Subjects -> AGRICULTURE (Total: 981 journals)
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    - AGRICULTURE (680 journals)
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AGRICULTURE (680 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4     

Showing 601 - 263 of 263 Journals sorted alphabetically
Science as Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Scientia Agricola     Open Access  
Scientia Agropecuaria     Open Access  
Seed Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Seed Science Research     Hybrid Journal  
Selçuk Tarım ve Gıda Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Semiárida     Open Access  
Siembra     Open Access  
Small Ruminant Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Smart Agricultural Technology     Open Access  
Social & Cultural Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Social and Natural Sciences Journal     Open Access  
South African Journal of Agricultural Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South African Journal of Economics : SAJE     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
South African Journal of Plant and Soil     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Spatial Economic Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Sri Lanka Journal of Food and Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Stiinta Agricola     Open Access  
Studies in Australian Garden History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Sugar Tech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Sustainability Agri Food and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sustainability and Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Sustainable Agriculture Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sustainable Environment Agricultural Science (SEAS)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tanzania Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Terra Latinoamericana     Open Access  
The Agriculturists     Open Access  
The Journal of Research, PJTSAU     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Translational Animal Science     Open Access  
Trends in Agricultural Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Tropical Agricultural Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Agricultural Research and Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tropical and Subtropical Agroecosystems     Open Access  
Tropical Grasslands - Forrajes Tropicales     Open Access  
Tropical Technology Journal     Open Access  
Tropicultura     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Agricultural and Natural Science / Türk Tarım ve Doğa Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Agricultural Engineering Research     Open Access  
Ukrainian Journal of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Uluslararası Tarım ve Yaban Hayatı Bilimleri Dergisi / International Journal of Agricultural and Wildlife Sciences     Open Access  
UNICIÊNCIAS     Open Access  
Universal Journal of Agricultural Research     Open Access  
Universidad y Ciencia     Open Access  
Urban Agricultural & Regional Food Systems     Open Access  
Viticulture Data Journal     Open Access  
VITIS : Journal of Grapevine Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Walailak Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access  
Wartazoa. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Weed Biology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Weed Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
West African Journal of Applied Ecology     Open Access  
Wildlife Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wirtschaftsdienst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
World Journal of Agricultural Research     Open Access  
World Mycotoxin Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World's Poultry Science Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
علوم آب و خاک     Open Access  

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Sugar Tech
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.441
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0974-0740 - ISSN (Online) 0972-1525
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Efficient Regeneration in Sugarcane Using Thin Cell Layer (TCL) Culture
           System

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      Abstract: Abstract In vitro micropropagation using transverse thin cell layer (tTCL), very small and thin section of explant, has now emerged as a useful tool in plant tissue differentiation and regeneration. Sugarcane, a difficult-to-regenerate crop, lacks an efficient regeneration system. The present study evaluated the TCL technique as a procedure for somatic embryo production and plantlet regeneration of sugarcane plant. Explants from young leaf whorls (tTCLs) were cultivated in MS culture medium supplemented with 3% sucrose and different concentrations of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and incubated under dark condition at 25 + 2 °C for callus formation. The innermost layer of the explants was found more responsive to callogenesis than the outer layers of the tTCLs. The explants cultured on 2.0 mg/l 2,4-D produced good-quality callus as compared to other concentrations. The calli were further evaluated for regeneration. MS medium supplemented with 2.0 mg/l BAP (Benzyl aminopurine) and 0.2 mg/l NAA (naphthalene acetic acid) was found suitable where 100% calli regenerated maximum number of shoots per callus mass (25 ± 1.6) with highest shoot length of 6 ± 0.5 cm. The highest number of root emergence (28.2 ± 0.8) and maximum root length (2.8 ± 0.09 cm) were achieved on MS medium supplemented with 4.0 mg/l NAA.
      PubDate: 2022-05-19
       
  • Levoglucosan as the Intermediate Product on the Pre-treated Sugarcane
           Bagasse Hydrolysis Catalyzed by Brønsted Acid

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      Abstract: Abstract Cellulose is the primary substance of sugarcane bagasse and is essential for producing chemicals such as levoglucosan (LG), which can be synthesized through various methods, such as cellulose hydrolysis catalyzed by a Brønsted acid. This recent research was preceded by a preliminary study on glucose hydrolysis into LG with hydrochloric acid (HCl) as the catalyst. Following the preliminary one, the main study was conducted in two stages: alkaline-acid pre-treatment to separate cellulose from other undesired components in bagasse and cellulose hydrolysis in generating LG. The cellulose hydrolysis was catalyzed by HCl at temperatures ranging from 140 to 180 °C with catalyst concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 M and solid-to-liquid ratios ranging from 1 to 10%. The experimental results showed that LG could be synthesized from glucose and cellulose, and all the variables observed, namely temperature, catalyst concentration, and solid-to-liquid ratio, influenced the formation of LG. The LG formed was very unstable, thus easily be degraded into other compounds. The cellulose hydrolysis to LG occurred through the following route: cellulose-glucose-LG-decomposition compounds. The reaction's controlling step was the cellulose conversion into glucose for its lowest reaction rate constant compared to the others.
      PubDate: 2022-05-19
       
  • A Soil Physical Assessment Over Three Successive Burned and Unburned
           Sugarcane Annual Harvests

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      Abstract: Abstract A field experiment was carried out to evaluate changes in soil physical properties over three successive years of sugarcane cultivation under burned (BH) and unburned (UH) cultivation systems. Soil samplings were collected after sugarcane planting, after the plant-cane harvest (H1) and after the first ratoon harvest (H2) in areas subjected to BH and UH. The degree of compactness (DC), macroporosity (MaP), soil penetration resistance (SPR), total organic carbon, field water content (θ) and water content at field capacity (θFC) were measured. Moreover, the amount of surface straw was measured after H1 and H2. Soil physical quality was considerably reduced after H1 regardless of the harvest systems. Annual successive harvests increased DC by 10%, reducing MaP by about 50% and increasing SPR. The negative effects of the successive harvests were slightly greater at BH because of the lowest amount of sugarcane straw on the soil surface, which considerably reduced θ. It can be concluded that successive harvests reduce the soil physical quality in burned and unburned harvest systems after the first harvest, but the negative effect is more prominent in areas with straw burning.
      PubDate: 2022-05-18
       
  • Response of Sugarcane Cultivars to Chemical Ripeners During the Mid-Period
           of Harvesting in Ethiopia

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      Abstract: Abstract The relatively high temperature at Kessem sugarcane plantation in Ethiopia was hypothesized to justify the implementation of chemical ripeners as a strategic intervention to combat poor cane quality. Accordingly, a field experiment was carried out to assess the responsiveness of four sugarcane varieties (B52-298, NCo334, C86-12, and SP70-1284) to five ripener treatments: 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid (Ethephon™, 480 g ai L−1) at 720 g ai ha−1, fluazifop-p-butyl (Fusilade Forte™, 150 g ai L−1) at 25.6 g ai ha−1, trinexapac-ethyl (Moddus™, 250 g ai L−1) at 250 g ai ha−1, 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid + fluazifop-p-butyl combination at the mentioned application rates, trinexapac-ethyl + fluazifop-p-butyl combination at the mentioned application rates, and an untreated control. The experiment was conducted in a factorial arrangement in a randomized complete block design (RCBD) with three replications. The results showed that stalk height, stalk weight, sucrose content (%), and sucrose yield (t ha−1) were affected by the main effect of ripener treatment, but there was no significant cultivar x ripener treatment interaction for the parameters collected. Overall, the sequential application treatment of trinexapac-ethyl followed by fluazifop-p-butyl 28 days later performed the best and improved sucrose content and sucrose yield by 2.64% unit and 2.15 t ha−1, respectively. In economic terms, the trinexapac-ethyl + fluazifop-p-butyl sequential application treatment resulted in a marginal rate of return of 2393%. Therefore, the sequential trinexapac-ethyl + fluazifop-p-butyl ripener program was identified as a promising ripening strategy to be evaluated on a commercial scale at the sugarcane plantations in Ethiopia.
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
       
  • Proteome Based Comparative Investigation of a High Sucrose Sugarcane
           Mutant in Contrast to the Low Sucrose Mother Variety by Using TMT
           Quantitative Proteomics

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      Abstract: Abstract Sugarcane (Saccharum sp. hybrid) is a significant crop in the world’s economy and fulfills 80% of the world's sugar production. To meet the rising sugar requirement, it is emphasized to enhance the cane sugar yield. In the present study, the TMT quantitative proteomic approach was applied to find the proteins associated with sucrose accumulation in a high sucrose sugarcane mutant GXB9 compared to its low sucrose mother variety B9. A total of 27,922 proteins were obtained, and 7484 proteins received functional annotations on blasting in COG, GO, NR, Pfam, and KEGG databases. A sum of 3,102 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) was recognized when the immature and maturing internodes of GXB9 were compared with B9. Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS), invertases (CWIN, NIN1, CINV2), and sucrose synthase (SuSy) are significant proteins involved in sucrose metabolism and accumulation in sugarcane. This study discovered that the DEPs of SPS (SPS2, SPS5) were upregulated, while SuSy, CWIN, NIN1, CINV2 were downregulated in the maturing internodes, and seven DEPs of trehalose phosphate synthase such as TPS6, TPS7, TPS9, TPS9, and trehalose phosphate phosphatase were downregulated in the immature and maturing internodes of GXB9 compared with B9. The result of our exploration would mediate progression in sugarcane varieties by concentrating on the manipulation of proteins associated with sucrose synthesis, metabolism, and accumulation through the use of advanced molecular approaches.
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
       
  • Physicochemical Characterization and Antioxidant Activity of Refined and
           Unrefined Sugarcane Products from Southern Brazil

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      Abstract: Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate commercial sugarcane products from southern Brazil, including refined, crystal, demerara, brown sugars, rapadura and molasses. The physicochemical parameters (ash, pH, color, moisture); nutritional parameters (sugar composition and minerals) were assessed; bioactive (phenolic compounds, flavonoids and carotenoids) and the antioxidant activity were also evaluated. Variation in the physicochemical parameters was observed according to the type of sample and depending on the sample's processing degree. The sugar composition of the samples varied from 0.13 to 20.14% of fructose, 1.13–29.78% of glucose and 29.47–98.85% of sucrose. The content of phenolic compounds ranged from 3.01 to 279.56 (mg EAG 100 g−1), flavonoids from 0.63 to 28.33 (mg EQ 100 g−1) and carotenoids from 0.18 to 4.37 (µg g−1 of β-carotene). The antioxidant activities in the samples showed variations both for DPPH (9.99–275.33 µM Trolox g−1) and ABTS (14.03–1263.46 µM Trolox g−1) methods. The highest bioactive content, minerals and antioxidant capacity were observed in the brown sugars, rapadura and molasses samples, confirming the loss of these compounds in more processed sugars.
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
       
  • Sustainability in Sugarcane Supply Chain in Brazil: Issues and Way Forward

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      Abstract: Abstract This study presents a literature review of the main advances that took place in the last 10 years in the agricultural production of sugarcane in Brazil, which can effectively result in increased productivity and sustainability. This became a central topic as much of this crop in Brazilian is used to produce ethanol to replace fossil fuels; therefore, the increased concerns about global warming and climate change, and the greater pressure from society for sustainability in agriculture in general became more relevant for sugarcane. Actions have been taken to encourage the use of more conservationist practices from planting to harvesting, greater recycling of residues, preservation of biodiversity, delivery of environmental services, adoption of circular economy and, especially, compliance with internal and external commitments on reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, among other aspects. Fertilizer recommendations have been revised to increase yields and ratoon longevity, leading to higher rates of micronutrients and the more frequent application of lime, phosphogypsum, and P fertilizers in ratoons. Optimized use of vinasse includes addition of mineral fertilizers to save field operations for separate fertilization. The sugarcane breeding programs in Brazil are releasing an average of eight varieties per year, including transgenic varieties. Replanting of sugarcane fields with newer and more productive varieties are facilitated by novel planting methods using pre-sprouted settlings (PSS) combined with the nurseries mingled into the crop renewal fields, locally termed “MEIOSI,” which also allow the easy introduction of rotation crops. Soil compaction and ratoon trampling caused by heavy machines that replaced manual harvesting are being solved with GPS-based traffic control, which is embedded in most farming equipment in the sugarcane sector nowadays. Finally, public policies, such as the Renovabio legislation, incentivizing the production of sugarcane/ethanol with low GHG emissions are also in place. With this, the sugarcane industry is revising all field and industrial procedures to optimize operations and earn more decarbonization credits, in a win–win situation. The combined efforts of research institutions and the private sector, along with the proper policies, have the potential to lead toward a renewed and more sustainable sugarcane industry.
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
       
  • Sustainable Growing Areas for Sugarcane in Sri Lanka Under a Changing
           Climate

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      Abstract: Abstract Climate change causes shifts in areas suitable for cultivating a wide range of crops. Sugarcane is a perennial crop currently grown in the intermediate and dry zones of Sri Lanka. However, there may be shifts in the potential areas for sugarcane cultivation due to climate change. This study thus attempted to analyze the suitability of rain-fed areas for cultivating sugarcane in Sri Lanka under the current and future projected climate. Ecocrop model was used to predict the climatically suitable areas for sugarcane, based on the present and future climate scenarios. Monthly minimum and maximum temperature, monthly mean rainfall, and crop data were used as inputs to the model. Climate data of the baseline period (1971–2000) were evaluated against the projected climate data in 2030 and 2050 under a Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) of 4.5 and 8.5 emission scenarios of six Global Climate Models Projected changes revealed to increase the area of intermediate zone of the country by 128, 8, 135, and 170% at RCP 4.5, 2030; RCP 8.5, 2030; RCP4.5, 2050, and RCP 8.5, 2050, respectively, compared to baseline status. Areas for optimum temperature range for sugarcane have expanded in future time periods in the country under two scenarios. The excellent suitable areas for cane growth are projected to increase in 2030 by 56 and 47%, under RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5, respectively. Considering the aggregated effect of temperature and rainfall, areas for sugarcane cultivation in Sri Lanka tend to increase with climate change.
      PubDate: 2022-05-10
       
  • Investigation on the Effect of Drying-Off and Harvest Date Management on
           Quantitative and Qualitative Yield of Sugarcane

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      Abstract: Abstract In sugarcane cultivation, harvest date is one of the factors that plays a decisive role in improving the yield of sugar. Accordingly, an experiment was conducted in the cropping years 2017–2018 and 2018–2019 in Khuzestan Imam Khomeini Agro-Industrial Research Farm to investigate the effect of drying-off date and harvest date on the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of sugarcane. The experimental treatments included factorial combinations of three drying-off pre-harvest dates: (1) September 10, (2) September 23, and (3) October 5, and three harvest times: 20, 27 and 35 days after each drying-off date. The cultivar of choice in this experiment was the early-maturing cultivar CP73-21. Quantitative yield parameters that were measured included cane yield, stem height, and juice weight. Moreover, pol (%), brix (%), purity (%), recoverable sugar (%) and residual nitrogen in leaf were measured as qualitative yield parameters. Results showed that in general, drying-off date had a stronger effect on qualitative yield parameters compared to the quantitative ones. In addition, it was found that drying-off date on October 5 led to the highest cane yield, while drying-off date on September 10 led to the lowest yield. Although quantitative yield corresponding to October 5 was higher than September 23, the qualitative yield was similar for both treatments (for all quality parameters except recoverable sugar (%) in the first year and residual leaf nitrogen in the second year). In general, the results showed that harvesting 35 days after the second drying-off date produced the highest quantitative and qualitative sugarcane yield (October 28).
      PubDate: 2022-05-09
       
  • Quality Improvement of Non-Centrifugal Sugar as Affected by Blanching and
           Organic Clarification

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      Abstract: Abstract Non-Centrifugal Sugar commonly known as jaggery is a famous sweetening agent derived from sugarcane juice. The sugarcane juice undergoes enzymatic reactions during jaggery production, resulting in the darkening of its color. The study presents enzymatic inactivation of sugarcane juice, which was extracted from blanched sugarcane stalks and also the effect of organic clarificants on the quality of jaggery. Blanching of sugarcane stalks at 80 °C for 5 min inhibited enzymatic browning up to 53–55%. Clarification of juice was carried out using organic clarificants such as aloe vera leaf extract, moringa leaf extract at 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.3% v/v concentrations and chemical clarificant (Hydros). The jaggery prepared using organic clarificants, either using aloe vera or moringa leaf extract at 0.3% concentration was found to be superior in terms of insoluble solids, sucrose content, total phenols and total flavonoids. The jaggery prepared using chemical clarificants is brighter in color with low microbial load, however, it is inferior in quality parameters such as total phenols and flavonoids compared to jaggery prepared using organic clarificants. Hence, the technology of jaggery making from blanched canes using organic clarificants may be recommended as an alternative to chemical clarification to produce organic jaggery rich in bioactive compounds.
      PubDate: 2022-05-07
       
  • Induction of Sugar Beet Resistance to Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera:
           Noctuidae) Under Field Conditions

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      Abstract: Abstract The beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, is the most destructive pest of sugar beet in many regions of the world including Iran. In this study, the effect of some potential resistance inducers (salicylic acid, calcium silicate and sodium silicate) for reducing the pest density were investigated in sugar beet field. The inducers were applied in 100 and 50% recommended field dosages (RFD). Salicylic acid (~8%) and calcium silicate (~11.5%) significantly reduced the larval density. For all inducers, the efficacies in application of 100% RFD were significantly more than 50% RFD. Among various treatments, the maximum resistance was induced using calcium silicate at 100 RFD (2 L/ha). Chemical analyses of treated leaves indicated that salicylic acid and calcium silicate at 100% RFD cause significant enhancements of polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activities. The findings can be useful for developing integrated pest management program of S. exigua in sugar beet fields.
      PubDate: 2022-05-06
       
  • Full-Length Cloning, Expression and Functional Characterization of
           Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase (PAL) Involved in Lignification of Secondary
           Cell Wall of Erianthus arundinaceus

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      Abstract: Abstract Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5) is the first committed limiting enzyme of phenylpropanoid pathway which catalyzes the deamination of phenylalanine to cinnamic acid. In the present study, we have cloned, functionally characterized and studied the expression pattern of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) involved in lignification of secondary cell wall. Phenylalanine ammonia lyase gene was cloned using RACE protocol from Erianthus arundinaceus (EaPAL). The 3.2-kb fragment consists of EaPAL with an ORF of 2116 bp encoding for 705 amino acid residues flanked by 172 bp of 5’ untranslated region and 300 bp of 3’ untranslated region. The tertiary structure of EaPAL showed 57% α-helixes, 3% β-sheet and 18% random coil regions with a calculated pI and molecular weight of 6.31 and ~ 77 KDa, respectively. The SDS-PAGE analysis showed that PAL protein was expressed at 1 mM IPTG induction at ~ 76 kDa. The expression profile of PAL across different tissues (leaf, stem and root) of a hybrid (Co 86032) and Erianthus (IK76-81) showed 2.5-fold increased expression in stem and root tissues of both the clones. Therefore, the genetic information, gene structure and expression of EaPAL might be used for achieving improved biofuel feedstocks.
      PubDate: 2022-05-06
       
  • Production of L-Lactic Acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Through Metabolic
           Engineering and Rational Cofactor Engineering

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      Abstract: Abstract Microbial engineering based on synthetic biology can facilitate large-scale production of target products. In this study, the introduction of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enabled Saccharomyces cerevisiae to acquire the capacity for L-lactic acid (LA) production and the NADH/NAD+ ratio from 0.228 to 0.156, while the subsequent modification of carbon metabolism pathway led to a rapid increase of NADH/NAD+ even up to 0.337. By testing the effectiveness of four different redox systems, we demonstrated that dynamic regulation of additional redox genes to consume excessive NADH is more beneficial for LA accumulation, alleviating the negative effects of metabolic modification on hosts, and altering the distribution of metabolic flow. We first reported expression of GLT1 which coding glutamate synthase has the strongest ability to increase LA production and reduce NADH/NAD+. Combining metabolic engineering and cofactor engineering, the LA yield reached from 0.04 g/g to 0.37 g/g in YNB medium. Subsequently, strain PK27 produced 37.94 g/L LA with production yield of 0.66 g/g in YPD medium. Finally, the results could provide a reference that the potential under poor nutrient culture conditions and the direction and intensity of regulation of intracellular NADH/NAD+ for LA accumulation.
      PubDate: 2022-05-04
       
  • In Silico Dissection and Expression Analysis of Sucrose Synthase Gene
           Family in Sugarcane

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      Abstract: Abstract Sugarcane, the world’s largest source of sugar and biofuel, still carries an unassembled ~ 10 GB polyaneuploid genome, which is a major bottleneck in studying this crop at molecular level. Sugar is mainly derived from sugarcane; hence, the sucrose metabolism pathway is one of the most intriguing hotspot for sugar crop researchers. Four main gene families have been reported to be involved in sucrose metabolism including the SuSy (sucrose synthase) gene family. Sucrose synthase in plants degrades sucrose to UDP-glucose and fructose to ensure their availability for growth and developmental purposes. Here, we attempted to get deep insights into sugarcane SuSy gene family and carried out bioinformatics and expression analyses to get a high-resolution holistic snapshot. Multiple stress-responsive cis motifs, abscisic acid-responsive element (ABRE), anaerobic induction-responsive element (ARE), auxin-responsive element (AuxRE), low-temperature-responsive (LTR), wounding response element (WUN), WRKY transcription factors binding site (W-motif), predicted in the regulatory region showed their involvement in the stress signaling pathways, in addition to sucrose metabolism. Similarly, the protein interaction network analysis predicted an array of proteins of diverse range of functions. Moreover, the expression pattern of SuSy gene family in two varieties CPF251 (higher sugar level) and CPF252 (lower sugar level) was compared in leaf and internodes (top and bottom). qRT-PCR indicated the differential expression pattern of the SuSy genes in these two varieties. The expression of SoSuSy2 was high in leaf and top internodes, while low in bottom internodes indicating its activity in this tissue. In CPF251, both SoSuSy2 and SoSuSy4 displayed higher expression level; however, only SuSy2 had higher expression in CPF252. In contrast, SoSuSy6 and SoSuSy7 were the least expressed genes followed by SoSuSy1. This study highlights the candidate genes for gene manipulation and consequent metabolic engineering of sugarcane for enhanced sucrose contents.
      PubDate: 2022-04-30
       
  • Establishment of DRIS Standards and Indices for Ratoon Cane Production in
           the Southern Region of Goiás, Brazil

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      Abstract: Abstract This study aimed to determine DRIS standards and indices in commercial sugarcane plantations through soil, leaf, and stem samples collected in the southern region of the state of Goiás, Brazil. The experiment was arranged in a 2 × 2 factorial design with two cultivation systems (with or without vinasse application) and two sugarcane varieties (CTC 4 and RB 867515), both with 50 sampling points. The database was created using the total amount of soil samples collected at a depth of 0–0.20 m for chemical analysis, leaves collected in the period of greatest vegetative development of the crop (240 days after ratoon sprouting) for chemical analysis and the yield of stems for the industry. It was found that fertigation with vinasse can promote increases in the yield of cane stalks for the industry in the order of 35 t ha−1 for the variety CTC 4. The DRIS indices for the soil enabled to diagnose limitations caused by nutritional deficiencies regarding the available contents of P and Zn for areas cultivated with CTC 4 and the available contents of K, Cu, Fe, and Mg for areas cultivated with RB 867515. The nutritional diagnosis carried out using the DRIS method for the chemical analysis of leaves showed greater sensitivity for detecting nutritional limitations of Ca, Cu, and Mn compared to traditional methods of interpretation by critical levels. The nutritional balance index (NBI) is an efficient tool for the proper diagnosis of nutritional balance, since the lowest NBI indices were the ones that provided the highest stalk yields of ratoon cane for the industry.
      PubDate: 2022-04-29
       
  • Growth, Varietal Scenario and Seed Production of Sugarcane in India:
           Status, Impact and Future Outlook

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      Abstract: Abstract Sugarcane (Saccharum species complex) is an important industrial crop in India, and it contributed 6.8% to the total export earnings from agricultural products during 2020–21. India ranked second after Brazil in terms of area and production of sugarcane and accounted for 17.5% and 19.4% of the global acreage and production, respectively. This paper presents the scenario of sugarcane growth in India during 1950–51 to 2020–21, varietal development, diversity in seed chain and breeder seed production during the last 11 years. The area under sugarcane cultivation increased by 184.2% (1.71 mha in 1950–51 to 4.86 mha in 2020–21), while cane production registered an increase of 599.8% (57.05 MT in 1950–51 to 399.25 MT in 2020–21). An appreciable yield improvement (82.2 t/ha in 2020–21) compared to 33.4 t/ha in (1950–51) could be the major driver for such manifold increase in sugarcane production. The annual compound growth rate in the last decade was 4.67%, 10.33%, 10.70%, 6.78% and 11.71% for cane area, production, yield, sugar recovery and sugar production, respectively. The release and notification of 139 high yielding and high sugar content varieties by Central Sub-committee on Crop Standards, Notification and Release of Varieties for Agricultural Crops since the notification was adapted in 1969, reflect robust sugarcane varietal development programme executed under the aegis of All India Coordinated Research Project on Sugarcane (AICRP-S). About 54.7% (76) of these high yielding varieties have been developed and released during the last 11 years (2011–21). The number of sugarcane varieties grown across 17 states of the country varied from 114 (2011–12) to 146 (2018–19), and Uttar Pradesh had the highest varietal diversity in the seed chain followed by Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat, Haryana and Maharashtra. The breeder seed production from 2010–11 to 2020–21 increased consistently, despite annual fluctuations and was higher by 10.8% in 2011–12 to 95.5% in 2019–20 than that of the base year (2010–11). In the last 11 years, Uttar Pradesh contributed the highest breeder seed production which ranged from 50.1% (2010–11) to 71.8% (2013–14). This status paper discusses the possible impact of the sugarcane varietal development and seed/variety replacement by analysing trends in area, production, yield, foreign exchange earnings through sugar export and net per capita sugar availability during the last decade. Future crop outlook and strategies to bridge the widening gap in sugar demand and supply in the country are also presented.
      PubDate: 2022-04-28
       
  • Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle in Sugarcane Cultivation in Brazil: A
           Review

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      Abstract: Abstract The use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) is becoming increasingly popular and present in various activities around the world, as an important innovation tool to optimize work and research in general. Among the various areas in which UAVs are present, in this article we will highlight their use as a Precision Agriculture tool, with emphasis on their use in the cultivation of sugarcane in Brazil, a crop with the third largest planted area in the country. The objective was to carry out a systematic review of the work already carried out on the use of UAVs in Brazilian crops, seeking to elucidate: where, how much and how this innovation has been used in national crops. To achieve this goal, we use important scientific articles indexing databases (Scopus, Web of Science, Scielo and Google Scholar), where we identify articles published in journals and annals of important events inside and outside the country. With this, it was possible to visualize the scenario of the distribution of researches identified throughout the national territory, noting that there are regions of the country where studies are concentrated more than others. In the end, we conclude that the country has a heterogeneous distribution regarding the use of this technology, which can be explained by legal restrictions imposed in the past or by the absence of works and/or advertising in the research carried out so far. In this sense, the present article contributes to elucidate the current state of research and dimension perspectives for the future.
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
       
  • Innovation for Sustainability of the Sugar Agro-Industry

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      PubDate: 2022-04-26
       
  • Study the Effect of Different Pollination Techniques on Date Palm
           Production

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      Abstract: Abstract Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) is a dioecious species therefore manual or mechanical pollination must be carried out to obtain better yield and quality of fruits. An experiment was conducted at Date Palm Research Centre, Agricultural Research Station, S.K. Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner from March 2019 to July 2020 to evaluation of most efficient technique of hand pollination. The female spath of Halawy cultivar were pollinated with various pollen techniques viz., inserting 5–6 strands/bunch (T1), 5% pollen dust (T2), 10% pollen dust (T3), 15% pollen dust (T4), 1 g/l suspension of pollen grain (T5), 2 g/l suspension of pollen grain (T6), 3 g/l suspension of pollen grain (T7) and 4 g/l suspension of pollen grain (T8). All the treatments were arranged in randomized block design. The maximum fruit set (77.13%) was recorded in treatment of inserting 5–6 strands/bunch (T1), whereas, minimum fruit drop (12.87%) was recorded with 3 g/l pollen suspension treatment (T7). The maximum yield of fruit/bunch (6.87 kg), yield/palm (38.16 kg), fruit weight (7.31 g), fruit length (3.86 cm), fruit diameter (2.02 cm), volume of fruit (8.11 cc), and pulp weight (6.08 g) was recorded with 3 g/l pollen suspension treatment (T7). The minimum fruit drop percentage (12.87%) and number of fruits/kg (135.13) were also recorded with 3 g/l pollen suspension treatment (T7).
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
       
  • Bio-Circular Economy: an Opportunity for Diversification for Sugar
           Industries in Compressed Biogas (CBG) and Organic Fertilizer Production

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      Abstract: Abstract Press mud cake (PMC) is one of the world’s most abundant sugarcane-based wastes, and in an Indian context, 8–10 million tonnes per annum is produced. The current use of PMC is restricted to use as filler material in bio-composting process or directly as fertilizer to improve soil fertility without any previous recovery of value-added products. However, considering its potential, only fertilizer use is not the best valorization route. Due to lack of transportation, press mud is unused and left in piles in most sugar mills, leading to blockage of drains and becoming a cause of water pollution. At the same time, increasing consumption of fossil fuels and environmental concern has led to increased use of compressed natural gas (CNG) in the transportation sector. Keeping in view limited resources of CNG, biogas is advised as potential fuel to provide continuous supply of CNG in the form of bio-CNG or Compressed Biogas (CBG). Therefore, to decrease the imports of crude oil and natural gas requirement and to increase the economic sustainability of sugar mills, utilization of wastes (spent wash and PMC)for biogas production through anaerobic digestion (AD) and further purification to produce CBG (a purified form of Biogas) will definitely generate additional revenue for sugar mills in India. This paper aims to produce a strong outlook on the importance of CBG production through anaerobic digestion and its purification. Further, an out sketch of five models has been designed showing the possibility to produce maximum CBG using existing biogas plant (sugar mill complex) with addition of a new biogas plant. Production of value-added CBG and recycle of digestate on organic fertilizer are perfect case of bio-circular economy.
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
       
 
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