A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  First | 1 2 3        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> PHARMACY AND PHARMACOLOGY (Total: 575 journals)
Showing 401 - 253 of 253 Journals sorted alphabetically
Microbial Drug Resistance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Molecular Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Molecular Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Molekul     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Natural Product Communications     Open Access  
Nature Reviews Drug Discovery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 316)
Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal  
NeuroMolecular Medicine     Hybrid Journal  
Neuropharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Neuropsychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Neuropsychopharmacology Reports     Open Access  
Nigerian Journal of Natural Products and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
OA Drug Design & Delivery     Open Access  
OA Medical Hypothesis     Open Access  
Obesity Facts     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Open Pharmacoeconomics & Health Economics Journal     Open Access  
Open Pharmacology Journal     Open Access  
OpenNano     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Orbital - The Electronic Journal of Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Oriental Pharmacy and Experimental Medicine     Partially Free   (Followers: 2)
Pain and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Particulate Science and Technology: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
PDA Journal of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Pediatric Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Pediatric Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pharmaceutica Analytica Acta     Open Access  
Pharmaceutical Biology     Open Access  
Pharmaceutical Care-La Farmacoterapia     Open Access  
Pharmaceutical Chemistry Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Pharmaceutical Development and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Pharmaceutical Executive     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Pharmaceutical Fronts     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Pharmaceutical Historian     Open Access  
Pharmaceutical Journal     Free   (Followers: 8)
Pharmaceutical Journal of Sri Lanka     Open Access  
Pharmaceutical Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology     Hybrid Journal  
Pharmaceutical Patent Analyst     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Pharmaceutical Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 97)
Pharmaceutical Statistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Pharmaceutical Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Pharmaceuticals     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Pharmacia     Open Access  
PharmacoEconomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
PharmacoEconomics German Research Articles     Full-text available via subscription  
PharmacoEconomics Spanish Research Articles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Pharmacogenetics and Genomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Pharmacogenomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pharmacogenomics Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Pharmacognosy Communications     Partially Free  
Pharmacognosy Magazine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pharmacognosy Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pharmacological Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Pharmacological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Pharmacological Research - Modern Chinese Medicine     Open Access  
Pharmacological Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription  
Pharmacology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Pharmacology & Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Pharmacology Research & Perspectives     Open Access  
Pharmacon : Jurnal Farmasi Indonesia     Open Access  
Pharmacopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Pharmacotherapy The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Pharmactuel     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Pharmacy & Pharmacology     Open Access  
Pharmacy Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Pharmacy Practice (Internet)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Pharmakon : Arzneimittel in Wissenschaft und Praxis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
PharmaNutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
PharmaTutor     Open Access  
Pharmazeutische Industrie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Pharmazeutische Zeitung     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Pharmazie in Unserer Zeit (Pharmuz)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Physiology International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Plant Products Research Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Planta Medica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Planta Medica International Open     Open Access  
Prescriber     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Psychiatry and Clinical Psychopharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Pulmonary Pharmacology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
PZ Prisma : Materialien zur Fort- und Weiterbildung     Full-text available via subscription  
Redox Report     Open Access  
Regulatory Mechanisms in Biosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Research & Reviews : A Journal of Drug Design & Discovery     Full-text available via subscription  
Research & Reviews : A Journal of Pharmaceutical Science     Full-text available via subscription  
Research & Reviews : A Journal of Pharmacognosy     Full-text available via subscription  
Research & Reviews : A Journal of Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Research in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Pharmacognosy     Open Access  
Research Results in Pharmacology     Open Access  
Reviews of Physiology, Biochemistry and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Reviews on Clinical Pharmacology and Drug Therapy     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Químico-Farmacéuticas     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Plantas Medicinales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Ciências Farmacêuticas Básica e Aplicada     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Farmaceuticas     Open Access  
Revue de Médecine et de Pharmacie     Full-text available via subscription  
Safety and Risk of Pharmacotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Saudi Pharmaceutical Journal     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Scientia Pharmaceutica     Open Access  
Seminars in Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Seminars in Oncology Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Separation Science plus (SSC plus)     Hybrid Journal  
Side Effects of Drugs Annual     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Skin Pharmacology and Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Substance Abuse : Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Suchttherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Sustainable Chemistry and Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Synfacts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
SynOpen     Open Access  
The Botulinum J.     Hybrid Journal  
The Brown University Psychopharmacology Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Medical Letter     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
The Pink Sheet     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
The Pink Sheet Daily     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Therapeutic Advances in Vaccines     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Therapeutic Drug Monitoring     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Therapeutic Innovation & Regulatory Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Thérapie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
TheScientist     Free   (Followers: 6)
Toxicological & Environmental Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Toxicological Research     Hybrid Journal  
Toxicological Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Toxicology and Industrial Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Toxicology in Vitro     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Toxicology International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Toxicology Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Toxicology Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Toxicon     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Toxicon : X     Open Access  
Toxin Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Translational Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Trends in Peptide and Protein Sciences     Open Access  
Trends in Pharmacological Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research     Open Access  
Ukrainian Biopharmaceutical Journal     Open Access  
Vascular Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
World Mycotoxin Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Yakugaku Zasshi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Phytotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Актуальні питання фармацевтичної та медичної науки та практики     Open Access  
Фармацевтичний часопис     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Planta Medica
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.581
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0032-0943 - ISSN (Online) 1439-0221
Published by Thieme Publishing Group Homepage  [233 journals]
  • Food Interactions Observed in a Pharmacokinetic Investigation Comparing
           Two Marketed Cold Preparations (BNO1016 and ELOM-080) after Administration
           to Beagle Dogs – A Pilot Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Seibel; Jan, Neumann, Astrid, Müller, Anne, Wonnemann, Meinolf
      Abstract: Sinupret extract (BNO 1016) and Gelomyrtol forte (ELOM-080) represent the two top-selling cold remedies in Germany nowadays. Whereas BNO 1016 is a typical immediate release coated tablet, ELOM-080 is an enteric-coated soft gelatin capsule. The latter formulation, however, is at risk of pharmacokinetic interactions affecting absorption, especially in cases of concomitant food intake. In the present pilot study, we investigated the risk of a possible food effect in three male beagle dogs. Single doses of BNO 1016 and ELOM-80 were administered under fasting and fed conditions. Blood was sampled up to 30 h post-administration and plasma concentrations of the characteristic ingredients of BNO 1016 as well as ELOM-080 analytes were determined. Pharmacokinetic parameters focusing on the rate and extent of absorption were derived. BNO 1016 analytes demonstrated a similar course in both the fasted and fed states. ELOM-080 analytes also showed a similar picture in the fasted state. However, lag times (time from administration to first quantifiable time point in plasma) of up to 2 h post-administration with corresponding time to reach maximum concentration (obtained directly from the measured concentration) values of 3 to 4 h were observed, reflecting a longer gastric residence time. In the fed state, ELOM-080 showed significant pharmacokinetic characteristics, suggesting a clear food effect. A major observation was a double peak phenomenon that could be observed in two of three dogs. Furthermore, lag times of some analytes, up to 3 – 4 h, and corresponding time to reach maximum concentration values, up to 6 – 8 h, occurred. In contrast to BNO 1016, these findings suggest that, as with other enteric-coated formulations, there may also be a significant risk for food effects with ELOM-080 in humans.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1821-8690
       
  • In Vitro Investigation on the Effect of Dendrobine on the Activity of
           Cytochrome P450 Enzymes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Wang; Zhiheng, Zhou, Kuilong, Liang, Zhijie, Zhang, Huiting, Song, Yangjie, Yang, Xiaomin, Xiang, Dongguo, Xie, Qingfan
      Abstract: Dendrobine is the major active ingredient of Dendrobium nobile, Dendrobium chrysotoxum, and Dendrobium fimbriatum, all of which are used in traditional Chinese medicine owing to their antitumor and anti-inflammation activities. Hence, investigation on the interaction of dendrobine with cytochrome P450 enzymes could provide a reference for the clinical application of Dendrobium. The effects of dendrobine on cytochrome P450 enzymes activities were investigated in the presence of 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 µM dendrobine in pooled human liver microsomes. The specific inhibitors were employed as the positive control and the blank groups were set as the negative control. The Lineweaver-Burk plots were plotted to characterize the specific inhibition model and obtain the kinetic parameters. The study reveals that dendrobine significantly inhibited the activity of CYP3A4, 2C19, and 2D6 with IC50 values of 12.72, 10.84, and 15.47 µM, respectively. Moreover, the inhibition of CYP3A4 was found to be noncompetitive (Ki = 6.41 µM) and time dependent (KI = 2.541 µM−1, Kinact  = 0.0452 min−1), while the inhibition of CYP2C19 and 2D6 was found to be competitive with the Ki values of 5.22 and 7.78 µM, respectively, and showed no time-dependent trends. The in vitro inhibitory effect of dendrobine implies the potential drug-drug interaction between dendrobine and CYP3A4-, 2C9-, and 2D6-metabolized drugs. Nonetheless, these findings need further in vivo validation.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1806-2935
       
  • Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) Validation: Quantitative Analysis of Indole
           and Oxindole Alkaloids Reveals Chemotypes of Plants and Products

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Manwill; Preston K., Flores-Bocanegra, Laura, Khin, Manead, Raja, Huzefa A., Cech, Nadja B., Oberlies, Nicholas H., Todd, Daniel A.
      Abstract: Many consumers are turning to kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) to self-manage pain and opioid addiction. In the United States, an array of capsules, powders, and loose-leaf kratom products are readily available. Additionally, several online sites supply live kratom plants. A prerequisite to establishing quality control and quality assurance standards for the kratom industry, or understanding how alkaloid levels effect clinical outcomes, is the identification and quantitation of major and minor alkaloid constituents within available products and preparations. To this end, an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry method was developed for the analysis of 8 indole alkaloids (7-hydroxymitragynine, ajmalicine, paynantheine, mitragynine, speciogynine, isopaynantheine, speciociliatine, and mitraciliatine) and 6 oxindole alkaloids (isomitraphylline, isospeciofoleine, speciofoline, corynoxine A, corynoxeine, and rhynchophylline) in US-grown kratom plants and commercial products. These commercial products shared a qualitatively similar alkaloid profile, with 12 – 13 detected alkaloids and high levels of the indole alkaloid mitragynine (13.9 ± 1.1 – 270 ± 24 mg/g). The levels of the other major alkaloids (paynantheine, speciociliatine, speciogynine, mitraciliatine, and isopaynantheine) and the minor alkaloids varied in concentration from product to product. The alkaloid profile of US-grown M. speciosa “Rifat” showed high levels of the indole alkaloid speciogynine (7.94 ± 0.83 – 11.55 ± 0.18 mg/g) and quantifiable levels of isomitraphylline (0.943 ± 0.033 – 1.47 ± 0.18 mg/g). Notably, the alkaloid profile of a US-grown M. speciosa seedling was comparable to the commercial products with a high level of mitragynine (15.01 ± 0.20 mg/g). This work suggests that there are several M. speciosa chemotypes.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1795-5876
       
  • Identification of Anticryptococcal Bornyl Compounds from Verbesina
           turbacensis and Their Structure-Activity Relationships

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Powers; Chelsea N., Mayo, John A., Moriarity, Debra M., Vogler, Bernhard, Setzer, William N., McFeeters, Robert L.
      Abstract: Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that has limited treatment options. Natural product plant extracts offer a cost-effective option for the discovery of new anticryptococcal lead compounds. The acetone bark extract of Verbesina turbacensis was found to potently inhibit C. neoformans and was subjected to bioautography. Two compounds that inhibited the growth of C. neoformans were isolated and displayed minimum inhibitory concentration values of 10 and 310 µg/mL. The compounds were identified as the bornyl hydroxycinnamic esters bornyl caffeate and bornyl ferulate, respectively. To better understand initial structure-activity relationships, anticryptococcal activity was characterized for similar compounds. All compounds were further evaluated for mammalian cell toxicity using the MTT assay with MCF-7 and HEK-293 cell lines. Overall, bornyl caffeate demonstrated promising anticryptococcal potential given its potent inhibition of C. neoformans and low mammalian cell toxicity.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1792-3214
       
  • The Role of Herbal Medicine in Cholangiocarcinoma Control: A Systematic
           Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Na-Bangchang; Kesara, Plengsuriyakarn, Tullayakorn, Karbwang, Juntra
      Abstract: The growing incidence of cholangiocarcinoma (bile duct cancer) and limited treatment options stimulate a pressing demand for research and the development of new chemotherapeutics against cholangiocarcinoma. This study aimed to systematically review herbs and herb-derived compounds or herbal formulations that have been investigated for their anti-cholangiocarcinoma potential. Systematic literature searches were conducted in three electronic databases: PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Scopus. One hundred and twenty-three research articles fulfilled the eligibility critera and were included in the analysis (68 herbs, isolated compounds and/or synthetic analogs, 9 herbal formulations, and 119 compounds that are commonly found in several plant species). The most investigated herbs were Atractylodes lancea (Thunb.) DC. (Compositae) and Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae). Only A. lancea (Thunb.) DC. (Compositae) has undergone the full process of nonclinical and clinical development to deliver the final product for clinical use. The extracts of A. lancea (Thunb.) DC. (Compositae), Garcinia hanburyi Hook.f. (Clusiaceae), and Piper nigrum L. (Piperaceae) exhibit antiproliferative activities against human cholangiocarcinoma cells (IC50
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1676-9678
       
  • New Terpenoids from the Corticioid Fungus Punctularia atropurpurascens and
           their Antimycobacterial Evaluation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Acero; Daniel, Khan, Firoz Shah Tuglak, Medina-Ortiz, Abraham J., Rivero-Cruz, Isabel, Raja, Huzefa A., Flores-Bocanegra, Laura, Fajardo-Hernández, Carlos A., Wan, Baojie, Franzblau, Scott G., Hematian, Shabnam, Figueroa, Mario
      Abstract: Chemical investigation of Punctularia atropurpurascens strain HM1 (Punctulariaceae), a corticioid isolated from a decorticated piece of Quercus bark collected in Bosque de Tlalpan, Mexico City, led to the isolation of a new drimane, 1-α-hydroxy-isodrimenine (1) and a new tetrahydroxy kauranol, 16-hydroxy-phlebia-nor-kauranol (2), together with the known N-phenylacetamide (3). Structures of all compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic and spectrometric methods, and the absolute configuration of 1 and 2 was confirmed via single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The isolated compounds showed modest antimycobacterial activity.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-03-30T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1786-8072
       
  • Pressurized Natural Deep Eutectic Solvent Extraction of Galanthamine and
           related alkaloids from Narcissus pseudonarcissus

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rachmaniah; Orchidea, Wilson, Erica, Choi, Young Hae, Witkamp, Geert-Jan, Verpoorte, Robert
      Abstract: The isolation of a compound from a natural source involves many organic and mostly toxic solvents for extraction and purification. Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents (NADES) have been shown to be efficient options for the extraction of natural products. They have the advantage of being composed of abundantly available common primary metabolites, being non-toxic and environmentally safe solvents. The aim of this study was to develop a NADES-based extraction method for galanthamine, an important therapeutic agent for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. This alkaloid can be produced by synthesis or by extraction from Narcissus bulbs. To develop an efficient extraction method a number of different NADES was first tested for their solubilization capacity of the galanthamine bromide salt. Promising results were obtained for ionic liquids, as well as some amphoteric and acidic NADES. In a two-cycle extraction process the best solvents were tested for the extraction of galanthamine from bulbs. The ionic liquids produced poor yields, and the best results were obtained with some acid and sugar mixtures, among which malic acid – sucrose – water (1:1:5) proved to be the best, showing similar yields to that of the exhaustive Soxhlet extraction with methanol. Furthermore, the NADES was more selective for galanthamine.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1803-3259
       
  • The NO-cGMP-K+ Channel Pathway Participates in Diuretic and
           Cardioprotective Effects of Blutaparon portulacoides in Spontaneously
           Hypertensive Rats

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Terço Leite; Patrícia Regina, Lorençone, Bethânia Rosa, Moreno, Karyne Garcia Tafarelo, Lopes, Katiana Simões, Marques, Aline Aparecida Macedo, Fortini, Clara Soligo, Palozi, Rhanany Alan Calloi, Dalmagro, Mariana, Kassuya, Cândida Aparecida Leite, dos Santos, Ariany Carvalho, Salvador, Marcos José, Gasparotto Junior, Arquimedes
      Abstract: Blutaparon portulacoides is a Brazilian plant species that is widely used in folk medicine. The present study investigated the role of an aqueous extract of B. portulacoides against hypertension in spontaneously hypertensive rats. The aqueous extract of B. portulacoides was obtained from the whole plant. Its chemical profile was analyzed by ultraperformance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The acute toxicity of the aqueous extract of B. portulacoides was evaluated in female Wistar rats. Male 6-month-old spontaneously hypertensive rats then received the aqueous extract of B. portulacoides (30, 100, and 300 mg/kg), hydrochlorothiazide (25 mg/kg), or vehicle once daily for 28 days. On days 1, 14, and 28, the diuretic effects of the aqueous extract of B. portulacoides were evaluated. The role of prostaglandins and the nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate-potassium channel pathway in the diuretic activity of the aqueous extract of B. portulacoides was also investigated. At the end of the treatment, hepatic and renal biochemical markers, serum nitrotyrosine, malondialdehyde, nitrite, and aldosterone levels, and angiotensin-converting enzyme activity were measured. The electrocardiographic profile, blood pressure, and renal vascular reactivity were also assessed. The heart, kidneys, and liver were collected to determine relative organ weight, histopathology, and cardiac morphometry. Caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and several flavonoids were identified in the aqueous extract of B. portulacoides. No signs of toxicity were observed. Prolonged treatment with the aqueous extract of B. portulacoides (300 mg/kg) induced significant diuretic activity by activating the nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate-potassium channel pathway. These effects reduced blood pressure and oxidative stress and prevented renal vascular dysfunction and left ventricular hypertrophy that was induced by hypertension. Overall, the present data suggest that the aqueous extract of B. portulacoides has important diuretic and cardioprotective effects by activation of the nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate-potassium channel pathway.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-03-17T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1690-3566
       
  • Cannabinoids as New Drug Candidates for the Treatment of Glaucoma

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jordan; Erin, Nguyen, Gia-Nam, Piechot, Alexander, Kayser, Oliver
      Abstract: Glaucoma is a blinding eye disease that affects about 70 million patients globally today. The cannabinoid receptors and the endocannabinoid system have found attention for new drug concepts. This review will analyze the potential of cannabinoids, primarily tetrahydrocannabinol, THCVS, and cannabinol, as drug candidates and the role of CB1/CB2 receptors with regard to the pathophysiology of glaucoma. The mode of action of cannabinoids as innovative drug candidates and recent formulations for topical delivery will be discussed. Cannabinoid receptors with associated TRPV channels will be evaluated for their potential as drug targets. Especially the role of the endocannabinoid system (fatty acid amide hydrolase, monoacylglycerol lipase) impacting the prostaglandin network (cyclooxygenase, PGE, PGF) and neuroprotection by inhibition of nitric oxide radical formation is in the focus of this review. Delivery systems, including recent clinical trials, will be analyzed to evaluate the potential for innovative future ophthalmological drugs.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-03-17T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1665-3100
       
  • Morphinan Alkaloids from the Leaves of Alphonsea cylindrica and Their
           Antibacterial Properties

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cho; Kin-Hau, Tan, Siow-Ping, Tan, Hui-Yin, Liew, Sook Yee, Nafiah, Mohd Azlan
      Abstract: A phytochemical study has been carried out on CH2Cl2 extract of Alphonsea cylindrica leaves, resulting in the isolation of three new morphinan alkaloids. They are kinomenine (1), N-methylkinomenine (2), and hydroxymethylkinomenine (3). The structures of these compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis (1D and 2D NMR, IR, UV, HRESIMS) and comparison with the data reported in literature for similar alkaloids. Kinomenine (1) and N-methylkinomenine (2) showed weak inhibition against S. aureus (MIC values of 1 and 2 = 500 µg/mL; pIC50 values in 95% C. I. of: 1 = 2.9 to 3.0; 2 = 2.9 to 3.1), while kinomenine (1) also showed weak inhibition against E. coli (MIC values of 1 = 500 µg/mL; pIC50 value in 95% C. I. of: 1 = 2.9) by broth microdilution method. The results obtained can be used as future referencefor the discovery of morphinans and the potential of A. cylindrica as an antibacterial source.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-03-14T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1797-0548
       
  • Development and evaluation of khellin-loaded microemulgel for
           dermatological applications

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Grifoni; Lucia, Vanti, Giulia, vannucchi, Maria Giuliana, Bergonzi, Maria Camilla, BILIA, Anna Rita
      Abstract: Microemulsions are optically nanosized emulsions, isotropic and thermodynamically stable. They represent versatile drug delivery systems with high potential because can be administered through all routes. In the present study, we report on the formulation of a microemulsion made with glycerol (2.25%), Labrasol (20.25%) vitamin E acetate (2.50%), and water (75.00%), which was developed using the pseudo-ternary phase diagram. Globules of the microemulsion had PdI less than 0.25 and size of about 17 nm, evaluated by DLS analysis. These values did not change after loading khellin, a natural lipophilic molecules with interesting biological activities, used as a model of lipophilic drug. Carboxymethyl cellulose was selected as gelling polymer to obtain a microemulgel. Viscosity was 22,100.0±1555.6 mPas·s at 21±2°C, while it was 8,916.5±118.1 mPas·s at 35±2°C, remaining stable over time. Khellin recovery was 93.16±4.39% and it was unchanged after 4 weeks of storage (93.23±2.14%). The pH was 6.59±0.19 and it was found 6.42±0.34 at the end of the storage lifetime. The diffusion of khellin from the developed formulation was prolonged over an extended period. Based on overall results and due to the dermatological properties of the ingredients of the formulation, the developed microemulgel loaded with khellin is very promising and suitable for skin care applications.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1789-3112
       
  • NO Release Inhibitory Activity of Flavonoids from Aesculus wilsonii Seeds
           through MAPK (p38), NF-κB and STAT3 Cross-talk Signaling Pathways

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cao; Huina, Ruan, Jingya, Han, Yu, Zhao, Wei, Zhang, Ying, Gao, Chang, Wu, Honghua, Ma, Lin, Gao, Xiumei, Zhang, Yi, Wang, Tao
      Abstract: The flavonoid constituents of Aesculus wilsonii, a source of the Chinese medicinal drug Suo Luo Zi, and their in vitro anti-inflammatory effects were investigated. Fifteen flavonoids, including aeswilflavonosides IA–IC (1–3) and aeswilflavonosides IIA–IIE (4–8), along with seven known derivatives were isolated from a seed extract. Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods, acid and alkaline hydrolysis, and calculated electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra. Among them, compounds 3 and 7 possess a 5-[2-(carboxymethyl)-5-oxocyclopent-yl]pent-3-enylate or oleuropeoylate substituent, respectively, which are rarely reported in flavonoids. Compounds 2, 3, 7, and 1215 were found to inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW 264.7 cell lines. In a mechanistic assay, the flavonoid glycosides 2, 3, and 7 reduced the expressions of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) induced by LPS. Further investigations suggest that 2 and 3 down-regulate the protein expression of TNF-α and IL-6 by inhibiting the phosphorylation of p38. Compound 7 was found to reduce the production of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and the secrection of TNF-α and IL-6 through inhibiting nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B (NF-κB) signaling pathway. Compounds 2, 3 and 7 possessed moderate inhibitory activity on the expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Taken together, the data indicate that the flavonoid glycosides of A. wilsonii seeds exhibit NO release inhibitory activity through mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38) [MAPK (p38)], NF-κB and STAT3 cross-talk signaling pathways.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1789-2983
       
  • Chemical constituents of Ulmus minor subsp. minor fruits used in the
           Italian phytoalimurgic tradition and their anti-inflammatory activity
           evaluation*

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: D'Angiolo; Michele, De Leo, Marinella, Camangi, Fabiano, Magliocca, Giorgia, De Tommasi, Nunziatina, Braca, Alessandra, Marzocco, Stefania
      Abstract: The phytochemical investigation of Ulmus minor subsp. minor samaras EtOAc and n-BuOH extracts is reported in this work for the first time, resulting in the isolation and characterization of twenty compounds (1-20) including one new flavan-3-ol (1), one new trihydroxy fatty acid (2), and two glycosylated flavonoids (6-7) whose NMR data are not available in the literature. Structure elucidation of the isolated compounds was obtained by 1D and 2D NMR and HRESIMS data. Prior to further pharmacological investigations, the extracts (100-6.25 µg/mL) and compounds 1-12 (50-5 µM) were tested for their influence on viability of a murine macrophage cell line (J774A.1). Subsequently, extracts and compounds that did not impede viability were studied for their inhibitory effect on some mediators of inflammation in J774A.1 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli (LPS). The NO release and the expression of iNOS and COX-2 were then evaluated and both extracts (50-6.25 µg/mL) and compounds (20-5 µM) significantly inhibited NO release as well as iNOS and COX-2 expression in macrophages. These data highlight the anti-inflammatory properties of several isolated compounds from U. minor samaras supporting its possible alimentary use.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1787-1342
       
  • Evaluation of a Zingiber officinale and Bixa orellana Supplement on
           the Gut Microbiota of Male Athletes: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled
           Trial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Domínguez-Balmaseda; Diego, Bressa, Carlo, Fernández-Romero, Arantxa, de Lucas, Beatriz, Pérez-Ruiz, Margarita, San Juan, Alejandro F., Roller, Marc, Issaly, Nicolas, Larrosa, Mar
      Abstract: The gut microbiota has emerged as a factor that influences exercise performance and recovery. The present study aimed to test the effect of a polyherbal supplement containing ginger and annatto called “ReWin(d)” on the gut microbiota of recreational athletes in a pilot, randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Thirty-four participants who practice physical activity at least three times weekly were randomly allocated to two groups, a ReWin(d) group or a maltodextrin (placebo) group. We evaluated the gut microbiota, the production of short-chain fatty acids, and the serum levels of interleukin-6 and lipopolysaccharide at baseline and after 4 weeks. Results showed that ReWin(d) supplementation slightly increased gut microbiota diversity. Pairwise analysis revealed an increase in the relative abundance of Lachnospira (β-coefficient = 0.013; p = 0.001), Subdoligranulum (β-coefficient = 0.016; p = 0.016), Roseburia (β-coefficient = 0.019; p = 0.001), and Butyricicoccus (β-coefficient = 0.005; p = 0.035) genera in the ReWin(d) group, and a decrease in Lachnoclostridium (β-coefficient = − 0.008; p = 0.009) and the Christensenellaceae R7 group (β-coefficient = − 0.010; p 
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1671-5766
       
  • (+)-Magnolin Enhances Melanogenesis in Melanoma Cells and
           Three-Dimensional Human Skin Equivalent; Involvement of PKA and p38 MAPK
           Signaling Pathways

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Uto; Takuhiro, Tung, Nguyen Huu, Ohta, Tomoe, Shoyama, Yukihiro
      Abstract: Magnoliae Flos is a traditional herbal medicine used to treat nasal congestion associated with headache, empyema, and allergic rhinitis. In our preliminary screening of crude drugs used in Japanese Kampo formulas for melanin synthesis, the methanol extract of Magnoliae Flos was found to exhibit strong melanin synthesis activity. However, there have been no studies evaluating the effects of Magnoliae Flos or its constituents on melanogenesis. The present study aimed to isolate the active compounds from Magnoliae Flos that activate melanin synthesis in melanoma cells and three-dimensional human skin equivalent, and to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying melanin induction. The methanol extract of Magnoliae Flos induced an increase of melanin content in both B16-F1 and HMV-II cells. A comparison of melanin induction by three fractions prepared from the extract showed that the ethyl acetate fraction markedly induced melanin synthesis. Bioassay-guided separation of the ethyl acetate fraction resulted in the isolation of seven lignans (1 – 7). Among them, (+)-magnolin (5) strongly induced melanin synthesis and intracellular tyrosinase activity. Furthermore, the ethyl acetate fraction and 5 clearly induced melanin content in a three-dimensional human skin equivalent. Molecular analysis revealed that 5 triggered the protein expression of tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein-1, and tyrosinase-related protein-2. Further analysis of transcriptional factors and signaling pathways demonstrated that 5 induces the protein expression of tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein-1, and tyrosinase-related protein-2 activated by the protein kinase A- and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathways, leading to cAMP-responsive element-binding protein phosphorylation and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor expression. These findings demonstrate the potential of 5 as a potent therapeutic agent for hypopigmentation.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1740-7325
       
  • Targeted isolation of two new anti-inflammatory and UV-A protective
           dipyrroloquinones from the sponge-associated fungus Aspergillus tamarii
           MCCF102

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Niveditha; Lekshmi, Fu, Peng, Leao, Tiago F., Li, Te, Wang, Tingting, Poulin, Remington X., Gaspar, Lorena Rigo, Naman, C. Benjamin, Thavarool Puthiyedathu, Sajeevan
      Abstract: In following up on observed in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of the organic extract of the marine sponge-derived fungus Aspergillus tamarii MCCF102, two new dipyrrolobenzoquinones, terreusinone B and C (1 and 2), were discovered along with the known analogue, terreusinone (3). The structures of 1–3 were determined by spectroscopic and spectrometric analyses, along with chemical inter-conversion. In vitro testing on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells revealed that 1–3 exhibit anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting nitric oxide production in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 < 1 μM) without any cytotoxicity observed at the same concentrations. Due to this and the UV-A absorptive properties imparted by the highly conjugated structures of these molecules, the potential for using 1–3 or related analogues as natural sunscreen components is suggested. Gene sequencing and informatics biosynthetic gene cluster comparisons were insufficient to confidently elucidate the biosynthetic origins of these compounds, possibly suggesting the occurrence of a gene cluster not detected in the initial sequencing or a non-canonical pathway that should be further investigated.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-02-11T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1769-8480
       
  • NCCIH Priorities for Natural Products Research* *Dedicated to Professor
           Dr. Douglas Kinghorn on the occasion of his 75th birthday

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Still; Patrick, Chen, Wen, Weber, Wendy, Hopp, Craig
      Abstract: The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health is the lead agency within the U.S. Federal Government for complementary and integrative health, which includes natural products. Although NCCIH is one of the smaller components of the NIH, NCCIH funds a disproportionately high percentage of natural products research at NIH. This stems from the fact that NCCIH is the only NIH grant issuing component for which natural products are an explicit part of our mission. This perspective will provide an overview of the NCCIH mission and summarize NCCIH funding priorities for natural products research across basic and mechanistic as well as clinical sectors. These priorities are guided by our recently released Strategic Plan. A primary element of this new Plan is a focus on whole person health including how natural products and multicomponent therapeutic systems which often include them can help move individuals towards health restoration and promotion instead of the frequent focus on the treatment of diseases.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-02-09T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1767-2226
       
  • Quantitative Proteomics Based on iTRAQ Reveal that Nitidine
           Chloride Induces Apoptosis by Activating JNK/c-Jun Signaling in
           Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chen; Shipeng, Liao, Yinan, Lv, Jinyan, Hou, Huaxin, Feng, Jie
      Abstract: The aim of the present study was to investigate the cytotoxic effects and underlying molecular mechanisms of nitidine chloride (NC) in hepatocellular carcinoma cells via quantitative proteomics. MTT assays were used to detect the inhibitory effects of NC in Bel-7402 liver cancer cells, and the number of apoptotic cells was measured by flow cytometry. Quantitative proteomics technology based on iTRAQ was used to discover differential expressed proteins after NC treatment, and bioinformatic techniques were further used to screen potential targets of NC. Molecular docking was applied to evaluate the docking activity of NC with possible upstream proteins, and their expression was detected at the mRNA and protein levels by quantitative reverse transcription PCR and western blotting. NC inhibited the proliferation of Bel-7402 cells after 24 h of treatment and stimulated apoptosis in vitro. The proteomics experiment showed that NC triggers mitochondrial damage in HCC cells and transcription factor AP-1 (c-Jun) may be a potential target of NC (fold change = 4.36 ± 0.23). Molecular docking results revealed the highest docking score of NC with c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), one of the upstream proteins of c-Jun. Moreover, the mRNA and protein expression of c-Jun and JNK were significantly increased after NC treatment (p 
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-02-01T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1676-4307
       
  • TRAIL-sensitizing Cytochalasins from the Endophytic Fungus Phoma
           multirostrata

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ruan; Hanli, Peng, Xiaogang, Ouyang, Qianxi, Pei, Jiao, Chang, Jinling, Qin, Chunlun
      Abstract: Seven undescribed cytochalasins, multirostratins K–Q (2–8), together with one known analogue, cytochalasin Z3 (1), were isolated from the culture of Phoma multirostrata XJ-2-1, an endophytic fungus obtained from the root of Parasenecio albus. Their structures with absolute configurations were determined by 1D and 2D NMR, high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HRESIMS), electronic circular dichroism (ECD), single-crystal X-ray crystallography, and chemical methods. The structure of ascochalasin was revised from Δ13 to Δ21 by detailed analysis of the NMR data and by comparison with the data for 7. In a TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand)-resistance-overcoming experiment, co-treatment of 2 or 6 with TRAIL reduced the cell viability of A549 cells by 30.3 % and 27.5 % at 10 µM, respectively.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-01-31T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1755-5411
       
  • Antiproliferative and microtubule-stabilizing activities of two
           iboga-vobasine bisindoles alkaloids from Tabernaemontana corymbosa in
           colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tan; Chun Hoe, Sim, Dawn Su Yin, Lim, Siew Huah, Mohd Mohidin, Taznim Begam, Mohan, Gokula, Low, Yun-Yee, Kam, Toh-Seok, Sim, Kae Shin
      Abstract: Two iboga-vobasine bisindoles, 16'-decarbomethoxyvoacamine (1) and its 19,20-dihydro derivative, 16'-decarbomethoxydihydrovoacamine (2) from Tabernaemontana corymbosa exhibited potent cytotoxicity against the human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells in our previous studies. Bisindoles 1 and 2 selectively inhibited the growth of HT-29 cells without significant cytotoxicity to normal human colon fibroblasts CCD-18Co. Treatment with bisindoles 1 and 2 suppressed the formation of HT-29 colonies via G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and induction of mitochondrial apoptosis. Owing to its higher antiproliferative activity, bisindole 2 was chosen for the subsequent studies. Bisindole 2 inhibited the formation of HT-29 spheroids (tumor-like cell aggregates) in 3D experiments in a dose-dependent manner, while an in vitro tubulin polymerization assay and molecular docking analysis showed that bisindole 2 is a microtubule-stabilizing agent which is predicted to bind at the β-tubulin subunit at the taxol-binding site. The binding resulted in the generation of ROS, which consequently activated the oxidative stress-related cell cycle arrest and apoptotic pathways, viz., JNK/p38, p21Cip1/Chk1, and p21Cip1/Rb/E2F, as shown by microarray profiling.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-01-31T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1755-5605
       
  • Potential anti-allergic effects of bibenzyl derivatives from liverworts,
           Radula perrottetii

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Asai; Haruka, Kato, Kohichi, Suzuki, Moe, Takahashi, Misato, Miyata, Erika, Aoi, Moeka, Kumazawa, Reika, Nagashima, Fumihiro, Kurosaki, Hiromasa, Aoyagi, Yutaka, Fukuishi, Nobuyuki
      Abstract: The liverwort Radula perrottetii contains various bibenzyl derivatives which are known to possess various biological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. Mast cells (MC) play crucial roles in allergic and inflammatory diseases; thus, inhibition of MC activation is pivotal for the treatment of allergic and inflammatory disorders. We investigated the effects of perrottetin D (perD), isolated from Radula perrottetii, and perD diacetate (Ac-perD) on antigen-induced activation of MCs. Bone marrow–derived MCs (BMMCs) were generated from C57BL/6 mice. The degranulation ratio, histamine release, and the interleukin (IL)-4 and leukotriene B4 productions on antigen-triggered BMMC were investigated. Additionally, the effects of the bibenzyls on binding of IgE to FcεRI were observed by flow cytometry, and signal transduction proteins was examined by Western blot. Furthermore, binding of the bibenzyls to the Fyn kinase domain was calculated. At 10 μM, perD decreased the degranulation ratio (p
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-01-26T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1750-3765
       
  • Systematic identification of the main constituents from Agrimonia pilosa
           Ledeb. and their metabolites in rats using HPLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Song; Mengmeng, Xu, Zhuicheng, Han, Sixuan, Sheng, Xianjie, Chen, Yan, Li, Xinru, Su, Yan, Li, Qin, Shan, Chenxiao, Xie, Tong, Kang, An
      Abstract: Agrimonia pilosa is a perennial herbaceous flowering plant, commonly known as agrimony or hairy agrimony. The dried aerial parts of this species have been widely used for the treatment of acute diarrhea, hemostasis, and other inflammation-related diseases. However, information on the in vivo metabolism of A. pilosa constituents is limited. In this study, the phytochemical profile of A. pilosa was investigated using HPLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS combined with a nontargeted diagnostic ion network analysis strategy. An information-dependent acquisition method with multiple filters was utilized to screen possible prototypes and metabolites in complex biological matrices. Furthermore, various data-processing techniques were applied to analyze possible prototypes and their metabolites in rat plasma, feces, and urine following oral administration of A. pilosa extract. A total of 62 compounds, which belonged to five main structural classes (21 phenols, 22 flavonoids, 6 coumarins, 3 triterpenes, and 10 organic acids), were tentatively identified in A. pilosa. In addition, using our proposed stepwise method, 32 prototypes and 69 metabolites were detected in rat plasma, feces, and urine. The main metabolic pathways after the oral administration of A. pilosa extract were revealed to include methylation, dihydroxylation, demethylation, hydrolysis, sulfation, and glucuronidation. This comprehensive in vivo and in vitro identification of the possible active components in A. pilosa could provide a basis for understanding its various pharmacological activities.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-01-21T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1747-6004
       
  • New Isoquinoline Alkaloids from Paraphaeosphaeria sporulosa F03, a Fungal
           Endophyte Isolated from Paepalanthus planifolius

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: de Amorim; Marcelo R., Paz, Tiago A., Pinto, Luciano da S., Hilário, Felipe, Zanini, Camila L., Aguiar, Anna Caroline C., Silva, Débora E. S., Furlan, Maysa, Guido, Rafael V. C., Bauab, Taís M., Netto, Adelino V. de G., dos Santos, Lourdes C.
      Abstract: As part of our continuing efforts to discover new bioactive compounds from endophytic fungal sources, we have investigated the extract of the Paraphaeosphaeria sporulosa F03 strain. The study led to the isolation of four new 3-methyl-isoquinoline alkaloids (1 – 4) and four known polyketides (5 – 8). The structures of compounds 1 – 4 were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR experiments and HRMS analysis. The absolute configuration of 4 was determined by comparison of its experimental electronic circular dichroism spectrum with calculated data. Compounds 1 – 4 exhibited antifungal activity with minimal inhibitory concentration values ranging from 6.25 – 50 µg/mL against six Candida species but they did not present any cytotoxic activity against the human tumor cell lines A549 (lung), MCF-7 (breast), and HepG2 (hepatocellular). In addition, compound 4 exhibited antiplasmodial activity in the low micromolar range (IC50 = 4 µM).
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-01-19T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1706-4642
       
  • Natural prenylated xanthones as potential inhibitors of PI3k/Akt/mTOR
           pathway in triple negative breast cancer cells

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nguyen; Thi Thu Ha, Qu, Zhao, Nguyen, Van Tuyen, Nguyen, Thanh Tra, Le, Thi Tu Anh, Chen, Sibao, Ninh, Son The
      Abstract: Three prenylated xanthones, garcinone E (1), bannaxanthone D (2) and bannanxanthone E (3) were isolated from the leaves of Garcinia mckeaniana Graib. Their structures were elucidated by spectral methods and compared with literature data. To evaluate their anti-proliferative effects in tumor cells, firstly, cisplatin was used as a positive control and the effects of compound 1-3 were determined by performing MTT assay in MDA-MB-231, CNE-2 and A549 cancer cells. The results showed compound 1-3 exhibited stronger inhibitory effect than cisplatin in MDA-MB-231. Further effects of compound 1-3 in TNBC MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells were examined by performing cell cycle and apoptosis assays. The results indicated that compound 1-3 had ability to arrest cell cycle at G2/M phase and induce apoptosis. Furthermore, compound 2 significantly down-regulated PI3K, Akt and mTOR levels in both total proteins and phosphorylated form, which is its potential anti-cancer mechanism. These findings indicated that those prenylated xanthones might serve as promising leading compounds for the development of anticancer drug for TNBC.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-12-28T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1728-5166
       
  • Cytochalasan Alkaloids as TRAIL Sensitizers from an Endophytic Fungus
           Chaetomium sp.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ruan; Hanli, Gao, Ying, Mao, Ruihua, Liu, Ye, Zhou, Ming
      Abstract: Two new cytochalasans with a rare 6/6/5/5/7 pentacyclic ring system, named chaetoconvosins C−D (1−2), together with two known congeners (3−4), were isolated from the fermentation of an endophytic fungus, Chaetomium sp. SG-01, harbored in the fibrous roots of Schisandra glaucescens Diels. Their structures including the absolute configuration were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic (HRESIMS, NMR, and ECD) and X-ray crystallographic analyses. The TRAIL sensitivity of 1–4 in a TRAIL-resistant HT29 colorectal cancer cell line was evaluated, which revealed that co-treatment of 1–4 at 50 µM with TRAIL (150 ng/mL) reduced the HT29 cell viability by 19.0%, 24.1%, 17.9%, and 15.5%, respectively, compared to treatment with 1–4 alone.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-12-28T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1728-4963
       
  • Antimicrobial Formulation of Chrysopogon zizanioides Essential Oil in an
           Emulsified Lotion for Acne

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kurrimboccus; Fadilah, Orchard, Ané, Danckwerts, Michael Paul, van Vuuren, Sandy
      Abstract: Acne is a skin condition arising from excess sebum production and microbial overgrowth within the pilosebaceous unit. Several commercial essential oils have shown promising activity against acne-related pathogens. Due to their volatility and thermal instability, the formulation of essential oils into commercial products remains a pharmaceutical challenge. Thus, this study aimed to develop a viable anti-acne topical treatment as an oil-in-water emulsified lotion to overcome these challenges. Chrysopogon zizanioides (vetiver) displayed noteworthy antimicrobial activity with a mean minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.14 mg/mL against Cutibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Streptococcus pyogenes. Emulsified lotions containing C. zizanioides were developed through the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance approach. At tested hydrophilic-lipophilic balance values of 8, 9, and 10, C. zizanioides emulsified lotions displayed maximum stability at hydrophilic-lipophilic balance 9 with a minimum change in mean droplet size and polydispersity index of 20.61 and 33.33%, respectively, over 84 days. The C. zizanioides emulsified lotion at optimum hydrophilic-lipophilic balance 9 completely inhibited the growth of C. acnes and killed S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and S. pyogenes within 24 h. Additionally, the lotion retained antimicrobial activity against these test micro-organisms over the 84-day stability test period. Thus, the C. zizanioides emulsified lotion demonstrated physical stability and antimicrobial efficiency, making it an ideal natural product anti-acne treatment.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-12-28T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1699-3284
       
  • Anti-inflammatory Constituents from Caulis Trachelospermi

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Song; Hongzhi, Tan, Jinni, Ma, Ruijing, Kennelly, Edward J, Tan, Qingang
      Abstract: Caulis Trachelospermi, the stems with leaves of Trachelospermum jasminoides, is a well-known herbal drug of the Apocynaceae family recorded in the Chinese pharmacopeia and used for the treatment of inflammation-related diseases by ethnic minorities of China. The mechanism of anti-inflammatory activity and responsible constituents of T. jasminoides have not been well elucidated in previous studies. Preliminary investigation showed that both the water and the ethyl ester extracts of T. jasminoides exhibited potent inhibitory activity on nitric oxide (NO) production using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages. Phytochemical investigation on these extracts afforded 23 compounds, including three new compounds (1 –3) identified on the basis of spectroscopic and mass spectrometric data. Anti-inflammatory bioassay showed that compounds 17, 18, 22, and 23 inhibited significantly the production of NO in a concentration-dependent manner. Further studies indicated that compound 23 inhibited significantly TNF-α and IL-6 produced by LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells with good selectivity, as well as protein expression of iNOS in RAW 264.7 cells. These chemical constituents may contribute to the anti-inflammatory potential of T. jasminoides.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-12-28T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1712-8209
       
  • Cyclooxygenase Enzyme and Lipid Peroxidation Inhibitory Terpenoids and
           Steroidal compounds as Major Constituents in Cleome viscosa Leaves

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dissanayake; Amila Abishake, Georges, Kambou, Nair, Muraleedharan G.
      Abstract: Bioassay guided study of Cleome viscosa Linn. (Cleomaceae) leaves led to the isolation of a new cembrenoid diterpene (1) and three known compounds (2-4) from the hexane extract. The chemical structures of these compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic methods such as NMR (1D and 2D), HRMS and IR and identified and afforded compound 1, malabaric acid (2), stigmast-4-en-3-one (3) and stigmast-4-ene-3,6-dione (4). This is the first report of compounds 1 and 2 from C. viscosa Linn. Isolates were evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity using in vitro cyclooxygenase enzyme (COX-1 and -2) inhibitory assays. The novel cembrenoid diterpene (1) exhibited IC50 values of 8.4 μM for COX-1 enzyme and 45.2 μM for COX-2 enzyme, respectively. Similarly, malabaric acid (2) exhibited IC50 values of 11.5 μM for COX-1 enzyme and 46.9 μM for COX-2 enzyme, respectively. Their inhibitory activities were in par with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen. Sterols 3 and 4 gave IC50 values of 62.6 and 67.9 μM, respectively for COX-1 enzyme while indicating weak COX-2 enzyme inhibition. Lipid peroxidation inhibitory (LPO) and MTT assays were used to determine antioxidant activity of these compounds. Compounds 1-4 showed LPO inhibition with IC50 values between 82 and 100 µM and moderate antioxidant activity in the MTT assay. Biological activities reported for these compounds are for the first time and it support anecdotal medicinal claims of C. viscosa Linn. leaves.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-12-25T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1728-2347
       
  • Microbiological and clinical effects of a Proanthocyanidin-enriched
           extract from Rumex acetosa in periodontally healthy carriers of
           Porphyromonas gingivalis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Selbach; Sabine, Klocke, Astrid, Peters, Ulrike, Beckert, Sabine, Watt, Rory Munro, Tong, Raymond, Flemmig, Thomas Frank, Hensel, Andreas, Beikler, Thomas
      Abstract: Rumex acetosa significantly inhibits the adhesion of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) to eukaryotic host cells in vitro. The objective of this randomized placebo-controlled pilot-trial was to analyze effects of a mouth rinse containing 0.8 % (w/w) of a quantified proanthocyanidin-enriched extract from Rumex acetosa (RA1) on microbiological, clinical, and cytological parameters in systemically healthy individuals without history of periodontitis, harboring P.g. intraorally.35 subjects received a supragingival debridement (SD) followed by mouth rinsing (3 times daily) with either RA1 mouth rinse solution (test) or placebo (control) for 7 days as adjunct to routine oral hygiene. Supragingival biofilm samples were taken at screening visit, baseline (BL), 2, 4, 7 and 14 days after SD. P.g. and 11 other oral microorganisms were detected and quantified by rtPCR. Changes in the oral microbiota composition of one test and one control subject were assessed via high throughput 16S rRNS gene amplicon sequencing. Approximal Plaque Index (API) and the modified Sulcular Bleeding Index (SBI) were assessed at BL, 7- and 14-days following SD. Brush biopsies were taken at BL and 14 d following SD.Intergroup comparisons revealed no significant microbiological, cytological, and clinical differences at any timepoint. However, a significant reduction in SBI at day 14 (p=0.003) and API at day 7 (p=0.02) and day 14 (p=0.009) was found in the test group by intragroup comparison. No severe adverse events were observed.The results indicate that RA1 mouth rinse is safe but does not seem to inhibit colonization of P.g. or improve periodontal health following SD.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-12-25T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1728-2249
       
  • Undescribed C-Glycosylflavones from Corn Silk and Potential
           Anti-inflammatory Activity Evaluation of Isolates

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sarfare; Satish, Khan, Shabana Iqrar, zulfiqar, fazila, Radhakrishnan, Srivedavyasasri, Ali, Zulfiqar, Khan, Ikhlas A
      Abstract: Phytochemical investigation of corn silk resulted in isolation and characterization of four flavone C-glycosides, chrysoeriol 6-C-β-oliopyranosyl-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), 3′-methoxycassiaoccidentalin A (2), chrysoeriol 6-C-β-boivinopyranosyl-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), and ax-4"-OH-3′-methoxymaysin (4), a triterpenoid, friedelin (5), two sterols, (22E)-5,8-epidioxyergosta-6,22-dien-3β-ol (6) and 6β-hydroxystigmasta-4,22-diene-3-one (7), and a mixture of β-sitosterol and stigmasterol. Compounds 1 and 2 were previously undescribed. Structure elucidation of the isolated compounds was attained using spectral data including 1D and 2D NMR and HRESIMS. Compounds 1, 2, 5, and 6 inhibited iNOS activity in LPS-induced macrophages and decreased nitrite levels by 68.64+4.46, 65.67 + 6.47, 88.50 + 0.50, and 94.00 + 4.00 %, respectively, at 50 µM. Compound 5 also showed inhibition of NF-κB (51.00+1.50 %). Compounds 1 and 2 induced NAG-1 activity in chondrocytes by 1.80 + 0.05 and 2.00 + 0.13 fold, respectively. The extract of corn silk, however, did not exhibit inhibition of iNOS or NF-κB but induced NAG-1 by 1.80+ 0.51 fold.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-12-24T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1728-1347
       
  • Chemical Principles of Boophone, Nerine, Crossyne, Clivia,
           Cryptostephanus, Haemanthus and Scadoxus of the South African
           Amaryllidaceae and Their Biological Properties

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nair; Jerald J., van Staden, Johannes
      Abstract: The Amaryllidaceae features prominently amongst bulbous flowering plant families. Accommodating about a third of its species, South Africa affords a sound basis for Amaryllidaceae plant research. Boophone, Nerine, Crossyne, Clivia, Cryptostephanus, Haemanthus and Scadoxus have been well-represented in such endeavors. The account herein summarizes the studies undertaken between 2013 – 2020 on these genera in regards to their chemical and biological characteristics. A total of 136 compounds comprising 63 alkaloids and 73 non-alkaloid entities were described during this period from eighteen members of the title genera. The alkaloids were reflective of the structural diversity found in eight isoquinoline alkaloid groups of the Amaryllidaceae. Of these, the crinane (29 compounds), lycorane and homolycorine (11 compounds each) groups were the most-represented. The non-alkaloid substances were embracive of the same number of unrelated groups including, acids, phenolics, flavonoids and triterpenoids. A wide variety of assays were engaged to ascertain the biological activities of the isolated compounds, notably in regards to cancer and motorneuron-related diseases. There were also attempts made to determine the antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of some of the substances. New information has also emerged on the herbicidal, insecticidal and plant growth regulatory effects of selected alkaloid principles. Coupled to the biological screening measures were in instances probes made to establish the molecular basis to some of the activities, particularly in relation to cancer and Parkinsonʼs disease.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-12-17T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1724-6244
       
  • Establishment of the Carrot-Made LTB-Syn Antigen Cell Line in Shake Flask
           and Airlift Bioreactor Cultures

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Carreño-Campos; Christian, Arevalo-Villalobos, Jaime I., Villarreal, María Luisa, Ortiz-Caltempa, Anabel, Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio
      Abstract: Carrot (Daucus carota) cells have been used to effectively manufacture recombinant biopharmaceuticals such as cytokines, vaccines, and antibodies. We generated the carrot cell line Z4, genetically modified to produce the LTB-Syn antigen, which is a fusion protein proposed for immunotherapy against synucleinopathies. In this work, the Z4 cell suspension line was cultivated to produce the LTB-Syn protein in a 250 mL shake flask and 2 L airlift bioreactor cultures grown for 45 and 30 days, respectively. Maximum biomass was obtained on day 15 in both the airlift bioreactor (35.00 ± 0.04 g/L DW) and shake flasks (17.00 ± 0.04 g/L DW). In the bioreactor, the highest LTB-Syn protein yield (1.52 ± 0.03 µg/g FW) was obtained on day 15; while the same occurred on day 18 for shake flasks (0.92 ± 0.02 µg/g FW). LTB-Syn protein levels were analyzed by GM1-ELISA and western blot. PCR analysis confirmed the presence of the transgene in the Z4 line. The obtained data demonstrate that the carrot Z4 cell suspension line grown in airlift bioreactors shows promise for a scale-up cultivation producing an oral LTB-Syn antigen.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1677-4135
       
  • Raw and wine processed Schisandra chinensis regulate NREM-sleep and
           alleviate cardiovascular dysfunction associated with insomnia by
           modulating HPA Axis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Su; Dan, Luo, Jian, Ge, Junqi, Liu, Yali, Jin, Chen, Xu, Pengfei, Zhang, Ruowen, Zhu, Genhua, Yang, Ming, Ai, Zhifu, Song, Yonggui
      Abstract: Clinical studies have shown that insomnia and anxiety are usually accompanied by cardiovascular dysfunction. In traditional Chinese medicine, Schisandra chinensis (SC) and wine processed Schisandra chinensis (WSC) are mainly used for the treatment of dysphoria, palpitation and insomnia. However, little attention was paid to its mechanism. In this study, we monitored the effect of SC and WSC on the nervous system and cardiovascular system of free-moving rats in the real-time. Our results show that SC and WSC can alleviate cardiovascular dysfunction while promoting sleep, and we further explored their potential mechanisms. HPLC-QTOF-MS was used for the quality control of chemical components in SC and WSC. Data sciences international (DSI) physiological telemetry system was applied to collect the electroencephalogram (EEG), electrocardiogram (ECG) and other parameters of free-moving rats to understand the effects of long-term intake of SC and WSC on rats. The content of Cortisol (CORT), neurotransmitters and amino acids in rat pituitary and hypothalamus were analyzed by UPLC-MS to determine the activity of HPA axis. The expression of melatonin receptor MT1 was analyzed by immunofluorescence technique. Our results suggested that SC and WSC may play the role of promoting sleep by increasing the expression level of melatonin receptor MT1 in hypothalamus, and modulate the activity of HPA axis by regulating the levels of the related neurotransmitters and amino acid, so as to improve the abnormal cardiovascular system of rats. This study may provide theoretical support for explicating the advantages of SC and other phytomedicines in the treatment of insomnia.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-12-15T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1721-4971
       
  • Phloridzin Highly Accumulated in Malus rockii Rehder and Its Structure
           Revision and Hypolipidemic Activity

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lang; Li-Juan, Wang, Min, Lei, Chang, Shen, Yi, Zhu, Qi-Jie, Diao, Hong-Mei, Chen, Hao, Shen, Lei, Dong, Xiang, Jiang, Bei, Xiao, Chao-Jiang
      Abstract: Phloridzin is a lead compound of the prestigious antidiabetic gliflozins. The present study found that phloridzin highly accumulated in Malus rockii Rehder. The content of phloridzin in M. rockii was the highest among wild plants, with the percentage of 15.54% in the dry leaves. The structure of phloridzin was revised by proton exchange experiments and extensive 2D NMR spectra. Phloridzin exhibited significant hypolipidemic activity in golden Syrian hamsters maybe by increasing the expression of CYP7A1, at the doses of 50 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg. The total performance of anti-hyperlipidemic effect of phloridzin may be superior to that of lovastatin, though lovastatin was more active than phloridzin. In addition, phloridzin exhibited moderate antimalarial activity with inhibition ratio of 31.3 ± 10.9% at a dose of 25 mg/kg/day, and showed moderate analgesic activity with 28.0% inhibition at a dose of 50 mg/kg.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-12-07T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1716-0958
       
  • In Vitro and In Vivo Antiglycation Effects of Connarus ruber Extract

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Takenokuchi; Mariko, Matsumoto, Kinuyo, Nitta, Yuko, Takasugi, Rumi, Inoue, Yukari, Iwai, Michi, Kadoyama, Keiichi, Yoshida, Kazutoshi, Takano-Ohmuro, Hiromi, Taniguchi, Taizo
      Abstract: Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) of the Maillard reaction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications. Connarus ruber has been used as a folk remedy for several diseases, including diabetes; however, its underlying mechanism has not yet been investigated. This study investigated the effects of C. ruber extract against glycation on collagen-linked AGEs in vitro and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ-DM rats) in vivo. The antiglycation activities of C. ruber extract and aminoguanidine (AG) were examined using a collagen glycation assay kit. Nonfluorescent AGE, Nε-carboxymethyl lysine (CML), Nω-carboxymethyl arginine, and Nε-carboxyethyl lysine levels were measured via electrospray ionization-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The effect of the extract on the cytotoxicity of methylglyoxal (MG), a precursor of AGEs, was examined in HL60 cells. STZ-DM rats were treated with the extract for 4 wk, and the effect was assessed using biochemical markers in the serum and CML-positive cells in renal tissues. C. ruber extract dose-dependently inhibited the glycation of collagen and formation of nonfluorescent AGEs, which was comparable to AG, and it significantly attenuated MG-induced cytotoxicity in HL60 cells. Furthermore, the glycated albumin levels in STZ-DM rats decreased, the increase in serum lipid levels was reversed, and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that CML deposition in the glomerulus of STZ-DM rats significantly decreased. Although further studies are needed, C. ruber could be a potential therapeutic for preventing and progressing many pathological conditions, including diabetes.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-12-03T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1690-3528
       
  • TCQA, A Natural Caffeoylquinic Acid Derivative Attenuates H2O2-Induced
           Neuronal Apoptosis by Suppressing Phosphorylation of MAPKs Signaling
           Pathway

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yang; Yue, Ding, Yufang, Gao, Huan, Jiang, Xiaowen, Zhao, Qingchun
      Abstract: 1,3,5-Tri-O-caffeoyl quinic acid is a caffeoylquinic acid derivative isolated from the roots of Arctium lappa L. Our previous studies have revealed that the ethyl acetate extract of the roots of A. lappa L. and the caffeoylquinic acids contained in it possess antioxidant properties, especially 1,3,5-tri-O-caffeoyl quinic acid. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of 1,3,5-tri-O-caffeoyl quinic acid against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress and explore the underlying mechanism. We found that 1,3,5-tri-O-caffeoyl quinic acid prevented the decline of cell viability and excessive release of lactate dehydrogenase induced by hydrogen peroxide. In addition, Hoechst 33 342 staining and Annexin V-PI double staining showed that 1,3,5-tri-O-caffeoyl quinic acid inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced neuronal cell apoptosis. 1,3,5-Tri-O-caffeoyl quinic acid reduced the excessive production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, decreased the malondialdehyde content, and improved the activity of superoxide dismutase. Furthermore, 1,3,5-tri-O-caffeoyl quinic acid restored the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in SH-SY5Y cells induced by hydrogen peroxide. 1,3,5-Tri-O-caffeoyl quinic acid downregulated the overexpression of proapoptotic proteins, including Bax, cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved caspase-3 as well as promoted the expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. Moreover, the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases induced by hydrogen peroxide was inhibited by 1,3,5-tri-O-caffeoyl quinic acid. Pretreatment with 1,3,5-tri-O-caffeoyl quinic acid also promoted the activation of phosphorylated Akt. Taken together, these findings suggest that 1,3,5-tri-O-caffeoyl quinic acid exerts protective effects against hydrogen peroxide-induced neuronal apoptosis. In addition, inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and the activation of Akt are implicated in the antioxidant activity of 1,3,5-tri-O-caffeoyl quinic acid, giving new insight in searching for a compound with antioxidant activity for the treatment of oxidative stress-associated neurological diseases.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-12-03T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1683-6361
       
  • In vitro cytotoxic and leishmanicidal activity of isolated and
           semisynthetic ent-pimaranes from Aldama arenaria

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Oliveira; Adriana S. S., Conrado, Gabrielly Galdino, Grazzia, Nathalia, Miguel, Danilo Ciccone, Franchi Junior, Gilberto, Garcia, Vera
      Abstract: Two pimaranes ent-pimara -8(14),15-dien-19-oic acid (1) and ent-8(14),15-pimaradien-3β-ol (2), isolated from Aldama arenaria, and six semi-synthetic derivatives methyl ester of the ent-pimara-8(14),15-dien-19-oic acid (3), ent-pimara-8(14),15-dien-19-ol (4), acetate of ent-pimara-8(14),15-dien-19-ol (5), ent-pimara-8(14),15-dien-19-ol succinic acid (6), acetate of ent-8(14),15-pimaradien-3β-ol (7), ent-8(14),15-pimaradien-3β-ol succinic acid (8) were evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxic activities to childhood leukemia cell lines and leishmanicidal activity against the parasite Leishmania amazonensis. Among these compounds, 1 to 6 presented moderate cytotoxic activity, with compound 4 being the most active (GI50 of 2.6 µM for the HL60 line) and the derivatives 7 and 8 inactive. Against the parasite Leishmania amazonensis, the most promising derivative was acetate of ent-pimara-8(14),15-dien-19-ol (5), with EC50 of 20.1 µM, selectivity index of 14.3, and significant reduction in the parasite load. Pimarane analogues 1, ent-pimara-8(14),15-dien-19-oic acid, and 2, ent-8(14),15-pimaradien-3β-ol, presented different activities, corroborating the application of such molecules as prototypes for the design of other derivatives that have greater cytotoxic or leishmanicidal potential.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-11-28T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1708-2081
       
  • Beyond the Psychoactive Effects of Ayahuasca: Cultural and Pharmacological
           Relevance of Its Emetic and Purging Properties

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Politi; Matteo, Tresca, Giorgia, Menghini, Luigi, Ferrante, Claudio
      Abstract: The herbal preparation ayahuasca has been an important part of ritual and healing practices, deployed to access invisible worlds in several indigenous groups in the Amazon basin and among mestizo populations of South America. The preparation is usually known to be composed of two main plants, Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis, which produce both hallucinogenic and potent purging and emetic effects; currently, these are considered its major pharmacological activities. In recent decades, the psychoactive and visionary effect of ayahuasca has been highly sought after by the shamanic tourism community, which led to the popularization of ayahuasca use globally and to a cultural distancing from its traditional cosmological meanings, including that of purging and emesis. Further, the field of ethnobotany and ethnopharmacology has also produced relatively limited data linking the phytochemical diversity of ayahuasca with the different degrees of its purging and emetic versus psychoactive effects. Similarly, scientific interest has also principally addressed the psychological and mental health effects of ayahuasca, overlooking the cultural and pharmacological importance of the purging and emetic activity. The aim of this review is therefore to shed light on the understudied purging and emetic effect of ayahuasca herbal preparation. It firstly focuses on reviewing the cultural relevance of emesis and purging in the context of Amazonian traditions. Secondly, on the basis of the main known phytochemicals described in the ayahuasca formula, a comprehensive pharmacological evaluation of their emetic and purging properties is presented.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-11-18T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1675-3840
       
  • Cyanogenesis in Aralia spinosa (Araliaceae)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lechtenberg; Matthias, Sendker, Jandirk, Kastner, Lisa, Hensel, Andreas
      Abstract: A systematic survey of Aralia spinosa (Araliaceae), covering an entire growing season and including aboveground organs at various developmental stages, revealed that only about half of all samples collected showed cyanogenesis. Cyanogenesis was detected in inflorescences and leaves but is apparently restricted to certain harvest times or developmental stages. The structurally unusual triglochinin, characterized by a hex-2-enedioic acid partial structure, was the only cyanogenic glycoside detected. This is the first description of triglochinin in this species and in the family of Araliaceae. Triglochinin is biogenetically derived from tyrosine, which is in good agreement with the few cyanogenic glycosides previously detected in members of the Araliaceae family. Triglochinin was identified, characterized, and quantified by modern chromatographic methods, and the amount of enzymatically releasable hydrocyanic acid was determined qualitatively and quantitatively. Two isomers of triglochinin were detected chromatographically at minor levels. The isomeric pattern agreed well with literature data from other triglochinin-containing plants. This was confirmed in the two species, Triglochin maritima and Thalictrum aquilegiifolium, which were comparatively studied. In the case of A. spinosa, inflorescence buds harvested in July showed the highest content of triglochinin, just under 0.2% on a dry weight basis. The detection of triglochinin adds to the knowledge of toxicological properties and the dereplication of U(H)PLC/MS² data provides a comprehensive phytochemical profile of A. spinosa.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-11-16T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1671-5525
       
  • cis-Aconitic Acid, a Constituent of Echinodorus grandiflorus Leaves,
           Inhibits Antigen-Induced Arthritis and Gout in Mice

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: de Oliveira; Diego Pinto, Garcia, Eliana de Faria, de Oliveira, Mariana Assíria, Candido, Luiza C. M., Coelho, Fernanda M., Costa, Vivian Vasconcelos, Batista, Nathália Vieira, Queiroz-Junior, Celso Martins, Brito, Larissa Froede, Sousa, Lirlândia Pires, Souza, Daniele G., Amaral, Flávio Almeida, de Pádua, Rodrigo Maia, Teixeira, Mauro Martins, Braga, Fernão Castro
      Abstract: cis-Aconitic acid is a constituent from the leaves of Echinodorus grandiflorus, a medicinal plant traditionally used in Brazil to treat inflammatory conditions, including arthritic diseases. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-arthritic effect of cis-aconitic acid in murine models of antigen-induced arthritis and monosodium urate-induced gout. The possible underlying mechanisms of action was evaluated in THP-1 macrophages. Oral treatment with cis-aconitic acid (10, 30, and 90 mg/kg) reduced leukocyte accumulation in the joint cavity and C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 1 and IL-1β levels in periarticular tissue. cis-Aconitic acid treatment reduced joint inflammation in tissue sections of antigen-induced arthritis mice and these effects were associated with decreased mechanical hypernociception. Administration of cis-aconitic acid (30 mg/kg p. o.) also reduced leukocyte accumulation in the joint cavity after the injection of monosodium urate crystals. cis-Aconitic acid reduced in vitro the release of TNF-α and phosphorylation of IκBα in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated THP-1 macrophages, suggesting that inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B activation was an underlying mechanism of cis-aconitic acid-induced anti-inflammatory effects. In conclusion, cis-aconitic acid has significant anti-inflammatory effects in antigen-induced arthritis and monosodium urate-induced arthritis in mice, suggesting its potential for the treatment of inflammatory diseases of the joint in humans. Additionally, our findings suggest that this compound may contribute to the anti-inflammatory effect previously reported for E. grandiflorus extracts.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-11-11T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1676-4371
       
  • Rosmarinic Acid Suppresses Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression in
           Apolipoprotein E-deficient Mice

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bian; Huimiao, Wang, Yang, Wu, Peng, Han, Na, Wang, Linlin, Li, Xue, Zhang, XianJing, Cho, Kenka, Zhang, Yongyu, Yin, Jun, Jiang, Baohong
      Abstract: An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a life-threatening cardiovascular disorder caused by dissection and rupture. No effective medicine is currently available for the > 90% of patients whose aneurysms are below the surgical threshold. The present study investigated the impact of rosmarinic acid, salvianolic acid C, or salvianolic acid B on experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms. Abdominal aortic aneurysms were induced in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice via infusion of angiotensin II for 4 wks. Rosmarinic acid, salvianolic acid C, salvianolic acid B, or doxycycline as a positive control was provided daily through intraperitoneal injection. Administration of rosmarinic acid was found to decrease the thickness of the aortic wall, as determined by histopathological assay. Rosmarinic acid also exhibited protection against elastin fragmentation in aortic media and down-regulated cell apoptosis and proliferation in the aortic adventitia. Infiltration of macrophages, T lymphocytes, and neutrophils in aortic aneurysms was found, especially at the aortic adventitia. Rosmarinic acid, salvianolic acid C, or salvianolic acid B inhibited the infiltration on macrophages specifically, but these compounds did not influence T lymphocytes and neutrophils. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor significantly increased in aortic aneurysms. Rosmarinic acid and salvianolic acid C decreased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in media, and rosmarinic acid also tended to reduce migration inhibitory factor expression. Further then, partial least squares-discriminate analysis was used to classify metabolic changes among different treatments. Rosmarinic acid affected most of the metabolites in the biosynthesis of the citrate cycle, fatty acid pathway significantly. Our present study on mice demonstrated that rosmarinic acid inhibited multiple pathological processes, which were the key features important in abdominal aortic aneurysm formation. Further study on rosmarinic acid, the novel candidate for aneurysmal therapy, should be undertaken to determine its potential for clinical use.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-11-05T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1659-3908
       
  • Two New Cytotoxic Maytansinoids Targeting Tubulin from Trewia nudiflora

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lei; Chun, Li, Ya-Nan, Li, Jia-Nan, Zhou, Yu-Bo, Cui, Ming-Jun, Fu, Kai-Cong, Li, Jia, Hou, Ai-Jun
      Abstract: Two new maytansinoids, N-methyltreflorine (1) and methyltrewiasine (2), were isolated from the dried fruits of Trewia nudiflora, together with three known congeners (3 – 5). Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, and the absolute configuration of 1 and 2 was determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis. Compounds 1 – 5 exhibited strong cytotoxicity against human tumor cell lines, including HeLa, MV-4 – 11, and MCF-7, with IC50 values ranging from 0.12 to 11 nM. Compounds 1 and 4 also showed inhibitory activity against the MCF-7/ADR cell line with IC50 values of 13 and 28 nM, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 significantly inhibited tubulin polymerization in vitro with IC50 values of 3.6 and 3.2 µM, respectively.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-10-29T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1530-1128
       
  • Chemical Analysis by LC-MS of Cannabis sativa Root Samples from Northeast
           Brazil and Evaluation of Antitussive and Expectorant Activities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Menezes; Pedro Modesto Nascimento, Pereira, Emanuella Chiara Valença, Lima, Kátia Simoni Bezerra, Silva, Bismarques Augusto Oliveira da, Brito, Mariana Coelho, Araújo, Tarcísio Cícero de Lima, Neto, Janaine Almeida, Ribeiro, Luciano Augusto de Araujo, Silva, Fabrício Souza, Rolim, Larissa Araújo
      Abstract: Cannabis sativa is a millenary medicinal plant. However, contrary to worldwide paradigm-shifting, countries like Brazil still prohibit C. sativa cultivation and its medicinal use, even though many populations use aerial parts and roots of this plant for healthcare. As such, the objective of this work was to identify substances in the samples of the C. sativa roots, tracing a correlation with antitussive and expectorant effects. Therefore, samples of C. sativa roots were donated by the Polícia Federal Brasileira, and its aqueous extract (AECsR) was prepared with subsequent lyophilization, to maintain the material stability. After that, the material was analyzed by LC-MS to observe its chemical profile. Four samples (AECsR-A, B, C, and D) were tested in animal models of citric acid-induced cough (0.4 M) and phenol red expectoration (500 mg/kg). Using LC-MS it was possible to identify 5 molecules in C. sativa roots: p-coumaroyltyramine, tetrahydrocannabinol-C4, feruoiltyramine, anhydrocanabisativine, and cannabisativine. In experimental protocols, male mice (Mus musculus) were treated with samples of AECsR at doses of 12.5, 25, or 50 mg/kg regardless of the pharmacological test. In these tests, all samples showed the potential to treat cough and promote fluid expectoration, differing only in the dose at which these effects were observed. Therefore, the data showed that the C. sativa roots of the Brazilian Northeast showed antitussive and expectorant effects, even with intense secondary metabolitesʼ variation, which alters its potency, but not its effect. This highlights the importance of this medicinal plant for future therapy and corroborates to traditional use.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-10-29T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1628-2299
       
  • New Perspectives for the Use of Potentilla alba Rhizomes to Treat Thyroid
           Gland Impairments

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Augustynowicz; Daniel, Podolak, Magdalena, Latté, Klaus Peter, Tomczyk, Michał
      Abstract: Potentilla alba is a valuable medicinal plant that has been highly praised even before its first appearance in herbal books; however, it has now been forgotten in Western Europe. Currently, this species is used in Eastern Europe as a remedy to treat dysentery and various thyroid gland dysfunctions. The present review summarizes the advances in the phytochemical, pharmacological, and toxicological research related to this plant species. Clinical trials that have been conducted to date support its traditional use for treating thyroid disorders, although its exact mechanism of action, bioavailability, and pharmacokinetics data are missing.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-10-29T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1663-6461
       
  • Silicon Resorption from Equisetum arvense Tea – A Randomized,
           Three-Armed Pilot Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Waterstradt; Aljoscha, Winker, Moritz, Zimmermann-Klemd, Amy Marisa, Devi, Seema, Lederer, Ann-Kathrin, Huber, Roman, Gründemann, Carsten
      Abstract: Equisetum arvense tea (TEA) contains high concentrations of silicon and has been used in folk medicine for the treatment of inflammatory ailments. We examined the resorption of silicon after TEA consumption. Safety and immunological effects were secondary outcomes. A monocentric, randomized, three-armed pilot study was conducted with 12 voluntary, healthy, male subjects. The study is registered in the German register for clinical trials (DRKS-ID: DRKS00016628). After a low silicon diet for 36 hours, 1000 mL TEA1 with approximately 200 000 µg silicon/L, TEA2 with approximately 750 000 µg silicon/L, or Si-low-Water (approximately 10 – 10 000 µg silicon/L as a control) were ingested on three consecutive days. Blood and urine samples were collected at baseline, day 1 examining silicon kinetics, day 3 examining silicon accumulation, and day 8 (safety, immunological parameters). Si-low-Water intake did not change silicon serum (Cmax 294 µg/L) or urine (19 000 µg/24 h) concentrations compared to baseline. Cmax was 2855 µg/L for TEA1 and 2498 µg/L for TEA2; tmax was 60 and 120 min, respectively. Silicon accumulation did not occur. Urine silica within 24 h (E24 h) was higher after TEA2 compared to TEA1 ingestion (142 000 vs. 109 000 µg/24 h). Serum silicon levels at t = 120 min differed significantly after intake of TEA2 or intake of Si-low-Water (p = 0.029). The immunological parameters did not show any significant changes indicating immunosuppressive effects in volunteers. TEA1 was well tolerated, while TEA2 caused diarrhoea in 4 subjects. Our investigations show that intake of TEA1 leads to significant rise in serum silicon concentration.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-10-27T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1643-5493
       
  • More Than Just a Weed: An Exploration of the Antimicrobial Activity of
           Rumex crispus using a Multivariate Data Analysis Approach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pelzer; Chantal V., Houriet, Joëlle, Crandall, William J., Todd, Daniel A., Cech, Nadja B., Jones, Derick D.
      Abstract: Plants have a long history of use for their medicinal properties. The complexity of botanical extracts presents unique challenges and necessitates the application of innovative approaches to correctly identify and quantify bioactive compounds. For this study, we used untargeted metabolomics to explore the antimicrobial activity of Rumex crispus (yellow dock), a member of the Polygonaceae family used as an herbal remedy for bacterial infections. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with high resolution mass-spectrometry (UPLC-MS) was used to identify and quantify the known antimicrobial compound emodin. In addition, we used biochemometric approaches to integrate data measuring antimicrobial activity from R. crispus root starting material and fractions against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with UPLC-MS data. Our results support the hypothesis that multiple constituents, including the anthraquinone emodin, contribute to the antimicrobial activity of R. crispus against MRSA.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-10-25T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1652-1547
       
  • Critical Assessment of In Vitro Screening of α-Glucosidase Inhibitors
           from Plants with Acarbose as a Reference Standard

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Miller; Neil, Joubert, Elizabeth
      Abstract: Postprandial hyperglycemia is treated with the oral antidiabetic drug acarbose, an intestinal α-glucosidase inhibitor. Side effects of acarbose motivated a growing number of screening studies to identify novel α-glucosidase inhibitors derived from plant extracts and other natural sources. As “gold standard”, acarbose is frequently included as the reference standard to assess the potency of these candidate α-glucosidase inhibitors, with many outperforming acarbose by several orders of magnitude. The results are subsequently used to identify suitable compounds/products with strong potential for in vivo efficacy. However, most α-glucosidase inhibitor screening studies use enzyme preparations obtained from nonmammalian sources (typically Saccharomyces cerevisiae), despite strong evidence that inhibition data obtained using nonmammalian α-glucosidase may hold limited value in terms of identifying α-glucosidase inhibitors with actual in vivo hypoglycemic potential. The aim was to critically discuss the screening of novel α-glucosidase inhibitors from plant sources, emphasizing inconsistencies and pitfalls, specifically where acarbose was included as the reference standard. An assessment of the available literature emphasized the cruciality of stating the biological source of α-glucosidase in such screening studies to allow for unambiguous and rational interpretation of the data. The review also highlights the lack of a universally adopted screening assay for novel α-glucosidase inhibitors and the commercial availability of a standardized preparation of mammalian α-glucosidase.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1557-7379
       
  • Correction: Placental Passage of Humulone and Protopine in an Ex Vivo
           Human Perfusion System

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Planta Med
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1666-5352



      Georg Thieme Verlag KG Rüdigerstraße 14, 70469 Stuttgart, Germany

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     open access Volltext

      Planta Med ; : -2021-10-12T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Activity of THC, CBD, and CBN on Human ACE2 and SARS-CoV1/2 Main Protease
           to Understand Antiviral Defense Mechanism

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pitakbut; Thanet, Nguyen, Gia-Nam, Kayser, Oliver
      Abstract: THC, CBD, and CBN were reported as promising candidates against SARS-CoV2 infection, but the mechanism of action of these three cannabinoids is not understood. This study aims to determine the mechanism of action of THC, CBD, and CBN by selecting two essential targets that directly affect the coronavirus infections as viral main proteases and human angiotensin-converting enzyme2. Tested THC and CBD presented a dual-action action against both selected targets. Only CBD acted as a potent viral main protease inhibitor at the IC50 value of 1.86 ± 0.04 µM and exhibited only moderate activity against human angiotensin-converting enzyme2 at the IC50 value of 14.65 ± 0.47 µM. THC acted as a moderate inhibitor against both viral main protease and human angiotensin-converting enzymes2 at the IC50 value of 16.23 ± 1.71 µM and 11.47 ± 3.60 µM, respectively. Here, we discuss cannabinoid-associated antiviral activity mechanisms based on in silico docking studies and in vitro receptor binding studies.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-10-12T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1581-3707
       
  • Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Mental Diseases in Pregnancy: An In
           Vitro Safety Assessment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Spiess; Deborah, Winker, Moritz, Chauveau, Antoine, Abegg, Vanessa Fabienne, Potterat, Olivier, Hamburger, Matthias, Gründemann, Carsten, Simões-Wüst, Ana Paula
      Abstract: Pregnancy is a critical period for medical care, during which the well-being of woman and fetus must be considered. This is particularly relevant in managing non-psychotic mental disorders since treatment with central nervous system-active drugs and untreated NMDs may have negative effects. Some well-known herbal preparations (phytopharmaceuticals), including St. Johnʼs wort, California poppy, valerian, lavender, and hops, possess antidepressant, sedative, anxiolytic, or antidepressant properties and could be used to treat mental diseases such as depression, restlessness, and anxiety in pregnancy. Our goal was to assess their safety in vitro, focusing on cytotoxicity, induction of apoptosis, genotoxicity, and effects on metabolic properties and differentiation in cells widely used as a placental cell model (BeWo b30 placenta choriocarcinoma cells). The lavender essential oil was inconspicuous in all experiments and showed no detrimental effects. At low-to-high concentrations, no extract markedly affected the chosen safety parameters. At an artificially high concentration of 100 µg/mL, extracts from St. Johnʼs wort, California poppy, valerian, and hops had minimal cytotoxic effects. None of the extracts resulted in genotoxic effects or altered glucose consumption or lactate production, nor did they induce or inhibit BeWo b30 cell differentiation. This study suggests that all tested preparations from St. Johnʼs wort, California poppy, valerian, lavender, and hops, in concentrations up to 30 µg/mL, do not possess any cytotoxic or genotoxic potential and do not compromise placental cell viability, metabolic activity, and differentiation. Empirical and clinical studies during pregnancy are needed to support these in vitro data.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-10-08T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1628-8132
       
  • The Low Copy Nuclear Gene Region, Granule Bound Starch Synthase (GBSS1),
           as a Novel Mini-DNA Barcode for the Identification of Different Sage
           (Salvia) Species

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Parveen; Iffat, Techen, Natascha, Handy, Sara M., Li, Jing, Wu, Charles, Chittiboyina, Amar G., Khan, Ikhlas A.
      Abstract: Morphological similarity within species makes the identification and authentication of Salvia species challenging, especially in dietary supplements that contain processed root or leaf powder of different sage species. In the present study, the species discriminatory power of 2 potential DNA barcode regions from the nuclear genome was evaluated in 7 medicinally important Salvia species from the family Lamiaceae. The nuclear internal transcribed spacer 2 and the exon 9 – 14 region of low copy nuclear gene WAXY coding for granule-bound starch synthase 1 were tested for their species discrimination ability using distance, phylogenetic, and BLAST-based methods. A novel 2-step PCR method with 2 different annealing temperatures was developed to achieve maximum amplification from genomic DNA. The granule-bound starch synthase 1 region showed higher amplification and sequencing success rates, higher interspecific distances, and a perfect barcode gap for the tested species compared to the nuclear internal transcribed spacer 2. Hence, these novel mini-barcodes generated from low copy nuclear gene regions (granule-bound starch synthase) that were proven to be effective barcodes for identifying 7 Salvia species have potential for identification and authentication of other Salvia species.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-09-20T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1618-6496
       
  • Seven-day Oral Intake of Orthosiphon stamineus Leaves Infusion Exerts
           Antiadhesive Ex Vivo Activity Against Uropathogenic E. coli in Urine
           Samples

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Deipenbrock; Melanie, Scotti, Francesca, Mo, Boris, Heinrich, Michael, Hensel, Andreas
      Abstract: Orthosiphon stamineus leaves (Java tea) extract is traditionally used for the treatment of urinary tract infections. According to recent in vitro data, animal infection studies, and transcriptomic investigations, polymethoxylated flavones from Java tea exert antiadhesive activity against uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). This antiadhesive activity has been shown to reduce bladder and kidney lesion in a mice infection model. As no data on the antivirulent activity of Java tea intake on humans are available, a biomedical study was performed on 20 healthy volunteers who self-administered Orthosiphon infusion (4 × 3 g per day, orally) for 7 days. The herbal material used for the study conformed to the specification of the European Pharmacopoeia, and ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) of the infusion showed rosmarinic acid, caffeic acid, and cichoric acid to be the main compounds aside from polymethoxylated flavones. Rosmarinic acid was quantified in the tea preparations with 243 ± 22 µg/mL, indicating sufficient reproducibility of the preparation of the infusion. Urine samples were obtained during the biomedical study on day 1 (control urine, prior to Java tea intake), 3, 6 and 8. Antiadhesive activity of the urine samples was quantified by flowcytometric assay using pre-treated UPEC NU14 and human T24 bladder cells. Pooled urine samples indicated significant inhibition of bacterial adhesion on day 3, 6 and 8. The urine samples had no influence on the invasion of UPEC into host cells. Bacterial proliferation was slightly reduced after 24 h incubation with the urine samples. Gene expression analysis (qPCR) revealed strong induction of fitness and motility gene fliC and downregulation of hemin uptake system chuT. These data correlate with previously reported datasets from in vitro transcriptomic analysis. Increased bacterial motility was monitored using a motility assay in soft agar with UPEC UTI89. The intake of Java tea had no effect on the concentration of Tamm-Horsfall Protein in the urine samples. The present study explains the antiadhesive and anti-infective effect of the plant extract by triggering UPEC from a sessile lifestyle into a motile bacterial form, with reduced adhesive capacity.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-09-14T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1585-6322
       
  • Effect of Gut Microbiota on the Metabolism of Chemical Constituents of
           Berberis kansuensis Extract Based on UHPLC-Orbitrap-MS Technique

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Du; Huan, Xu, Tong, Yi, Huan, Xu, Xinmei, Zhao, Chengcheng, Ge, Yiman, Zhang, Chuantao, Fan, Gang
      Abstract: The dried stem bark of Berberis kansuensis is a commonly used Tibetan herbal medicine for the treatment of diabetes. Its main chemical components are alkaloids, such as berberine, magnoflorine and jatrorrhizine. However, the role of gut microbiota in the in vivo metabolism of these chemical components has not been fully elucidated. In this study, an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography method coupled with Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Orbitrap-MS) technology was applied to detect and identify prototype components and metabolites in rat intestinal contents and serum samples after oral administration of a B. kansuensis extract. A total of 16 prototype components and 40 metabolites were identified. The primary metabolic pathways of the chemical components from B. kansuensis extract were demethylation, desaturation, deglycosylation, reduction, hydroxylation, and other conjugation reactions including sulfation, glucuronidation, glycosidation, and methylation. By comparing the differences of metabolites between diabetic and pseudo-germ-free diabetic rats, we found that the metabolic transformation of some chemical components in B. kansuensis extract such as bufotenin, ferulic acid 4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, magnoflorine, and 8-oxyberberine, was affected by the gut microbiota. The results revealed that the gut microbiota can affect the metabolic transformation of chemical constituents in B. kansuensis extract. These findings can enhance our understanding of the active ingredients of B. kansuensis extract and the key role of the gut microbiota on them.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-09-14T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1617-9489
       
  • The Anti-Proliferative Lichen-Compound Protolichesterinic Acid Inhibits
           Oxidative Phosphorylation and Is Processed via the Mercapturic Pathway in
           Cancer Cells

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jóhannsson; Freyr, Cherek, Paulina, Xu, Maonian, Rolfsson, Óttar, Ögmundsdóttir, Helga M.
      Abstract: The lichen compound protolichesterinic acid (PA) has an anti-proliferative effect against several cancer cell lines of different origin. This effect cannot be explained by the known inhibitory activity of PA against 5- and 12-lipoxygenases. The aim was therefore to search for mechanisms for the anti-proliferative activity of PA. Two cancer cell lines of different origin, both sensitive to anti-proliferative effects of PA, were selected for this study, T-47D from breast cancer and AsPC-1 from pancreatic cancer. Morphological changes were assessed by transmission electron microscopy, HPLC coupled with TOF spectrometry was used for metabolomics, mitochondrial function was measured using the Agilent Seahorse XFp Real-time ATP assay and glucose/lactate levels by radiometry. Levels of glutathione, NADP/NADPH and reactive oxygen species [ROS] were measured by luminescence. Following exposure to PA both cell lines showed structural changes in mitochondria that were in line with a measured reduction in oxidative phosphorylation and increased glycolysis. These changes were more marked in T-47D, which had poorer mitochondrial function at baseline. PA was processed and expelled from the cells via the mercapturic pathway, which consumes glutathione. Nevertheless, glutathione levels were increased after 24 hours of exposure to PA, implying enhanced synthesis. Redox balance was not much affected and ROS levels were not increased. We conclude that PA is metabolically processed and expelled from cells, leading indirectly to increased glutathione levels with minimal effects on redox balance. The most marked effect was on mitochondrial structure and metabolic function implying that effects of PA may depend on mitochondrial fitness.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-09-14T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1579-6454
       
  • Accumulation of the Major Components from Polygoni Multiflori Radix in
           Liver and Kidney after Its Long-Term Oral Administrations in Rats

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Li; Dan, Lyu, Yuanfeng, Zhao, Jiajia, Ji, Xiaoyu, Zhang, Yufeng, Zuo, Zhong
      Abstract: Although Polygoni Multiflori Radix (PMR) has been widely used as a tonic and an anti-aging remedy for centuries, the extensively reported hepatotoxicity and potential kidney toxicity hindered its safe use in clinical practice. To better understand its toxicokinetics, the current study was proposed, aiming to evaluate the biodistributions of the major PMR components including 2,3,5,4′-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (TSG), emodin, emodin-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (EMG) and physcion as well as their corresponding glucuronides following bolus and multiple oral administrations of PMR to rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received a bolus dose or 21 days of oral administrations of PMR concentrated granules at 4.12 g/kg (equivalent to 20.6 g/kg raw material). Fifteen minutes after bolus dose or the last dose on day 21, rats were sacrificed and the blood, liver, and kidney were collected for the concentration determination of both parent form and glucuronides of TSG, emodin, EMG, and physcion by HPLC-MS/MS. Among all the tested analytes, TSG, EMG, EMG glucuronides in liver and TSG, EMG, as well as all the glucuronides of these analytes in the kidney demonstrated the most significant accumulation after multiple doses. Moreover, the levels of the parent analytes were all significantly higher in liver and kidney in comparison to their plasma levels. Strong tissue binding of all four analytes and accumulation of TSG, EMG, and EMG glucuronides in the liver and TSG, EMG, as well as the glucuronides of all four analytes in the kidney after multiple dosing of PMR were considered to be associated with its toxicity.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-09-14T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1585-5991
       
  • Medicinal Plants: Guests and Hosts in the Heterologous Expression of
           High-Value Products

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Vasilev; Nikolay
      Abstract: Medicinal plants play an important dual role in the context of the heterologous expression of high-value pharmaceutical products. On the one hand, the classical biochemical and modern omics approaches allowed for the discovery of various genes encoding biosynthetic pathways in medicinal plants. Recombinant DNA technology enabled introducing these genes and regulatory elements into host organisms and enhancing the heterologous production of the corresponding secondary metabolites. On the other hand, the transient expression of foreign DNA in plants facilitated the production of numerous proteins of pharmaceutical importance. This review summarizes several success stories of the engineering of plant metabolic pathways in heterologous hosts. Likewise, a few examples of recombinant protein expression in plants for therapeutic purposes are also highlighted. Therefore, the importance of medicinal plants has grown immensely as sources for valuable products of low and high molecular weight. The next step ahead for bioengineering is to achieve more success stories of industrial-scale production of secondary plant metabolites in microbial systems and to fully exploit plant cell factoriesʼ commercial potential for recombinant proteins.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-09-14T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1576-4148
       
  • Flavanols and Flavanes from Crinum asiaticum and Their Effects on LPS
           Signaling Pathway Through the Inhibition of NF-κB Activation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Do; Kiep Minh, Shin, Min-Kyoung, Kodama, Takeshi, Win, Nwet Nwet, Prema, Prema, Nguyen, Hien Minh, Hayakawa, Yoshihiro, Morita, Hiroyuki
      Abstract: Three new flavanols, (2R,3S)-7-methoxy-flavan-3-ol (1), (2R,3S)-7-hydroxy-flavan-3-ol (2), and (2R,3S)-2′-hydroxy-7-methoxy-flavan-3-ol (3), together with two known flavans (4 and 5), were isolated from the chloroform extract of Crinum asiaticum. Their structures were elucidated by various spectroscopic methods, including 1D and 2D NMR, HR-ESI-MS, and CD data. The isolated compounds 1 and 3−5 showed inhibitory activity toward LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production. Further investigation of the NF-κB pathway mechanisms indicated that 1 and 3−5 inhibited the LPS-induced IL-6 production and p65 subunit phosphorylation of NF-κB in RAW264.7 cells, with an effective dose of 10 µM.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-09-02T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1585-5877
       
  • An in-depth look into a well-known herbal drug: Fingerprinting, isolation,
           identification, and content estimation of saponins in different
           Strophanthus seeds

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Włodarczyk; Maciej, Gleńsk, Michał
      Abstract: Seeds of Strophanthus species are known as a source of rapid-acting cardenolides. These water-soluble glycosides are listed as the sole critical constituents of this raw herbal drug. A non-standard cardioprotective medication with ouabain-containing oral remedies has become popular in Europe as a result of the withdrawal of corresponding registered drugs from the market. However, the bioequivalence of pure ouabain solutions, tinctures, and home-made extracts from Strophanthus seeds is unknown. Thus, this study aimed to update the information on the composition of Strophanthus seeds used for this purpose. The distribution of two main saponins and about 90 previously unreported compounds, tentatively identified as saponins in eleven Strophanthus species, was systematically evaluated by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS) and -MS/MS. Seeds of S. gratus were selected to isolate the dominant unreported triterpenoids, bidesmosides of echinocystic and oleanolic acid. Their structures were established by HRMS, MS/MS, as well as by NMR techniques. The total saponin content, estimated by UHPLC-MS, was up to 1%. The detected saponins could influence the peroral bioavailability of hardly absorbable Strophanthus cardenolides and exhibit their own activity. This finding may be relevant when Strophanthus preparations (containing both saponins and cardiac glycosides) are used, particularly when homemade preparations are administered.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-09-02T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1586-1915
       
  • Herbal Medicines in the Treatment of Dyspepsia: An Overview

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Boeing; Thaise, de Souza, Priscila, da Silva, Luisa Mota, Gasparotto Junior, Arquimedes
      Abstract: This review focuses on the efficacy of herbal medicines for managing dyspepsia in humans and animals. Searches were conducted on the PubMed, Science Direct, and Medline databases, for publications in the last 3 years. In each database, the search terms used consisted of the 2 key terms describing the disorder and subtypes plus each of the terms relating to the therapy. The key terms used were “natural product” and “medicinal plant” in a cross-over with “dyspepsia” and “functional dyspepsia” (i.e., gastroprotection, Helicobacter pylori infection, prokinetic). We included all human and animal studies on the effects of herbal medicines reporting the key outcome of dyspepsia symptoms. Preclinical studies using critically validated models showed that most medicinal plants with gastroprotective action had antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and antisecretory effects. Moreover, several species displayed anti Helicobacter pylori and prokinetic efficacy. The data availability of controlled clinical studies is currently minimal. The use of different methodologies and the minimal number of patients raise doubts about the effects of these preparations. Only adequate clinical trials with scientifically validated methods can determine whether different herbal medicines can be used as viable alternatives to the conventional pharmacological treatments used to control dyspepsia symptoms.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-09-02T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1580-7782
       
  • Correction: Natural Products as a Source of Inspiration for Novel
           Inhibitors of Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) Formation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Planta Med
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1585-5219



      Georg Thieme Verlag KG Rüdigerstraße 14, 70469 Stuttgart, Germany

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Planta Med ; : -2021-08-24T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • The Influence of Turmeric and Curcumin on Female Reproductive Processes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sirotkin; Alexander V.
      Abstract: The present review summarizes the available knowledge concerning the action of curcumin, the best-known polyphenol among the rhizomes of Curcumas, on female reproductive processes and their dysfunctions. Curcumin affects a number of physiological processes, including female reproduction (puberty, reproductive aging, ovarian follicullogenesis and oogenesis, and fecundity). Curcumin can affect these processes via changes in the release and reception of pituitary and ovarian hormones, growth factors and cytokines. Furthermore, it can influence the response of ovarian cells to these substances and external environmental factors. Finally, curcumin can affect oxidative processes within the ovary and numerous intracellular signalling pathways related to ovarian cell proliferation and apoptosis. These effects suggest the applicability of curcumin for stimulation of female reproductive processes in vivo and in vitro, as well as for the prevention, mitigation, and treatment of various reproductive disorders from ovarian insufficiency and infertility to polycystic ovarian syndrome and ovarian cancer.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-08-20T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1542-8992
       
  • Development and Validation of a Species-specific PCR Method for the
           Identification of Ginseng Species Using Orthogonal Approaches

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lu; Zhengfei, Handy, Sara M., Zhang, Ning, Quan, Zheng, Xu, Qun, Ambrose, Michael, Giancaspro, Gabriel, Sarma, Nandakumara D.
      Abstract: When testing botanical ingredients of herbal medicines and dietary supplements, the complexity of botanical matrixes often requires the use of orthogonal methods to establish identification procedures suitable for quality control purposes. Genomic-based botanical identification methods are evolving and emerging as useful quality control tools to complement traditional morphological and chemical identification methods. Species-specific polymerase chain reaction methods are being evaluated for botanical quality control and as a cost-effective approach to identify and discriminate between closely related botanical species. This paper describes orthogonal identification of Panax ginseng, P. quinquefolius, and P. notoginseng materials in commerce as an example of the development and validation of a set of species-specific polymerase chain reaction methods to establish botanical identity in ginseng roots. This work also explored the possibility of extending the application of species-specific polymerase chain reaction methods to provide species identity information for processed materials, such as steamed roots and hydroalcoholic extracts, and showed success with this approach. Finally, the paper provides recommendations for an out-of-specification investigation of samples that may pass some of the orthogonal tests and fail others.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-08-13T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1478-9143
       
  • The Standardized Wood Extract of Albizia myriophylla: Its Potential as an
           Active Ingredient in an Anti-inflammatory Herbal Gel Formulation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bakasatae; Nazneen, Sangkaew, Warissara, Kunworarath, Nongluk, Ontong, Julalak Chorachoo, Phoopha, Sathianpong, Takahashi Yupanqui, Chutha, Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan, Joycharat, Nantiya
      Abstract: Albizia myriophylla has been used in Thai folk medicine for treating inflammation-related diseases. The wood of this medicinal plant is traditionally used as a single herbal drug in the form of an aqueous decoction and as a component in several Thai herbal formulations for the remedy of fever, sore throat, and aphthous ulcers. This study aimed to evaluate in vivo the anti-inflammatory potential and possible mechanism of action of the standardized wood extract of A. myriophylla as well as to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity and physicochemical properties of the developed herbal gel formulation containing standardized wood extract of A. myriophylla. Results of quantitative HPLC analysis demonstrated that the standardized wood extract of A. myriophylla contained 22.95 mg/g of 8-methoxy-7,3′,4′-trihydroxyflavone, a bioactive marker compound of A. myriophylla. The standardized wood extract of A. myriophylla (1% w/v) exhibited remarkable inhibition (54.4 – 80.3%) in the croton oil model of topical inflammation at all assessment times, comparable to standard indomethacin (55.3 – 63.6%). Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to clarify the anti-inflammatory mechanism of standardized wood extract of A. myriophylla, and the result showed that this standardized extract decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide synthase mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner. The developed herbal gel containing standardized wood extract of A. myriophylla (1% w/w) had good physicochemical characteristics and exhibited potent inhibition (51.4 – 77.8%) of inflammation in a rat ear edema model at all assessment times, comparable to indomethacin gel (33.3 – 40.5%). The notable anti-inflammatory activity of standardized wood extract of A. myriophylla and its developed herbal gel formulation indicates their potential application as natural anti-inflammatory agents.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-08-06T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1535-2230
       
  • Bulbine natalensis (currently Bulbine latifolia) and select bulbine
           knipholones modulate the activity of AhR, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and P-gp

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Husain; Islam, Dale, Olivia R., Manda, Vamshi, Ali, Zulfiqar, Gurley, Bill J., Chittiboyina, Amar G., Khan, Ikhlas A., Khan, Shabana I.
      Abstract: Bulbine natalensis, an emerging medicinal herb on the global market with androgenic properties, is often formulated in dietary supplements that promote perceived sexual enhancement. However, to date, comprehensive safety studies of B. natalensis are lacking, particularly those related to its herb-drug interaction potential. The purpose of this study was to assess the inductive and inhibitory effects of extracts and pure compounds of B. natalensis on human cytochrome P-450 isozymes in vitro. Our findings demonstrated that both water and methanolic extracts of B. natalensis as well as knipholone, bulbine-knipholone, and 6′-O-methylknipholone dose-dependently increased mRNA expression encoded by CYP2B6, CYP1A2, and ABCB1 genes. Functional analyses showed that water (60 to 2.20 µg/mL) and methanolic (30 to 3.75 µg/mL) extracts and knipholones (10 to 0.33 µM) increased CYP2B6 and CYP1A2 activity in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, water extract (60 µg/mL), methanolic extract (30 µg/mL), and knipholone (10 µM) caused activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor up to 11.1 ± 0.7, 8.9 ± 0.6, and 7.1 ± 2.0-fold, respectively. Furthermore, inhibition studies revealed that methanolic extract attenuated the activity of metabolically active CYP1A2 (IC50, 22.6 ± 0.4 µg/mL) and CYP2B6 (IC50, 34.2 ± 6.6 µg/mL) proteins, whereas water extracts had no inhibitory effect on either isoform. These findings suggest that chronic consumption of B. natalensis may affect normal homeostasis of select CYPs with subsequent risks for HDIs when concomitantly ingested with conventional medications that are substrates of CYP2B6 and CYP1A2. However, more in-depth translational studies are required to validate our current findings and their clinical relevance.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-08-06T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1557-2113
       
  • Competitive CatSper Activators of Progesterone from Rhynchosia volubilis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Xiang; Jin, Kang, Hang, Li, Hong-Gang, Shi, Yu-Long, Zhang, Ya-Li, Ruan, Chang-Lei, Liu, Lin-Hui, Gao, Han-Qi, Luo, Tao, Hu, Gao-Sheng, Zhu, Wei-Liang, Jia, Jing-Ming, Chen, Jia-Chun, Fang, Jin-Bo
      Abstract: The root Rhynchosia volubilis was widely used for contraception in folk medicine, although its molecular mechanism on antifertility has not yet been revealed. In human sperm, it was reported that the cation channel of sperm, an indispensable cation channel for the fertilization process, could be regulated by various steroid-like compounds in plants. Interestingly, these nonphysiological ligands would also disturb the activation of the cation channel of sperm induced by progesterone. Therefore, this study aimed to explore whether the compounds in R. volubilis affect the physiological regulation of the cation channel of sperm. The bioguided isolation of the whole herb of R. volubilis has resulted in the novel discovery of five new prenylated isoflavonoids, rhynchones A – E (1 – 5), a new natural product, 5′-O-methylphaseolinisoflavan (6) (1H and 13C NMR data, Supporting Information), together with twelve known compounds (7 – 18). Their structures were established by extensive spectroscopic analyses and drawing a comparison with literature data, while their absolute configurations were determined by electronic circular dichroism calculations. The experiments of intracellular Ca2+ signals and patch clamping recordings showed that rhynchone A (1) significantly reduced cation channel of sperm activation by competing with progesterone. In conclusion, our findings indicat that rhynchone A might act as a contraceptive compound by impairing the activation of the cation channel of sperm and thus prevent fertilization.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-08-06T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1542-0151
       
  • Benzoylcyclopropane Derivatives from Hypoxis hemerocallidea Corms

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zulfiqar; Fazila, Pandey, Pankaj, Tripathi, Siddharth K., Ali, Zulfiqar, Chittiboyina, Amar G., Khan, Ikhlas A.
      Abstract: Two monobenzoylcyclopropane (hypoxhemerol A (1) and hypoxhemeroloside G (2)) and three dibenzoylcyclopropane (hypoxhemerol B (3), hypoxhemeroloside H (4), and hypoxhemeroloside I (5)) derivatives were isolated from the hydro-alcoholic extract of Hypoxis hemerocallidea corms. This is the first instance where benzoylcyclopropane analogs were isolated from any natural source. Structure elucidation was mainly based on 1D- and 2D-NMR and HRESIMS data. The absolute configuration (2R, 4R) of 1 was determined via NOESY NMR and experimental and calculated ECD data analyses. Compounds 1–5 and 11 recently reported metabolites (hypoxoside, obtuside A, interjectin, acuminoside, curcapicycloside, and hypoxhemerolosides A – F) were screened for in vitro antimicrobial activity against various bacterial and fungal strains. Curcapicycloside and acuminoside exhibited antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli with 78 and 79% inhibition at 20 µg/mL, respectively. Hypoxhemeroloside A showed mild antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans with 63% inhibition at 20 µg/mL.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-07-30T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1540-4978
       
  • Suffrutines A and B Inhibit the Expression of Inflammatory Mediators in
           LPS-Induced RAW264.7 Cells by Suppressing the NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chen; Chun, Zhu, Ze-Feng, Nie, Wen-Xing, Zou, Yong
      Abstract: Flueggea suffruticosa is a traditional Chinese medicine that has been commonly used for the treatment of inflammatory ailments, including rheumatism and lumbago. Suffrutines A and suffrutines B are a pair of novel E,E and Z,E isomeric indolizidine alkaloids isolated from the roots of F. suffruticosa. However, their anti-inflammatory activity has not been reported thus far. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of inflammatory mediators and possible mechanisms of suffrutines A and B in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW264.7 cells. Results showed that suffrutines A and B could remarkably inhibit the production of nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2, interleukin-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW264.7 cells. Further evaluation demonstrated that compared with suffrutines A, suffrutines B could more significantly inhibit the phosphorylation of IKKα/β, the degradation of IκBα, and the nuclear translocation of the p65 and p52 subunits in the canonical and non-canonical nuclear factor-κB pathways. Therefore, suffrutines B exhibited more potent inhibitory activity on inflammatory mediators than suffrutines A.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-07-22T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1528-1760
       
  • Quantitative Removal of Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids from Essential Oils by the
           Hydrodistillation Step in Their Manufacturing Process

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Giera; David S., Preisitsch, Michael, Brevard, Hugues, Nemetz, Jörn
      Abstract: Pyrrolizidine alkaloids are naturally occurring toxins produced by certain weeds that can, if accidentally co-harvested, contaminate plant-based food, feed, and herbal medicinal products. Focusing on herbal medicinal products, the presence of pyrrolizidine alkaloids is restricted by regulatory prescribed thresholds to assure patient safety. Among the multitude of different herbal active substances utilized in herbal medicinal products, the class of pharmaceutically effective essential oils is considered to exhibit a negligible contribution to pyrrolizidine alkaloid contamination. Within the present investigation, this hypothesis should be scientifically scrutinized. For this purpose, an experimental set-up was chosen that reproduces the typical manufacturing step of hydrodistillation. Essential oils of eucalyptus and lemon were selected exemplarily and spiked with 3 representative pyrrolizidine alkaloids (retrorsine, retrorsine-N-oxide, and lycopsamine), whereupon hydrodistillation was performed. Analysis of the resulting distillates by LC-MS/MS proved that artificially added pyrrolizidine alkaloids were removed completely. Moreover, quantitative pyrrolizidine alkaloid recovery in the aqueous phases was observed. Hence, it was experimentally confirmed that herbal medicinal products employing hydrodistilled essential oils of pharmaceutical quality are intrinsically free of pyrrolizidine alkaloids due to the particularities of their manufacturing process. Furthermore, it can be concluded from theoretical considerations that essential oils produced by cold pressing have a negligible risk of carrying pyrrolizidine alkaloid contamination. Our findings provide a strong indication that the requirement for analytical pyrrolizidine alkaloid testing of essential oils for pharmaceutical use should be fundamentally reconsidered.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-07-22T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1534-6928
       
  • Alkaloids from Lime Flower (Tiliae flos) Exert Spasmodic Activity on
           Murine Airway Smooth Muscle Involving Acetylcholinesterase

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hake; Alexander, Symma, Nico, Esch, Stefan, Hensel, Andreas, Düfer, Martina
      Abstract: Lime flower (Tiliae flos) is traditionally used either for treatment of the common cold or to relieve symptoms of mental stress. Recently, the presence of a new class of piperidine and dihydro-pyrrole alkaloids from lime flower has been described. The present study aimed to investigate the pharmacological activity of hydroacetonic lime flower extracts, alkaloid-enriched lime flower fractions, and isolated alkaloids on the murine airway smooth muscle and the cholinergic system. While a hydroacetonic lime flower extract did not show any pharmacological activity, enriched Tilia alkaloid fractions potentiated acetylcholine-induced contractions of the trachea by ~ 30%, showing characteristics comparable to galanthamine. Effects were abrogated by atropine, indicating an involvement of muscarinic receptors. The dihydro-pyrrole alkaloid tiliine A, the piperidine alkaloid tiliamine B, and the acetylated piperidine alkaloid tilacetine A were characterized as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. The positive control galanthamine (IC50 = 2.0 µM, 95% CI 1.7 to 2.2 µM) was approximately 100 times more potent compared to tiliine A (IC50 = 237 µM, 95% CI 207 to 258 µM) and tiliamine B (IC50 = 172 µM, 95% CI 158 to 187 µM). Neither DNA synthesis of HepG2 liver cells, HaCaT keratinocytes, and Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells nor cell viability of primary human fibroblasts was reduced by the alkaloids. The indirect cholinergic activity of the alkaloids might explain some aspects of the traditional use of lime flowers and may extend the portfolio of compounds with regard to diseases involving parasympathetic malfunction or central cholinergic imbalance.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1534-3766
       
  • The Reassessed Impact of Nicotine against Neurotoxicity in Mesencephalic
           Dopaminergic Cell Cultures and Neuroblastoma N18TG2 Cells

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Delijewski; Marcin, Radad, Khaled, Krewenka, Christopher, Kranner, Barbara, Moldzio, Rudolf
      Abstract: Neuroprotective effects of nicotine are still under debate, so further studies on its effectiveness against Parkinsonʼs disease are required. In our present study, we used primary dopaminergic cell cultures and N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells to investigate the effect of nicotine and its neuroprotective potential against rotenone toxicity. Nicotine protected dopaminergic (tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive) neurons against rotenone. This effect was not nAChR receptor-dependent. Moreover, the alkaloid at a concentration of 5 µM caused an increase in neurite length, and at a concentration of 500 µM, it caused an increase in neurite count in dopaminergic cells exposed to rotenone. Nicotine alone was not toxic in either cell culture model, while the highest tested concentration of nicotine (500 µM) caused growth inhibition of N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells. Nicotine alone increased the level of glutathione in both cell cultures and also in rotenone-treated neuroblastoma cells. The obtained results may be helpful to explain the potential neuroprotective action of nicotine on neural cell cultures.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1527-1390
       
  • New Phenolic Glycosides and Lignans from the Roots of Lilium dauricum

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Xia; Xiao, Zhang, Jiao, Wang, Xiao-Jiang, Lu, Yan, Chen, Dao-Feng
      Abstract: Three new phenolic glycosides, carvacrol-2-O-β-D-apiofuranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), 1-methyl-3-isopropylphenol-4-O-β-D-apiofuranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), p-methoxythymol-5-O-β-D-apiofuranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), and a pair of new 8-O-4′ neolignan enantiomers (5a/5b), together with 26 known compounds (4, 6 – 30) were isolated from the roots of Lilium dauricum. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated based on extensive spectroscopic and chemical methods, and the absolute configurations of 5a and 5b were established by electronic circular dichroism analysis. Nine compounds (1, 3, 4, 8, 9, 17, 25, 29, and 30) exhibited potent α-glucosidase inhibitory activity with IC50 values ranging from 73.4 µM to 988.2 µM. Besides, compound 19 displayed strong anticomplementary activity (CH50: 71.6 µM).
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1527-9602
       
  • Medicinal Plants in the Treatment of Depression. II: Evidence from
           Clinical Trials

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Moragrega; Inés, Ríos, José Luis
      Abstract: Depression is a syndrome characterized by deep sadness and the inhibition of psychic functions, sometimes accompanied by neurovegetative disorders, with symptoms of anxiety almost always present. The disease produces alterations in a variety of neural networks and neurotransmission systems, along with a dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which leads to concomitant alterations in the immunological response. Generally, there is a parallel increase in proinflammatory mediators as well as oxidative and nitrosative damage caused by a reduction of antioxidant defenses. In a previous review, we compiled and examined studies of medicinal plants that had been evaluated in preclinical assays, including existing data on 155 species studied and reported as antidepressants or as sources of active principles for treating this condition. This review will thus limit its focus to the 95 clinical trials found in PubMed among the 670 articles on antidepressant-like medicinal plants. To this end, we have reviewed the publications cited in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PubMed, and the Science Citation Index from 2000 to 2020. Our review emphasizes those species that have demonstrated the greatest pharmacological potential when studied for their antidepressant properties in humans through clinical trials. Saffron, turmeric, St. Johnʼs wort, ginkgo, kava, and golden root are the most relevant plants that have provided important evidence for the treatment of depression in clinical trials.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-06-22T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1517-6882
       
  • Antiviral and Virucidal Properties of Essential Oils and Isolated
           Compounds – A Scientific Approach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Reichling; Jürgen
      Abstract: Essential oils and isolated essential oil compounds are known to exert various pharmacological effects, such as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, anti-immunomodulatory, antioxidant, and wound healing effects. Based on selected articles, this review deals with the potential antiviral and virucidal activities of essential oils and essential oil compounds together with their mechanism of action as well as in silico studies involving viral and host cell-specific target molecules that are indispensable for virus cell adsorption, penetration, and replication. The reported in vitro and in vivo studies highlight the baseline data about the latest findings of essential oils and essential oil compounds antiviral and virucidal effects on enveloped and non-enveloped viruses, taking into account available biochemical and molecular biological tests. The results of many in vitro studies revealed that several essential oils and essential oil compounds from different medicinal and aromatic plants are potent antiviral and virucidal agents that inhibit viral progeny by blocking different steps of the viral infection/replication cycle of DNA and RNA viruses in various host cell lines. Studies in mice infected with viruses causing respiratory diseases showed that different essential oils and essential oil compounds were able to prolong the life of infected animals, reduce virus titers in brain and lung tissues, and significantly inhibit the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In addition, some in vitro studies on hydrophilic nano-delivery systems encapsulating essential oils/essential oil compounds exhibited a promising way to improve the chemical stability and enhance the water solubility, bioavailabilty, and antiviral efficacy of essential oils and essential oil compounds.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-06-18T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1382-2898
       
  • Herbacetin Broadly Blocks the Activities of CYP450s by Different
           Inhibitory Mechanisms

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Qian; Jianchang, Li, Yinghui, Zhang, Xiaodan, Chen, Daoxing, Han, Mingming, Xu, Tao, Chen, Bingbing, Hu, Guoxin, Li, Junwei
      Abstract: Herbacetin is a bioactive flavanol compound that has various pharmacological effects. However, the pharmacokinetic characteristics have not been thoroughly investigated. Previously, we screened a natural compound library and identified herbacetin as a potent CYP blocker. Herein, we aimed to mechanistically determine the inhibitory effects of herbacetin on CYP450 and its potential application. A human liver microsome incubation system was developed based on a UPLC-MS/MS method. Moreover, an in silico docking assay and a human CYP recombinase reaction system were developed and used to investigate binding affinity and inhibitory efficacy. Subsequently, the effects of the combination of herbacetin and sorafenib on HepG2 cells were assessed by MTT and immunoblotting assays. The concentration of sorafenib and its main metabolite were measured by UPLC-MS/MS after incubation with or without herbacetin. As a result, we found herbacetin almost completely inhibited the functions of major CYPs at 100 µM. Moreover, through analysis of the structure-activity relationship, we found 4-, 6-, and 8-hydroxyl were essential groups for the inhibitory effects. Herbacetin inhibited CYP3A4, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, and CYP2E1 in a mixed manner, but non-competitively blocked CYP2D6. These results are in good agreement with the recombinase reaction in vitro results, with an IC50
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-06-11T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1502-7131
       
  • Pharmacokinetics of Five Alkaloids and their Metabolites in Normal and
           Diabetic Rats after Oral Administration of Rhizoma coptidis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Feng; Xinchi, Wang, Kun, Cao, Shijie, Ding, Liqin, Qiu, Feng
      Abstract: Rhizoma coptidis has been clinically used for a long time for the treatment of various diseases in China, such as hypertension, diabetes, and inflammation. Previous studies have shown that alkaloid components of Rhizoma coptidis extract could be extensively metabolized and the metabolites were also considered to be the therapeutic material basis. However, until now, pharmacokinetic studies of the in vivo metabolites have not been revealed yet. The aim of the present study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics and excretions of five main alkaloids (berberine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine, epiberberine, and coptisine) and their seven metabolites (berberrubine, demethyleneberberine, jatrorrhizine-3-O-β-D-glucuronide, thalifendine-10-O-β-D-glucuronide, berberrubine-9-O-β-D-glucuronide, demethyleneberberine-2-O-sulfate, and demethyleneberberine-2-O-β-D-glucuronide) in rats after oral administration of Rhizoma coptidis extract. Meanwhile, comparative pharmacokinetics and excretions of these analytes in diabetic model rats were also investigated, since Rhizoma coptidis is widely used for the treatment of diabetes. Our results showed that the in vivo existing forms of alkaloid components were phase II metabolites, highlighting the glucuronidation metabolic pathway. In diabetic model rats, the utilization of Rhizoma coptidis alkaloids was significantly increased and the biotransformation of berberine into berberrubine was significantly inhibited.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-06-10T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1506-1627
       
  • Desmethylbellidifolin Attenuates Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis:
           Impact on Intestinal Barrier, Intestinal Inflammation and Gut Microbiota

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Wu; Jiaqi, Wu, Yuzheng, Chen, Yue, Liu, Mengyang, Yu, Haiyang, Zhang, Yi, Wang, Tao
      Abstract: Ulcerative colitis has been recognized as a chronic inflammatory disease predominantly disturbing the colon and rectum. Clinically, the aminosalicylates, steroids, immunosuppressants, and biological drugs are generally used for the treatment of ulcerative colitis at different stages of disease progression. However, the therapeutic efficacy of these drugs does not satisfy the patients due to the frequent drug resistance. Herein, we reported the anti-ulcerative colitis activity of desmethylbellidifolin, a xanthone isolated from Gentianella acuta, in dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice. C57BL/6 mice were treated with 2% dextran sulfate sodium in drinking water to induce acute colitis. Desmethylbellidifolin or balsalazide sodium was orally administrated once a day. Biological samples were collected for immunohistological analysis, intestinal barrier function evaluation, cytokine measurement, and gut microbiota analysis. The results revealed that desmethylbellidifolin alleviated colon shortening and body weight loss in dextran sulfate sodium-induced mice. The disease activity index was also lowered by desmethylbellidifolin after 9 days of treatment. Furthermore, desmethylbellidifolin remarkably ameliorated colonic inflammation through suppressing the expression of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α. The intestinal epithelial barrier was strengthened by desmethylbellidifolin through increasing levels of occludin, ZO-1, and claudins. In addition, desmethylbellidifolin modulated the gut dysbiosis induced by dextran sulfate sodium. These findings suggested that desmethylbellidifolin effectively improved experimental ulcerative colitis, at least partly, through maintaining intestinal barrier integrity, inhibiting proinflammatory cytokines, and modulating dysregulated gut microbiota.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-06-07T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1506-3476
       
  • Lichen Depsidones with Biological Interest

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ureña-Vacas; Isabel, González-Burgos, Elena, Divakar, Pradeep Kumar, Gómez-Serranillos, M. Pilar
      Abstract: Depsidones are some of the most abundant secondary metabolites produced by lichens. These compounds have aroused great pharmacological interest due to their activities as antioxidants, antimicrobial, and cytotoxic agents. Hence, this paper aims to provide up-to-date knowledge including an overview of the potential biological interest of lichen depsidones. So far, the most studied depsidones are fumarprotocetraric acid, lobaric acid, norstictic acid, physodic acid, salazinic acid, and stictic acid. Their pharmacological activities have been mainly investigated in in vitro studies and, to a lesser extent, in in vivo studies. No clinical trials have been performed yet. Depsidones are promising cytotoxic agents that act against different cell lines of animal and human origin. Moreover, these compounds have shown antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi, mainly Candida spp. Furthermore, depsidones have antioxidant properties as revealed in oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo models. Future research should be focused on further investigating the mechanism of action of depsidones and in evaluating new potential actions as well as other depsidones that have not been studied yet from a pharmacological perspective. Likewise, more in vivo studies are prerequisite, and clinical trials for the most promising depsidones are encouraged.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-05-25T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1482-6381
       
  • Prophylactic Use of Natural Products against Developmentally Programmed
           Metabolic Syndrome

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ibrahim; Kasimu Ghandi, Adeshina, Kehinde Ahmad, Bello, Muhammad Bashir, Malami, Ibrahim, Abubakar, Bilyaminu, Abubakar, Murtala Bello, Imam, Mustapha Umar
      Abstract: Parental dietary choices and/or nutritional interventions in the offspring are critical to early life development, especially during the periods of active developmental plasticity in the offspring. Exposure to a high-fructose, high-fat diet during the fetal or neonatal period predisposes the affected individuals to the development of one or more features of metabolic syndrome, such as dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, diabetes, and associated cardiovascular diseases, later in their life. Owing to the increasing global prevalence of metabolic syndrome and multiple side effects that accompany conventional medicines, much attention is directed towards medicinal plants and phytochemicals as alternative interventions. Several studies have investigated the potential of natural agents to prevent programmed metabolic syndrome. This present review, therefore, highlights an inextricable relationship between the administration of medicinal plants or phytochemicals during the intrauterine or neonatal period, and the prevention of metabolic dysfunction in adulthood, while exploring the mechanisms by which they exert such an effect. The review also identifies plant products as a novel approach to the prevention and management of metabolic syndrome.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-05-17T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1482-2343
       
  • Low Piperine Fractional Piper nigrum Extract Enhanced the Antitumor
           Immunity via Regulating the Th1/Th2/Treg Cell Subsets on NMU-Induced
           Tumorigenesis Rats

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Saetang; Jirakrit, Tedasen, Aman, Sangkhathat, Surasak, Sangkaew, Natnaree, Dokduang, Sirinapa, Prompat, Napat, Taraporn, Siriporn, Graidist, Potchanapond
      Abstract: Cancer is one of the major causes of death worldwide. In addition to standard regimens, tumor suppression ability has been demonstrated in many types of natural products, including Piper nigrum, or black pepper. In previous reports, we demonstrated the antitumor effect of low piperine fractional Piper nigrum extract in vitro and in vivo. However, the effects of low piperine fractional P. nigrum extract in the aspect of antitumor immunity has not yet been investigated. In this study, tumor-bearing rats were fed with 100 mg/kg BW or 200 mg/kg BW of low piperine fractional P. nigrum extract 3 times per week for 4 weeks. Tumor burden and hematological data were then evaluated. Immunological data was investigated using a cytokine array and flow cytometry. The results showed that both doses of low piperine fractional P. nigrum extract significantly suppressed tumor progression in N-nitrosomethylurea-induced mammary tumor rats. There were no significant changes observed in the total white blood cells, red blood cells, and hemoglobin. Low piperine fractional P. nigrum extract suppressed some cytokine and chemokine levels including CXCL7, sICAM-1, and L-selectin 0.2- to 0.6-fold. Interestingly, 200 mg/kg BW of low piperine fractional P. nigrum extract significantly promoted type 1 T helper cell, and suppressed neutrophil, basophil, type 2 T helper cell, and regulatory T cell compared to the control group. In summary, these results indicate that low piperine fractional P. nigrum extract had a high efficacy in supporting antitumor activity at immunological levels via regulating Th1/Th2/Treg cells.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-04-26T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1458-5646
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • White Sage (Salvia apiana)–a Ritual and Medicinal Plant of the
           Chaparral: Plant Characteristics in Comparison with Other Salvia Species

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Krol; Agata, Kokotkiewicz, Adam, Luczkiewicz, Maria
      Abstract: Salvia apiana, commonly known as white sage, is an aromatic evergreen subshrub of the chaparral, commonly found in coastal plains in California and Baja California. It has been traditionally used by the Chumash people as a ritual and medicinal plant and used as a calmative, a diuretic, and a remedy for the common cold. However, until recently, relatively little has been known about the composition and biological activity of white sage. Phytochemical studies on S. apiana revealed the presence of substantial amounts of essential oil, accompanied by a variety of triterpenes, C23 terpenoids, diterpenes, and flavonoids. Extracts of the plant have been shown to exhibit antioxidative, antimicrobial, and cytotoxic effects. The influence of white sage constituents on the nervous system, including GABA, opioid, and cannabinoid receptors, has also been documented. The review aimed to compile information on the taxonomy, botany, chemical composition, and biological activities of S. apiana. White sage was compared with other representatives of the genus in terms of chemical composition. The differences and similarities between S. apiana and other sage species were noted and discussed in the context of their therapeutic applications. Reports on ethnomedicinal uses of white sage were confronted with reports on chemistry, bioactivity, and bioavailability of S. apiana constituents. Finally, a critical assessment of the available data was made and perspectives for the use of white sage preparations in modern phytomedicine were discussed.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-04-22T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1453-0964
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Cannabis sativa and Skin Health: Dissecting the Role of Phytocannabinoids

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Martinelli; Giulia, Magnavacca, Andrea, Fumagalli, Marco, DellʼAgli, Mario, Piazza, Stefano, Sangiovanni, Enrico
      Abstract: The use of Cannabis sativa is currently recognized to ease certain types of chronic pain, reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea, and improve anxiety. Nevertheless, few studies highlighted the therapeutic potential of C. sativa extracts and related phytocannabinoids for a variety of widespread skin disorders including acne, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, pruritus, and pain. This review summarized the current evidence on the effects of phytocannabinoids at the cutaneous level through the collection of in vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies published on PubMed, Scopus, Embase, and Web of Science until October 2020. Phytocannabinoids have demonstrated potential anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-aging, and anti-acne properties by various mechanisms involving either CB1/2-dependent and independent pathways. Not only classical immune cells, but also several skin-specific actors, such as keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, and sebocytes, may represent a target for phytocannabinoids. Cannabidiol, the most investigated compound, revealed photoprotective, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory mechanisms at the cutaneous level, while the possible impact on cell differentiation, especially in the case of psoriasis, would require further investigation. Animal models and pilot clinical studies supported the application of cannabidiol in inflammatory-based skin diseases. Also, one of the most promising applications of non-psychotropic phytocannabinoids is the treatment of seborrheic disorders, especially acne. In conclusion, the incomplete knowledge of the role of the endocannabinoid system in skin disorders emerged as an important limit for pharmacological investigations. Moreover, the limited studies conducted on C. sativa extracts suggested a higher potency than single phytocannabinoids, thus stimulating new research on phytocannabinoid interaction.
      Citation: Planta Med ; : -
      PubDate: 2021-04-13T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1420-5780
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Correction: A Novel Peptide Derived from Ginger Induces Apoptosis through
           the Modulation of p53, BAX, and BCL2 Expression in Leukemic Cell Lines

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Planta Med
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1468-1106



      Georg Thieme Verlag KG Rüdigerstraße 14, 70469 Stuttgart, Germany

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Planta Med ; : -2021-03-30T00:00:00+01:00
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Correction: Erianthridin Induces Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Apoptosis
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Planta Med
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1405-4720



      Georg Thieme Verlag KG Rüdigerstraße 14, 70469 Stuttgart, Germany

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Planta Med ; : -2021-03-11T00:00:00+0100
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Correction: Compound Cocktail Inhibits Influenza Viral Pneumonia via
           Phospholipase Cγ1 Phosphorylation-Related Necroptosis and Partial
           Autophagy in Natural Killer Cells

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Planta Med
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1388-0028



      Georg Thieme Verlag KG Rüdigerstraße 14, 70469 Stuttgart, Germany

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Planta Med ; : -2021-02-11T00:00:00+0100
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
  • Correction: Pharmacokinetic Properties of Moracin C in Mice

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Planta Med
      DOI: 10.1055/a-1384-8484



      Georg Thieme Verlag KG Rüdigerstraße 14, 70469 Stuttgart, Germany

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Planta Med ; : -2021-02-05T00:00:00+0100
      Issue No: Vol. eFirst
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.230.142.168
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-