Subjects -> AGRICULTURE (Total: 963 journals)
    - AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS (93 journals)
    - AGRICULTURE (662 journals)
    - CROP PRODUCTION AND SOIL (120 journals)
    - DAIRYING AND DAIRY PRODUCTS (30 journals)
    - POULTRY AND LIVESTOCK (58 journals)

AGRICULTURE (662 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4     

Showing 201 - 263 of 263 Journals sorted by number of followers
Biodiversity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Agriculture & Food Security     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Future of Food : Journal on Food, Agriculture and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Nature Plants     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Agricultural History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Life Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biological Agriculture & Horticulture : An International Journal for Sustainable Production Systems     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Land and Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Agriculture and Food Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Agricultural Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Indian Horticulture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aceh International Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
New Journal of Botany     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Invertebrate Reproduction & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Advances in Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Scientiarum. Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
EvoDevo     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Italian Journal of Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cereal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Australian Garden History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Agricultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Agriculture and Rural Development in the Tropics and Subtropics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Tanzania Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Modern Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
EU Agrarian Law     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Agrobotanica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Food and Energy Security     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Ghana Science Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agriculture and Natural Resources Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Biocatalysis and Agricultural Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sustainable Agriculture Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Agricultural Research, Innovation and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Applied Agriculture and Apiculture Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agra Europe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Essential Oil Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Diatom Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Acta Universitatis Sapientiae, Alimentaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Food Security     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural Chemistry and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Rural China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Revista Cubana de Ciencia Agrícola     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rivista di Studi sulla Sostenibilità     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Food Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tropical Agricultural Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Agricultural Management and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tropical Agricultural Research and Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Journal of Agricultural Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Parasitology : Parasites and Wildlife     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Apicultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agricultura Tropica et Subtropica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Biology, Agriculture and Healthcare     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Sustainable Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Agricultural Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Agriculture and Food Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Agricultural Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Huria : Journal of the Open University of Tanzania     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agro-Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ghana Journal of Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Agricultural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Berkala Ilmiah Pertanian     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Natural Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Progressive Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
COCOS : The Journal of the Coconut Research Institute of Sri Lanka     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Veteriner     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian Journal of Technological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Higiene e Sanidade Animal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wartazoa. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos de Zootecnia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Folia Horticulturae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Technologica Agriculturae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agricultural Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Emirates Journal of Food and Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Research in Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RIA. Revista de Investigaciones Agropecuarias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca : Food Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Approaches to Extension Practice : A Journal of Agricultural Extension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Plant Knowledge Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agrociencia Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chemical and Biological Technologies for Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Recycling of Organic Waste in Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Science Foundation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Avances en Investigacion Agropecuaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Management and Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bangladesh Journal of Agricultural Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu dan Kesehatan Hewan (Veterinary Science and Medicine Journal)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Innovare Journal of Agricultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arquivos do Instituto Biológico     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social and Natural Sciences Journal     Open Access  
Jurnal Agroteknologi     Open Access  
Perspectivas Rurales Nueva Época     Open Access  
Organic Farming     Open Access  
Research Ideas and Outcomes     Open Access  
Jurnal Udayana Mengabdi     Open Access  
Landtechnik : Agricultural Engineering     Open Access  
International Letters of Natural Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Agriculture System     Open Access  
Heliyon     Open Access  
Ciência e Técnica Vitivinícola     Open Access  
Oilseeds and fats, Crops and Lipids     Open Access  
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access  
Pastura : Journal Of Tropical Forage Science     Open Access  
Journal of Citrus Pathology     Open Access  
Revista Iberoamericana de las Ciencias Biológicas y Agropecuarias     Open Access  
Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports     Open Access  
International Journal of Secondary Metabolite     Open Access  
Scientia Agropecuaria     Open Access  
Pelita Perkebunan (Coffee and Cocoa Research Journal)     Open Access  
Revista de Agricultura Neotropical     Open Access  
Cogent Food & Agriculture     Open Access  
Fave : Sección ciencias agrarias     Open Access  
Revista de Ciências Agrárias     Open Access  
Review of Agrarian Studies     Open Access  
Nigerian Journal of Biotechnology     Open Access  
Nigeria Agricultural Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Annales des Sciences Agronomiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of the Bangladesh Agricultural University     Open Access  
Journal of Buffalo Science     Hybrid Journal  
Revista de Ciências Agroveterinárias     Open Access  
Tropical Grasslands - Forrajes Tropicales     Open Access  
Research in Plant Sciences     Open Access  
World Journal of Agricultural Research     Open Access  
Universal Journal of Agricultural Research     Open Access  
Research & Reviews : Journal of Agriculture Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Revue Marocaine des Sciences Agronomiques et Vétérinaires     Open Access  
Nativa     Open Access  
SAARC Journal of Agriculture     Open Access  
West African Journal of Applied Ecology     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural Research and Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal de la Recherche Scientifique de l'Universite de Lome     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Agrosearch     Open Access  
Agronomie Africaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Professional Agricultural Workers Journal     Open Access  
Interciencia     Open Access  
Nepal Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access  
Journal of the Saudi Society of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Information Processing in Agriculture     Open Access  
Sabaragamuwa University Journal     Open Access  
Ceiba     Open Access  
Research in Sierra Leone Studies : Weave     Open Access  
The Agriculturists     Open Access  
La Calera     Open Access  
Selçuk Tarım ve Gıda Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Revista de la Universidad del Zulia     Open Access  
Journal of Arid Land     Hybrid Journal  
Rangifer     Open Access  
Encuentro     Open Access  
Journal Of Agrobiotechnology     Open Access  
Coffee Science     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Scientific Research     Open Access  
Landbohistorisk Tidsskrift     Open Access  
Biotecnología en el Sector Agropecuario y Agroindustrial     Open Access  
Walailak Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access  
Universidad y Ciencia     Open Access  
Tropical and Subtropical Agroecosystems     Open Access  
Terra Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Revista Iberoamericana de Tecnologia Postcosecha     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Ciências Agrárias     Open Access  
Multiciencias     Open Access  
Ensaios e Ciência : Ciências Biológicas, Agrárias e da Saúde     Open Access  
Bioagro     Open Access  
Agroalimentaria     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Agrícolas     Open Access  
Revista U.D.C.A Actualidad & Divulgación Científica     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias Técnicas Agropecuarias     Open Access  
Revista Chapingo. Serie horticultura     Open Access  
Pastos y Forrajes     Open Access  
Fitosanidad     Open Access  
Cultivos Tropicales     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Desarrollo Rural     Open Access  
Ciencia e Investigación Agraria     Open Access  
Agronomía Mesoamericana     Open Access  
Agronomía Costarricense     Open Access  
Agrociencia     Open Access  
Agrivita : Journal of Agricultural Science     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4     

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Journal Cover
International Journal of Agricultural Research, Innovation and Technology
Number of Followers: 3  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2224-0616 - ISSN (Online) 2224-0616
Published by Bangladesh Journals Online Homepage  [87 journals]
  • On-farm demonstration of improved emmer wheat varieties in bale zone,
           Oromiya national regional state, Ethiopia

    • Authors: Bayeta Gadissa, Amare Biftu, Ayalew Sida
      Pages: 1 - 3
      Abstract: On-farm demonstration of improved emmer wheat varieties was conducted in Sinana and Goba districts of Bale Zone. The main objective of the study was to demonstrate and evaluate recently released Haydaro variety along with standard check. The demonstration was under taken on single plot of 10 m x 10 m area for each variety with the spacing of 20 cm between rows and recommended seed rate of 150 kg ha-1 and fertilizer rate of 100 qt ha-1 NPS. Mini-field day involving different stakeholders was organized at each respective site. Yield data per plot was recorded and analysed using descriptive statistics, while farmers’ preference to the demonstrated varieties was identified using focused group discussion and summarized using pair wise and simple ranking methods. The demonstration result revealed that Haydaro variety performed better than the standard check of Sinana 01 variety with an average yield of 33.5 qt ha-1, while that of the standard check was 27.2 qt ha-1. Haydaro variety had 23.16% yield advantage over the standard check. The farmers in all districts selected this variety. Thus, Haydaro variety was recommended for further scaling up in the selected area. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 1-3, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61022
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • On-farm demonstration of improved field pea varieties in selected
           districts of bale highlands, Oromiya national regional state, Ethiopia

    • Authors: Bayeta Gadissa, Amare Biftu, Ayalew Sida
      Pages: 4 - 7
      Abstract: On-farm demonstration of improved field pea varieties was conducted in Goba, Sinana and Agarfa districts of Bale zone. The main objective of the study was to demonstrate and evaluate recently released Hortu variety along with standard check. The demonstration was under taken on single plot of 10m x 10m area for each variety with row planting, recommended seed rate of 75 kg ha-1 and fertilizer rate of 100 kg ha-1 NPS. Mini-field day involving different stakeholders was organized at each respective site. Yield data per plot was recorded and analysed using descriptive statistics, while farmers’ preference to the demonstrated varieties was identified using focused group discussion and summarized using pair wise ranking methods. The demonstration result revealed that Hortu variety performed better than the standard check Harena variety with an average yield of 36.30 qt ha-1 and 31.42 qt ha-1, respectively. Hortu variety had 15.53% yield advantage over the standard check. Furthermore, farmers selected this variety. Thus, Hortu variety was recommended for further scaling up. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 4-7, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61023
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • On-farm demonstration of improved faba bean varieties in bale and west
           arsi zones, southeastern oromiya, Ethiopia

    • Authors: Bayeta Gadissa, Ayalew Sida, Amare Biftu
      Pages: 8 - 11
      Abstract: On-farm demonstration of improved faba bean varieties was conducted in Adaba and Dodola districts of West Arsi Zone and Sinana, Goba and Agarfa of Bale Zone. The main objective of the study was to demonstrate and evaluate recently released Aloshe variety along with standard check. The demonstration was under taken on single plot of 10m x 10m area for each variety with the spacing of 40 cm between rows and recommended seed rate of 180 kg ha-1 and fertilizer rate of 100 qt ha-1 NPS. Mini-field day involving different stakeholders was organized at each respective site. Yield data per plot was recorded and analysed using descriptive statistics, while farmers’ preference to the demonstrated varieties was identified using focused group discussion and summarized using pair wise and simple ranking methods. The demonstration result revealed that Aloshe variety performed better than the standard check of Mosisa variety with an average yield of 35.97 qt ha-1, while that of the standard check was 28.50 qt ha-1. Aloshe variety had 26.21% yield advantage over the standard check. This variety was selected by farmers in Adaba, Dodola and Agarfa. Thus, Aloshe variety was recommended for further scaling up in the area it was selected. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 8-11, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61024
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Marketing system of summer tomato in Jashore district of Bangladesh

    • Authors: Pradip Hajong, Md Hafijur Rahman, Md Shahriar Kobir
      Pages: 12 - 17
      Abstract: The study was conducted for the assessment of marketing system of summer tomato in Jashore. Summer tomato had high demand and high value crop in summer season among the consumers. Data were collected from 30 randomly selected tomato farmers and 60 traders from different market of Jashore district of Bangladesh during July-October, 2019. Farmer, faria, bepari, wholesaler, commission agents and retailer were involved in marketing of summer tomato. Marketing cost of farmar, faria, bepari, wholesaler, retailer (urban) and retailer (rural) were 430.00, 691.00, 2184.00, 2443.00, 1857.00 and 1074.00 Tk ton-1, respectively. Net margin or profit of the faria, bepari, wholesaler and retailer were 1300.00, 817.00, 557.00 and 2143.00 Tk ton-1, respectively. There were seven marketing channel exist in tomato marketing. Total marketing cost of all intermediaries was 7604.00 Tk ton-1 and net margin was 4826.00 Tk ton-1. Marketing efficiency was 2.25. Price spread between consumer paid and producer received was 8000.00 Tk ton-1. On the other hand, producer share was 78 percent. Spoilage and damage, transportation and packaging were the main marketing problem of summer tomato. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 12-17, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61025
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Response of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to the combined application of
           organic and inorganic fertilizers at Chena district, South Western
           Ethiopia

    • Authors: Konjit Abreham, Ute Guja, Tatek Mekuria, Henok Tsegaye
      Pages: 18 - 22
      Abstract: Low level or no use of organic and inorganic fertilizers and serious imbalances soil nutrients, depressed potato yields and pose accelerated mining of native soil nutrients. Present on-farm studies was undertaken to observe the combined effects of FYM and compost along with inorganic fertilizers, particularly NPSB on potato production. The experiment comprised of seven treatments: No fertilizer, recommended NP (115 kg N and 92 kg ha-1 P2O5), NPSB (115 kg N and 92 kg P2O5, 6.5 kg S. and 0.71 kg B ha-1), 10 tone FYM ha-1, 10 tone compost ha-1, 5 tone FYM + 50% NPSB (57.5 kg N and 92 kg P2O5 ha-1), and 5 tone compost + 50% NPSB ha-1 were arranged in RCBD with three replications. The yield and yield components were collected and subjected to mean separation and economic analysis. The analysis of variance indicated that either applied organic and inorganic fertilizers combined or alone significantly (p ≤ 0.05) improved potato yield at Chena. Full dose of each FYM and compost, recommended NP rate and NPSB gave similar potato yield. The highest average marketable and total fresh potato tuber yield (27.44, 27.92 t ha-1, respectively) were recorded by combined application of 5 t FYM ha-1 with 50% NPSB (115 kg N and 92 kg P2O5, 6.5 kg S. and 0.71 kg B ha-1) which is economically acceptable with MRR (1239.7%), whereas the lowest tuber yield (14.45 t ha-1) was obtained from unfertilized plot. Hence, combined application of 50% FYM and 50% NPSB proved best potato yield in the study area. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 18-22, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61026
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Analysis of technical efficiency and its determinants among tobacco
           producers in Uganda: An application of data envelopment analysis

    • Authors: Midamba Dick Chune, Mustaf Mohamed Takoy, Odongkara Peter
      Pages: 24 - 29
      Abstract: This study aimed at analyzing technical efficiency and its determinants among tobacco producers in Uganda. To achieve this, primary data were drawn from 200 tobacco farmers using semi-structured questionnaires. In order to determine the technical efficiency and its determinants, Data envelopment analysis and Tobit regression model were used for the analysis respectively. From the results, we observed that the mean TE was 49%, implying that the farmers were 51% inefficient. Furthermore, input prices, land size, farmers’ age, farm income and farm location were found to be the determinants of technical efficiency. This study recommended that the government should subsidize farm inputs as well as training the farmers on input combinations in order to increase technical efficiency level. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 24-29, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61027
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Effect of cassava legumes intercropping on yield and yield components of
           compound crops in Jinka on station, Southern Ethiopia

    • Authors: Biruk Gezahegn, Awoke Tadesse, Anteneh Tadesse, Zeynu Kelifa
      Pages: 30 - 33
      Abstract: A field experiment was carried out during the 2017-18 cropping season at Jinka Agricultural Research Center on station, South Omo zone, Southern Ethiopia, to determine suitable legumes in cassava legume intercropping on yield and land use efficiency of both crops. The experiment consisted of 7 treatments (cassava with haricot bean, cowpea, and pigeon pea as intercrop compared with cassava, haricot bean, cowpea and pigeon pea as sole) laid in RCBD in three replications. Statistical analysis showed that, intercropping cassava with haricot bean, cowpea and pigeon pea resulted in 54, 56 and 21% greater land use efficiency than for either crop grown alone. The highest MAI was obtained by growing cassava with haricot bean (18310.8) followed by cassava with cowpea (14524.4) whereas relatively the lowest was cassava with pigeon pea (6005.6). Based on the present finding, intercropping of cassava with haricot bean had more economic advantage (52219.8 Ebirr) than the other crop combination or grown alone. Therefore, intercropping cassava with grain legumes such as haricot bean and cowpea is important to cassava farmers since it would provide additional crop yield during the early cassava growth stage with the same piece of land and more profitable related to cost benefit. Therefore, use of cassava intercropping with haricot bean can be recommended for cassava producing farmers at Jinka and its vicinity. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 30-33, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61028
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Effects of seed rate and inter row spacing on yield and yield components
           of food barley in Semen Ari Woreda, Ethiopia

    • Authors: Biruk Gezahegn, Awoke Tadesse, Anteneh Tadesse
      Pages: 34 - 38
      Abstract: A field experiment was carried out for two successive cropping seasons in 2017 and 2018 at Shama Bulket, Semen Ari Woreda, South Omo Zone, Southern Ethiopia, to determine optimum seed rate and inter-row spacing for food barley production. The experiment involved a factorial combination of three seed rates (80, 100 and 120 kg ha-1) and three inter-row spacing (20, 30 and 40 cm). The experiment was conducted using a randomized complete block design with three replications. The results indicated the treatments had significant effect in all parameters except plant height and spike length. Based on the result of this study, use of 30 cm inter-row spacing and 120 kg ha-1 seed rate is superior in grain yield (4481 kg ha-1) and total biomass (14.6 t ha-1). Therefore, use of 30 cm inter row spacing with seeding rate of 120 kg ha-1 can be recommended for food barley production at Shama Bulket kebele and its vicinity. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 34-38, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61029
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • How do youth innovate to make agriculture gainful' Challenges and
           youth entrepreneurs in mid-western Uganda

    • Authors: Dorcas Elizabeth Loga, Paul Kibwika, Florence Birungi Kyazze
      Pages: 39 - 44
      Abstract: The global population is expected to increase to 9 billion by 2050, with the youth accounting for 14 per cent of this total. While the world's youth population is expected to grow, employment and entrepreneurial opportunities for youth, particularly those living in low and middle-income countries remain limited, poorly remunerated and of poor quality. The Ugandan population, in particular, is largely comprised of a high youthful population with 78 percent below the age of thirty. Evidence reveals that youth engagement in agriculture is declining, and in recognition of the agricultural sector's potential to serve as a source of livelihood opportunities, this study assesses the factors impeding youth engagement and the drivers of innovation among the youth engaged in agricultural enterprises in Mid-Western Uganda. Anchoring in the Agricultural Innovation System (AIS), cross-sectional survey and case study research designs were employed to establish the innovativeness of youth, and the factors impeding engagement in agricultural enterprises from the youth's perspective. A pairwise ranking of the factors was also independently done. The findings reveal that the significant factors restraining youth engagement in agricultural enterprises as enhancing soil productivity, access to relevant technical knowledge and information, and access to land for production. The major innovations for successful youth engagement in agriculture are irrigation to reduce risks of dependence on rain, mechanization to reduce labour struggle, and market linkages. The case studies' innovation index portrays a high potential of innovativeness of youth to revolutionize and make agriculture gainful and attractive to the youth. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 39-44, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61030
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Trade-off between forest conservation and agricultural expansion in
           Gura-ferda district, Southwest Ethiopia

    • Authors: Henok Tsegaye, Yemiru Tesfaye, Degnet Abebaw, Habtemariam Kassa, Abdu Abdelkadir, Kebede Gizachew
      Pages: 45 - 55
      Abstract: Agricultural expansion is one of the main drivers of deforestation in Ethiopia. This study was therefore carried out to examine the trade-off between forest and agricultural land uses in Guraferda district, southwest Ethiopia. Data to estimate economic values of land use were derived from the household surveys, key informant interviews, and focus group discussions. The household surveys were carried out in four purposively selected kebeles. Within the selected Kebeles, a total of 186 sample households were selected randomly. In addition, this study used Remote Sensing (RS) to detect and quantify LULC changes that occurred in the district throughout a thirty-year study period. The study employed by Excel 2013 for solving a cost –benefit analysis and ERDAS Imagine 9.1 for image processing. The finding revealed that an expansion of agriculture/settlement and shrinkage of forest and shrub land over the last thirty-year. The forest and shrub land use decreased by 0.43 and 2.42% ha year-1, respectively, whereas agriculture/settlement and grassland increased by 9.1 and 0.64% ha year-1, respectively over the same period. The deforestation rate is estimated at 425 ha year-1 in the study area. Analysis of trade-off provides estimated forgone earnings of about ETB 79,138 ETB (1665.3 USD ha-1) and ETB 258,298.10 (5,435.5 USD ha-1) from forest conservation and crop production, respectively assuming a 20-year planning horizon and a 10% discount rate. The 425 ha of annual deforestation entails a loss of ETB 33,633,650 (707,779 USD year-1) from forest conservation and a gain of 109,776,692.5 ETB (2,310,115.5 USD) agricultural activity. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 45-55, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61031
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • The market chain analysis of live cattle in South Omo Zone, Southern
           Ethiopia

    • Authors: Kutoya Kusse, Yidnekachew Alemayehu, Gedion Ermias, Dawit Darcho
      Pages: 56 - 66
      Abstract: This study focus on market chain actors and their functions they play in the market, to analyze the S-C-P of live cattle in the study area. Few traders dominated the market structure of live cattle in the study area. Degree of competition between traders varies and the live cattle market structure varies from loose oligopoly to tight oligopoly. This shows that in the study area few traders dominated market shares and earns abnormal profit. Entry barriers of the market are high market distant, characterize the market of live cattle and high transportation cost. In addition, market the structure varies for each cattle type. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 56-66, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61032
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Nutritional and sensory properties of smoked pork sausage produced with
           pig stomach as filler-meat

    • Authors: Worlah Yawo Akwetey, Justice Bless Dorleku, Elizabeth Yeboah
      Pages: 67 - 71
      Abstract: The nutritional and sensory characteristics of processed meat are of major concern to consumers across the globe. This study evaluated nutritional and sensory properties of pork sausages using pig stomach as filler meat. Pig stomach replaced lean pork at 0% (control), 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%, respectively to obtain treatments coded as T0, T25, T50, T75 and T100, respectively. The sausages were assessed for acidity, water holding capacity, cooking loss, proximate composition and sensory attributes. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) in flavour of sausages in particular; and all other sensory attributes of sausages produced with or without pig stomachs. Treatments T0, T25 and T50 were very similar in most of the sensory properties. Both pH and water holding capacity reduced with increasing levels of pig stomach used, and there were significant differences (p<0.05) between treatments. The results obtained suggest that pig stomach could be used at 50% in smoked pork sausages without adverse effects on nutritional and sensory properties. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 67-71, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61033
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Compost enriched with effective microorganism and bordeaux mixture on
           ginger bacterial wilt (Ralstonia solanaceurum) epidemics in southwestern,
           Ethiopia

    • Authors: Merga Jibat, Mulukan Asfaw
      Pages: 72 - 78
      Abstract: Ginger is one of the most widely distributed spices grown in various cropping systems and locations throughout the southwestern Ethiopia. Bacterial wilt, caused by Ralstonia solanacearum, is one of the serious diseases of ginger in Ethiopia. Field experiments were conducted during 2019 and 2020 to assess effects of soil amendments on bacterial wilt development and epidemics at Tepi, Ethiopia. Three soil amendments practices: compost, effective microorganisms and Bordeaux mixture alone and in integration were evaluated. Treatments were arranged in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Compost at the rate of 7 ton ha-1 enriched with effective and Bordeaux mixture treatment significantly reduced ginger bacterial wilt severity, AUDPC and disease progress rate. This treatment reduced bacterial wilt mean severity by up to 21.08% as compared to untreated control plot. Compost at the rate of 7 ton ha-1 application also slowed down epidemic progression of bacterial wilt and significantly reduced the disease parameters when integrated effective microorganisms and Bordeaux mixture. The overall results indicated that integrated compost enriched with effective microorganisms and Bordeaux mixture was effective to slow down the epidemics of bacterial wilt and to sustain ginger production and productivity. Hence, integrated compost enriched with effective microorganisms and Bordeaux mixture along with other crop management systems are recommended for improved ginger production and productivity. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 72-78, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61034
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Adaptability evaluation of improved Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.)
           varieties for yield and other quantitative traits in Arba Minch, Southern
           Ethiopia

    • Authors: Gezahegn Fikre, Awoke Mensa, Alemayehu Wodaje
      Pages: 79 - 83
      Abstract: Tomato is one of the important vegetables grown all over the world for its nutritious and economic value. Varietal improvement for high yielding, pest resistance and tolerance, drought tolerance and processing quality traits are vital thereby to enhance production and productivity of the crop. Due to lack of improved varieties in the study area, local productivity of tomato is challenged and its production is very limited. Hence, identification of improved tomato varieties that are adaptable, high yielding and disease resistant is crucial before dissemination to boost its productivity in the study area. Therefore, this experiment was conducted at Arba Minch to evaluate ten improved tomato varieties for yield and yield components under irrigation condition using randomized complete block design replicated three times. ANOVA result indicated that there is a significant variation among tested varieties in all studied parameters. The mean total yield and number of fruits plant-1 of tomato varieties varied from 4991.1 to 11,215 kg ha-1 and 13.33 to 36.53 fruits plant-1, respectively. ‘Melkashola’ scored the highest marketable yield (9,438 kg ha-1) and total yield (11,216 kg ha-1) being followed by ‘Bishola’ (8,756 kg ha-1) and ‘Melkasalsa’ (8,367 kg ha-1). On the other hand, ‘Melkasalsa’ and ‘Miya’ with moderately high yield might also be regarded as other potential varieties. Therefore, the first three varieties are recommended for cultivation in the study area and similar agro-ecology. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 79-83, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61035
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Assessment of rural and peri-urban youths’ participation in micro and
           small agricultural enterprises in South Omo Zone, Southern Ethiopia

    • Authors: Dawit Darcho, Asmera Adicha, Gedion Ermias, Kutoya Kusse
      Pages: 84 - 93
      Abstract: The Ethiopian government has a package of encouraging youths to participate in small and micro agricultural enterprises by giving legal certificate for youths who were organized in-group to start the business by providing financial supports in terms of credit. However, youths are less willing to participate in agricultural enterprises. Even after being organized into groups and having supports from government, some of them were not starting the business and some were interrupting the business they have been organized. Due to these, huge amount of money from the government, which was allocated for this purpose, is not being used as expected. Therefore, this study was intended to assess factors affecting rural and peri-urban youth participation in agricultural enterprises in Bena-Tsemay and Debubi Ari woreda of south omo zone. Two-stage sampling technique was used to select 155 sample households. Logit model was used to analyze determinants of youth's participation in agricultural enterprises. The result of this study indicated that 32.3% respondents were participated and 67.7% were not participated in enterprises. Econometric results revealed that variables such as farm size, institutional capacity building, and weather road significantly affected youths’ participation in agricultural enterprises at 1% and 5% significance level. The study recommends that the provision of land for the agricultural enterprises should consider the size/type of the enterprises that youth are willingness to participate. The government should specify the institution/sector to enterprise type and consideration of all-weather roads for each enterprise type during organizing youth in different agricultural enterprises is important. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 84-93, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61036
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Response of upland rice variety to plant population under the low land
           agro-ecology of Bench Sheko Zone, South-west Ethiopia

    • Authors: Merkine Mogiso, Tesfaye Tarekegn
      Pages: 94 - 100
      Abstract: Plant population has a strong influence on rice yield. A field experiment was conducted during the 2017 and 2018 main cropping seasons at Guraferda district in Bench Sheko Zone, Southwest Ethiopia. The objective of this study was to determine the optimum plant population and appropriate variety on grain yield and yield components of upland rice. The experiment was carried out using RCBD with three replications. Five levels of plant populations (60, 80, 100, 120, and 140 kg ha-1) and three levels of genotypes (Nerica-4, Suparica-1, and Local check) were studied. The main effect of plant population and variety had significant (p<0.05) for most of the parameters investigated. However, the interaction effect had only statistically significant for the number of tillers, panicles, and grain yield. The combined results showed that the maximum grain yield of 5553.3, 5491.0, 5252.5, 5047.6, 5043.1, and 4955.6 kg ha-1 were obtained at the respective treatment combinations of Suparica-1 with 80, Suparica-1 with 100, Local check with 140, Suparica-1 with 120, and Local check with 120 and 100 kg ha-1 plant populations. In addition to the above result, a Partial budget analysis was also carried out to determine the economic optimum plant population for production. Accordingly, the combination of Suparica-1 at the rate of 80 kg ha-1 was appropriate to get a better yield and higher economic benefit. Therefore, it can be possible to suggest the finding for wider production. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 94-100, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61037
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Evaluation of improved Cassava (Manihot esculanta Crantz) varieties in mid
           land area of South Omo Zone, Ethiopia

    • Authors: Atlaw Eshbel, Mihretu Muluneh, Mohamed Awol
      Pages: 101 - 104
      Abstract: Cassava is one of the most important foods security crops, especially in those regions disposed to difficult crop environments. The crop is also grown in the southern part of Ethiopia and plays an important role for home consumption, animal feed and source of income for small-scale farmers. However, its productivity is still low due to the lack of improved planting materials. Therefore, the experiment was conducted at Jinka Agricultural Research Center’s research site during the 2018 and 2019 consecutive cropping seasons to investigate the adaptability of improved cassava varieties and to select high-yielding variety/varieties for the target area. Four improved cassava varieties (Hawassa-4, Kello, Qulle and Chichu) and one local check were used as treatments and arranged in randomized complete block design with three replications. ANOVA revealed that the interaction between year and variety showed non-significant, whereas varieties performed significantly different (p<0.05) for root yield and other yield-related characters considered in this study. The higher mean value of total root yield was recorded on Hawassa-4 (56.91 ton ha-1) followed by Kello (42.8 ton ha-1) and showed good mean performance for root yield-related parameters than local and Qulle varieties. In general, the varieties Hawassa-4 and Kello yielded better than local checks by 50.95% and 13.5%, respectively. Therefore, the variety Hawassa-4 followed by Kello was identified as the highest yielding and adaptable Cassava varieties at the midland area of South Omo Zone and similar agro-ecologies. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 101-104, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61038
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Households’ willingness to pay for improved water service in Bonga town,
           Kaffa zone, Southwestern Ethiopia

    • Authors: Aklilu Asado, Asmera Adicha, Yemiryu Tesfaye
      Pages: 105 - 114
      Abstract: This study was initiated to estimate households’ willingness to pay for improved water services and identify its determinants by using the contingent valuation method in Bonga town of Kaffa zone, Southwestern Ethiopia. A cross-sectional data from a total of 212 sampled households’ from two randomly selected kebeles of Bonga town. Contingent valuation survey responses were analyzed through descriptive and econometric analysis using Probit and Bivariate probit model. Double bounded dichotomous choice with open-ended follow-up format was used to elicit the household’s willingness to pay. The descriptive analysis showed that out of the total 205 valid responses indicated that most households’ have perceived the problem of existing water services and were willing to pay for its improvement. Results from the study showed that about 80.98% of the sampled households were willing to pay the initial bid offered for an improvement in their water services scheme. The Probit model regression result shows that the age, daily water use, satisfaction level, fetching time, initial bid, ownership of the house, quality, family size, stay in town, and income were important factors that influenced WTP for improved water service. The study also shows that the maximum willingness to pay for improved water service was calculated to be 57.62 Birr and 30.11 Birr per month from double bounded and open-ended format respectively. The study also reveals that the aggregate welfare gains from the improvement of water supply in the study area were calculated to be 1,176,531 and 614,810 ETB per month from double bounded dichotomous choice and open-ended format respectively. Therefore, the policymakers, as well as project implementers who design solutions to address the problem of water service in the study area, should take account of these factors into their decision. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 105-114, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61039
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Comparative effects of partial conservation farming practices on plant
           development and yield

    • Authors: Thandiwe Mphande, Mebelo Mataa, Kalaluka Munyinda, Dominic Namanyungu
      Pages: 115 - 119
      Abstract: Sustainable farming systems are being introduced to ensure optimum agricultural productivity despite climate change and environmental degradation. One such sustainable agricultural technology is conservation farming (CF). The uptake of this technology has remained low at about 5% years after its introduction. CF has five interrelated practices but for a variety of reasons, farmers are unable or unwilling to adopt all recommended practices. This study studied the agronomic effects of incomplete or partial conservation practice whereby not all the five practices are used, mimicking actual practices adopted by farmers. A split- plot design experiment involving partial or incomplete CF mainly use of basins, ripping were compared to conventional farming of normal ploughing (as main plots) and three crops - cowpea, millet and sorghum (split plot) was conducted. The objective was to determine the agronomic effects and efficacy of partial adoption of CF compared to conventional farming system. Data were collected on vegetative and reproductive parameters including, plant height, germination percentage, canopy density, number of leaves, number of branches/tillers/stems, SPAD (Soil Plant Analysis Development) readings a proxy for leaf chlorophyll content. Plants grown in basins had higher plant development (plant height, total biomass) and higher yields compared to those on conventional methods. This effect could be explained by better soil physical and chemical conditions in the basins as indicated by higher SPAD readings. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 115-119, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61040
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Profitability assessment and efficiency analysis of tilapia farming in
           Bangladesh: An application on data envelopment analysis

    • Authors: Afruz Ahmed, M Kamruzzaman, Mashrat Jahan, Kaynath Akhi
      Pages: 120 - 128
      Abstract: This study was carried out to find out the financial profitability and technical efficiency of tilapia fish farmers in the selected area of Bangladesh. A total of 70 tilapia fish farmers (large 36 farmers and small 34 farmers) were selected from major tilapia producing area at Trishal upazila of Mymensingh district in Bangladesh. To fulfill the objectives of this study, profitability, socioeconomic analysis, Cobb-Douglas production function and Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) were employed. Study revealed that gross profit margin of the large farmers was 24.42% and small scale farmers was 23.8% indicating that farmers did not enough well in managing their farm and farmers has less capacity to cover for operating, financing and other cost. Break-even price for the large tilapia farmers worked out Tk. 77.33 per kg and small farmers was Tk. 81.56 per kg while break-even production for large farmers was found 1159.64 kg per hectare. Benefit cost ratio, net profit margin were found more than one and positive respectively, indicated that tilapia farming was commercially profitable. Considering all selected farmers, tilapia farming found a profitable business where undiscounted BCR for large farmers was 1.213 and a small farmer was 1.230. The mean technical efficiency level of tilapia fish farmers was 81.8 (where allocative efficiency was 93.1 and scale efficiency was 88.2) percent, implies that by operating at full technical efficiency levels, tilapia yield could be increased and efficient farmers found more productive than inefficient farmers. The results of technical efficiency showed that the farmers were efficient nevertheless, the sample farmers operated well below the production frontier and hence that they still had a chance to achieve targeted yields. Farmer’s financial benefit can be increased by reducing the feed price or increasing the output price. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 120-128, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61041
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Participatory variety selection of improved finger millet [Eleusine
           coracana (L.) Gaertn.] varieties at Debube Ari District, South Omo Zone,
           Southern Ethiopia

    • Authors: Temesgen Jerjero, Awoke Tadesse, Anteneh Tadesse, Tekle Yosef, Muhaba Sultan
      Pages: 129 - 136
      Abstract: Finger millet is staple food crop in drought-prone areas of the world and often considered as a component of food security strategies in Ethiopia. However, its yield is low in South Omo zone due to different production problems such as lack of improved varieties, lodging, and moisture stress in dry areas. A participatory finger millet variety selection was conducted at Kaysa, Baytesimal and Alga kebeles of Debube Ari District, South Omo Zone during the 2019-cropping season to identify high yielding finger millet variety/varieties .The field experiments was laid out in a randomized complete block design with three replications. The combined analysis’s of variance results revealed that there were significant (p<0.05) differences among varieties based on the recorded parameters except the harvest index. The maximum combined mean grain yield obtained to the varieties: Tadesse, Tesema and Kako-1 were 3746.75 kg ha-1, 3691.94 kg ha-1, and 3593.42 kg ha-1, respectively. While the minimum grain yield was recorded to variety, BKFM-0010 was 1341.18 kg ha-1. Regarding farmers' preferences, variety Kako-1 and Tesema had higher grain yield followed by variety Tadesse. Based on data from researchers and farmers, varieties Tadesse, Tesema, and Kako-1 were the best varieties for the test agro-ecologies. Therefore; varieties; Tadesse, Tesema and Kako-1 could be recommended and popularized for use in the test areas and similar agro-ecologies. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 129-136, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61042
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Adaptability study of Cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp.] varieties in
           Pastoral areas of South Omo Zone, Southern Ethiopia

    • Authors: Tekle Yoseph
      Pages: 137 - 140
      Abstract: Field experiments were conducted on pastoral and agro-pastoral areas of South Omo Zone at Dasenech, Hammer and Gynagatom woredas of South Omo Zone, Southern Ethiopia on four cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp.] varieties in 2019 under irrigation. The objective of the study was to select the best performing cowpea varieties in the target areas. The cowpea varieties included in the field experiment were (Black eye bean, Bole, TVU, and Kankeit). The experiments were carried out using a randomized complete block design (RCBD) with three replications. The combined analysis of variance results depicted that there were significant differences among the varieties for all the studied parameters except the number of seeds per pod. The mean values for plant height ranged from 84.89 (cm) for the variety Bole to 120.67 (cm) for TVU. The mean values for the number of pods per plant ranged from 24.33 for the variety Bole to 46.90 for TVU. The mean value for 100 seeds weight was maximum (21.11g) for the cowpea variety black eye bean and, while it was minimum (17.11 g) for the variety TVU. The highest overall mean grain yield of 2457.0 kg ha-1 was recorded for the variety Kankeit while the minimum 1695.3 kg ha-1 was noted for the cowpea variety black eye bean. Therefore, the variety Kankeit and TVU could be recommended for the study areas however further research should be done to put the recommendation on a strong basis. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 137-140, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61043
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Performance evaluation of Mung bean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] varieties
           in pastoral areas of South Omo Zone, Southern Ethiopia

    • Authors: Tekle Yoseph
      Pages: 141 - 144
      Abstract: Field experiments were conducted on pastoral and agro-pastoral areas of South Omo Zone at Dasenech, Hammer and Gynagatom woredas of Southern Ethiopia on mung bean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] varieties in 2019 under irrigated condition. The objective of the study was to select the best performing mung bean varieties in the target areas. The treatments involved in the study were three improved and one local mung bean variety (NVL-01, Shewarobit, N-26, and local). The experiment was carried out using a randomized complete block design (RCBD) with three replications. The combined analysis of variance result for mean squares depicted that there were significant differences observed among the varieties for all the studied parameters except the number of seeds per pod. The overall mean values for plant height ranged from 41.33 cm for Shewarobit to 62.00 cm for the local check. The mean values for the number of pods per plant ranged from 19.33 for the local check to 24.44 for NVL-01. The mean value for a thousand seeds weight was maximum 59.56 g for N-26, while it was a minimum 48.22 g for Shewarobit. The highest overall mean grain yield of 2483.8 kg ha-1 was recorded for N-26 while the minimum 1462.6 kg ha-1 was noted for the local check. The grain yield advantages of 41.11, 34.52, and 25.26% were obtained from the improved varieties N-26, NVL-01, and Shewarobit, respectively over the local check. The effect of varieties on grain yield was significant and the best performing mung bean varieties namely N-26 2483.8 kg ha-1 and NVL-01 2233.6 kg ha-1 would be recommended for the specific community and its vicinity even though further study should be carried out including some recently released varieties for improved mung bean production and also to put the recommendation on a strong basis. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 141-144, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61044
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Teff growth and yield response to blended fertilizer type and rate in
           Debub Ari and Bena Tsemay Districts, Southwestern Ethiopia

    • Authors: Merdikios Malla, Genanaw Tesema, Yenesew Animaw
      Pages: 145 - 154
      Abstract: Depleting of soil fertility, soil organic matter, macro-and micro-nutrients and crop nutrient imbalances are among the primary biophysical limitations that reduce the production of teff. The experiment was conducted to evaluate teff response to blended fertilizer types and rates in Debub Ari and Bena Tsemay districts. Control, Recommended NP, 3 dosages of NPS and NPSB blended fertilizer rates each were used that is laid out in RCBD following three replication. The full dose of blended and P fertilizers was applied at planting and urea was applied in two splits. The result was revealed that application of 200 kg ha-1 NPSB + 127 kg ha-1 Urea resulted in the highest grain yield of 2299.5 kg ha-1 in Debub Ari and 200 kg ha-1 NPS + 117 kg ha-1 Urea gives 1809.2 kg ha-1 in Bena Tsemay, while the lowest grain yield was recorded from the nil in both districts. However, the highest economic return was obtained in response to the application of 64 kg ha-1 N + 20 kg ha-1 P in both districts. Application of 64 kg ha-1 N + 20 kg ha-1 P gives 57.24% and 14.42% yield increment in Debub Ari and Bena Tsemay, respectively; also 54.47% and 7.57% increment in economic return in Debub Ari and Bena Tsemay in the same order over the control. Application of 64 kg ha-1 N + 20 kg ha-1 P was recommended for the production of teff on the study area and similar agro-ecologies, as it was optimum for improving teff production. Further investigation should be done on plant nutrient uptake and using efficiency and grain quality. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 145-154, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61045
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Assessment of post-harvest handling of mango and evaluation of mango jam
           in major mango producing areas of South Omo Zone, SNNPR, Ethiopia

    • Authors: Tamerat Gutema, Anteneh Tadesse
      Pages: 155 - 160
      Abstract: The present study aimed to assess the postharvest handling practice, demonstrate and popularize mango jam processing on rural households’ levels in major mango growing areas of Debub Ari Woreda, South omo, Southern Ethiopia. Training manual was developed and Practical training on processing, post-harvest handling and utilization of mango jam was given for 12 DAs, 7 Administrators and 161 model Farmers comprising of 72 female farmers and 65 model male farmers and 40 model farmer households were interviewed about the technology and postharvest handling practice in the area in which 28 are females and 12 are male. Postharvest handling practice and sensory perception of mango jam and other relevant data were collected, analysed, interpreted and discussed. Results revealed that, 87.5% of respondent are greater than 25 years old and 40.0% attended various levels (elementary to high school) education. The major transportation method and packaging material used as replied by the respondents are 42.5% (use pack animals: donkey, mule and horse) and 47.5% (use sack), respectively. Pest attack (disease, insect) followed by mechanical damage during harvesting, poor packaging material and damage during transportation were identified as the main causes of mango loss specified by the respondents. Therefore, use of the better adapted and pest/disease-tolerant varieties, improved fruit production and harvesting practice, proper storage and transportation facilities, appropriate postharvest innovations and technologies are required to reduce postharvest loss and extend fruit shelf-life. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 155-160, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61046
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Performance evaluation and sensory acceptability of improved cooking
           banana varieties in low land areas of South Omo Zone, Ethiopia

    • Authors: Atlaw Eshbel, Tamerat Gutema, Anteneh Tadesse, Mohamed Awol, Mehari G mikael
      Pages: 161 - 165
      Abstract: Cooking banana is a type of banana mainly cultivated for its fruit, which is eaten as cooked as a vegetable in many food insecurity areas. The experiment was conducted at Dasenech Woreda where food insecurity and malnutrition is the main problem to evaluate the performance of cooking banana varieties for Fruit yield and boiling suitability. Four improved cooking banana verities (Cardaba, Nijiru, Matoke and Kitawira) were used as a treatment and arranged in RCBD with three replications. All the growth, agronomic and sensory acceptability data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) using SAS 9.0 computer software. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significant (P≤0.05) differences among the varieties on day of flowering, day of maturity, plant height, fruit weight, number of hands per bunch, bunch weight and total fruit yield. The early date flowering (112) and date of maturing (203.33), as well as the highest number of hands per bunch (8.66), were observed on the variety Matoke. The higher mean value of average fruit weight (168.33 g), bunch weight (15.66 kg) and total yield (23.46 ton ha-1) were observed on the variety Kitawira followed by Mattoke. For panelists scoring preference, the sensory acceptability means scores of boiled Mattoke, Cardoba and Nijru verities showed positive acceptability value from like slightly (Nijiru) to like very much (Mattoke) while Kitawara showed a negative acceptability level. Therefore, the variety Mattoke was identified as the early maturing, moderately yielder and best sensory quality accepted as compared to other varieties that could be recommended to demonstrate in the study area. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 161-165, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61047
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • The determinants of smallholder coffee producers’ market outlet choice
           decision in Debub ari district of South Omo Zone, SNNPR, Ethiopia

    • Authors: Yidnekachew Alemayehu, Mebratu Alemu
      Pages: 166 - 173
      Abstract: This study mainly aimed at analyzing coffee market chain and the determinants of coffee market outlet choice decision of smallholder coffee producers in the Debub Ari District. The descriptive statistics and econometric models were used to analyze the data. Multivariate probit model was used to identify factors affecting market outlet choices of the smallholder coffee producers. Both primary and secondary data were collected from the study area. The multi-stage sampling techniques have been employed for this study. A total of 194 coffee producer household heads have been randomly selected and interviewed with the help of pre-tested structured questionnaire. The focus group discussion and key informants interviews were conducted to supplement the formal data. The probability of choosing collector, wholesalers, retailer, processor, consumer’s outlets is 67.1%, 66.4%, 36.9%, 71.6% and 15.3%, respectively. The joint probabilities of households to jointly choose the four market outlets was 0.031% which is greater than the likely of not choosing all market outlets which is 0.003%. Access to credit negatively influenced retailer, processor and consumer market outlet choice, distance to the nearest market negatively influenced processor market outlet choices, market information, off-farm participation positively influenced retailer and consumer market outlets choices. Therefore, the intervention is needed to improve coffee marketing chain through promoting cooperatives, infrastructural development and timely market information for efficient marketing system in the study area. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 166-173, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61048
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Attitude of the women farmers towards organic farming of Nilphamari
           district in Bangladesh

    • Authors: Md Golam Sarwar, Md Abu Sayed Mondol, Pallab Goswami, Saiful Huda
      Pages: 174 - 181
      Abstract: The key objective of the study was to determine the extent of attitude of the women farmers towards organic farming. The study was conducted in two union of Nilphamari Sadar upazila such as Lakshmi Chap and Palashbari under Nilphamari district. Total 100 women farmers were selected from the study area as the population and random sample techniques was used to comprised of 80 constituted the sample of the study. Data were collected by a pre-tested interview schedule during 25 April to 25 May 2020. Simple and direct questions with different scales were used to obtain information. Attitude of the women farmers towards organic farming was measured by Likert scale. Descriptive statistics, multiple regression was used for analysis. Slightly above three-fifths (63.7 percent) of the women farmers had moderately favorable attitude towards organic farming while 21.3 percent slightly favorable attitude and 15.0 percent of women farmers under highly favorable attitude towards organic farming. It is noticed that the majority (85.0 percent) of the women farmers showed slightly favorable to moderately favorable attitude towards organic farming. Educational qualification, training experience, and access to extension contact of the respondents had significant positive contribution with their attitude towards organic farming. The most important problem (77.50 percent) faced by the women farmers was “higher amount of insect pest and diseases”. The foremost (67.50 percent) suggestion offered by the women farmers was “Developing organic pesticide company through private and government initiatives”. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 174-181, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61049
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Financial profitability analysis of dairy milk production in some selected
           areas of Bangladesh

    • Authors: Md Ariful Alam, Asma Yeasmin Sampa, Sauda Afrin Anny, Sharmin Afrin
      Pages: 182 - 187
      Abstract: The study analyzed profitability and productivity of dairy milk production from a survey of 70 respondents (farmers and market actors) in Dhaka region. Responsible factors that affect dairy milk production were identified using the Cobb-Douglas production function. The findings unveil that significant coefficients of variables exhibit positive impact on the dairy milk production. It is possible for dairy farmers to enjoy sufficient profits from milk production since earned gross return and net return were Tk. 1099 and Tk. 594, respectively against the total cost of production Tk. 487.83 per cow per day. Average production of milk per cow was 12.5 liters. The estimated Benefit Cost Ratio (BCR) was 2.17 that is dairy farmers earned Tk. 2.17 investing one taka in dairy farming. Int. J. Agril. Res. Innov. Tech. 12(1): 182-187, June 2022
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.3329/ijarit.v12i1.61050
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2022)
       
 
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