Subjects -> AGRICULTURE (Total: 981 journals)
    - AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS (93 journals)
    - AGRICULTURE (680 journals)
    - CROP PRODUCTION AND SOIL (120 journals)
    - DAIRYING AND DAIRY PRODUCTS (30 journals)
    - POULTRY AND LIVESTOCK (58 journals)

AGRICULTURE (680 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4     

Showing 601 - 263 of 263 Journals sorted alphabetically
Science and Technology Indonesia     Open Access  
Science as Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Scientia Agricola     Open Access  
Scientia Agropecuaria     Open Access  
Seed Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Seed Science Research     Hybrid Journal  
Selçuk Tarım ve Gıda Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Semiárida     Open Access  
Siembra     Open Access  
Small Ruminant Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Smart Agricultural Technology     Open Access  
Social & Cultural Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Social and Natural Sciences Journal     Open Access  
South African Journal of Agricultural Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
South African Journal of Economics : SAJE     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
South African Journal of Plant and Soil     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Spatial Economic Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Sri Lanka Journal of Food and Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Stiinta Agricola     Open Access  
Studies in Australian Garden History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Sugar Tech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Sustainability Agri Food and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sustainability and Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Sustainable Agriculture Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sustainable Environment Agricultural Science (SEAS)     Open Access  
Tanzania Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Terra Latinoamericana     Open Access  
The Agriculturists     Open Access  
The Journal of Research, PJTSAU     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Translational Animal Science     Open Access  
Trends in Agricultural Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Tropical Agricultural Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tropical Agricultural Research and Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tropical and Subtropical Agroecosystems     Open Access  
Tropical Grasslands - Forrajes Tropicales     Open Access  
Tropical Technology Journal     Open Access  
Tropicultura     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Agricultural and Natural Science / Türk Tarım ve Doğa Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Agricultural Engineering Research     Open Access  
Ukrainian Journal of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Uluslararası Tarım ve Yaban Hayatı Bilimleri Dergisi / International Journal of Agricultural and Wildlife Sciences     Open Access  
UNICIÊNCIAS     Open Access  
Universal Journal of Agricultural Research     Open Access  
Universidad y Ciencia     Open Access  
Urban Agricultural & Regional Food Systems     Open Access  
Viticulture Data Journal     Open Access  
VITIS : Journal of Grapevine Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Walailak Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access  
Wartazoa. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Weed Biology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weed Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
West African Journal of Applied Ecology     Open Access  
Wildlife Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wirtschaftsdienst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
World Journal of Agricultural Research     Open Access  
World Mycotoxin Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World's Poultry Science Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
علوم آب و خاک     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4     

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Seed Science Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.95
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0960-2585 - ISSN (Online) 1475-2735
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • Environmental effect on temporal patterns in lentil seed quality
           development

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      Authors: Whitehouse; Katherine J., Norton, Sally L.
      Pages: 1 - 12
      Abstract: To maximize seed longevity, seeds should be harvested at optimal maturity, that is, when seeds have acquired maximum physiological quality before deterioration begins. The aim of this study was to map the variation in temporal patterns of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) seed quality development when grown across four regeneration environments, which differ in the level of temperature and humidity control throughout the growing season, at the Australian Grains Genebank. Seeds of two lentil accessions (76080 and 76072) were harvested at different stages throughout development, commencing at 21 d after 50% anthesis until a maximum of 130 d. At each harvest, physiological quality traits, including germinability (fresh and dried seeds) and seed longevity, were determined, as well as seed dry weight and moisture content. Seeds of both accessions, and in all environments, started to accumulate physiological quality early on in development but did not reach their maximum until 3–54 d after mass maturity. The temporal patterns of desiccation tolerance and storage longevity were highly influenced by the environmental conditions during the maturation drying phase, affecting both ‘when’ maximum quality was attained and for how long it was maintained, thereafter. Seeds did not show a typical developmental response, rather variation was observed in seed quality development both between and within accessions grown in the different environments. The poorest storage longevity was seen when seeds of both accessions were grown in the cooler, temperature-controlled glasshouse, and the maximum longevity was observed in the warmer, semi-protected environments of the green and the big igloo for accessions 76080 and 76072, respectively.
      PubDate: 2022-01-31
      DOI: 10.1017/S0960258521000313
       
  • Width of the temperature range for seed germination of herbaceous plant
           species in temperate eastern North America: life cycles, seasons and
           temperature variation and implication for climate warming

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      Authors: Baskin; Carol C., Baskin, Jerry M., Hu, Xiao Wen, Zhang, Chun Hui
      Pages: 13 - 22
      Abstract: To persist (without immigration) in habitats with unpredictable environmental conditions, annuals must produce seeds each year or have a seed bank. Thus, we predicted that compared to perennials, annuals have a wider germination temperature range (GTR, the difference in temperature between the week with the highest and the week with the lowest germination during the natural germination season). We determined the GTR via germination phenology data for 350 herbaceous species in 59 families from the eastern USA: summer annuals (SA), 63; winter annuals (WA), 83; monocarpic perennials (MP), 28; and polycarpic perennials (PP), 176. There was no significant phylogenetic signal for the GTR. The width of the GTR during the first spring germination season was 9.6, 8.7 and 8.8°C for MP, PP and SA, respectively, and during the first autumn germination season 12.8, 11.8 and 12.4°C for MP, PP and WA, respectively. Annuals did not have a wider GTR than perennials in either the spring or the autumn germination season. Our data suggest that selection for early germination in either spring or autumn has resulted in only small differences in the GTR. We predict that global warming will have little or no effect on reshaping the germination phenology of herbaceous species of temperate eastern North America.
      PubDate: 2022-02-02
      DOI: 10.1017/S0960258522000010
       
  • Developing soybean seed germination: low ABA and high EXP1 gene expression
           promote embryonic axis growth whereas the seed coat delays radicle
           protrusion

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      Authors: Montechiarini; Nidia H., Morandi, Eligio N., Gosparini, Carlos O.
      Pages: 23 - 33
      Abstract: Seed germination implies an expansion process restarting the growth of the embryonic axis (Ax) and which is completed by radicle emergence through the seed covering layers. In developing soybean seeds, abscisic acid in Ax (ABAa) mainly inhibits Ax growth. Additionally, the expression of the EXP1 gene at the elongation zone (EZ) was found to be involved in the promotion of mature soybean Ax growth, which increased during water incubation and which was repressed by exogenous ABA. This work aimed to evaluate (1) the ABAa and EXP1 levels at the EZ and (2) the role of the seed coat (SC) in developing soybean seed germination. Whole seeds (Se), embryos (Em) and Ax at 25–45 d after anthesis (DAA) germinated in vitro, and germination performance increased with DAA. ABAa decreased in planta from 25 DAA until its critical non-inhibitory threshold (ABAc) at around physiological maturity (45 DAA). At earlier ages, the ABAc was reached during the in vitro incubation. Concomitantly, EXP1 transcripts accumulated with age into the pool of long-lived mRNAs and were up-regulated during incubation. Additionally, isolated Ax germinated faster, took up more water and increased its water potential more rapidly during incubation than Ax in Se. Also, a lower osmotic gradient was required to germinate at 45 DAA, when ABAa was no longer inhibitory. Simultaneously, the pressure to protrude SC through the micropylar area increased from 25 to 45 DAA. These results support the role of ABAa and EXP1 in controlling Ax growth and the SC in delaying radicle protrusion.
      PubDate: 2022-03-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S0960258522000022
       
  • Cleistogamous spike and chasmogamous spike carbon remobilization improve
           the seed potential yield of Cleistogenes songorica under water stress

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      Authors: Zhang; Zhengshe, Bai, Mengjie, Tao, Qibo, Wu, Fan, Yan, Qi, Nan, Zhibiao, Wang, Yanrong, Zhang, Jiyu
      Pages: 34 - 45
      Abstract: Developmental signals and environmental stresses regulate carbon distribution in the vegetative and reproductive organs of plants and affect seed yield. Cleistogenes songorica is a xerophytic grass with great potential application value in ecological restoration. However, how carbohydrate transport and distribution during grain filling affect the seed yield of C. songorica under water stress is not clear. The present study showed that the soluble sugar and starch contents of cleistogamous (CL) spikes and chasmogamous (CH) spikes were significantly higher at the milk stage, which was attributed to a significantly higher seed number and seed yield per spike under water stress conditions than under well-watered conditions (P < 0.01). RNA-seq data revealed a total of 54,525 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) under water stress conditions, but only 3744 DEGs were shared among all comparison groups. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis showed that the transport and distribution of carbohydrates were regulated by ABA-responsive genes (CsABA8OX1_1, CsABA8OX1_2, CsABA8OX2_1, CsABA8OX2_2, CsNCED3, CsNCED1_1, CsNCED1_2 and CsNCED4_1) and sugar transport and starch synthesis genes (CsSUS1, CsSUS2, CsSUS3, CsAGP1, CsAGP4, CsAGP5, CsSSS1 and CsSBE5) under water stress conditions. These genes jointly regulated carbohydrate remobilization in sources (stems, leaves and sheaths) to promote grain filling and improve seed yield. The present study helped to clarify the phenotypic, metabolic and transcriptional response mechanisms of vegetative organs, such as stems and leaves, and reproductive organs, such as CL spikes and CH spikes, to promote carbohydrate redistribution under water stress, and it provides theoretical guidance for improving seed yields.
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
      DOI: 10.1017/S0960258522000058
       
  • Correlated evolution of seed mass and genome size varies among life forms
           in flowering plants

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      Authors: Carta; Angelino, Mattana, Efisio, Dickie, John, Vandelook, Filip
      Pages: 46 - 52
      Abstract: Seeds show important variation as plant regenerative units among species, but their evolutionary co-variations with other plant characteristics are still poorly understood. Whilst a positive association of seed mass with genome size (GS) and life forms has already been documented, a broad-scale quantification of their evolutionary correlation and adaptive selection has never been conducted. Here, we tested for correlated evolution of seed mass and GS towards distinct selective regimes related to life form in angiosperms. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that the selection toward lighter seeds and smaller genomes is stronger for annual plants, ensuring high regenerative potential. Using multivariate evolutionary models over a dataset containing 3242 species, we showed an overall positive correlated evolution of seed mass and GS deviating from a pure drift process. Instead, evolutionary changes in seed and genome sizes were driven by adaptive selection towards optimal values differing among life forms. Specifically, the evolutionary optima towards which the seed and genome sizes evolve show a covariation toward small values in annuals, intermediate values in perennial herbs and a trade-off between seed mass and GS in woody plants. Moreover, the evolutionary correlation between seed mass and GS is strongest in annuals as an adaption to complete their life cycle in a short time window, when environmental conditions are favourable for regeneration and development to maturity. The asymmetry in the correlated evolution acting on seed and genome sizes due to life form could explain how life-history traits interplay with functional traits and how plants have evolved diverse successful life-history strategies.
      PubDate: 2022-05-13
      DOI: 10.1017/S0960258522000071
       
  • Seed mass, dormancy and germinability variation among maternal plants of
           four Arabian halophytes

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      Authors: Bhatt; Arvind, Gallacher, David J, Jarma-Orozco, Alfredo, Pompelli, Marcelo F.
      Pages: 53 - 61
      Abstract: Coastal desert vegetation of the Arabian Peninsula is almost entirely dominated by halophytes. Natural populations provide a genetic resource for ecological remediation and may also have direct economic value. High intrapopulation variation of seed traits is presumed to increase population persistence in the unpredictable climatic conditions of this hyper-arid desert. We investigated whether intrapopulation variation of seed mass, dormancy and germinability of four species was attributable to maternal individuals. Arthrocnemum macrostachyum, Halothamnus iraquensis, Haloxylon salicornicum and Seidlitzia rosmarinus are commonly distributed Arabian halophytes with differing seed weight variation. All species exhibited a higher germination when exposed daily to 12 h light, compared to seeds in darkness. A higher germination was correlated with a shorter germination time. For H. iraquensis and S. rosmarinus, a shorter germination time was negatively correlated with germination synchrony. H. salicornicum showed the highest intrapopulation variation of seed traits, followed by A. macrostachyum, S. rosmarinus and H. iraqensis. We found that individuals within populations of all the studied species showed variability in germination but the extent of variation was species-specific. The variation in seed mass and germination among the individuals of the studied species may facilitate a temporal distribution of germination, which may reduce the risk of seed bank exhaustion. The results of this study could assist conservation and management by improving the efficiency of seed collection from wild populations of these species.
      PubDate: 2022-06-13
      DOI: 10.1017/S0960258522000083
       
 
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