Subjects -> ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (Total: 913 journals)
    - ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (810 journals)
    - POLLUTION (31 journals)
    - TOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY (54 journals)
    - WASTE MANAGEMENT (18 journals)

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (810 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 201 - 378 of 378 Journals sorted alphabetically
Energy and Environment Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Energy and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Energy, Ecology and Environment     Hybrid Journal  
Entrepreneurship and Sustainability Issues     Open Access  
EnviroLab Asia     Open Access  
Environment & Ecosystem Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Environment and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Environment and Development Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Environment and Ecology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Environment and Natural Resources Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Environment and Planning A : Economy and Space     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 57)
Environment and Planning B : Urban Analytics and City Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Environment and Planning C : Politics and Space     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45)
Environment and Planning D : Society and Space     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 76)
Environment and Planning E : Nature and Space     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Environment and Pollution     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Environment and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Environment Conservation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Environment International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Environment Systems & Decisions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Environment, Development and Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Environment, Space, Place     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Environment: Science and Policy for Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Environmental & Engineering Geoscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Environmental & Socio-economic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Advances     Open Access  
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Environmental and Sustainability Indicators     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Environmental and Water Sciences, public Health and Territorial Intelligence Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Environmental Bioindicators     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Environmental Challenges     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology     Open Access  
Environmental Chemistry Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Claims Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Environmental Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental DNA     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Education Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Environmental Engineering Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Environmental Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Environmental Evidence     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Fluid Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Environmental Forensics     Hybrid Journal  
Environmental Geosciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Environmental Geotechnics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Environmental Hazards     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Environmental Health Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Environmental History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Environmental Impact Assessment Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Environmental Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Environmental Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Environmental Management     Open Access   (Followers: 54)
Environmental Management and Sustainable Development     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Environmental Microbiology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Environmental Modeling & Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Environmental Modelling & Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Environmental Monitoring and Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Environmental Nanotechnology, Monitoring and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Policy and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Environmental Pollutants and Bioavailability     Open Access  
Environmental Pollution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Environmental Processes : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Environmental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Environmental Science & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Environmental Science & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 191)
Environmental Science & Technology Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Environmental Science : Atmospheres     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Science : Water Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Environmental Science and Ecotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Science and Pollution Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Environmental Science and Sustainable Development : International Journal Of Environmental Science & Sustainable Development     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Environmental Science: Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Environmental Sciences Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Environmental Skeptics and Critics     Open Access  
Environmental Smoke     Open Access  
Environmental Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Environmental Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Systems Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Environmental Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Environmental Technology & Innovation     Full-text available via subscription  
Environmental Technology Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Environmental Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Environmental Values     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Environments     Open Access  
Erwerbs-Obstbau     Hybrid Journal  
eScience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Estuaries and Coasts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Ethics & the Environment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Ethics, Policy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Études caribéennes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Euro-Mediterranean Journal for Environmental Integration     Hybrid Journal  
European Energy and Environmental Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
European Environment: The Journal of European Environmental Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Environmental and Civil Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Environmental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Spatial Research and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Evolutionary Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal  
Exposure and Health     Hybrid Journal  
Facta Universitatis, Series : Working and Living Environmental Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
FIGEMPA : Investigación y Desarrollo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Fire Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Food and Chemical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Food and Ecological Systems Modelling Journal     Open Access  
Food and Environment Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Fordham Environmental Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Forest Ecology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Foresta Veracruzana     Open Access  
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Freshwater Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Fronteiras : Journal of Social, Technological and Environmental Science     Open Access  
Frontier of Environmental Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Frontiers in Environmental Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Water     Open Access  
Frontiers of Environmental Science & Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Future Cities and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
FUTY Journal of the Environment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geo : Geography and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Geo-Image     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geoacta     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Geochemical Transactions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Geochronometria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geoenvironmental Disasters     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Geoforum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
GeoHealth     Open Access  
Geology, Geophysics and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Géomorphologie : relief, processus, environnement     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
GeoScience Engineering     Open Access  
Geospatial Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geosystems and Geoenvironment     Open Access  
Global Challenges     Open Access  
Global Environment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Global Environmental Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Global Journal of Environmental Science and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Global Journal of Environmental Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Grassland Science     Hybrid Journal  
Green Energy & Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Greenhouse Gas Measurement and Management     Hybrid Journal  
Groundwater for Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Harvard Environmental Law Review     Free   (Followers: 13)
Health Services Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health, Safety and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Hereditas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hidrobiológica     Open Access  
Historia Ambiental Latinoamericana y Caribeña     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
História, Natureza e Espaço - Revista Eletrônica do Grupo de Pesquisa NIESBF     Open Access  
Home Health Care Management & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Horticulture, Environment, and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Human & Experimental Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Human Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Hydrology: Current Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Ideas in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IMA Journal of Management Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Green Technology Journal     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Conservation     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Sustainability Accounting and Management     Open Access  
Indoor Air     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Information Systems Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Informs Journal on Applied Analytics:     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Ingeniería Hidráulica y Ambiental     Open Access  
Inhalation Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Innovative Infrastructure Solutions     Hybrid Journal  
Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Interdisciplinary Environmental Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Aquatic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Electronic Journal of Environmental Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Acarology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Information Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Alternative Propulsion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Applied Earth Observations and Geoinformation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Corrosion     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Critical Infrastructures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Disaster Risk Science     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Ecological Economics and Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Ecology & Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Energy and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Energy and Water Resources     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Environment and Geoinformatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Environment and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Environment and Planning A : Economy and Space
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.348
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 57  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0308-518X - ISSN (Online) 1472-3409
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Articulation work: Value chains of land assembly and real estate
           development on a peri-urban frontier

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      Authors: Vinay Gidwani, Carol Upadhya
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      If the entanglements of real estate and finance capital are pivotal in ongoing urban transformations in cities of the global south, then a less visible but equally vital dimension is the process of land assembly on which residential and commercial real estate speculation and development are premised. This paper pries open the value chain of land assembly that underlies these transformations in a rapidly expanding peri-urban frontier of Bengaluru, India. Drawing on detailed interviews with land market intermediaries, operating across different scales, who were instrumental in assembling agricultural land for a large apartment complex, the paper shows how existing forms of social power and local knowledge are harnessed to create inter-scalar linkages that enable the creation and extraction of value in Indian real estate. It makes the case for understanding the economic and cultural work of intermediaries in animating land's value chain as ‘articulation work’. Finally, the paper assesses the varying forms and quantum of value that are generated and captured by different actors in the value chain, which stretches from the landowning farmer up to a major real estate company, to reflect on the micro-dynamics of speculative urbanism and agrarian urbanization.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T05:09:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221107016
       
  • Territorial stigmatisation beyond the city: Habitus, affordances and
           landscapes of industrial ruination

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      Authors: Stephen Hincks, Ryan Powell
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Loїc Wacquant's concept of territorial stigmatisation has resonated widely across the social sciences and is increasingly called upon in analyses and critiques of contemporary modes of governing marginality. It forms a key part of his broader theorisation of the polarised city and urban scholars have responded to his call for comparative analyses of neoliberal state-crafting in applying it to other urban contexts. This paper focuses on non-urban deindustrialised and peripheral spaces in discussing the ways in which the shifting interdependencies, differing historical trajectories, geographies (including terrain), and social relations of such spaces mark them out as outliers within, but not necessarily incompatible with, Wacquant's schema. It focuses on the former coalfield communities of the Welsh Valleys in the UK as one such example of a peripheral, deindustrialised ‘area of relegation’ distinct from urban locales. We bring together a rich body of UK scholarship that articulates the coalfields as ‘laboratories of deindustrialisation’ with Wacquant's framework. In doing so, we offer a critique of Wacquant's integration of social, physical and symbolic space. We argue that terrain and landscape are weakly incorporated within Wacquant's theorising, and those influenced by his writings, and discuss the potential of the theory of affordances as a useful complement in more fully integrating physical space in accounts of territorial stigmatisation.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-17T06:01:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221107022
       
  • Follow the money

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      Authors: Sarah Hughes-McLure
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper presents an original follow the money methodology and argues for adopting the approach in geographical research. In 2011, Christophers made a compelling theoretical case for following money; however, it is empirically challenging, and his call remains unanswered. I propose an approach for following money in practice, using quantitative methods to do critical financial analysis to map and model flows of money. Drawing on the cases of vaccine bonds and rhino bonds, I illustrate this approach and make the case for this powerful methodology, outlining its contributions to advancing debates in geography. First, following money provides a robust and detailed empirical evidence base, offering a clear and precise understanding of a case study. Second, empirically, the methodology delivers a precise account of the material (re)distribution of resources, revealing who benefits or loses, by how much, and where. Theoretically, the methodology contributes to understanding the social and economic relations which support and are created by money's circulation. Fourth, following money reveals the mechanisms and consequences of financialisation. Finally, the approach contributes to understanding risk in society by uncovering financial risks, who faces them, and their significance. I also present some notes of caution on the limitations of the approach.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-17T06:01:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221103267
       
  • The proximity and dynamics of intercity technology transfers in the
           Guangdong–Hong Kong–Macau Greater Bay Area: Evidence from patent
           transfer networks

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      Authors: Haitao Ma, Yehua Dennis Wei, Liang Dai, Xuanfang Xu
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The patent transfer provides an important indication of technology flows and knowledge diffusion across space. Drawing on patent transfer data, we modeled intercity technology transfer networks in the Guangdong–Hong Kong–Macau Greater Bay Area, a city region special for its “one country, two systems” structure, in the periods 2007–2011 and 2012–2016. We then explored the evolutionary characteristics of the networks and further examined the impact of, and interaction between, different forms of proximities in relation to technology transfer over time. Our results show that some kinds of proximities (institutional, cognitive, and social) are able to promote technology transfers, while others (geographical and cultural) do not exert significant impacts. Of the latter category, geographical proximity can, however, indirectly affect technology transfer by acting on the proximity of other dimensions (institutional, cognitive, and social). For instance, cognitive proximity can compensate for the lack of geographical proximity and social proximity frequently accompanies geographical proximity—and both relationships are reinforced over time. In contrast, the interrelatedness of geographical and institutional proximities have transformed from a relation of substitution to complementarity.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T05:31:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221104822
       
  • Firm decline and the mobility of US inventors, 1976–2015

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      Authors: Melissa Haller
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Because innovation is a key driver of economic growth, the mobility of inventors is one important consideration for firms and policy makers. While considerable research examines the factors that influence inventor mobility in general, this research traces US inventors in response to firm decline. Using regression to model inventors’ probability of patenting in a new firm or moving to a new city, I find that the most skilled and well-connected inventors have the easiest transition after leaving a struggling company, but they are also most likely to move away to seek re-employment. After the decline of a major firm, inventors are less likely to move away from cities with more diverse regional economies.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T06:03:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221103266
       
  • Global locational inequality: Assessing unequal exchange effects

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      Authors: Andrea Ricci
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Growth in international trade between countries at different levels of development is one of the main drivers of economic globalization. This phenomenon relates to the new international division of labour in which an Emerging Periphery, hosting the offshoring and outsourcing of world manufacturing, stands between a developed Center and a still backward, Poor Periphery. Following the analysis of the relative and absolute indices of global locational inequality, the effect of the unequal exchange on world income distribution in the last 25 years is investigated. A new methodology based on real currency misalignments and value-added trade is presented, which accounts also for international value transfers within global value chains. The counterfactual test shows that trade value transfers represent a significant source of revenue for the Center diverted from the Peripheries. Unequal exchange widens the opportunity gap between citizens of rich and poor countries through an increase in global locational inequality. Redefining post-pandemic international economic rules should therefore recognize the effect of unequal exchange on global inequality.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-13T06:23:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221107023
       
  • Critical realist perspectives on the urban growth system

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      Authors: David Waite
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Why some cities have been able to sustain economic growth more than others, and how particular technological or sectoral break points shift a city's economic performance favourably (or unfavourably), present ongoing conundrums. Whilst single factor accounts – such as the skilled city and the creative city – have the appeal of analytical parsimony, economic geographers suggest that a multiplicity of structures, processes and events typically sit behind how growth originates and is subsequently shaped. Given such complexity, how can we develop appropriate approaches to theorising causality within urban economic systems' This paper presents the case that critical realism may perform a useful ground-clearing role. With a layered ontology at its core, coupled with recent literature providing greater guidance for empirical application, it is argued that critical realism may present a complementary explanatory perspective.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T01:23:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221102958
       
  • Global production and the crisis of the tax state

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      Authors: Clair Quentin
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article combines a fiscal sociology framing with value theory in the classical tradition to yield a composite lens through which to examine the relation between Global Value Chains, Global Wealth Chains and the tax state. It has specific regard to the ongoing crisis of tax states globally, as corporate profits go undertaxed. In summary, the argument is as follows. Although capital and the state are both primarily in the business of capturing value from Global Value Chains indirectly (i.e. otherwise than through ownership of means of material production), labour in Global Wealth Chains has a dual role of (i) suppressing the profitability associated with material production in favour of returns from intangibles and (ii) suppressing the corporate tax take. It therefore simultaneously constitutes capital's instrument of value capture, and its instrument of supremacy in its contestation with the state over the proportion in which value capture is shared between the two. Better-paid labour associated with value capture on the part of capital (i.e. better paid Global Wealth Chain labour) is predominantly located in wealthier states, giving those states an alternative source of revenue and consequently giving them a reason for maintaining a global order in which capital has supremacy over them in the contestation over value capture from Global Value Chains. Further, these dynamics are in a feedback loop which serves as a countervailing tendency staving off a structural crisis of capitalism, and that feedback loop is a core driver for today's crisis of tax states.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T05:40:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221105083
       
  • The structural deficit of the Olympics and the World Cup: Comparing costs
           against revenues over time

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      Authors: Martin Müller, David Gogishvili, Sven Daniel Wolfe
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The Olympic Games and the Football World Cups are among the most expensive projects in the world. While available theoretical explanations suggest that the revenues of mega-events are overestimated and the costs underestimated, there is no comprehensive empirical study on whether costs exceed revenues. Based on a custom-built database from public sources, this article compares the revenues and costs of the Olympic Games and World Cups between 1964 and 2018 (N = 43), together totalling close to USD 70 billion in revenues and more than USD 120 billion in costs. It finds that costs exceeded revenues in most cases: more than four out of five Olympics and World Cups ran a deficit. The average return-on-investment for an event was negative (– 38%), with mean costs of USD 2.8 billion exceeding mean revenues of USD 1.7 billion per event. The 1976 Summer Olympics in Montréal, the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi and the 2002 World Cup in Japan/South Korea recorded the highest absolute deficits. The Summer Olympics 1984 in Los Angeles, the Winter Olympics 2010 in Vancouver and the 2018 World Cup in Russia are among the few events that posted a surplus. The article concludes that the Olympic Games and the Football World Cup suffer from a structural deficit and could not exist without external subsidies. This finding urges a re-evaluation of these events as loss-making ventures that lack financial sustainability.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T05:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221098741
       
  • Authoritarian state capitalism: Spatial planning and the megaproject in
           Russia

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      Authors: Nadir Kinossian, Kevin Morgan
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The phenomenon of state capitalism is attracting growing attention in economic geography and political economy. We contribute to the debate by exploring the authoritarian state capitalism variant whereby the state moves beyond a predominantly regulatory role and appears as the dominant actor. We take Russia to be a prominent example of authoritarian state capitalism because the central state has subjugated economy, created organisational structures and designed development strategies to serve the interests of the kleptocrat, inverting the conventional meaning of ‘state capture’. The paper illustrates the centrality of the state by exploring two state-sponsored megaprojects: (i) the upgrade of the Northern Sea Route and (ii) the construction of innovation clusters (Skolkovo). In the first case, the state directs resources to the Northern Sea Route to secure Russia's control of the Arctic. In the second case, the state attempts to replicate the perceived developmental success stories of the West by fostering technology clusters. Each illustrative case offers an instructive insight into Russia's authoritarian state capitalism characterised by tensions between its own political and economic repertoires and a contentious relationship with the Western-dominated liberal capitalist world order.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T05:39:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221104824
       
  • State capitalism, capitalist statism: Sovereign wealth funds and the
           geopolitics of London’s real estate market

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      Authors: Callum Ward, Frances Brill, Mike Raco
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      We respond to the special issue’s call for a multiscalar, historicised approach to state capitalism through an exploration of Sovereign Wealth Fund investment into London real estate. We point to how the UK’s ostensibly market-led recovery since the 2008 financial crisis has relied in part on attracting ‘patient’ state capitalist investments. In this, we contextualise the relational regulation of real estate markets as the outcome of intersecting state projects by considering the investment motivations of the single largest owner of London real estate, the Qatari Investment Authority, and the utilisation of their investment by UK governance actors. Focusing on Qatari Investment Authority’s involvement in London’s Olympic Village, we highlight how this strategic coupling in the real estate market realised domestic and geopolitical aims for the Qataris while facilitating the UK government's strategy to ameliorate London’s housing shortage by fostering a ‘build to rent’ asset class. In doing so, we contribute to readings of state capitalism as an ‘uneven and combined’ process beyond the traditional state/market binary by placing sovereign wealth fund investment into the context of city governance, the geopolitics of real estate and resultant relational forms of regulation.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-31T02:17:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221102157
       
  • Microfoundations of global value chain research: Big decisions by small
           firms

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      Authors: Giulio Buciuni, Jacopo Canello, Gary Gereffi
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we introduce a unique longitudinal dataset from the Italian Ministry of Economy and Finance Annual Survey (IMEFAS) to assess how micro and small enterprises (MSEs) partake in the global economy by tapping into global value chains (GVCs). The results of the empirical analysis show that the great majority of micro and small enterprises are unable to establish direct links with GVCs. However, two sub-categories of subcontractors and branded producers were able to accomplish upgrading and partake in GVCs after the 2008 economic crisis. For both groups of firms, strategies implemented in domestic value chains contributed to their future participation in GVCs. By identifying small firms’ value chain decisions associated with their ability to access GVCs directly, this study sheds light on the microfoundations of GVCs. It paves the way for the future intersection of small business economics and GVCs, two areas of research that have seldom talked to each other.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T05:48:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221099025
       
  • The distinctiveness of state capitalism in Britain: Market-making,
           industrial policy and economic space

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      Authors: James Silverwood, Craig Berry
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Britain is rarely considered an exemplar of ‘state capitalism’. In contrast, we argue that Britain should be treated as the prototype project of state capitalism in the world economic system, the primary contribution of our paper been to outline the parameters of state capitalism in Britain across two historical periods. Turning the conceptual lens of state capitalism towards Britain raises some challenging issues for the wider literature. Recent scholarship has started to consider greater diversity in regimes of state capitalism and moved beyond the typical nation-state geographical imaginary of state capitalism. Similarly, our paper seeks to introduce a new spatiality to state capitalism with deeper sensitivity to multi-scalar relations. State capitalism in Britain has rarely been bound to the geographical limitations of the nation-state; instead, it has been a transnational project, centred variably on empire, Europe, and the global market – with industrial policy tailored to enable the British economy to exploit and/or service these various spaces by ‘making markets’. We emphasize the often-financialized nature of this industrial policy intervention arguing it is constitutive of a ‘financial state capitalism’.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T05:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221102960
       
  • The spatiality of collective action and organization among platform
           workers in Spain and Chile

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      Authors: Karol Morales-Muñoz, Beltran Roca
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The expansion of the platform economy has altered the spatial organization of work and employment relations, leading to deregulation and eroding workers’ social power. However, despite the radical individualization and precarization of platform work, workers demonstrate agency. This article explores the political strategies employed by place-based platform workers, with a particular focus on the spatiality of their collective action. Using an ethnographic methodology, the article analyses the case studies of drivers’ trade associations in Chile and the couriers’ organization in Spain. The results show significant similarities between the two groups: (a) non-conventional forms of labour activism; (b) using social media to share experiences, foster solidarity and organize collectively; (c) organizing in large cities; (d) starting locally and progressing to higher scales, and (e) building national and international alliances. The article concludes that workers respond to the spatial organization of work by platforms in a multi-scalar way that is strongly influenced by both their imaginaries and the political and regulatory context.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T05:35:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221103262
       
  • Road to nowhere or to somewhere' Migrant pathways in platform work in
           Canada

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      Authors: Laura Lam, Anna Triandafyllidou
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Canada boasts some of the most highly educated migrants in the world, but it is well recognised that these migrants face many labour market barriers to gainful employment despite their experience and qualification. Administrative data indicate that the proportion of gig workers is considerably higher among migrants, yet little is known about the various perceived and desired pathways of migrants who choose to pursue platform work. In this inductive, qualitative study, we interviewed 35 platform workers in Canada regarding why and how they turned to such forms of work and how it fits their overall plans for integrating into the Canadian labour market. Adopting a grounded theory approach, we found six pathways into platform work ranging from those who feel in control of the situation as a means to an end, to those who feel trapped in it, unable to find alternatives. We question how these pathways relate to macro factors (e.g. immigration status, professional status), meso factors (e.g. education and skills, networks) or micro factors (e.g. stage in life cycle, aspirations). In our analysis, we consider the critical insights offered by scholars on racial and platform capitalism in understanding the factors impacting migrants’ pathways into platform work in Canada. Our findings suggest that these structural inequalities are further perpetuated within platform work, even though in theory Canada's immigration system is merit-based with emphasis on high human capital. Migrants’ engagement in platform work is a piece of a larger puzzle of segmented labour markets.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T04:29:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221090248
       
  • When large-scale regeneration becomes an engine of urban growth: How new
           power coalitions are shaping Milan's governance

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      Authors: Veronica Conte, Guido Anselmi
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The overall aim of this paper is to discuss how, and the extent to which, the entrance of financial players in urban development affects the governance of the city. To this aim, we focus on Milan, a fast-globalising city that has recently opened its real estate market to transnational capital investors, and we zoom in on two flagship projects, Porta Nuova and CityLife, both symbols of the entrepreneurial agenda adopted in the early 2000s. While investigating these empirical cases, we aim to put in conversation urban regime analysis and the literature on the financialisation of urban development, by theorising the relationship between capital and the state. In contexts such as Milan, where local governments face increasingly reliance on local revenues from urban transformation, the main priority is to anchor investments and create a good business environment for increasingly mobile capital. At the same time, capital actors’ strategies depend on specific localised political and economic advantages that the state has to provide. We thus argue that power relations are shaped by the mutual dependence between the local state and capital investors. We conclude that it is precisely this relationship of mutual dependence that accounts for how urban governance is being restructured today, in a way that makes it financialised or more formally dependent on financial capital.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T12:37:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221100828
       
  • Placing the Foundational Economy: An emerging discourse for
           post-neoliberal economic development

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      Authors: Bertie Russell, David Beel, Ian Rees Jones, Martin Jones
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Emerging in the mid-2010s, the Foundational Economy has been heralded as ‘a compelling counter-project against neoliberalism’ and ‘an alternative pathway … [for] progressive political renewal’. Grounded in a review of cross-disciplinary debates, this paper introduces the concept of the Foundational Economy and places it in relation to heterodox geographic theories of socio-economic development such as the ‘social economy’ and ‘diverse economies’ literature. Whilst there are clear overlaps, the concept of the Foundational Economy can be distinguished through its commitment to (a) a zonal perspective; (b) a focus on maximalist social innovations; and (c) the reconstitution of citizenship. In radical combination, it is argued that the lens of the Foundational Economy facilitates ‘a trenchant critique and denaturalization of current conditions, in tandem with creative explorations of the political economy of alternatives’. The paper concludes by reflecting on current oversights and future research trajectories for Foundational Economy research.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T12:36:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221098745
       
  • Class monopoly rent and the urban sustainability fix in Seattle's South
           Lake Union District

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      Authors: Matthew B. Anderson, Elijah C. Hansen, Jason Y. Scully
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The paper contributes to the recent renaissance in Marxian land rent theory by examining the dynamics of rent in the context of contemporary urban sustainability policies and practices. It specifically examines the ways in which landowners, developers, and the local state work together to pursue class monopoly rent through a variety of policies and practices normally treated as separate, such as tax-increment financing, discursive-branding, urban growth boundaries, business improvement districts, and transfer of development rights. We implicate each of these practices as fundamentally linked insofar as they function as strategies for myriad invested actors in collaboratively pursuing class monopoly rent. In the process, we present a heuristic tool to conceptualize how these policies converge to the benefit of myriad rent seekers in the context of Seattle's rapidly redeveloping South Lake Union District. The study peels back the discursive and ostensibly progressive façade of urban sustainability to reveal a collaborative network of landowners, developers, and state actors whose goal is to increase rents. The multi-scalar dynamic of class monopoly rent is revealed as a constitutive feature of an urban sustainability fix embedded within wider processes of uneven neoliberal urbanization.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T06:24:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221099024
       
  • ‘Demarginalising’ a territorially stigmatised neighbourhood': The
           relationship between governance configurations and trajectories of urban
           change

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      Authors: Hannah Holmes
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Gentrification and territorial stigma are understood to be closely linked, yet the workings of the governance networks which underlay this relationship have seldom been explored in depth. This paper seeks to develop understandings of this relationship by showing how the interactions which occur in decision-making processes at the local level culminate in particular strategies for regeneration. It draws on interviews and document analysis to map out and examine networks of governance in Middlehaven, a territorially stigmatised area of Middlesbrough, UK, which has been targeted for regeneration, and indicates the methodology used for tracing the emergence of regeneration strategies in order to reveal how gentrification emerges as a policy response to territorial stigma. In doing so, this paper highlights the relationship between institutional arrangements, governance networks, and approaches to urban change in the context of a territorially stigmatised space in a post-industrial town, and indicates how neoliberal governance occurs in practice at the local level. By highlighting how particular strategies of gentrification which gain traction are embedded in local governance configurations, the paper challenges policy approaches to territorially stigmatised spaces which frame gentrification as an inevitable outcome.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T11:15:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221098742
       
  • Gillian Hart in Beijing: Negotiating capitalist models at the World
           Bank–China nexus

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      Authors: Chris Meulbroek
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Recent formulations of state capitalism tend to present it as a distinct system, anchored in China, in opposition to a neoliberal model represented by the United States and its global armatures. As an alternative to this binarism, this paper argues for Gillian Hart's relational-comparative approach to the geographies of the new state capitalism. It outlines three of Hart's theoretical-methodological principles—multiple trajectories, conjunctural analysis, and articulation—and demonstrates how they can be used to analyze the interrelations between “statist” and “liberal” development trajectories, through an empirical account of conjunctural struggles in and between China and the World Bank during the Tiananmen Square crisis. It argues that Tiananmen was an inflection point in the relation between the development trajectories of the Chinese state and the World Bank, where conflicts over the continuity of economic reform were simultaneously struggles over the boundaries of the state. Examining these institutions conjuncturally shows that China's “state capitalism” is not an opposite of the Bank's liberal model, but has been, in part, produced through power-laden contests over the meaning and materiality of state and market in multiple arenas.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T05:17:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221099299
       
  • Power couples, cities, and wages

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      Authors: Richard Florida, Charlotta Mellander, Karen King
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Power couples, defined as pairs of highly educated partners, tend to cluster in cities to take advantage of more developed labor markets, better jobs, and higher wages. This research examines to what extent being a partner in a power couple brings additional wage income benefits. We examine what the effects of power couple partnering is on wage income. Furthermore, we examine how the results are affected by gender and place of residence. To determine this, the research uses detailed Swedish micro data on power couples 23–39 years of age over the period 2007–2016. Our analysis finds positive and significant results from being in a power couple on wage income after controlling for individual, workplace, and geographical characteristics. This is the case for both men and women in power couple households without children, but for women only when children are present. For power couples in denser urban areas, we find a positive effect for men in power couples with or without children. We suggest this effect is due to a more equal “balance of power” between partners in highly educated power couples located in bigger cities, where norms and values may favor a relatively greater sharing of household duties between men and women, and where men face a different competitive situation in the labor market.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T05:39:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221094025
       
  • Can gentrification theory learn from Airbnb' Airbnbfication and the
           asset economy in Reykjavík

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      Authors: Anne-Cécile Mermet
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Urban studies have predominantly analysed the impact of short-term rental platforms such as Airbnb on cities through the lens of gentrification. However, the concept of gentrification has been applied to this platform-based urban change without considering how platform economy might alter the way scholars think about gentrification. First, this paper shows that short-term rental platforms build on the increasing use of housing by ordinary people to generate income. Second, it explores what this entails for gentrification studies. Contrary to the classical pattern of gentrification, suppliers of short-term rental platforms are not necessarily external investors but may be local homeowners in an area that is appealing to tourists. This puts local homeowners in an ambiguous position regarding gentrification patterns. On the one hand, as stakeholders providing the accommodation supply, they can theoretically benefit from short-term rental platforms by generating income from their housing. On the other hand, as long-term inhabitants, their housing trajectory can also be disrupted by the consequences of Airbnb-driven gentrification that they enable. This paper aims to disentangle the role of local homeowners in Airbnb-driven gentrification by answering the three following questions. (1) Who are the Airbnb hosts' Are they external newcomers or local homeowners' (2) Which host strategies lead to the displacement of long-term inhabitants' (3) What lines of inquiry does the ambiguous position of local hosts (as both driver and victim of Airbnbfication) open for gentrification studies'
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T05:39:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221094616
       
  • Capital accumulation, territoriality, and the reproduction of state
           sovereignty in China: Is this “new” state capitalism'

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      Authors: Xiaobo Su, Kean Fan Lim
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The portrayals of “new state capitalism” in both the popular media and policy-making circles have become a potent geopolitical category. This politically realist categorization is understandably popular because of its simplicity—states proactively participating in capital accumulation are construed as threats to institutions underpinning the “free market”. This paper complicates this portrayal by framing what appears to be a “rise” of state capitalistic maneuvers from China as a dynamic sovereignty–accumulation nexus. Specifically, Chinese state capitalism—and arguably state capitalism in general—constitutes the reproduction of sovereign rule. Underpinning this tension-filled process is territoriality: the use of territory for political, economic, and social ends. This dynamic relationship will be illustrated through an examination of how and why Yunnan, a southwestern Chinese province that was economically marginalized for several decades, emerged as a geostrategic platform for facilitating new rounds of capital accumulation. Through large-scale infrastructural investments in Yunnan, the Chinese state generated new territorial configurations that (a) enabled the positioning of Yunnan as a “bridgehead” of Chinese economic statecraft and (b) encouraged investments aimed at capturing new growth opportunities. While this state-led developmental process partially resolves tensions generated by previous rounds of capital accumulation, it also generates new tensions. Building on this case study, the paper demonstrates how Chinese state capitalism more accurately exemplifies a state-building process that is embedded in and is constituted by a central contradiction between the territorial and capitalistic logics of power. It concludes by presenting two directions for future research on Chinese state capitalism.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T05:59:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221093643
       
  • Mutable mobiles' Making space for an access-based car sharing market

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      Authors: Gianluca Chimenti, Hans Kjellberg
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      How is space made to matter in contemporary access-based markets' Drawing on the geographies of marketization and constructivist market studies, we examine how space is framed as a relevant quality to take into account in market exchange and how that qualification process itself is spatially situated. We trace a failed attempt to create an access-based car market in Stockholm, involving parallel but poorly synchronized site-specific effects of marketization across public and private realms. Our findings show how DriveNow sought to render its envisioned market spatially homogenous and the spatial interdependencies between this envisioned market and other (market and nonmarket) uses of space. We highlight the performation struggles between such alternative but overlapping spatial demarcations in specific microgeographies and show how seemingly similar spatial imaginaries can be materialized in different ways in one spatial realm.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T02:11:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221092773
       
  • Understanding social class in place: Responding to supergentrification in
           Aspen, Colorado

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      Authors: Jenny Stuber, Krista E Paulsen
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Existing research portrays elite places as prone to exclusion, welcoming of upscaling, and focused on protecting their economic self-interests. This paper provides nuance to this research by exploring how stakeholders understand and respond to supergentrification. During the fall of 2016, a group of citizen activists in the exclusive community of Aspen, Colorado, initiated an ordinance seeking to limit the expansion of luxury chain stores. Drawing on qualitative data related to this case, we show that how communities respond to supergentrification depends on locally specific understandings of place and social class, and how class interests have been institutionalized in local policies. In Aspen, residents opposed luxury chain stores by marshaling narratives that foreground the community's history of class mixing and the significance of working locals. Elected officials responded by taking account of the political power of local residents as well as the city's dependence on tax revenues from affluent visitors and second homeowners. Our findings extend and complicate understandings of how power works in elite places, highlighting both the potential for, and limitations of, efforts to thwart supergentrification and associated dislocation.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-06T06:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221090247
       
  • Platformed distinction work: Rethinking the migration and integration of
           food delivery workers in China

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      Authors: Ping Sun, Yuchao Zhao
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article describes how Chinese rural migrant workers are subject to the contradictory integrated regimes of capitalist advocates of migration and urbanisation, which are, in reality, distinctive integrating constraints. Online platform work has become a key site for rural migrant workers in China to experience and experiment with obfuscating sets of promotions and disciplines about labour, migration and urbanness. We propose the concept of platformed distinction work to explain how platforms have played a complex and multifunctional role that enhances migrant workers’ participation in the digital economy while concurrently defining and conditioning their labour as disadvantaged distinct work. This dual process of migrant workers’ social integration and distinction in platform work reveal the multilayered, complicated relations between migration and platformisation.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-01T06:16:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221090245
       
  • Writing geography: Teaching research writing and storytelling in the
           discipline

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      Authors: Robert M Wilson
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Writing is a vital activity for all academic geographers and essential to their success. But few graduate programs devote courses to teaching MA and PhD students how to write even though qualitative and quantitative methods courses are now commonplace. This article discusses some of the major critiques of academic writing and how I have sought to address these criticisms in Writing Geography, a graduate seminar I developed to help students improve their research writing.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T08:16:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221088599
       
  • The new whole state system: Reinventing the chinese state to promote
           innovation

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      Authors: Lin Zhang, Tu Lan
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article joins interdisciplinary efforts to problematize dichotomous thinking (i.e. state vs. market, East vs. West, and new vs. old) in existing discourses concerning state capitalism. Focusing on the New Whole State System in relation to tech companies owned by Tsinghua University, we analyze the actually existing state capitalism in China as a spatiotemporally specific and conjuncturally situated assemblage of discourses, policies, and practices. We show that under both the Old Whole State System (1950s–1970s) and New Whole State System (mid-2000s onward) eras, the Chinese state, reacting to foreign economic and geopolitical pressures, attempted to graft a centralized innovation system onto preexisting decentralized governance structures, concentrating resources to promote selected strategic industries. Unlike the Old Whole State System, the New Whole State System relies on new policy tools characterized by state-led financialization and state–private fusion. The evolution of New Whole State System as an assemblage reveals that, contrary to the dominant geo-imaginary, the Chinese state is not monolithic, unchanging, and culturally essentialist. Rather, it is actively engaged in global debates about, and in contested experiments with expanding the state's role in the economy in response to global, conjunctural crises of overproduction and financialization. By foregrounding this non-Western country/region’s internal debate about its own development trajectory, its uneven success in overcoming uneven development, and its interaction with the rest of the world, we propose an alternative perspective that contributes both theoretically and methodologically to the epistemologically Euro-American centric literature of state capitalism.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T08:16:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221088294
       
  • Making markets from the data of everyday life

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      Authors: Sangeetha Chandrashekeran, Svenja Keele
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This paper shows how the capture and circulation of data about social lives are enabled through digitalisation and market logics and practices. Drawing on Australia's new Consumer Data Right, a state-led initiative that creates access rights to personal data, we distinguish between market promises and the translation of market models in actually existing markets and regulatory frameworks. ‘Life's work’ is brought to market through promises to fix the problems of essential service markets by harnessing data. We argue that the Consumer Data Right is underpinned by a more ambitious vision to create future markets that transcend individual sectors through aggregation across the economy. These visions are silent on how the data, which cannot be owned and therefore cannot be commoditised, is capitalised. We show the Consumer Data Right's discursive, administrative, regulatory and technical aspects through which the previously hard-to-penetrate spaces of the home and everyday life become enrolled in circuits of value, both present and future. This involves technical standard setting by state agencies for accreditation, consent and approval processes; discourses of trust and calculative devices to promote consumer control; and weak de-identification and deletion requirements that grant data an afterlife beyond the original agreed use. This paper calls for greater attention to the enabling role of the state in digital markets as a counterbalance to the focus on the state's regulatory and constraining role. We argue for a more staged approach to market-making analysis to show how the state lays the market foundations that can then be deepened through practices of intermediation and capitalisation by private firms.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T08:15:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221083985
       
  • Balancing equity-based goals with market-driven forces in land
           development: The case of density bonusing in Toronto

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      Authors: Jeffrey Biggar, Abigail Friendly
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the connections between planning and land rent through a case study of density bonusing in Toronto, known as ‘Section 37’ – a form of land value capture. Density bonusing facilitates speculative bidding on future rents by private developers seeking ‘highest and best’ land uses – or efficient land uses – yet has implications related to equity when the unearned increment is extracted to recover value and invest in public goods. We situate land value capture within debates on the unearned income derived from land development in cities. We view the case of density bonusing through the lens of discretionary planning systems operating through flexible mechanisms. Specifically, we consider the direct role of planners towards balancing private interests with public goods in the face of shifting market and political contexts. The findings show that securing public goods from private land development through the unearned increment lacks consistency and predictability when the flexibility exercised by development actors drives planning decision-making. We conclude with a discussion on the implications for discretionary planning and land value capture in market-intensive, neoliberal environments.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T04:28:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221087243
       
  • A vicious cycle: Fiscal intervention, pension underfunding, and
           instability in (re)making racialized geographies

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      Authors: Amanda Kass, Andrew Crosby, Brenda Parker
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The 2008 financial crisis had profound impacts on government finances across the United States, including a lasting decrease in public pension funding levels. Today state and local governments in the United States have trillions of dollars in unfunded public pension liabilities, and the financial condition of pension systems has material impacts on borrowing costs, service delivery, and taxation, as well as retirement security. Local governments have been tasked with shoring up their pension systems while also grappling with sluggish revenue recovery, a situation that compounds already existing fiscal issues. Building on extant scholarship on crisis, austerity urbanism, and pragmatic municipalism, we examine the practice of “shorting” pension systems among Illinois municipalities and a state law meant to strengthen the fiscal health of local pension systems by curbing that practice. Using the case of the City of Harvey, a suburb of Chicago, we show how municipal finance and seemingly neutral policies aimed at ensuring fiscal health can trigger austerity actions that deepen fiscal stress for racialized communities. By examining Illinois’ pension fund landscape and proposing avenues for further research, we contribute to larger conversations about how governance, property, and pensions are inextricably intertwined with persistent racial inequality.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-17T05:58:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221084995
       
  • Uncovering the City of London Corporation: Territory and temporalities in
           the new state capitalism

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      Authors: Matthew Eagleton-Pierce
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The heterogenous literature on the ‘new state capitalism’ has provoked considerable academic and popular interest in recent years, but also critique regarding how to analytically bolster the concept and enhance empirical understanding. This paper responds to Alami and Dixon’s (2020a, 2020b) call for a fresh interrogation of the new state capitalism through an examination of the governance of the City of London. As the largest exporter of financial services in the world, the City plays a crucial role in the reproduction of financial capitalism. However, one major deficiency in debates on the political governance of the City surrounds the role of sub-state institutions. Remarkably, with limited exceptions, we know comparatively little about the main municipal authority: the City of London Corporation. As a local governing body, it conducts all the ordinary work of a public authority. But the Corporation also has many peculiar features which distinguish it from other public institutions, including vigorous support of financial services through planning law, lobbying and other promotion. This paper argues that thinking on the new state capitalism offers a vehicle for dissecting how the Corporation operates in the service of transnational financial interests. By unpacking how the Corporation is tied into a web of relations with private finance and other historically developed networks of power, the discussion problematises two macro themes on the new state capitalism: the spatial complexity of multi-scalar state governance and the temporal fluidity of legacies of the past interpenetrating with the present definition of ‘now’.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-08T10:57:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221083986
       
  • Any Time, Any Place, Any Way, Any Pace: Markets, EdTech, and the spaces of
           schooling

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      Authors: Dan Cohen
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      For decades investors have sought to find ways of profiting off the billions of public dollars spent annually on systems of public schooling across the world. This interest has coincided with the growing marketization of systems of public schooling, especially in the United States, as well as the increased use of educational technologies (or EdTech). This study examines the implications of the growing use of profit-driven educational technologies for the politics and spatial practices of schooling. Specifically, it examines past experiences with market-oriented EdTech systems in Oregon and Michigan to highlight how the combination of market systems of governance and profit-driven EdTech practices depend on the deconstruction of links between schools, communities, and students in order to roll out aspatial and apolitical educational practices that maximize profits. The placeless vision for education embedded in profit-driven EdTech helps promote the reproduction of dominant orders and stifles place-based struggles over educational justice.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T10:46:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221084708
       
  • Institutional incongruence, the everyday, and the persistence of street
           vending in Lagos: a demand-side perspective

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      Authors: Eghosa Igudia, Robert Ackrill, Michael Machokoto
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Informal street vending is the most widespread activity in the global informal economy and a central part of citizens’ everyday lives, both sellers and patrons, in the urban centres of the Global South. Recently, however, authorities have started to ban street vending and even buying from vendors, as they impose policies that seek to control access to and use of urban spaces in pursuit of urban modernisation. Despite this, street vending continues. We seek understanding of this policy failure, from the perspective of the patrons of street vendors, a largely-neglected focus. Adopting a neoinstitutionalist framework, we utilise the concept of institutional incongruence to frame our empirical research. We apply multinomial analysis to an in-depth survey of 529 individuals in Lagos, Nigeria, complemented by 10 interviews. We find patrons are motivated by multiple economic, social and spatial factors. Our results, as well as codifying and confirming existing understandings of patrons’ motivations, introduce a distinct factor – necessity – into the literature. These results allow us to offer important policy insights. Gaps between citizens’ behaviour impacted by the formal institutions of neoliberal urban policies, and the longstanding informal institutions shaping custom, and community, provide new insights into Lagosians’ everyday lives as patrons of street vendors. Moreover, these urban policies are shown to drive people towards street vending, as sellers and patrons – the opposite of their intended outcome. For policies to be developed that can reduce institutional incongruence and improve, rather than worsen, Lagosians’ lives, our results offer an important starting point.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T04:15:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221083989
       
  • ‘This isn’t forever for me’: Perceived employability and migrant gig
           work in Norway and Sweden

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      Authors: Gemma Newlands
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Information asymmetry regarding local job prospects, imperfect portability of qualifications and a lack of host country language skills combine to reduce migrants’ perceptions of their own employability. As a result, platform mediated gig work has become a common labour market entry point for new migrants. However, there is a near-universal expectation among workers is that gig work will be undertaken short-term, rather than as the first step of a longer gig-career. While research has explored the individual and structural factors, there has been limited attention as to how the specific occupational context in which a worker is embedded can also shape workers’ perceived employability. In this article, I therefore present the results of 37 semi-structured interviews with migrant Foodora couriers across Norway and Sweden, exploring how the specific occupational context of gig work intersects with migrants’ perceived employability. This article identifies, firstly, that obtaining employment in gig work was not perceived to be a reflection of workers’ own local employability. Secondly, workers’ short-term temporal orientations shape how participants are able to cope with the physical, emotional and identity demands of gig work. Thirdly, workers have to re-frame their perceived employability in the face of what is perceived to be widespread discrimination in the local labour market context. Lastly, the specific occupational context of gig work was considered to be either of no value to future local employers, or a negative signal as to a worker’s skills and labour market integration.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T12:30:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221083021
       
  • State Capitalism and Spanish port development along the Maritime Silk Road

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      Authors: Federico Jensen
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      With the rise of ‘new’ state capitalisms, control over transport infrastructure has returned to the forefront of competition in the global economy. This article investigates how different state capitalisms interact to enable economic developments in ports. It tracks the relationship between state-owned firms in the shipping and ports sectors through a case study of the port of Valencia in Spain and COSCO shipping group. The article identifies state capitalisms as variegated and relational to analyze the ways in which qualitatively different state capitalist dynamics interact at different scales. The article identifies two state capitalist dynamics which have been dominant in determining relations between Spanish and Chinese state capitalisms: 1) A commercial dynamic of maximizing Spanish ports profits by establishing new relationships with Chinese firms; and 2) an expansionary dynamic of increasing market share of Chinese state-owned firms in European shipping markets. These two dynamics are synergistic and have contributed to the competitiveness of Spanish ports and Chinese shipping firms by providing new capital to the port of Valencia and expanding the port's profile as a hub in the eastern Mediterranean, while also further solidifying COSCO's position in European shipping markets and its internalization and vertical integration strategy.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T10:27:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221083683
       
  • A very British state capitalism: Variegation, political connections and
           bailouts during the COVID-19 crisis

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      Authors: Geoffrey T Wood, Enrico Onali, Anna Grosman, Zulfiquer Ali Haider
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in governments playing increasingly prominent roles as active economic agents. However, state capitalism does not necessarily serve broad developmental purposes, and rather can be directed to supporting sectional and private interests. As the literature on variegated capitalism alerts us, governments and other actors regularly devise fixes in response to a systemic crisis, but the focus, scale, and scope of the interventions vary considerably, according to the constellation of interests. Rapid progress with vaccines notwithstanding, the UK government's response to COVID-19 has been associated with much controversy, not only because of an extraordinarily high death rate, but also because of allegations of cronyism around the granting of government contracts and bailouts. We focus on the latter, investigating more closely who got bailed out. We find that badly affected sectors (e.g. hospitality, transportation) and larger employers were more likely to get bailouts. However, the latter also favored the politically influential and those who had run up debt profligately. Although, as with state capitalism, crony capitalism is most often associated with emerging markets, we conclude that the two have coalesced into a peculiarly British variety, but one that has some common features with other major liberal markets. This might suggest that the eco-systemic dominance of the latter is coming to an end, or, at the least, that this model is drifting towards one that assumes many of the features commonly associated with developing nations.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T03:34:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X211072545
       
  • Dispossession without displacement: Producing property through slum
           redevelopment in Bengaluru, India

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      Authors: Carol Upadhya, Deeksha M Rao
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The paper examines the role of slum redevelopment in the production of private property in land in a fast-growing city of southern India. Drawing on an in-depth case study in Bengaluru, we show that the tenurial rights of slum residents were eroded when the contested land on which they lived – which was layered with multiple rights and claims of various actors – was confirmed by the court as the sole property of an individual who claimed to be its owner. The transformation of the plot into private property and therefore into a fungible asset, free of encumbrances, allowed the landowner, the political entrepreneurs who spearheaded the redevelopment project, and various intermediaries to capture most of the rapidly escalating value of the land. The exchange of recognized land tenure rights for small flats carrying conditional titles further excluded slum residents from ‘proper’ urban citizenship based on property ownership and exacerbated the precarity of their lives in the city. In this case, in-situ (on the same site) slum redevelopment is shown to operate as a modality of enclosure in which the urban poor are displaced even while remaining in place – or a process of dispossession without displacement.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-02-02T05:40:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221073988
       
  • Reluctant state capitalism: Antipathy, accommodation and hybridity in
           Irish telecommunications

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      Authors: Donal Palcic, Eoin Reeves, Heather Whiteside
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      The state capitalism literature emphasizes the new roles played by states in global politics and domestic economies through heightened intervention and ownership of key resources and sectors. In Ireland, we instead find a reluctant state capitalism evinced by antipathy towards state ownership, the accommodation of private sector failures and embrace of hybrid governance. Rather than something new and unprecedented, the Irish state has been a long-standing feature of domestic market development and an important institution supporting private enterprise today as in the past. Urging a more academically robust conceptualization of state capitalism, this paper relinquishes innate assumptions of obvious boundaries dividing liberalized capitalism from state capitalism in favour of engaging the domestic state and sectoral developments on their own terms and within their proper historical context. We find reluctant state capitalism in Ireland's telecommunications sector through a continuum of state–market involvement in four phases: commercial, devolving, evolving and partnership state capitalism. By identifying temporal phases of state capitalism, we move beyond the here-and-now of more contemporary ‘new’ state capitalism analyses that suggest rupture with an idealized, liberalized past.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T12:36:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221073989
       
  • Everyday speculation in the remaking of peri-urban livelihoods and
           landscapes

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      Authors: Helga Leitner, Samuel Nowak, Eric Sheppard
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Peri-urbanization is transforming the urban-rural interface of metropolitan areas across the global south. Large-scale planned developments and infrastructure projects result in the widespread displacement of residents and the disappearance of agricultural fields, vegetable plots, and small enterprises. Through multi-year fieldwork in eastern peri-urban Jakarta, we shift the optic from the large players driving these transformations—developers, land brokers, and investors—to examine how residents of peri-urban settlements (kampungs) respond to unexpected developments and manage the uncertainties associated with market-induced displacement. We conceptualize their practices as everyday speculation, extending speculation beyond its financial meaning to include social and cultural aspects. Both displacees in relocation kampungs and holdouts in kampungs subject to displacement make the most of emergent spatiotemporal rent gaps to devise ways to improve their livelihoods and accumulate wealth, but they also attempt to realize their social and cultural aspirations of reproducing kampung ways of life characterized by dense social networks and commoning practices such as mutual aid. Speculation reinforces pre-existing economic inequalities among kampung residents but is not obliterating social and cultural values that contest the norms of neoliberal global urbanism. Scaling up from everyday speculation by individual households, we identify three paths of kampung transformation that are concatenating across a shape-shifting speculative kampung landscape that coexists in a complex and synergistic relationship with the planned developments. Understanding residents’ everyday actions is thus important to grasping the full scope of peri-urbanization.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-10T12:59:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X211066915
       
  • A shift from home to the market: The marketization of reproductive labor
           in India

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      Authors: Dalia Bhattacharjee
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Commercial surrogacy marketizes life's work. In the era of neo-liberalism, women's work, which is often intimately performed within a heterosexual marriage in exchange of support, now remains a principal avenue to earn money. This form of feminization of labor has led to the emergence of markets for women's reproductive capacities. The present study stems from my ethnographic journey into the lives of the women who work as surrogate mothers in India. The narratives presented in the paper emerge from my prolonged fieldwork in Anand, Gujarat. It engages with the experiences, understandings, and the voices of these women, who I term reproductive laborers, in order to examine the notion of putting one's reproductive capacities in this intimate market for money.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-05T02:24:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X211071104
       
  • Winners of the Ashby prizes

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      Authors: Gabriella Y Carolini, Katie J Wells, Kafui Attoh, Declan Cullen
      First page: 841
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T04:58:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221105034
       
  • Mega-urban politics: Analyzing the infrastructure turn through the
           national state lens

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      Authors: Gavin Shatkin
      First page: 845
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Recent studies have focused attention on the proliferation of plans in the Global South for massive infrastructure investment to accelerate peri-urbanization and link together networks of proximate cities. This paper proposes that a focus on the national politics of the infrastructure push is an essential starting point to understand this trend, both because the national state plays a constitutive role in the processes that are shaping emerging urbanity, and because national states are themselves being transformed by this moment. In pursuing infrastructure-driven extended urbanization, national state actors seek to capitalize on moments of opportunity presented by shifts in the investment priorities of transnational financial actors, and by advances in infrastructure and logistics technologies, to gain power through the formation of political regimes based on economic growth and the distribution of rents from land development. Hence extended urbanization proceeds not as a gradual and linear process, but is instead marked by waves of disruptive and politically contentious reforms and plans intended to enable real estate, infrastructure, and logistics megaprojects. The current wave of political projects around extended urbanization is marked by distinct features, including the increasingly fragmented and decentered nature of transnational finance, and geopolitical dynamics associated with the emergence of an increasingly polycentric global order. It is consequently marked by geopolitical competition to shape emergent state agendas of extended urbanization, and by increasing variegation in the models of infrastructure-driven extended urbanization that state actors adopt. The paper illustrates these arguments with examples from Southeast Asia's mega-urban regions.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-03-17T05:59:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221087713
       
  • Between the colossal and the catastrophic: Planetary urbanization and the
           political ecologies of emergent infectious disease

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      Authors: Neil Brenner, Swarnabh Ghosh
      First page: 867
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Against the backdrop of contemporary debates on the transcendence of city-centric epistemologies in urban theory, this article proposes a theoretical framework for exploring the connections between processes of planetary urbanization and the political ecologies of emergent infectious disease. Following a brief overview of research on cities and the coronavirus pandemic, we elaborate a critical interrogation and heterodox synthesis of two distinct lines of investigation—(1) research by Roger Keil and his collaborators on the embeddedness of emergent infectious diseases within processes of extended urbanization and (2) work by radical epidemiologist Rob Wallace and his colleagues, which productively situates emergent infectious diseases in relation to the geographies and political ecologies of agribusiness under neoliberalizing capitalism. We direct attention to the ways in which processes of planetary urbanization are remaking the human and nonhuman geographies of non-city spaces, causing infectious pathogens to be unmoored from previously localized ecosystems and catapulted into broader territories of circulation. This line of analysis requires rigorous application of dialectical methods that can illuminate the internal relations through which cities dynamically co-evolve and co-transform with the non-city spaces, more-than-human territories, and multispecies political ecologies that support their metabolic operations, including at the microbiological scale of novel pathogens. The elaboration of such an approach yields an interpretation of the urbanization/emergent infectious disease nexus as a medium and expression of the agro-ecological crisis tendencies of neoliberal capitalism. A concluding section outlines three emergent arenas of agro-industrial transformation in which processes of extended urbanization have created new spatial configurations and infrastructural pathways for the production and proliferation of emergent infectious diseases.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T08:26:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221084313
       
  • Platform capitalism and cloud infrastructure: Theorizing a hyper-scalable
           computing regime

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      Authors: Devika Narayan
      First page: 911
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      There has been an explosion of scholarship on platform capitalism, with scholars identifying emergent labor practices, organizational forms, and business models. There is broad agreement that successful platform companies quickly dominate their markets, and winner-takes-all scenarios are common. However, market domination should not only be viewed as a condition but also as a process that is defined by specific drivers and practices. With regard to rapid expansion, much is said about network effects and data-intensive business models that are fueled by speculative logics as well as weak regulatory mechanisms. 1 advance the discussion on expansion and hyper-scalability by focusing on the transformation in underlying computing arrangements that shape the growth of platform-based companies. This article establishes cloud computing arrangements as setting the foundational sociotechnical infrastructure that drives rapid expansion.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T07:11:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221094028
       
  • Circulation and containment in the knowledge-based economy: Transnational
           education zones in Dubai and Qatar

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      Authors: Tim Rottleb, Jana M. Kleibert
      First page: 930
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Our analysis focuses on evolving global capitalism's production of high-skilled temporary migrant labour through the technology of special economic zones. Drawing on debates in economic geography on zones as globalised spaces of production and interdisciplinary scholarship on economic transformation in the Arabian Peninsula, we interrogate a relatively new type of zone that agglomerates foreign higher education institutions: transnational education zones. We conceptualise these zones as a distinct form of exceptional space produced by aspirations for a knowledge-based economy. Transnational education zones provide financial benefits and legal exemptions to state territory for international higher education investors who operate offshore campuses. By conducting a situated empirical analysis of transnational education zones’ logics and mechanisms in Dubai and Qatar, we show how these zones function as sites of circulation and containment that allow governments to harness globally circulating people and institutions for building a knowledge-based economy, while aiming to contain their social and political impact locally. While the underlying contradictions of simultaneous circulation and containment of knowledge and knowledge workers are modulated by the exceptional character of the zones, they cannot be fully resolved. In many ways, transnational education zones constitute a continuation of established strategies for economic development by exception that have been pursued by governments in the Gulf, which aim for global connectivity and rely heavily on controlling a temporary and contingent migrant workforce.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-02-02T05:40:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221077105
       
  • Waiting for the market' Microinsurance and development as anticipatory
           marketization

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      Authors: Nick Bernards
      First page: 949
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      This article traces experiments aimed at promoting wider adoption of ‘microinsurance’ – small, simplified insurance policies targeting the poorest. Microinsurance is a central element of a wider turn towards the promotion of ‘resilience’ in global development. The development of commercial markets for microinsurance, however, has failed to meet the expectations of promoters. This article traces the ways that the diverse donor agencies, professional organizations and philanthropic organizations involved in the promotion of microinsurance have responded to these failures, primarily by seeking to articulate basic data infrastructures that might make possible profitable insurance operations. These activities are described as a kind of ‘anticipatory marketization’ – experiments seeking to prepare the ground for the emergence of markets for risk management, thus far without much success. Where microinsurance has often been described in terms of ‘financialization’, this article suggests that there are important political dynamics at play that have been overlooked. Efforts to develop markets for microinsurance, and the persistent focus on troubleshooting and re-engineering those markets in the face of failure, are not driven directly by finance capital. Rather, they reflect fraught efforts to articulate modes of social protection not requiring substantial redistribution.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T12:36:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221073986
       
  • Financializing nursing homes' The uneven development of Health Care
           REITs in France, the United Kingdom and Japan

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      Authors: Natacha Aveline-Dubach
      First page: 984
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      Population aging has led to the establishment of Healthcare Real Estate Investment Trusts (HC-REITs) to boost the supply of nursing homes, but these initiatives have met with contrasting success in different countries. This paper bridges two strands of research on financialization, social welfare and the built environment, to explain the uneven geography of HC-REIT development in France, the UK and Japan. It argues that nation-specific processes of nursing home securitization are shaped by the interrelationships between three crucial factors: (i) the regime of retirement income, (ii) public policies dedicated to long-term institutional care and (iii) the power relations between the REITs and care providers themselves. Drawing on discussions with experts in these sectors, the paper demonstrates that liberal welfare states such as the UK have an especially attractive profile for Healthcare REIT investors due to the advanced state of financialized pension reforms, significant state disengagement in the provision of long-term care and REIT-friendly regulations that facilitate investment operations and leases. On the one hand, these tendencies are driving financial investors to satisfy a growing demand for retirement savings in niche markets such as Healthcare REITs. On the other hand, value extraction is being increasingly sought through the capture of care-dependent residents’ home equity. By linking social benefit provisioning to later life housing accommodation, this article casts important light on current debates on the political economy of real estate financialization, while also emphasizing the need for continued state support for long-term institutional care.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-31T11:11:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X211072865
       
  • Bringing borders back into cross-border regional innovation systems:
           Functions and dynamics

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      Authors: Francesco Cappellano, Christophe Sohn, Teemu Makkonen, Virpi Kaisto
      First page: 1005
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.
      International boundaries have been mainly considered as barriers in literature on the ‘cross-border regional innovation system’ (CBRIS), in line with their traditional understanding. In this paper, we underline that such a perspective presents limits, and argue in favour of an understanding of multidimensional borders that are subject to dynamic change over time. By mobilizing conceptualizations from the field of border studies, we examine the various functions of borders to explain the innovation-led development potential in cross-border regions. In this view, international borders can function as an interface, a marker of difference or a symbol, rather than a mere barrier that separates regions. Further, we suggest that these border functions are key factors in explaining the ‘fluctuating’ integration dynamics of regional innovation systems across the border. Mobilizing evidence from two case studies in European and North American contexts, the paper sheds light on the border as a potential resource for innovation and discusses implications for future research.
      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T12:36:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221073987
       
  • Symposium – Built Up: An Historical Perspective on the Contemporary
           Principles and Practices of Real Estate Development, by Patrice
           Derrington. London: Routledge (2021)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      First page: 1022
      Abstract: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T05:39:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308518X221083682
       
 
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