Subjects -> AGRICULTURE (Total: 981 journals)
    - AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS (93 journals)
    - AGRICULTURE (680 journals)
    - CROP PRODUCTION AND SOIL (120 journals)
    - DAIRYING AND DAIRY PRODUCTS (30 journals)
    - POULTRY AND LIVESTOCK (58 journals)

AGRICULTURE (680 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4     

Showing 601 - 263 of 263 Journals sorted alphabetically
Science and Technology Indonesia     Open Access  
Science as Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Scientia Agricola     Open Access  
Scientia Agropecuaria     Open Access  
Seed Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Seed Science Research     Hybrid Journal  
Selçuk Tarım ve Gıda Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Semiárida     Open Access  
Siembra     Open Access  
Small Ruminant Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Smart Agricultural Technology     Open Access  
Social & Cultural Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Social and Natural Sciences Journal     Open Access  
South African Journal of Agricultural Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South African Journal of Economics : SAJE     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
South African Journal of Plant and Soil     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Spatial Economic Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Sri Lanka Journal of Food and Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Stiinta Agricola     Open Access  
Studies in Australian Garden History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Sugar Tech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Sustainability Agri Food and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sustainability and Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Sustainable Agriculture Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sustainable Environment Agricultural Science (SEAS)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tanzania Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Terra Latinoamericana     Open Access  
The Agriculturists     Open Access  
The Journal of Research, PJTSAU     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Translational Animal Science     Open Access  
Trends in Agricultural Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Tropical Agricultural Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tropical Agricultural Research and Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tropical and Subtropical Agroecosystems     Open Access  
Tropical Grasslands - Forrajes Tropicales     Open Access  
Tropical Technology Journal     Open Access  
Tropicultura     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Agricultural and Natural Science / Türk Tarım ve Doğa Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Agricultural Engineering Research     Open Access  
Ukrainian Journal of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Uluslararası Tarım ve Yaban Hayatı Bilimleri Dergisi / International Journal of Agricultural and Wildlife Sciences     Open Access  
UNICIÊNCIAS     Open Access  
Universal Journal of Agricultural Research     Open Access  
Universidad y Ciencia     Open Access  
Urban Agricultural & Regional Food Systems     Open Access  
Viticulture Data Journal     Open Access  
VITIS : Journal of Grapevine Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Walailak Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access  
Wartazoa. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Weed Biology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weed Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
West African Journal of Applied Ecology     Open Access  
Wildlife Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wirtschaftsdienst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
World Journal of Agricultural Research     Open Access  
World Mycotoxin Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World's Poultry Science Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
علوم آب و خاک     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4     

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Sugar Tech
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.441
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0974-0740 - ISSN (Online) 0972-1525
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Sugarcane: A Promising Source of Green Carbon in the Circular Bioeconomy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Sugarcane is one of the most promising biomass resources in the developing bioeconomy. It is a source of fermentable sugars and of lignocellulosic biomass that can be converted to a variety of products. Brazil is the leading producer of sugarcane, with 734 million tons projected for 2022 and a yield of 74 tons per hectare. Sugarcane is already an important source of sugar, ethanol, and electricity through the direct burning of sugarcane bagasse, but its potential goes far beyond these products. For being easily fermentable, sugarcane juice is a promising source for other bio-based products, and the valorization of sugarcane residues in existing biorefineries has enormous potential, from the production of biogas from vinasse to the valorization of CO2, recovery of xylans and xylooligosaccharides, production of hydrogels, biosorbents, and 3G bioproducts. This manuscript will address the impact of sugarcane in the Brazilian bioeconomy, the status of technological development in sugarcane biorefineries, and the perspectives for sugarcane and its residues in a circular bioeconomy.
      PubDate: 2022-06-24
       
  • Integration of Bio-products and NPK Fertilizers for Increasing
           Productivity and Sustainability of Sugarcane-Based System in Subtropical
           India

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract A field experiment was conducted from 2016 to 2018 at the ICAR-Indian Institute of Sugarcane Research, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India, to study the effect of integration of bio-products and inorganic fertilizers on soil quality parameters, growth and yield of sugarcane and also to assess the possibilities of reduction in inorganic fertilizers doses, if any through the integration of bio-products with inorganic fertilizers. Eight treatments of various bio-products in different combinations were applied on sugarcane plant and ratoon crops. These treatments were replicated three times in randomized block design. Inclusion of dharmarut (DHA), diamond (DIA), sugar factory kit (SF kit), and bio NPK kit with a recommended dose of fertilizers (RDF) improved about 18.4% soil organic carbon (SOC) in sugarcane ratoon crop (13.37 Mg/ha). However, a 40% reduction in NPK could also improve SOC by 7.9% over the control (11.29 Mg/ha). Application of SF kit and bio NPK kit with RDF improved available N content in soil by 15.5% over the control. SF and bio NPK kits and NPK also improved available P in soil significantly over the control. Integration of DHA, DIA, SF kit, and bio NPK kit with 100% RDF improved 11.41% available K in the soil as compared to control plot (289 kg/ha). However, reduction in NPK with similar bio-products improved 15.6% available K after harvesting of ratoon crop compared to control plot. Mean available K content in soil (305.5 kg/ha) after harvesting ratoon crop was recorded higher by 43.6 kg/ha than after harvesting of plant crop. Integrated use of DHA, DIA, SF kit, and bio NPK kit along with 100% RDF improved sugarcane yield by 38.58% and 30.0% in sugarcane (plant) and ratoon crops, respectively, over the control (RDF). Such improvements in sugarcane yield also improved sugar yield by 30.4% and 26.4% in plant and ratoon crops, respectively, over the recommended NPK through chemical fertilizers alone. Integrated use of these bio-products with 60% RDF also resulted in an improvement of 16.65% and 19.0% cane yield in plant and ratoon crops, respectively, over the RDF. Such improvement in yield could contribute additional sugar production by 9% and 18.5% in sugarcane plant and ratoon crops, respectively, over the recommended dose of NPK (RDF). Thus, the integration of bio-products with NPK holds great promise for various sugarcane growing regions and categories of farmers to harness sustainable yield increases in sugarcane-based systems.
      PubDate: 2022-06-22
       
  • Identification of Changes in the Freshness of Palm (Arenga Pinnata) Sap

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Arenga pinnata sugar as one of the palm sugar is an alternative sweetener appreciated because it contains additional nutritional properties with phytochemicals. The sugar is processed from fresh A. pinnata sap which spoils easily following harvest as it is very easy to ferment, so preservatives are often added during the sap collection period. This practice results in the changed characteristics of A. pinnata sap which are reported are generally measured from sap that has been collected over many hours and to which preservatives may have been added. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the fresh characteristics of A. pinnata sap, namely pH and colour with samples of A. pinnata sap which were collected and measured over a short time span and without using preservatives. The results indicated that fresh palm sap was alkaline with a pH of about 8 and decreased during the time of observation. Colour measurement showed the L*, a*, and C* values decreased, while the a* and ΔE* increased with time of observation. The hue angle implied the colour of the very fresh A. pinnata sap can be compared to the colour of drinking water. Correlation analysis performed showed a strong relationship between pH and colour, especially for pH-L* (r = 0.81) and pH-a* (r = − 0.85). Changes in the pH value for 12 h observed from this study revealed that without the use of preservatives the palm sap was still fresh and could be processed into crystal A. pinnata sugar crystals.
      PubDate: 2022-06-21
       
  • Short-Term Limited Water Irrigation Influences the Photosynthetic
           Pigments, Enzymatic and Non-Enzymatic Activities in Saccharum spontaneum
           L. at Vegetative Stage

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Insufficient water is a leading environmental problem that affects overall crop development, productivity, and sometimes total crop failure. It brings a number of morpho-physiological and cellular disturbances. The purpose of this study was carried out to assess the effects of photosynthetic pigments and antioxidative enzyme activities of Saccharum spontaneum cv. GX83-10 plants during mild to severe water stress conditions. After 90 days of bud setts germination, S. spontaneum plants were sustained up to 15 days of withdrawing water. Our results indicated that the stressed plants were negatively affected, such as growth, biomass, photosynthetic loss, and significant reduction in photosynthetic CO2 assimilation rate. Severe water stress enhanced the level of osmolytes, i.e., proline, soluble protein, soluble sugar, and malondialdehyde, as well as catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase enzyme activities. Antioxidative enzyme activities in S. spontaneum plant leaves were improved and enhanced the metabolism of superoxide, leading to enhanced water stress tolerance efficiency. The present findings may help in better understanding of S. spontaneum antioxidative defense systems in drought-stressed conditions.
      PubDate: 2022-06-21
       
  • Targeting a Sustainable Sugar Crops Processing Industry: A Review (Part
           II): Reuse and Conversion Technologies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Sustainability of the sugar crops harvesting and processing industry is closely associated with valorization of its byproducts via conversion into beneficial bioproducts, biomaterials, biochemicals, and biofuels, with potential in agricultural, pharmaceutical, and industrial applications. Sugar crops are versatile in that they include a rich sugar fraction (sucrose, glucose, and fructose) in addition to fiber (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin). Byproducts such as leaves and tops can be used for fodder; bagasse and molasses for fuel and chemicals and press mud as fertilizer, and these encompass just a few examples of a myriad of applications. A detailed review of the state-of-the-art value-added conversion technologies for these byproducts is described in detail herein. Some technologies generate multiple co-products simultaneously, making the conversion more economically attractive and competitive toward traditional materials. There is also the opportunity for the creation of new jobs and markets for the dissemination of these products. In the first of two manuscripts, production of these byproducts is detailed together with their specific physicochemical properties and applications. This second manuscript is a review of the value-added conversion technologies for these byproducts.
      PubDate: 2022-06-21
       
  • Crop Residue Recycling Affecting Carbon Sequestration, Nutrients
           Availability and Crop Yields in Rice–Wheat and
           Sugarcane–Ratoon–Wheat System

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The field experiment was conducted during 2016–2018 and 2018–2020 at the ICAR-Indian Institute of Sugarcane Research, Lucknow (IISR) research farm. The experiment was laid out in a randomized block design (RBD) with eight treatments in rice-wheat-rice-wheat and sugarcane–ratoon–wheat cropping systems with/without application of Trichoderma viride. Mean experimental results obtained for both the cropping systems revealed that in the rice-wheat-rice-wheat (RWRW) cropping system, about one-third of crop residues produced could be recycled effectively with Trichoderma inoculation. However, in the sugarcane–ratoon–wheat (S.R.W.) system, complete residues (trash) could be applied in the subsequent ratoon crop. In the rice-wheat-rice-wheat cropping system, crop residue supplemented a mean 26.49 kg N, 7.12 kg P, and 12.55 kg K ha−1 year−1. However, the corresponding values for sugarcane–ratoon–wheat system were 56.13 kg N, 7.19 kg P, and 44.09 kg K ha−1 year−1.The population of soil bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes could be increased after crop residue retention/trash mulching. Thus, improved soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC), soil microbial biomass N (SMBN), and soil respiration (S.R.) could be recorded. The highest S.O.C. was sequestered with trash mulching + Trichoderma. The crop residues added the soil nutrients (N.P.K.) status and the improved rhizospheric environment through improving soil physical, chemical, and biological properties after completion of the crop cycle. Sugarcane, rice, and wheat yields in the system could also be enhanced by crop residue addition and inoculation of T. viride.
      PubDate: 2022-06-17
       
  • Genetic Transformation in Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris L.): Technologies and
           Applications

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is a potential cash crop of immense commercial importance. The crop finds many industrial utilizations owing to its rich carbohydrate storage reserves. Conventional strategies bank on traditional cultivation package of practices and hence expose the otherwise recalcitrant sugar beet crop to various stresses like diseases, pests, and abiotic stress factors. Hence, potential alternative transpiring to the rescue is the development of genetically transformed crop plants (supplemented by an efficient in vitro regeneration protocol) harbouring beneficial genes to counter the above-mentioned problems. Sugar beet could be genetically modified through the indirect methods using Agrobacterium spp. along with the direct transformation methods, viz. particle bombardment, polyethylene-glycol mediated, somatic hybridization, sonication, and electroporation. Such biotechnological explorations aim towards the development of improved herbicide -resistant, salinity-tolerant, frost and moisture stress-resistant, rhizomania-, Cercospora leaf spot- and nematode-resistant lines along with concerted efforts to augment the intrinsic secondary metabolites. Industrially important carbohydrates like fructans and sucrose have also been improvised via transgenic interventions. With the multi-dimensional prospects of genetic engineering in sugar beet being explored since the early 1990s, the different investigative attempts along with the associated underlying reasons and parameters to the derived results have been discusse in the current review that effectively summarizes the different transformation techniques employed along with the potential applications of the transformed plants for crop improvement in sugar beet with major focus on biotic and abiotic stress tolerance.
      PubDate: 2022-06-17
       
  • Targeting a Sustainable Sugar Crops Processing Industry: A Review (Part
           I)—By-Product Applications

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Around the world, growing energy consumption from rapid urbanization and industrialization together with the overwhelming reliance on fossil fuels is affecting the integrity of both natural and human systems. Additionally, rising oil and gas prices and potential future shortages lead to concerns about the security of the energy supply needed to sustain our economic growth. This has resulted in an increased awareness for environmental sustainability in all industrial sectors. In the agricultural sector, sugar crops processing for the production of sugar generates a wide variety of by-products. Their reuse represents a prime opportunity for value capture and for the sugar processing industry to be in the forefront of sustainability, while possibly realizing additional profits. Sugar crops such as sugarcane and sugar beets are versatile in that they include a rich sugar fraction (sucrose, syrups) in addition to fiber (cellulose), fodder (green and brown leaves and tops), fuel and chemicals (bagasse, molasses), and fertilizer (press mud). This is the first of two papers where production of several by-products is detailed together with their specific physicochemical properties and the ways in which they can be utilized beneficially and sustainably. In the second paper, state of the art value-added conversion technologies for these by-products are described in detail.
      PubDate: 2022-06-16
       
  • Fortification of Sugar: A Call for Action

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The insufficiency of nutrients in man’s diet has led to an increase in food fortification in recent times. Sugar, a commodity widely consumed globally and used in the production of a wide variety of products, has been found to be a suitable vehicle for food fortification. This study is a review of literature published on the subject of sugar fortification that has spanned over five decades now. The study discusses the various types of nutrients, fortificants, and techniques that have been used or could be used to fortify sugar in relation to the need of various regions in the world. It was observed that other nutrients have not been successfully adopted for fortification, as vitamin A. Fortification using iodine, iron, and thiamine has been performed on sugar either on a laboratory scale or in a factory pilot phase. Other nutrients such as vitamins B, C, D, folic acid, calcium, and zinc could still be introduced into sugar. In a bid to minimize the loss of the fortificants in the molasses, it was observed that the fortificants are best introduced after the sugar has left the centrifuge during processing, before it is bagged. Future prospects were also given in the study based on the observed knowledge gaps to ensure maximum usage and application of sugar as a "vehicle" for fortification.
      PubDate: 2022-06-15
       
  • Synergistic Effect of LAB Strains (Lb. fermentum and Pediococcus
           acidilactisci) with Exogenous Fibrolytic Enzymes on Quality and
           Fermentation Characteristics of Sugarcane Tops Silage

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The present study compared pre-treatment effect of exogenous fibrolytic enzyme (EFE) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inoculants on the quality of sugarcane tops silage (SCT). Sugarcane tops (301 g DM/kg fresh matter) were chopped into 2.5–3.0 cm lengths and sub-sampled in 33 (11 × 3; treatments × replications) batches. A total of eleven treatments, including two controls, i.e. C1 (without additives) and C2 (with common additives: 0.5% NaCl, 0.5% urea and 2% molasses as such) and nine treatments were prepared in factorial arrangements of (3 × 3) exogenous fibrolytic enzyme (C cellulose, X xylanase and C + X) with LAB inoculants (LF Lactobacillus fermentum, PA Pediococcous acidilactici and LF + PA). After 30 days of ensiling samples were analysed; pH, lignocelluloses, butyric acid, oxalate, yeast and mould count were reduced (p < 0.05) in all treatments, whereas, the lactic acid (LA), acetic acid (AA) and metabolisable energy (ME) content were increased (p < 0.05) in all treatments than controls, C1 and C2 SCT silage. DM loss and NH3–N (% total nitrogen) was found higher (p < 0.05) in C2 and all treatments as compared to the C1 silage. The effect of EFE and LAB interaction was found significant (p < 0.01) for LA:AA, Fleig point and butyric acid content of SCT silage. The efficacy of EFE and LAB inoculant was higher (p < 0.05) when used in combinations, cellulase + xylanase and LF + PA as compared to either type. Silage Fleig point value was found highest (p < 0.05) in LF + PA + X and LF + PA + C + X treatments. Overall comparative effectiveness suggested that xylanase with Lactobacillus fermentum plus Pediococcous acidilactici were the most promising combinations to improve sugarcane tops silage quality.
      PubDate: 2022-06-15
       
  • Does Exogenous Vitamins Improve the Morphophysiological Condition of
           Sugarcane Subjected to Water Deficit'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Most of the areas cultivated with sugarcane around the world are subject to a period of water deficiency, reducing the productive potential of the crop. Management techniques that allow a greater resistance of plants concerning this stress can be an important tool for the better reestablishment of plants after the drought period. Thus, in the present study, the effects of exogenous application of thiamine and nicotinamide in sugarcane plants submitted to water deficit in the early stages of development were considered. The treatments tested were: T1 = control; T2 = 100 mg nicotinamide L−1; T3 = 100 mg thiamine L−1; T4 = 50 mg nicotinamide + 50 mg thiamine L−1; T5 = 100 mg nicotinamide + 100 mg thiamine L−1, which were applied prior to the imposition of stress. After 90 days of cultivation, we found that treatments T3 and T4 provided better adaptability of plants to water deficit stress, improving the physiological conditions of gas exchange and stomatal functionality. Thus, we conclude that the isolated application of thiamine (100 mg L−1) and its combination with nicotinamide, in a concentration of 50 mg L−1, can be beneficial to the photosynthetic apparatus and the stomatal morphology of sugarcane plants subjected to a period of water deficit.
      PubDate: 2022-06-10
       
  • Media optimization for erythritol production by Moniliella sp. BCC25224

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Erythritol was a safe and low-calorie sweetener, generally used as food additive. Erythritol could be produced from fermentation of glucose, which obtained from sucrose hydrolysis. In this research, erythritol was produced by fermentation of food-grade osmophilic yeasts, Moniliella sp. BCC25224. To optimize the production, the cultivation media were optimized using the Taguchi L9 array. Three levels of glucose concentration (100, 200 and 300 gL−1) and three types of nitrogen sources (yeast extract, corn steep liquor and soybean flour) were investigated. Cell mass, glucose consumption, erythritol production and erythritol yield were used as optimization parameters. The obtained optimal media were 200 gL−1 glucose and 13 gL−1 soybean flour. The optimal media were used to achieve 46.7% erythritol yield and 0.47 gg−1 yield coefficient in a batch fermentation. The results showed that the optimal media compositions were suitable for Moniliella sp. BCC25224 and could be used for efficient erythritol production.
      PubDate: 2022-06-10
       
  • An Efficient Protocol for Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation and
           Regeneration of Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris L.) based on Blade–Petiole
           Transition Zone Explants

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is an economically important crop, which contributes significantly to the global sugar supply. The present study was performed to establish and optimize the parameters of Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation with the sugar beet blade–petiole transition zone as explants to provide a reliable and efficient genetic transformation method for studies of sugar beet. This study used beet pollination line 32467. In the explants screening test, the differentiation rate of the explant blast–petiole transition zone was 10.8%, which was significantly higher than those of hypocotyl segments (6.7%) and multiple shoot clumps (4.2%). In the medium selection test, the main medium components used in the transformation process were as follows: induced differentiation medium: MS medium, 1.2 mg kinetin, 0.7 mg 1-naphthylacetic acid (pH 5.8); rooting medium: MS medium, 1.2 mg 1-naphthylacetic acid (pH 5.8); infection medium: MS medium, 0.7 mg 1-naphthylacetic acid, 1.2 mg kinetin, 29 mg acetosyringone (pH 6.8); co-cultivation medium: MS medium, 29 mg acetosyringone, 0.7 mg 1-naphthylacetic acid, 1.2 mg kinetin, 388 mg d-galacturonic acid (pH 5.8); delayed selection medium: MS medium, 0.5 mg benzylaminopurine, 0.05 mg 1-naphthaleneacetic acid, 500 mg carboxypenicillin, 100 mg cefotaxime (pH 5.8); and selection medium: MS medium, 0.5 mg benzylaminopurine, 0.05 mg 1-naphthaleneacetic acid, 500 mg carboxypenicillin, 100 mg cefotaxime, 0.013 mg glyphosate (pH 5.8). The results of Agrobacterium infection experiments showed that the optimal Agrobacterium infection concentration was OD600 = 0.4 with an infection time of 20 minutes.
      PubDate: 2022-06-09
       
  • Biotechnological Intervention for Sugarcane Improvement Under Salinity

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is a major cash crop that drives the economy of several countries owing to being an important source for sugar, bioethanol, and ethanol production globally. Several biotic and abiotic stresses have been reported to reduce the overall yield and production of sugarcane globally. Salinity is major abiotic stress which drastically influences the yield and hence needs a holistic approach to develop salt-tolerant sugarcane varieties. Efforts of conventional breeding approaches toward the development of salt-tolerant varieties are being hampered due to the presence of narrow genetic pool and complicated genome architecture of sugarcane. Substantial efforts have been made to expedite marker-assisted breeding approach. Recent advancements in the plant molecular biology have led to the identification of some of the identification of few potential genes for developing transgenic salt-tolerant sugarcane. The emergence of omics-based technologies such as genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics with the deciphering of genome sequences have substantially enhanced the pace of sugarcane improvement. Genome-wide analysis has revealed several salt inducible regulatory sequences, transcription factors, and miRNAs, which could be a potential tool for developing salt-tolerant sugarcane varieties. The potential of recent genome-editing technologies for enhancing salt tolerance in sugarcane is also being explored. The present review highlights the biotechnological intervention emerging from the recent omics-driven research for developing salt tolerance in sugarcane.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
       
  • Investigation on Thermokinetic Study and Optimization of Sugarcane Bagasse
           Thermal Pyrolysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract In this article, studies on kinetics and thermodynamics of sugarcane bagasse (SB) pyrolysis using thermogravimetric data have been carried out. The optimization of the process parameters involved in thermal pyrolysis was also investigated using a statistical technique called response surface methodology. The investigations on the physical properties of SB have revealed the presence of a high amount of volatile matter of about 79.54 wt% and less ash content of 3.02 wt% and a heating value of 18.27 MJ/kg. The thermogravimetric analysis of SB was performed at 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C/min heating rate under the inert atmosphere of nitrogen with a flow rate of 100 ml/min. The thermogravimetric studies have confirmed that the maximum degradation occurred in the temperature range of 200–500 °C. The kinetic parameters of SB pyrolysis at different heating rates were estimated by using Mampel’s first-order model-fitting method. The kinetic study has manifested an optimum activation energy value of 83.56 kJ/mol at 10 °C/min and a lower activation energy of 76.22 kJ/mol at 15 °C/min. The average activation energy of all the heating rates was obtained to be 79.04 kJ/mol. The thermodynamic studies affirmed an average ΔS value of − 150.27 J/K/mol, ΔH value of 73.819 kJ/mol, and ΔG value of 168.294 kJ/mol, respectively. The optimization studies showed that the maximum bio-oil yield was 43.02 wt% at optimum parameters such as the temperature of 500 °C, a nitrogen flow rate of 100 ml/min, and a heating rate of 20 °C/min, respectively. The gross calorific value and kinematic viscosity of the bio-oil obtained at optimum condition were found to be 34.02 MJ/kg and 14.20 cSt., respectively. It was also observed that the bio-oil obtained at optimum conditions contains a high amount of water of 23.70% attributing to a lesser calorific value of the bio-oil. Hence, it can be corroborated that the properties like water content, conradsons carbon residue, oxygen content, and kinematic viscosity need to be upgraded to make it a viable fuel source.
      PubDate: 2022-06-03
       
  • Identification of Near Homozygous Inbred Lines for Developing Hybrid
           Populations to Explore the Possibility of True Seed-Based Sugarcane
           Cultivation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Identification of homozygous lines is a prerequisite for commercial sugarcane cultivation through true seed, which will bring a transformational change in sugarcane agriculture. In order to explore this possibility, several commercial canes were selfed and the selfs were evaluated for economic traits and molecular similarity. Among the families, Co 1148 family contained advanced generation selfs, while others were of early generations. The families Co 1148, Co 86032, Co 99008 recorded the least variability for cane yield and quality traits, while Co 775 families exhibited the highest variability. On genotyping with eleven sequence tagged microsatellite markers and subjecting the data to STRUCTURE analysis revealed 9, 4, 4 and 2 subpopulations in Co 1148, Co 86032, Co 99008 and Co 775 families, respectively. In each family, clone(s) amplifying least number of markers within each allele and having highest genomic differentiation in relation to the parent are considered as relatively homozygous types. One such identified sixth generation self, viz. 1148-13-11-2-237-2-61 was selfed and crossed with other identified near homozygous lines, and the progenies were compared for their homogeneity. The hybrid progeny populations recorded lower coefficient of variation and exhibited high hybrid vigour over the corresponding selfed progenies. The results implied the scope of hybrid breeding and true seed production in sugarcane through developing homozygous selfs. The identified near homozygous selfs need to be further advanced and investigated for their utilisation as parents in sugarcane true seed production programme.
      PubDate: 2022-06-03
       
  • Sucrose-Specific Genic Microsatellites to Analyse the Genetic Structure
           Among the Commercial Hybrids and Clones of Interspecific and Intergeneric
           Origin in Saccharum Complex

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Mining of non-redundant transcript assemblies from Saccharum spp. associated with sucrose synthesis located a higher number of repeat units in the open reading frames (ORF) of sucrose biosynthesis pathway. Functional annotation of these SSR motifs revealed that the two paralogs of soluble acid invertase (SAI) consisting of trimer motifs (TGC)5 and (TTC)10 were located in the coding region of the genome (ORFs). Molecular diversity analysis of the 44 unigenic microsatellite markers associated with six major sucrose-metabolizing enzymes indicated that Shannon’s information index (SI) was highest for neutral invertase (0.8743), but lowest for SSR allele specific to cell wall invertase (0.4506). Dendrogram based on dissimilarity coefficients grouped 40 genotypes into two major clusters. Cluster I had 26 genotypes that comprised high-sucrose Indian Co canes, while 14 low-sugar clones of S. spontaneum, S. officinarum and Erianthus genotypes formed cluster II. Population structure analysis revealed the presence of three different sub-populations with 24 high-sucrose clones grouped into two clusters and the remaining 14 low-sugar genotypes in a separate cluster. The first two factors in principal component analysis (PCA) had the highest contribution in variability as PC1 (34.47%) and PC2 (11.76%). Results of PCA from this study highlighted the importance of eight Indian Co canes (Co 11015, Co 94012, Co 87044, Co 86011, Co 86002, Co 86032, Co 85002 and CoC 671) exhibiting high diversity for sucrose-specific SSR alleles and utilization of these clones is expected to enhance the genetic gain for sucrose content in sugarcane improvement programmes. The SSR mined were of highly informative and able to distinguish high- and low-sugar genotypes, and are candidate markers for sucrose content. After marker traits association analysis, validation and precise estimation of marker effect could serve as markers for selecting high-sucrose genotypes in sugarcane.
      PubDate: 2022-06-02
       
  • An Approach to Sugarcane Yield Estimation Using Sensors in the Harvester
           and ZigBee Technology

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Data-driven decisions can be performed based on crop yield values, essential information for precision agriculture practices. Technical solutions for yield mapping have been increasing for the sugarcane crop. However, the adoption of a yield monitor is low among farmers. An alternative is associating the amount of sugarcane harvested with the yield. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the sugarcane mass prediction by a hydraulic oil pressure sensor installed in the chopper of the harvester. A commercial sugarcane field was used for the field trial with four harvesters and an in-field wagon instrumented with the load cells. All equipment at the harvesting front were equipped with ZigBee technology for data transfer to the sugar mill's Remote control center. The redistribution of the total weight of sugarcane harvested within each field was based on the chopper hydraulic pressure variation. The yield monitor had a low prediction error (4.5%) compared to the total measured by the in-field wagon. The results suggest enhancing the frequency of data collection by the harvester improves the spatial variability detection of sugarcane yield at the field level. The distribution of the total mass of sugarcane harvested indicated that neither empirical model nor sensors calibration is required to estimate yield regardless of the harvester. In future, the application of telemetry and distribution of the total harvest within the field should be studied for other crops, e.g., grains, which already use this technology for the management of equipment in the field.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Physiology of Sucrose Productivity and Implications of Ripeners in
           Sugarcane

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Sugarcane is grown in India in about 4.7 million hectares with a production of 348 million tonnes and sugar output of 32.34 million tonnes during the year 2017–2018. Although cane yield has doubled over the years, it is not so in the case of sugar recovery. Genetic and environmental factors influence sugarcane growth, sucrose accumulation as well as maturity processes. Sucrose in storage compartment of cane stalk is the ultimate balance between synthesis and internal consumption in simple terms; nevertheless, it is stored against a number of complex processes such as respiration loss, demand from growing shoot and root tissues and also the dormant lateral buds apart from pests, diseases and abiotic stress factors. Maturity or ripening in sugarcane is the culmination of diphasic physiological processes occurring in individual internodes. In the first stage of maturation, only about 50% of sucrose is accumulated. Additional sucrose accumulation occurs in the second phase of maturity and is so closely related to ripening. The response of sugarcane to proven ripeners varies with variety, rate of application, physiological stage of the crop and environmental factors before and after ripener application. Decline in recovery is primarily due to crushing of pre-mature canes and delayed harvest of over-mature canes. Sugar recovery is dependent on the juice quality and influenced by factors, viz. moisture stress, light, temperature and nutrient availability. There is wide scope for the use of chemical ripening agents, viz. Ethrel, Glyphosate, Fusilade Super and Gallant Super, which show differential varietal response across locations to either induce ripening or to synchronize ripening with the harvest schedule.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Innovation for Sustainability of the Sugar Agro-Industry

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-04-26
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.201.94.72
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-