of NPK fertilizer.
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.4314/jafs.v20i1.19
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2022)
       
 
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