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  Subjects -> PHARMACY AND PHARMACOLOGY (Total: 575 journals)
Showing 401 - 253 of 253 Journals sorted alphabetically
Microbial Drug Resistance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Molecular Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Molecular Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Molekul     Open Access  
Natural Product Communications     Open Access  
Nature Reviews Drug Discovery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 309)
Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal  
NeuroMolecular Medicine     Hybrid Journal  
Neuropharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Neuropsychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Neuropsychopharmacology Reports     Open Access  
Nigerian Journal of Natural Products and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
OA Drug Design & Delivery     Open Access  
OA Medical Hypothesis     Open Access  
Obesity Facts     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Open Pharmacoeconomics & Health Economics Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Pharmacology Journal     Open Access  
OpenNano     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Orbital - The Electronic Journal of Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Oriental Pharmacy and Experimental Medicine     Partially Free   (Followers: 2)
Pain and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Particulate Science and Technology: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
PDA Journal of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Pediatric Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Pediatric Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pharmaceutica Analytica Acta     Open Access  
Pharmaceutical Biology     Open Access  
Pharmaceutical Care-La Farmacoterapia     Open Access  
Pharmaceutical Chemistry Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Pharmaceutical Development and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Pharmaceutical Executive     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Pharmaceutical Fronts     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Pharmaceutical Historian     Open Access  
Pharmaceutical Journal     Free   (Followers: 8)
Pharmaceutical Journal of Sri Lanka     Open Access  
Pharmaceutical Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology     Hybrid Journal  
Pharmaceutical Patent Analyst     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Pharmaceutical Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 93)
Pharmaceutical Statistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Pharmaceutical Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Pharmaceuticals     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Pharmacia     Open Access  
Pharmaciana     Open Access  
PharmacoEconomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
PharmacoEconomics German Research Articles     Full-text available via subscription  
PharmacoEconomics Spanish Research Articles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Pharmacogenetics and Genomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Pharmacogenomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pharmacogenomics Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Pharmacognosy Communications     Partially Free  
Pharmacognosy Magazine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pharmacognosy Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pharmacological Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Pharmacological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Pharmacological Research - Modern Chinese Medicine     Open Access  
Pharmacological Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription  
Pharmacology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Pharmacology & Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Pharmacology Research & Perspectives     Open Access  
Pharmacon : Jurnal Farmasi Indonesia     Open Access  
Pharmacopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Pharmacotherapy The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Pharmactuel     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Pharmacy & Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pharmacy Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Pharmacy Practice (Internet)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Pharmakon : Arzneimittel in Wissenschaft und Praxis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
PharmaNutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
PharmaTutor     Open Access  
Pharmazeutische Industrie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Pharmazeutische Zeitung     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Pharmazie in Unserer Zeit (Pharmuz)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Physiology International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Plant Products Research Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Planta Medica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Planta Medica International Open     Open Access  
Prescriber     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Psychiatry and Clinical Psychopharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Pulmonary Pharmacology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
PZ Prisma : Materialien zur Fort- und Weiterbildung     Full-text available via subscription  
Redox Report     Open Access  
Regulatory Mechanisms in Biosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Research & Reviews : A Journal of Drug Design & Discovery     Full-text available via subscription  
Research & Reviews : A Journal of Pharmaceutical Science     Full-text available via subscription  
Research & Reviews : A Journal of Pharmacognosy     Full-text available via subscription  
Research & Reviews : A Journal of Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Research in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Pharmacognosy     Open Access  
Research Results in Pharmacology     Open Access  
Reviews of Physiology, Biochemistry and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Reviews on Clinical Pharmacology and Drug Therapy     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Químico-Farmacéuticas     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Plantas Medicinales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Ciências Farmacêuticas Básica e Aplicada     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Farmaceuticas     Open Access  
Revue de Médecine et de Pharmacie     Full-text available via subscription  
Safety and Risk of Pharmacotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Saudi Pharmaceutical Journal     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Scientia Pharmaceutica     Open Access  
Seminars in Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Seminars in Oncology Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Separation Science plus (SSC plus)     Hybrid Journal  
Side Effects of Drugs Annual     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Skin Pharmacology and Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Substance Abuse : Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Suchttherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Sustainable Chemistry and Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Synfacts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
SynOpen     Open Access  
The Botulinum J.     Hybrid Journal  
The Brown University Psychopharmacology Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Medical Letter     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
The Pink Sheet     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
The Pink Sheet Daily     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Therapeutic Advances in Vaccines     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Therapeutic Drug Monitoring     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Therapeutic Innovation & Regulatory Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Thérapie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
TheScientist     Free   (Followers: 5)
Toxicological & Environmental Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Toxicological Research     Hybrid Journal  
Toxicological Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Toxicology and Industrial Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Toxicology in Vitro     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Toxicology International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Toxicology Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Toxicology Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Toxicon     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Toxicon : X     Open Access  
Toxin Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Translational Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Trends in Peptide and Protein Sciences     Open Access  
Trends in Pharmacological Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research     Open Access  
Ukrainian Biopharmaceutical Journal     Open Access  
Vascular Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
World Mycotoxin Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Yakugaku Zasshi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Phytotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Актуальні питання фармацевтичної та медичної науки та практики     Open Access  
Фармацевтичний часопис     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
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Hospital Pharmacy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.207
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0018-5787 - ISSN (Online) 1945-1253
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Calcium and Phosphate Solubility Curve Equation for Determining
           Precipitation Limits in Compounding Parenteral Nutrition

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      Authors: Collin Anderson, Larry Eggert, Kristie Fitzgerald, Daniel Jackson, Fred Farr
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.
      Clinicians have published research and reports on calcium and phosphate solubility within parenteral nutrition (PN) for over 40 years. Foundational empirical laboratory investigation in the 1980s motivated by the prevalence of neonatal rickets and osteomalacia in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) population led to precipitation curves that have guided PN prescribing and compounding. Over subsequent decades, numerous publications have expanded the knowledge of factors influencing calcium and phosphate solubility in formulating optimal and safe PN admixtures. Failure to adhere to known principles has led to serious injury and death. Known solubility curves are derived from empiric analysis of a finite number of conditions and concentrations, whereas custom PN orders vary widely and rarely match the admixture composition in the data set used to derive the published precipitation curves. Various commercial platforms have been developed to aid the pharmacist in assessing the potential for precipitation when evaluating a PN order. Some applications plot the calcium and phosphate concentrations of the prescribed PN against known published graphs most similar to the order, allowing the pharmacist to judge the risk of precipitation. Other approaches use intellectually protected trade secret algorithms to determine calcium and phosphate solubility across a continuum of conditions. This publication reports equations that have been used successfully for over 2 decades in our regional network of NICUs and shared with others to determine safe prescribing limits for calcium and phosphate concentrations using an electronic PN prescribing program.
      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-06-13T12:21:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787221104367
       
  • Opioid Use in Vaso-Occlusive Crisis During Intravenous Opioid Drug
           Shortage

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      Authors: Katherine V. Katsivalis, Jeremy Kosacz, Jennifer Austin Szwak
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction: In October 2017, the Food and Drug Administration announced a shortage of intravenous (IV) opioid medications. Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) are particularly vulnerable, as high amounts of IV opioid medications are standard therapy during vaso-occlusive crises (VOC). Our institution responded to the crises by implementing IV to oral (PO) conversions of opioid therapies and encouraging multimodal pain management with non-opioid medications. Objectives: The primary objective was the assessment of IV opioid medication utilization before and during the shortage. Secondary objectives included total opioid consumption, length of stay, and prescribing of non-opioid analgesics. Methods: This single-institution retrospective study included patients>18 years of age admitted to adult medicine teams with VOC during February 2017 or February 2018. The amount of opioid medication administered to patients during both periods was assessed, and quantities were then converted to PO morphine milligram equivalents and compared between years. The number of patients receiving scheduled non-opioid medications were also compared. Length of stay and readmissions were compared between years. Results: Between 2017 and 2018, IV opioid use for VOC decreased by 52% on inpatient services, and there was a 34% reduction in overall opioid use. Oral opioid use more than doubled during the period (10.2% in 2017 vs 39.1% in 2018, P 
      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-06-04T11:52:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787221095894
       
  • Significant Published Articles in 2021 for Pharmacy Nutrition Support
           Practice

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      Authors: Roland N. Dickerson, Angela L. Bingham, Todd W. Canada, Lingtak Neander Chan, M. Petrea Cober, Sarah V. Cogle, Anne M. Tucker, Vanessa J. Kumpf
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The purpose of this article is to assist the pharmacist engaged in nutrition support therapy in staying current with pertinent literature. Methods: Several clinical pharmacists engaged in nutrition support therapy compiled a list of articles published in 2021 considered important to their clinical practice. The citation list was compiled into a single spreadsheet where the author participants were asked to assess whether the article was considered important to nutrition support pharmacy practice. A culled list of publications was then identified whereby at least 5 out of the 8 author participants considered the paper to be important. Guideline and consensus papers from professional organizations, important to practice but not ranked, were also included. Results: A total of 211 articles were identified; 8 from the primary literature were voted by the group to be of high importance. An additional 18 guidelines, position, recommendation, or consensus papers were also identified. The top-ranked articles from the primary literature were summarized and a narrative regarding its implications to pharmacy nutrition support practice were provided. Conclusion: We recommend that pharmacists engaged in nutrition support therapy be familiar with these articles as it pertains to their practice.
      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-06-04T11:41:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787221095765
       
  • Implementation of a COVID-19 Vaccination Program in the Emergency
           Department

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      Authors: Claudia Cooper, Stephanie Zack, Shailly Shah
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-06-04T10:37:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787221095773
       
  • Review of Medication Error Sources Associated With Inpatient Subcutaneous
           

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      Authors: Connor McKay, Dan Schenkat, Kristin Murphy, Elizabeth Hess
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.
      Background: The challenge of addressing variation in practice is underlined by variation in institutional operational and financial limitations, which ultimately directs institutional insulin dispensing strategy. Insulin therapy is multi-modal, and inpatient pharmacies may be responsible for simultaneously managing up to 8 formulations. While available as a tool for glycemic management in the inpatient setting, intravenous (IV) insulin and insulin pumps are out of scope for this review. Considerations when designing subcutaneous insulin dispensing processes include medication safety, infection control, pharmacy workflow, nursing workflow, drug cost, hardware cost, and hospital policy. Objective: This review provides an overview of common inpatient subcutaneous insulin dispensing practices, describes the regulations directing current practice, and discusses the benefits and risks of each dispensing practice. Finally, the review provides recommendations for subcutaneous insulin dispensing practices with respect to institutional limitations that minimize patient safety risk and consider the variable costs that practices incur. Methods: Common formulations will be presented along with medication safety considerations and potential medication administration errors to preface strategies for management. Conclusion: Nearing the centennial anniversary of the invention of insulin, the practice of dispensing subcutaneous insulin products has remained a core responsibility of the hospital pharmacy as a primary treatment option for Diabetes Mellitus. Despite the continued presence of this product as a universal component of the hospital formulary, subcutaneous insulin dispensing practices remain varied institution-to-institution.
      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-06-04T10:35:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787221095771
       
  • Omadacycline for a Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacter cloacae-Associated
           Wound Infection

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      Authors: Dylan C. VanDuyn, Saloni Chadha, Lauren A. Paul, Andrea R. Dressler, Mario V. Beccari, Rajinder P.S. Bajwa
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction: Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are problematic pathogens because infections caused by these organisms are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. These organisms often harbor multiple resistance mechanisms, which makes it difficult to treat their associated infections. Treatment typically consists of intravenous antibiotics that are selected based on the specific susceptibility pattern for the pathogen. Data on the use of oral antibiotics for the treatment of infections caused by CRE are sparse. Case Presentation: In this case, a 62-year-old female presented with a chronic left leg wound infection. She previously underwent surgical debridement and skin grafting, which were unsuccessful. She was initially prescribed minocycline for the infection, but the wound got re-infected. At this time, the wound had significant surrounding erythema, drainage, and slough. A wound culture was obtained and demonstrated growth of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacter cloacae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The patient was initiated on oral omadacycline, and she responded with resolution of the cellulitis and wound drainage. Conclusion: This case demonstrates that omadacycline may be beneficial as an oral medication for the treatment of complicated acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacter cloacae.
      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T04:51:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787221095767
       
  • Safety and Efficacy Analysis of Apixaban Compared to Heparins in
           Hospitalized Non-Critically Ill COVID-19 Patients

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      Authors: Daniel Appiah, Nicholas J. Quinn, Emily G. Messing, Keith T. Veltri
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Heparin-based regimens are recommended for anticoagulation in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 though a study reported similar mortality with apixaban in critically ill hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Our pilot study sought to determine the differences in all-cause mortality, venous thromboembolism (VTE), and bleeding events between apixaban and therapeutic heparin-based regimens in hospitalized non-critically ill COVID-19 patients. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of non-critically ill COVID-19 patients aged ≥ 18 years admitted to 3 campuses of Montefiore Medical Center during the first (March 2020 to May 2020) and second (January 2021 to February 2021) COVID-19 surges, who received within 48 hours of admission and continued for ≥72 hours a therapeutic dose of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), unfractionated heparin (UFH), or any apixaban dose for VTE prophylaxis. Outcomes data analyzed included mortality, suspected or imaging-confirmed VTE, and bleeding using a defined criteria. Results: Overall, 162 patients met eligibility for analysis. Baseline characteristics were similar between the 2 groups except liver and renal functions. Mortality occurred in 10 (13.3%) patients on apixaban and 23 (26.4%) patients on a heparin-based regimen (P = .059). Confirmed VTE events were not different between the groups (8% vs 13.8%, P = .359), but higher incidence of bleeding occurred in heparin-based group (4% vs 52.9%, P 
      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T04:49:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787221095764
       
  • Avacopan

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      Authors: Terri L. Levien, Danial E. Baker
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T10:56:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787221087187
       
  • Assessment of A new Strategy to Prevent Prescribing Errors Involving
           COVID-19 Patients in Community Pharmacies

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      Authors: Derar H. Abdel-Qader, Ahmad Z. Al Meslamani, Abdullah Albassam, Nadia Al Mazrouei, Asma A. El-Shara, Husam El Sharu, Samah Bahy Mohammed Ebaed, Osama Mohamed Ibrahim
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Because COVID-19 patients are vulnerable to prescribing errors (PEs) and adverse drug events, designing and implementing a new approach to prevent prescribing errors (PEs) involving COVID-19 patients has become a priority in pharmacotherapy research. Objectives: To investigate whether using WhatsApp to deliver prescribing error (PE)-related clinical scenarios to community pharmacists could enhance their ability to detect PEs and conduct successful pharmaceutical interventions (PIs). Methods: In this study, 110 community pharmacies were recruited from different regions across Jordan and equally allocated to 2 groups. Over the course of 4 weeks, WhatsApp was used to send PEs-related clinical case scenarios to the active group. The second group was controlled with no clinical scenarios. After completion of the 4-week phase, pharmacists from both groups were asked to document PEs in COVID-19 patients and their interventions using a data-collection form. Results: The incidence of PEs in COVID-19 patients documented in the active group (18.54%) was higher than that reported in the control group (3.09%) (P = .001). Of the 6598 and 968 PIs conducted by participants working in the active and control group pharmacies, 6013 (91.13%) and 651 (67.25%) were accepted, respectively. The proportions of wrong drug (contraindication), wrong drug (unnecessary drug prescribed/no proof of its benefits), and omission of a drug between the active and control groups were 15.30% versus 7.21% (P = .001), 11.85% versus 6.29% (P = .03), and 17.78% versus 10.50% (0.01), respectively. Additionally, the proportions of lethal, serious, and significant errors were 0.74% versus 0.35% (P = .04), 10.52% versus 2.57% (0.002), and 47.88% versus 9.57% (0.001), respectively. Addition of drug therapy interventions (AOR = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.21-0.84) and errors with significant clinical seriousness (AOR = 0.32; 95% CI, 0.16-0.64). Conclusions PEs involving COVID-19 patients in community settings are common and clinically significant. The intervention assessed in this study could be promising for designing a feasible and time-efficient interventional tool to encourage pharmacists’ involvement in identifying and correcting PEs in light of COVID-19.
      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T07:12:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787211073506
       
  • Prevalence of Potential Pharmacological Interactions in Patients
           Undergoing Systemic Chemotherapy in a Tertiary Hospital

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      Authors: Eric Diego Turossi-Amorim, Bruna Camargo, Fabiana Schuelter-Trevisol
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction: Pharmacological interactions are frequently observed in patients with chronic diseases, and their occurrence is proportional to the amount of medication used daily. Patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment commonly have comorbidities, which favor a greater prevalence of polypharmacy, increasing the risk of drug interactions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of drug interactions in patients undergoing intravenous chemotherapy treated at a hospital oncology service in southern Brazil. Methods: This was an observational study with a cross-sectional design that was carried out with the analysis of secondary data obtained through the review of medical records. The population assessed consisted of all cancer patients who received intravenous chemotherapy from October to December 2020. Results: Out of the 297 patients included in the study, 231 (77.8%) had at least 1 potential pharmacological interaction. In total, 1044 drug interactions were found that were classified according to severity, resulting in 18 (1.7%) contraindicated drug-drug interactions (DDI), 699 (67%) severe, 281 (26.9%) moderate, and 46 (4.4%) minor interactions. There was an association between polypharmacy and the prevalence of drug interactions. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that a large percentage of patients undergoing chemotherapy are susceptible to drug interactions. Thus, it is necessary that prescribers consider all drugs used by patients and, when possible, prescribe alternative drugs that have less potential for interaction in order to prevent drug interactions adverse effects and provide a better prognosis for patients.
      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T10:20:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787211073464
       
  • Severity and Hospitalization Cost Related to Warfarin-Related Adverse
           Events in a Tertiary Malaysian Hospital

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      Authors: Doris George, Chung Aun Wong, Subramaniam Thanimalai, Hoo Seng Tan
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction: Oral anticoagulant is essential for the treatment and prevention of thromboembolism. Warfarin is an effective oral anticoagulant in prevention and treatment of thromboembolism. However, warfarin is frequently associated with adverse event (AE) requiring hospitalization. Method: We performed a retrospective cohort study of all patients admitted to a large tertiary public hospital for warfarin-related AEs. Patients were grouped based on bleeding severity and the direct medical cost was also calculated. Results: During the 4 years study period, a total of 224 patients were admitted for warfarin-related AEs. Mean age of patients admitted was 65.1 years (standard deviation [SD] = 11.5). More than half, 59.6%, of them were on warfarin for prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter. Major bleeding occurred among 50.9% of the patients with gastrointestinal bleed, 34 (29.8%), as the common site of bleed. Patients with major bleed had longer median hospital stay of 4 days (interquartile range [IQR] = 5) compared to 3 (IQR = 3) days in non-major bleed. There were 17 (14.9%) death among the major bleeders. Mean medical cost for managing warfarin-related AEs was USD 708.08. Conclusion: The admitted patients were equally distributed in terms of bleeding severity. Medical cost incurred for managing warfarin-related AEs increased with the severity of bleeding.
      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T06:10:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787211070182
       
  • Compatibility and Physical Properties of Dexamethasone-Ondansetron
           Intravenous Admixture

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      Authors: Krit Suknuntha, Kotchakorn Wattanapoka, Pilor Poonpattanachai, Natanan Titipornwanich, Warunsuda Sripakdee
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This work aimed at evaluating the impact of different concentrations and final volumes on the compatibility and physical properties of dexamethasone-ondansetron intravenous (IV) admixture. Methods: The IV admixture of dexamethasone-ondansetron was prepared at different concentrations using normal saline solution as solvent. The final volume of the IV admixture was prepared at 50 and 100 ml. Turbidity was measured as an indicator of physical compatibility of the IV admixture of dexamethasone-ondansetron using UV-visible spectrophotometer and the pH of the IV admixture was measured on day 0, 7,14, and, 21 as an index of chemical stability. Also, the particle size and potential molecular interactions of the admixtures were determined using particle size analyzer and Fourier Transform infrared spectrometry analysis, respectively. Additionally, the effect of preservatives on the IV admixture was also evaluated. Results: Precipitation was observed for mixtures with amounts of dexamethasone and ondansetron exceeding 8 and 16 mg, respectively, in a final volume of 50 ml. For all mixtures with final volume of 100 ml, clear solutions void of any precipitates were observed. The pH of the solution had no effect on the precipitation of the dexamethasone-ondansetron during storage up to 21 days. Analyses of the precipitate formed revealed the presence of molecular interactions between dexamethasone and ondansetron. The benzyl alcohol used as a preservative affected the compatibility of the IV admixture compatibility. Conclusion: Thus, for the preparation of clear, physically compatible normal saline solutions of dexamethasone-ondansetron IV admixture, the maximum amounts of the respective drugs should not exceed 8 and 16 mg in total volume of 50 ml or 20 and 16 mg in a final volume of 100 ml.
      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T06:39:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787221074563
       
  • Pharmaceutical Supply Chain Practices and Its Associated Factors in Public
           Health Facilities, West Gojjam Zone, Ethiopia: Cross-Sectional Study

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      Authors: Bereket Bahiru Tefera, Gizachew Tilahun Anbessa
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Effective pharmaceutical supply chain practices help to minimize stockout, losses due to expiry, and pilferage. Besides, it helps to ensure the availability of the pharmaceutical in an adequate quantity and improving the quality of services provided. This study aimed to assess the status of the pharmaceutical supply chain practices and associated factors from the healthcare professional’s perspective in public health facilities. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study design, complemented with a qualitative study, was conducted in public health facilities between April 30 and June 30, 2018. The data were collected with self-administering questionnaires and face-to-face interviews. Epidata and SPSS version 20 was utilized for quantitative data entry and analysis, respectively. Simple and multiple linear regressions were done. A variable with a P-value less than .05 was considered as significantly associated. Twenty-seven key informants were interviewed for qualitative study and the data were analyzed using the thematic analysis method. Result: A total of 425 questionnaires were distributed to respondents and 413 questionnaires were filled and returned successfully. Supplier relationship management and information sharing and technology were underperformed supply chain practices with a mean value of 2.64 and 2.39, respectively. On the contrary, inventory management was a better-performed supply chain practice with a mean of 3.22. The linear regression analysis revealed that the Integrated Pharmaceutical Logistics System [IPLS] skill of the staff and management support were the factors significantly associated with the performance of most supply chain practices. Additional, in-depth interviews exposed that the shortage of budget, poor management support, and lack of staff commitment were the major challenges for most supply chain practices. Conclusion: Generally, the study revealed that most of the supply chain practices were poorly executed in public health facilities. Besides, the pharmaceutical supply chain practices were compromised by budget constraints, staff ignorance, and lack of administrative support.
      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T08:36:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787211067375
       
  • Short-Term Readmission Following Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A
           Cross-Sectional Study

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      Authors: Dung Thien Nguyen, Sang Thanh Huynh, Ho Nhu Nguyen
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Community-acquired pneumonia continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Hospital readmissions following community-acquired pneumonia are linked to significant cost of care and medical burdens. This study aimed to determine the incidence and reasons for readmission as well as to assess factors associated with short-term hospital readmission among community-acquired pneumonia patients. Methods:A retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted on 582 medical records of community-acquired pneumonia inpatients from December 2018 to December 2019 at an 800-bed tertiary hospital in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. We collected data on patient characteristics, pneumonia severity at hospital admission, microbiology and antibiotic resistance, appropriateness of empiric antibiotic therapies, and the readmissions information. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with 30-day hospital readmission. Results: Of the 582 hospitalized community-acquired pneumonia patients, 11.9% were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days. About half of the cases (43.5%) were due to pneumonia. Multidrug-resistant bacteria accounted for 43.2% of the pathogen isolates. A high Charlson comorbidity index (aOR, 1.40; CI 95%, 1.08-1.82) and multidrug-resistant infection (aOR, 2.63; CI 95%, 1.05-6.56) were associated with higher odds of all-cause readmission. Conclusions:Hospital readmissions within 30 days occurred frequently among community-acquired pneumonia inpatients, and the most common reason for readmission recorded was pneumonia-related. Monitoring closely patients with multimorbidity or multidrug-resistant infections may improve treatment outcomes.
      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-02-25T08:36:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787221078815
       
  • The Slow Path to Therapeutic Adherence

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      Authors: Francesco Ferrara, Livia Nava, Ugo Trama, Eduardo Nava, Antonio Vitiello
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.
      The therapeutic adherence to drug therapies is a crucial aspect for the proper management of chronicity. Over time, we are witnessing the evolution of the concept of adherence: today the patient must play an increasingly active role in the entire process in order for the pharmacological therapy to be fully successful. Poor therapeutic adherence can cause a bad success of the treatment path and, at the same time, lead to higher expenses. In this regard, it is necessary that each health company must undertake dedicated and organized paths. At the Asl Napoli 3 Sud an analysis of adherence in the year 2020 was carried out regarding the major pharmacological classes prescribed: anti-hypertensives, antidepressants, statins, anti-diabetes, and drugs for bpco and osteoporosis. The results show a very poor adherence where, at best, we have an adherence of about 50% of the therapies dispensed. This analysis shows how it is necessary to share actions with doctors and patients themselves to try to stem this phenomenon that is harmful both therapeutically and economically. Thus, it becomes essential to search for possible strategies for improvement and include them in the Diagnostic-Therapeutic-Assistance Pathways (PDTA).
      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T05:20:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787221074570
       
  • Antimicrobial Stewardship in the Covid-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Sergio Venturini, Manuela Avolio, Sara Fossati, Astrid Callegari, Rita De Rosa, Barbara Basso, Chiara Zanusso, Daniele Orso, Francesco Cugini, Massimo Crapis
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.
      During COVID-19 pandemic, implementing and maintaining an antimicrobial stewardship protocol obtained both low rates of MDR microorganisms and low antimicrobial use in an 800-bed hospital network in northern Italy. Infectious diseases specialist consulting was crucial to maintain this protocol active.
      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-02-10T09:43:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787221075190
       
  • Formulary Drug Review: Odevixibat

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      Authors: Terri L. Levien, Danial E. Baker
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.
      Each month, subscribers to The Formulary Monograph Service receive 5 to 6 well-documented monographs on drugs that are newly released or are in late phase 3 trials. The monographs are targeted to Pharmacy & Therapeutics Committees. Subscribers also receive monthly 1-page summary monographs on agents that are useful for agendas and pharmacy/nursing in-services. A comprehensive target drug utilization evaluation/medication use evaluation (DUE/MUE) is also provided each month. With a subscription, the monographs are available online to subscribers. Monographs can be customized to meet the needs of a facility. Through the cooperation of The Formulary, Hospital Pharmacy publishes selected reviews in this column. For more information about The Formulary Monograph Service, contact Wolters Kluwer customer service at 866-397-3433.
      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-02-08T09:58:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787211069036
       
  • Evidence Based Scarce Resource Allocation During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A
           Case Study of Bamlanivimab Administration in the Emergency Department

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      Authors: Elizabeth Rozycki, Ashley Weiner, Carlos Malvestutto, Nicholas E Kman, Mark Lustberg, Michael Dick, K. Joy Lehman, Ariane Schieber, Lynne Luca, Trisha A Jordan, Erica E Reed, James Allen, Jonathan Parsons, Courtney Nichols, Mark J Conroy
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Patients presenting for emergency department (ED) evaluation may be appropriate for treatment with monoclonal antibodies for mild to moderate COVID-19. While many sites have implemented infusion centers for these agents, EDs will continue to evaluate these patients where appropriate identification and efficient infusion of eligible patients is critical. Objectives: Patients receiving bamlanivimab in the EDs of an academic medical center are described. The primary objective was to describe operational metrics and secondary objectives reported clinical outcomes. Methods: Patients receiving bamlanivimab and discharged from the ED were included from November 16, 2020 to January 16, 2021 in the retrospective, observational cohort. Primary outcome was adherence to institutional criteria. Secondary outcomes included ED visit metrics, clinical characteristics, and return visits within 30 days. Risk factors for return visits were assessed with regression. Results: One hundred nineteen patients were included. Most (71%) were diagnosed with COVID-19 during the ED visit and median symptom duration was 3(IQR 2-5) days. Median number of risk factors for progression to severe disease was 2 (IQR 1-2). Thirty percent had a documented abnormal chest x-ray. Institutional criteria adherence was 99.2%. Median time from ED room to bamlanivimab was 4 (IQR 3.1-5.2) hours. Thirty patients had return visit within 30 days; 19 were COVID-19 related. Two multivariable regression models were analyzed for COVID-19 related return visit. Characteristics on ED presentation were considered in Model I: male gender (OR 3.01[0.97-9.31]), age (per 10 years) (OR 1.49[1.05-2.12]), African-American race (OR 3.46[1.09-11.06]), and symptom duration (per day) (OR 1.34[1.05-1.73]). Model II included labs and imaging acquired in ED. In Model II, age (per 10 years) (OR 1.52[1.07-2.16]) and abnormal CXR (OR 5.74[1.95-16.9]) were associated with COVID-19 related return visits. Conclusions: Administration of bamlanivimab to ED patients can be done efficiently, with the potential to reduce COVID-19 related return visits. Age and abnormal imaging were independent predictors of COVID-19 return visits.
      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-02-02T12:54:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787211073466
       
  • Fluoxetine and Molnupiravir: A Synergistic Combination for COVID-19
           Treatment'

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      Authors: Yaser Pashaei
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-01-31T11:19:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787211073465
       
  • Narrative Review: Addressing Covid-19 Vaccine Concerns in Special and
           Vulnerable Populations

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      Authors: Kent A. Owusu, Muhammad K. Effendi, Melissa L. Thompson Bastin, Samad Tirmizi, Ishaq Lat, Mahmoud A. Ammar
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.
      Public health advocates and healthcare professionals (HCPs) have been challenged with vaccine hesitancy and addressing misinformation. In order for HCPs and pharmacists, in particular, to serve as effective stewards of COVID-19 vaccine science in the interest of the public good, it is imperative for HCPs to appreciate the various factors contributing to vaccine hesitancy and vaccine distrust. A PubMed search was performed and relevant articles on COVID-19 vaccine in populations of interest were included. Information from health agencies, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as well as established professional health societies was incorporated for guidance. This review focuses on COVID-19 vaccine concerns in the populations of children, pregnancy and lactation, immunocompromised, and religious and ethnic disparities. We also discuss post emergency use authorization experience with respect to vaccine safety including annotations on Guillain-Barré Syndrome, myocarditis and pericarditis, and thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome.
      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-01-19T12:16:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787211066463
       
  • Pharmacy Resident Perspectives on the Layered Learning Practice Model

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      Authors: Nathan V. Dang, Tiffany K. Pon, Yvette M. Hellier
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: To describe pharmacy resident perspectives on the layered learning practice model (LLPM) at large academic medical centers in the United States and identify the types of training residents receive to prepare for the LLPM. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, mixed methods study that surveyed pharmacy residents completing training at large, academic medical centers on their perspectives of the LLPM. Residents with at least 4 weeks of precepting experience were eligible to complete an online survey. Descriptive statistics were generated for demographic and Likert data while themes were identified from narrative free responses. Results: Twenty-seven resident responses from 10 institutions were included. Likert data showed generally positive perspectives toward overall experience with the LLPM and perceived LLPM impact on clinical knowledge and professional practice, with 100.0% of respondents agreeing they enjoyed precepting under the LLPM. However, 44.4% also agreed that precepting was stressful. LLPM impact on resident behavior received positive to neutral responses; 63.0% neither agreed nor disagreed that the LLPM changed their approach to patient care. Written comments revealed themes such as sources of stress within the LLPM, increased depth of learning, improved comprehensive patient care, and improved professional growth. The most common forms of LLPM training occurred through preceptor and student evaluations (73.1% and 61.5%, respectively) and orientation (50.0%). Conclusion: These findings identified a variety of resident perspectives on the LLPM ranging from positive to negative and revealed possible areas of improvement related to LLPM implementation. Residency programs may consider exploring stressors on the resident role in the LLPM to better structure resident precepting training and maximize their clinical learning experience.
      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-01-19T12:11:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787211066458
       
  • Could Decreased Reporting of Suspected Adverse Reactions Generate Future
           Safety Concerns'

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      Authors: Francesco Ferrara, Carolina Mancaniello, Livia Nava, Alessandra Salierno, Raffaele Casillo, Ugo Trama, Eduardo Nava, Antonio Vitiello
      Abstract: Hospital Pharmacy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Hospital Pharmacy
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T10:03:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00185787211069040
       
 
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