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  Subjects -> PHARMACY AND PHARMACOLOGY (Total: 575 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 253 Journals sorted by number of followers
Nature Reviews Drug Discovery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 331)
International Journal of Drug Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 253)
Journal of Clinical Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 243)
Journal of Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 158)
Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 155)
Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 146)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 98)
Pharmaceutical Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 86)
Drug Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 83)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Biomaterials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Controlled Release     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
International Journal of Pharmaceutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Clinical Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Drug Development and Industrial Pharmacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
PharmacoEconomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Clinical Pharmacokinetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
AAPS Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Critical Reviews in Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Pharmacy Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Chemical Research in Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Pain & Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Trends in Pharmacological Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Applied Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Clinical Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Pharmaceutical Development and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Clinical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Natural Products     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Pharmaceutical Statistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Toxicology Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Pharmacy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
American Journal of Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Drug and Chemical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of the American Pharmacists Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Research and Regulatory Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Seminars in Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Drug Discovery Today: Technologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Current Pharmaceutical Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Oncology Pharmacy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Biopharmaceutics and Drug Disposition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Toxicology in Vitro     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Drug Development Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Drug Metabolism and Disposition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Seminars in Oncology Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Biochemical Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Separation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
CNS Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Medical Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Drugs & Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
European Neuropsychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Food Additives & Contaminants Part A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Biometrical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Drugs & Therapy Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Prescriber     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
ChemMedChem     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Current Opinion in Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Inhalation Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Antiviral Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Drug Metabolism Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Human & Experimental Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Drug Delivery     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
BioDrugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers in Drug Design & Discovery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Expert Review of Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Pharmacological and Toxicological Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Epilepsy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Clinical Drug Investigation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Toxicology and Industrial Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Skin Pharmacology and Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
AAPS PharmSciTech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Drug Discovery Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Anti-Inflammatory & Anti-Allergy Agents in Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Therapeutic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Current Drug Delivery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Neuropharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current Drug Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Fitoterapia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Expert Review of Molecular Diagnostics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Anti-Infective Agents     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Toxicon     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Medicinal Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Investigational New Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current Cancer Therapy Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Reviews of Physiology, Biochemistry and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Planta Medica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Vascular Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Pharmaceutical Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
CNS Drug Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Inpharma Weekly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Immunopharmacology and Immunotoxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Inflammation Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pharmacology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Physiology International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cardiovascular Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ASSAY and Drug Development Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Pharmacopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Chemotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Therapeutic Drug Monitoring     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Drug Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Aerosol Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ethnopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Drug Resistance Updates     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Pain Management & Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Acta Pharmacologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Microbial Drug Resistance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Human Psychopharmacology Clinical and Experimental     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
BMC Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Brown University Psychopharmacology Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Clinical Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Drug Targeting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Inflammopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Inflammation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Behavioural Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Vascular Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Pulmonary Pharmacology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Neuropharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Drugs in R & D     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Immunopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Letters in Drug Design & Discovery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Archiv der Pharmazie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Pharmacological Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Molecular Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Microencapsulation: Microcapsules, Liposomes, Nanoparticles, Microcells, Microspheres     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Toxicological & Environmental Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Particulate Science and Technology: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Pharmacological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Enzyme Inhibition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Pharmaceutical Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Neuropharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Pharmacogenetics and Genomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Texture Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Pharmaceutical Biology     Open Access  
Journal of Liposome Research     Hybrid Journal  
Toxin Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Kaohsiung Journal of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Redox Report     Open Access  
Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription  
Pharmaceutical Chemistry Journal     Hybrid Journal  
NeuroMolecular Medicine     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal  
Harm Reduction Journal     Open Access  
Current Nanoscience     Hybrid Journal  
Infectious Disorders - Drug Targets     Hybrid Journal  
Current Bioactive Compounds     Hybrid Journal  
Cancer Biotherapy & Radiopharmaceuticals     Hybrid Journal  
Autonomic & Autacoid Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal  

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Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.147
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1432-0843 - ISSN (Online) 0344-5704
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • SMAGP regulates doxorubicin sensitivity in triple-negative breast cancer
           cells via modulating mitochondrial respiration

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      Abstract: Abstract Doxorubicin-based chemotherapy remains as a major therapeutic approach for patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, insensitivity or resistance to doxorubicin treatment limits the therapeutic efficacy. Mitochondrial respiration plays a critical role in regulating the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs. Here, we found that small trans-membrane and glycosylated protein (SMAGP) is upregulated in TNBC cells in comparison to normal breast and other subtypes of breast cancer cells. High SMAGP expression is associated with poorer overall survival of TNBC patients. Importantly, loss of SMAGP enhanced the sensitivity of TNBC cells to doxorubicin treatment. Mechanistically, we detected a functional pool of SMAGP in the mitochondria of TNBC cells controlling doxorubicin sensitivity via regulating mitochondrial respiration. Thus, our data suggest that SMAGP acts as a novel regulator of doxorubicin sensitivity in TNBC, identifying SMAGP as a promising therapeutic target for improving the efficacy of doxorubicin-based chemotherapy in TNBC patients.
      PubDate: 2022-11-27
       
  • Renal function-based versus standard dosing of pemetrexed: a randomized
           controlled trial

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      Abstract: Purpose Pemetrexed is a chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer and mesothelioma. Optimized dosing of pemetrexed based on renal function instead of body surface area (BSA) is hypothesized to reduce pharmacokinetic variability in systemic exposure and could therefore improve treatment outcomes. The aim of this study is to compare optimized dosing to standard BSA-based dosing. Methods A multicenter randomized (1:1) controlled trial was performed to assess superiority of optimized dosing versus BSA-based dosing in patients who were eligible for pemetrexed-based chemotherapy. The individual exposure to pemetrexed in terms of area under the concentration–time curve (AUC) was determined. The fraction of patients attaining to a predefined typical target AUC (164 mg × h/L ± 25%) was calculated. Results A total of 81 patients were included. Target attainment was not statistically significant different between both arms (89% vs. 84% (p = 0.505)). The AUC of pemetrexed was similar between the optimized dosing arm (n = 37) and the standard of care arm (n = 44) (155 mg × h/L vs 160 mg × h/L (p = 0.436). Conclusion We could not show superiority of optimized dosing of pemetrexed in patients with an adequate renal function does not show added value on the attainment of a pharmacokinetic endpoint, safety, nor QoL compared to standard of care dosing. Clinical trial number Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT03655821
      PubDate: 2022-11-21
       
  • Incidence and risk factors of infusion reactions in patients with breast
           cancer administered trastuzumab plus pertuzumab-based regimen

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      Abstract: Purpose Pertuzumab (Per) is a humanized monoclonal antibody used in combination with trastuzumab (Tra) in the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer. The administration of biologics, such as Tra and Per, frequently causes infusion reactions (IRs) with fever and chills. This study aimed to clarify the characteristics of and risk factors for IRs in Tra + Per combination therapy. Methods Between March 2013 and December 2019, 64 patients with breast cancer who started Tra + Per combination therapy were included in the study. The severity of IRs was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 5.0. Results The incidence of IRs in the Tra + Per combination therapy was 48.4% (31/64). The severity of IRs in the Tra + Per combination therapy was Grade 1 (9 patients) and Grade 2 (22 patients). Lymphocyte counts were significantly different between the IR and non-IR groups in patients receiving Tra + Per combination therapy (univariate analysis, p = 0.006; multivariate analysis, p = 0.050). ROC curve analysis found the cutoff value of lymphocyte counts were 1.60 (× 103/µL). The incidence of IRs in the lymphocyte counts ≥ 1.60 group was significantly higher than that in the lymphocyte counts < 1.60 group (p < 0.001). Conclusion Our study indicates that the severity of IRs in most patients is moderate or less and the risk of IRs is higher in patients with higher lymphocyte counts (≥ 1.60 × 103/µL).
      PubDate: 2022-11-19
       
  • Fluoropyrimidine-associated toxicity and DPYD variants c.85T>C,
           c.496A>G, and c.1236G>A: impact of haplotype

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      Abstract: Abstract Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) is the rate-limiting step in fluoropyrimidines metabolism. Currently, genotype-guided fluoropyrimidine dosing is recommended for four DPYD single nucleotide variants (SNVs). However, the clinical impact of additional DPYD SNVs on fluoropyrimidine-related toxicity remains controversial. We assessed common DPYD SNVs c.85T>C, and c.496A>G which are often in linkage disequilibrium with c.1236G>A, a variant currently recommended for DPYD genotyping, in a retrospective cohort of cancer patients who had received fluoropyrimidines (N = 1371). When assessing individual SNVs, during the total chemotherapy treatment period, a significant increased risk of severe grade ≥ 3 toxicity was seen in carriers of c.496A>G (OR = 1.38, 95% CI 1.01–1.88, p = 0.0405) after adjusting for age, sex and treatment drug (capecitabine or 5-Fluorouracil). No association with fluoropyrimidine-related toxicity was seen in patients given standard dosing among those carrying one allele of DPYD c.1236G>A (OR = 1.19, 95% CI 0.59–2.27, p = 0.6147) or c.85T>C (OR = 1.04, 95% CI 0.80–1.62, p = 0.7536). Haplotype analysis confirmed a high linkage disequilibrium of these three variants. Toxicity was not significantly increased in haplotypes containing only one of c.85T>C or c.496A>G or c.1236G>A alleles. However, the haplotype containing both c.85T>C and c.496A>G alleles, which had a predicted frequency of 7.1%, was associated with an increased risk of fluoropyrimidine toxicity (OR = 1.57, 95% CI 1.15–2.13, p = 0.0041). This study suggests DPYD haplotype structure may help explain previous conflicting studies concerning the impact of these variants. Our findings suggest patients with both DPYD c.85T>C and c.496A>G variants have a significant increased risk for toxicity and may potentially benefit from genotype-guided fluoropyrimidine dosing.
      PubDate: 2022-11-10
       
  • Resistance to the BCL-XL degrader DT2216 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic
           leukemia is rare and correlates with decreased BCL-XL proteolysis

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      Abstract: Purpose The BCL-2 family of anti-apoptotic proteins, BCL-2, BCL-XL and MCL-1, can mediate survival of some types of cancer. DT2216 is a PROteolysis-TArgeting Chimera (PROTAC) that degrades BCL-XL specifically and is in phase 1 trials. We sought to define the frequency and mechanism of resistance to DT2216 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines. Methods We measured cell survival and protein levels of BCL-XL, BCL-2, MCL-1 and the pro-apoptotic BIM in 13 distinct T-ALL cell lines after exposure to varying concentrations of DT2216. Results We identified concentrations of DT2216 which were cytotoxic to each T-ALL cell line. These concentrations have no correlation with the initial protein levels of BCL-XL, BCL-2, MCL-1 or BIM in each cell line. However, there was a correlation between survival to DT2216 and the efficiency of degradation of BCL-XL by DT2216. Only one cell line, SUP-T1, had significant resistance to DT2216, defined as an IC50 above what is achievable in murine tumors in vivo. Conclusion Resistance to DT2216 is rare in a wide variety of T-ALL cells but when it occurs is correlated with decreased BCL-XL degradation. Resistance to DT2216 in T-ALL is not predicted by initial BCL-XL or BIM protein levels, or BCL-2 or MCL-1 levels before or after treatment. These data imply that a phase 2 clinical trial of DT2216 in T-ALL should be widely available and not limited to a subset of patients.
      PubDate: 2022-11-08
       
  • Exposure–response analysis of Camidanlumab tesirine in patients with
           relapsed or refractory classical Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma
           

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      Abstract: Purpose To investigate camidanlumab tesirine (Cami) exposure–response (E–R) relationships, using an integrated population pharmacokinetic model, for patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma enrolled in an open-label, phase 1 study (NCT02432235). Methods Exploratory analyses investigated relationships between exposure measures (Cmaxss, Cminss, and Cavgss) and the occurrence of binary variables (overall response rate [ORR] and selected adverse events [AEs]) and nonbinary variables (overall survival [OS]). Results Exploratory analyses showed a significant, positive relationship between exposure and ORR/OS. The final model showed this effect was non-significant due to the covariate effects. Cami exposures were higher in patients with selected grade ≥ 2 AEs at cycle 6 (the anticipated steady-state exposure level), confirmed in the final E–R models. Conclusions Based on univariate results, Cmaxss was used as the exposure measure in all models, except for the autoimmune AE full E–R model in which Cavgss was used. The positive relationship between exposure and ORR/OS (higher exposure significantly associated with higher probabilities of ORR/OS) was not statistically significant in the final models. The final safety E–R models demonstrated a significant positive association between Cami exposure and selected grade ≥ 2 AEs, with higher exposures associated with higher probabilities of experiencing the grade ≥ 2 AEs at cycle 6. The results identify preliminary predictors of efficacy and safety and provide a basis for a dosing rationale and benefit–risk profile of Cami in patients with relapsed/refractory cHL.
      PubDate: 2022-11-04
       
  • Population pharmacokinetics analysis of camidanlumab tesirine in patients
           with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma

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      Abstract: Purpose The objective of this analysis was to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model to characterize camidanlumab tesirine (Cami) pharmacokinetics based on the phase 1 study in relapsed/refractory lymphoma (NCT02432235). Methods An initial PPK model was developed based on a two-compartment model with parallel linear and nonlinear elimination pathways. Pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated for correlation with potential demographic covariates; significant covariates were retained in the final model. Results In the final PPK model, baseline weight effects were included on clearance (CL), intercompartmental clearance (Q), and the volumes of distribution in the central (V1) and peripheral (V2) compartments. The baseline soluble CD25 (sCD25) effect was included on CL and maximum velocity of saturable clearance (Vmax); sex effect was included on CL and V1; and ethnicity effect was included on deconjugation clearance (CLdec). For a typical patient, CL and CLdec were 0.516 and 0.21 L/day, respectively (tAb elimination half-life: 18.72 days); V1 and V2 were 4.41 and 2.67 L, respectively; Vmax was 0.49 mg/day; the Michaelis–Menten constant (Km) was 0.409 µg/mL; and the first-order rate for decrease of Vmax (KDES) was 0.0197/day. Cami exposure was higher for patients with low baseline sCD25, higher body weight, and females. Conclusions The final model described the observed data well, estimates of PK parameters were obtained, and covariates with significant effects on Cami exposure were identified. Altogether, this final PPK model provides a robust basis for analysis of Cami exposure–response relationships and further supports identification of the optimal Cami dosing schedule for patients with relapsed/refractory lymphoma.
      PubDate: 2022-11-04
       
  • Characterization of exposure–response relationships of ipatasertib in
           patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in the
           IPATential150 study

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      Abstract: Purpose The exposure–response relationships for efficacy and safety of ipatasertib, a selective AKT kinase inhibitor, were characterized using data collected from 1101 patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in the IPATential150 study (NCT03072238). Methods External validation of a previously developed population pharmacokinetic model was performed using the observed pharmacokinetic data from the IPATential150 study. Exposure metrics of ipatasertib for subjects who received ipatasertib 400 mg once-daily orally in this study were generated as model-predicted area under the concentration–time curve at steady state (AUCSS). The exposure–response relationship with radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) was evaluated using Cox regression and relationships with safety endpoints were assessed using logistic regression. Results A statistically significant correlation between ipatasertib AUCSS and improved survival was found in patients with PTEN-loss tumors (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.92 per 1000 ng h/mL AUCSS, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87–0.98, p = 0.011). In contrast, an improvement in rPFS was seen in subjects receiving ipatasertib treatment (HR: 0.84, 95% CI 0.71–0.99, p = 0.038) but this effect was not associated with ipatasertib AUCSS in the intention-to-treat population. Incidences of some adverse events (AEs) had statistically significant association with ipatasertib AUCSS (serious AEs, AEs leading to discontinuation, and Grade ≥ 2 hyperglycemia), while others were associated with only ipatasertib treatment (AEs leading to dose reduction, Grade ≥ 3 diarrhea, and Grade ≥ 2 rash). Conclusions The exposure–efficacy results indicated that patients receiving ipatasertib may continue benefiting from this treatment at the administered dose, despite some variability in exposures, while the exposure–safety results suggested increased risks of AEs with ipatasertib treatment and/or increased ipatasertib exposures.
      PubDate: 2022-10-28
       
  • A feasibility study of lenvatinib plus pembrolizumab in Japanese patients
           with advanced solid tumors

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      Abstract: Purpose Combination treatment using lenvatinib (a multikinase inhibitor) plus pembrolizumab (a programmed death-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor) has shown efficacy in the treatment of endometrial and renal cell cancers. This phase 1b study investigated the tolerability and safety of lenvatinib plus pembrolizumab in Japanese patients with metastatic selected solid tumors. Methods Patients received a starting dose of 20 mg oral lenvatinib per day plus 200 mg intravenous pembrolizumab every 3 weeks in 21-day cycles. Dose-limiting toxicities were evaluated during the first cycle. Tumor assessments were performed by investigators based on modified RECIST v1.1. Pharmacokinetic parameters and serum biomarkers were assessed. Results Among enrolled patients (N = 6), 3 had non-small cell lung cancer, and 3 had urothelial cancer. No patients experienced a dose-limiting toxicity. All patients experienced at least 1 treatment-related treatment-emergent adverse event. The objective response rate was 33.3% (95% confidence interval 4.3–77.7); both responses (1 complete, 1 partial) were observed in patients with urothelial cancer. Pharmacokinetics were consistent with previous studies. Serum angiopoietin-2 levels tended to decrease, and serum fibroblast growth factor-23 levels tended to increase from baseline to Cycle 2 Day 1. Conclusions This study supports the tolerability of 20 mg lenvatinib/day plus 200 mg pembrolizumab every 3 weeks in Japanese patients, consistent with the results from a global study of lenvatinib plus pembrolizumab combination therapy in patients with selected solid tumors. Favorable antitumor activity was observed and there were no new safety signals identified. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov number: NCT03006887.
      PubDate: 2022-10-26
       
  • Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of [14C]Mefuparib
           (CVL218), a novel PARP1/2 inhibitor, in rats

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      Abstract: Introduction Mefuparib (CVL218) is a novel second-generation poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitor for cancer treatment. CVL218 can easily enter the brain. However, the transport mechanism by which CVL218 crosses the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is unknown. Methods (1) [14C] CVL218 metabolism in rats was traced by a liquid scintillation counter and oxidative combustion. (2) Metabolic profiles and metabolites were identified by UHPLC-β-RAM/UHPLC-Fraction Collector and UHPLC-Q Exactive Plus MS. (3) The partition coefficient Kp,uu,brain value was simulated by two strategies. One strategy was using ACD and GastroPlus Software based on the results of intravenous administration pharmacokinetics and plasma protein-binding studies. The reliability was confirmed by comparison with another strategy (brain/plasma distribution study). Results (1) Rapid drug elimination was observed 24 h after intragastric administration. The total cumulative excretion in urine and feces within 168 h accounted for 97.15% of the dose. The cumulative radioactive dose recovery in bile was 41.87% within 72 h. The drug-related substances were extensively distributed to the tissues within 48 h. (2) M8 was the major metabolite in plasma, urine, feces and bile. (3) CVL218 exhibited high brain protein-binding rate (88.16%). The Kp,uu,brain value (8.42) simulated by the simple software strategy was similar to that of the brain/plasma distribution study (7.01). Conclusions CVL218 is a fast-metabolizing drug and is mainly excreted in feces. The B/P ratio prediction and observation data for CVL218 were consistent. Furthermore, the Kp,uu,brain value indicated that penetration through the BBB might be mediated by uptake transporters.
      PubDate: 2022-10-25
       
  • Starting dose selection of palbociclib in Chinese patients with breast
           

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      Abstract: Abstract Neutropenia is the most common adverse event (AE) of palbociclib, an oral CDK4/6 inhibitor for breast cancer. Neutropenia increases the risk of infection and is even life threatening. Asian patients generally suffer more severe neutropenia from palbociclib treatment, but the label does not recommend a reduction in the starting dose for Asian patients. Therefore, the study aimed to explore the exposure–response (E–R) relationship in Chinese patients and preliminarily generate a scale for starting dose selection of palbociclib in Chinese patients. After comparing the kinetic–pharmacodynamic (K–PD) and the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model, a semi-mechanistic K–PD model was selected and developed on the basis of real-world data from 28 patients with breast cancer to describe the time course of longitudinal absolute neutrophil counts (ANC). The longitudinal ANC data were well described by the population K–PD model with reasonable parameters: mean transit time (MTT) of 198 h, feedback parameter (γ) of 0.317, baseline ANC level (Circ0) of 3.36 × 109 L−1, drug effect coefficient (kd) of 0.0349, and drug effect power (β) of 0.383. No covariate was included in the final model. The model showed that palbociclib dose-dependently reduced ANC levels in a Chinese population, and lower baseline ANC level was associated with more severe neutropenia. The dose selection scale suggested that palbociclib 125 mg daily was appropriate for Chinese patients with Circ0 higher than 3.75 × 109 L−1. In summary, the K–PD model of palbociclib well described the longitudinal ANC in Chinese patients. Besides, the starting dose selection scale may provide reference for clinicians during individualized therapy.
      PubDate: 2022-10-22
       
  • Mass spectroscopy-based proteomics and metabolomics analysis of
           triple-positive breast cancer cells treated with tamoxifen and/or
           trastuzumab

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      Abstract: Purpose HER2-enriched breast cancer with high levels of hormone receptor expression, known as "triple positive" breast cancer, may represent a new entity with a relatively favourable prognosis against which the combination of chemotherapy, HER-2 inhibition, and endocrine treatment may be considered overtreatment. We explored the effect of the anticancer drugs tamoxifen and trastuzumab, both separately and in combination, on the integrated proteomic and metabolic profile of "triple positive" breast cancer cells (BT-474). Method We employed ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry using a Bruker timsTOF to investigate changes in BT-474 cell line treated with either tamoxifen, trastuzumab or a combination. Differentially abundant metabolites were identified using the Bruker Human Metabolome Database metabolite library and proteins using the Uniprot proteome for Homo sapiens using MetaboScape and MaxQuant, respectively, for identification and quantitation. Results A total of 77 proteins and 85 metabolites were found to significantly differ in abundance in BT-474 treated cells with tamoxifen 5 μM/and or trastuzumab 2.5 μM. Findings suggest that by targeting important cellular signalling pathways which regulate cell growth, apoptosis, proliferation, and chemoresistance, these medicines have a considerable anti-growth effect in BT-474 cells. Pathways enriched for dysregulation include RNA splicing, neutrophil degranulation and activation, cellular redox homeostasis, mitochondrial transmembrane transport, ferroptosis and necroptosis, ABC transporters and central carbon metabolism. Conclusion Our findings in protein and metabolite level research revealed that anti-cancer drug therapy had a significant impact on the key signalling pathways and molecular processes in triple positive BT-474 cell lines. Graphical abstract
      PubDate: 2022-10-20
       
  • A prospective, open-label, randomised, parallel design study of 4 generic
           formulations of intramuscular L-asparaginase in childhood precursor B-cell
           acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL)

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      Abstract: Aims L-asparaginase is an essential medicine for childhood ALL. The quality of generic L-asparaginase available in India is a matter of concern. We compared four commonly used generic formulations of L-asparaginase in India. Materials and methods We conducted a prospective, open-label, randomised trial of four generic formulations of asparaginase for the treatment of patients with newly diagnosed intermediate-risk B-ALL. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1:1:1 ratio to receive generic asparaginase at a dose of at 10,000 IU/m 2 on days 9, 12, 15, and 18 of a 35-day cycle (Induction treatment). The primary end points were to determine the difference in the asparaginase activity and asparagine depletion. Historical patients who received L-asparaginase Medac (innovator) served as controls. Results A total of 48 patients underwent randomization; 12 patients each in the four arms. Failure to achieve predefined activity threshold of 100 IU/L was observed in 9/40 samples of Generic A (22·5%), 23/40 of Generic B (57·5%), and 43/44 (98%) each of Generic C and D. All 27 samples from seven historical patients who were administered Medac had activity > 100 IU/L. The average activity was significantly higher for Genericm A, 154 (70·3, 285·4) IU/L followed by Generic B 84·5(44·2, 289·1) IU/L, Generic C 45(14·4, 58·4) IU/L, and Generic D 20·4(13, 35) IU/L. Only 6 patients had asparaginase activity > 100 IU/L on each of the four occasions (Generic A = 5; Generic B = 1), and none of them developed Anti-Asparaginase Antibodies (AAA). On the other hand, AAA was observed in 12/36 patients who had at least one level < 100 IU/L (P < 0·05): Generic A 3/5, Generic B = 3/9, Generic D (4/11), and Generic C (5/11). Conclusion Generic A and B had better trough asparaginase activity compared to Generic D and C. Overall, generic formulations had lower asparaginase activity which raises serious clinical concerns regarding their quality. Until strict regulatory enforcement improves the quality of these generics, dose adaptive approaches coupled with therapeutic drug monitoring need to be considered.
      PubDate: 2022-10-17
       
  • Disulfiram enhances chemotherapeutic effects of doxorubicin liposomes
           against human hepatocellular carcinoma via activating ROS-induced cell
           stress response pathways

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      Abstract: Purpose Increasing evidences have revealed the anti-cancer effect of disulfiram. Current disulfiram-based cancer therapies still have limitations, such as poor tumor-targeting ability and insufficient studies on anti-tumor mechanisms. Methods In the present study, tumor-targeting liposomes were prepared as drug carriers to increase retention of disulfiram in tumor cells. Then, anti-tumor efficacy of liposomes and the underlying mechanisms were investigated in in vitro, in vivo, and transcriptomic level. Results The results showed that disulfiram enhanced sensitivity of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells to doxorubicin by 15–27-fold, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production as well as caspase-dependent apoptosis. Inhibition of tumor migration and invasion by doxorubicin were further enhanced by disulfiram. In vivo study showed that disulfiram additive doxorubicin liposomes had better performance in suppressing tumor growth than single doxorubicin liposomes. Gene expression profiling found that cellular components destruction, cell stress, check point regulation, and immunoregulation were the main anti-tumor mechanisms of disulfiram. More importantly, disulfiram possessed a great potential to be a protein ubiquitination and murine double minute 4 (MDM4) targeting compound. Conclusions Due to its low price and good safety, it is worth to repurposing disulfiram as a chemotherapeutic drug. Furthermore, MDM4 may act as a biomarker for observation the clinical effect of disulfiram-based treatment.
      PubDate: 2022-10-17
       
  • An inhibitor of BRD4, GNE987, inhibits the growth of glioblastoma cells by
           targeting C-Myc and S100A16

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      Abstract: Purpose Among children, glioblastomas (GBMs) are a relatively common type of brain tumor. BRD4 expression was elevated in GBM and negatively correlated with the prognosis of glioma. We investigated the anti-GBM effects of a novel BRD4 inhibitor GNE987. Methods We evaluated the anti-tumor effect of GNE987 in vitro and in vivo by Western blot, CCK8, flow cytometry detection, clone formation, the size of xenografts, and Ki67 immunohistochemical staining, and combined ChIP-seq with RNA-seq techniques to find its anti-tumor mechanism. Results In vitro experiments showed that GNE987 significantly degraded BRD4, inhibited the proliferation of GBM cells, blocked the cell cycle, and induced apoptosis. Similarly, in vivo experiments, GNE987 also inhibited GBM growth as seen from the size of xenografts and Ki67 immunohistochemical staining. Based on Western blotting, GNE987 can significantly reduce the protein level of C-Myc; meanwhile, we combined ChIP-seq with RNA-seq techniques to confirm that GNE987 downregulated the transcription of S100A16 by disturbing H3K27Ac. Furthermore, we validated that S100A16 is indispensable in GBM growth. Conclusion GNE987 may be effective against GBM that targets C-Myc expression and influences S100A16 transcription through downregulation of BRD4.
      PubDate: 2022-10-12
       
  • The use of vitamin E in preventing taxane‐induced peripheral
           neuropathy

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      PubDate: 2022-10-05
       
  • Effects of vitamin E in preventing taxane‑induced peripheral
           neuropathy

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      PubDate: 2022-10-05
       
  • Idiopathic hyperammonemic encephalopathy secondary to
           gemcitabine–cisplatin treatment

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      Abstract: Abstract Idiopathic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare complication of chemotherapy, which has previously mainly been associated with L-asparaginase, cytarabine and 5-FU. We present a case following treatment with gemcitabine–cisplatin in a patient with cholangiocarcinoma. The etiology of chemotherapy-induced idiopathic hyperammonemic encephalopathy remains unclear and existing theories differ per chemotherapeutic agent. Physicians treating patients with gemcitabine–cisplatin should be aware of the possibility of this complication, especially because it is treatable when recognized early.
      PubDate: 2022-09-20
       
  • Population pharmacokinetics of zanidatamab, an anti-HER2 biparatopic
           antibody, in patients with advanced or metastatic cancer

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      Abstract: Purpose To characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) of zanidatamab including evaluation of the impact of intrinsic and extrinsic patient factors. To investigate alternative dosing regimens to improve caregiver convenience and reduce zanidatamab wastage. Methods Serum zanidatamab concentrations were obtained from 305 patients with advanced or metastatic breast cancer, gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma (GEA), biliary tract cancer, and other HER2-expressing cancers from four ongoing phase I and II clinical trials. Zanidatamab PK were described using population methods. The exposure of alternative dosing regimens and the impact of dose delay was estimated by model simulation. Results A two-compartment model with parallel linear and nonlinear clearance from the central compartment adequately described zanidatamab PK. At the recommended dose regimens of 20 mg/kg Q2W and 30 mg/kg Q3W, zanidatamab clearance was primarily linear at steady state. At steady state, 30 mg/kg Q3W zanidatamab returns within 10% of the steady state trough after 2 subsequent doses following either a 1-week or 2-week dose delay. Statistically significant covariates included in the final model were body weight, sex, albumin, GEA cancer type, baseline tumor size, and presence of post-baseline anti-drug antibodies, all of which resulted in less than 30% impact on exposure. Model simulation predicts weight-based and two-tiered flat dosing will result in similar exposure and variability. Conclusion The identified significant covariates were not considered clinically meaningful. Both weight-based (30 mg/kg Q3W) and two-tiered flat dosing (1800/2400 mg Q3W, 70 kg threshold) strategies are expected to provide similar exposures of zanidatamab.
      PubDate: 2022-09-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s00280-022-04471-x
       
  • Re-thinking the possible interaction between proton pump inhibitors and
           capecitabine

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      Abstract: Abstract Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPI) rank within the top ten most prescribed medications in Europe and USA. A high frequency of PPI use has been reported amongst patients undergoing chemotherapy, to mitigate treatment-induced gastritis or gastro-oesophageal reflux. Several recent, mostly retrospective, observational studies have reported inferior survival outcomes among patients on capecitabine who concomitantly use PPI. Whilst this association is yet to be definitively established, given the prominence of capecitabine as an anti-cancer treatment with multiple indications, these reports have raised concern within the oncological community and drug regulatory bodies worldwide. Currently, the leading mechanism of interaction postulated in these reports has focussed on the pH altering effects of PPI and how this could diminish capecitabine absorption, leading to a decrease in its bioavailability. In this discourse, we endeavour to summarise plausible pharmacokinetic interactions between PPI and capecitabine. We provide a basis for our argument against the currently proposed mechanism of interaction. We also highlight the long-term effects of PPI on health outcomes, and how PPI use itself could lead to poorer outcomes, independent of capecitabine.
      PubDate: 2022-09-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s00280-022-04473-9
       
 
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