Subjects -> ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (Total: 913 journals)
    - ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (810 journals)
    - POLLUTION (31 journals)
    - TOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY (54 journals)
    - WASTE MANAGEMENT (18 journals)

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (810 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 601 - 378 of 378 Journals sorted alphabetically
Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Mutation Research/Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nano Select     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nanotechnology for Environmental Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Nativa     Open Access  
Natur und Recht     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Natural Areas Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Natural Hazards     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Natural Resources     Open Access  
Natural Resources & Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Natural Resources and Environmental Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Nature-Based Solutions     Open Access  
Nepal Journal of Environmental Science     Open Access  
NeuroToxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Neurotoxicology and Teratology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
NEW SOLUTIONS: A Journal of Environmental and Occupational Health Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Journal of Environmental Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
NJAS : Wageningen Journal of Life Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
Novos Cadernos NAEA     Open Access  
npj Urban Sustainability     Open Access  
Observatorio Medioambiental     Open Access  
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Ochrona Srodowiska i Zasobów Naturalnych : Environmental Protection and Natural Resources     Open Access  
Oecologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Oikos     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
One Earth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
One Ecosystem     Open Access  
Open Environmental Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Our Nature     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pace Environmental Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Packaging, Transport, Storage & Security of Radioactive Material     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Particle and Fibre Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pastos y Forrajes     Open Access  
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Perspectives in Ecology and Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Pharmacology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Physio-Géo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pittsburgh Journal of Environmental and Public Health Law     Open Access  
Planet     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Planeta Amazônia : Revista Internacional de Direito Ambiental e Políticas Públicas     Open Access  
Planning & Environmental Law: Issues and decisions that impact the built and natural environments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Plant Ecology & Diversity     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
Plant Knowledge Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Plant, Cell & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Plant-Environment Interactions     Open Access  
Plants, People, Planet     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Polar Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Political Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Population and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Population Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Practice Periodical of Hazardous, Toxic, and Radioactive Waste Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Presence: Virtual and Augmented Reality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Waste and Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers Part M: Journal of Engineering for the Maritime Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Proceedings of the International Academy of Ecology and Environmental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Vertebrate Pest Conference     Open Access  
Process Integration and Optimization for Sustainability     Hybrid Journal  
Process Safety and Environmental Protection     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Producción + Limpia     Open Access  
Progress in Disaster Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Progress in Industrial Ecology, An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Projets de Paysage     Open Access  
Psychological Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Public Money & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Quaternary     Open Access  
Recursos Rurais     Open Access  
REDER : Revista de Estudios Latinoamericanos sobre Reducción del Riesgo de Desastres     Open Access  
Regional Environmental Change     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Regional Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Rekayasa     Open Access  
Remediation Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Remote Sensing Applications : Society and Environment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Remote Sensing Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Rendiconti Lincei     Hybrid Journal  
Renewable Energy and Environmental Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Renewable Energy Focus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Research & Reviews : Journal of Ecology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Environmental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Environmental Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Resources     Open Access  
Resources and Environment     Open Access  
Resources, Conservation & Recycling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling : X     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Rethinking Ecology     Open Access  
Reuse/Recycle Newsletter     Hybrid Journal  
Review of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Review of Environmental Economics and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Revista AIDIS de Ingeniería y Ciencias Ambientales. Investigación, desarrollo y práctica     Open Access  
Revista Ambivalências     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Ciências Ambientais     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Meio Ambiente     Open Access  
Revista Chapingo. Serie Ciencias Forestales y del Ambiente     Open Access  
Revista Ciência, Tecnologia & Ambiente     Open Access  
Revista de Ciencias Ambientales     Open Access  
Revista de Direito Ambiental e Socioambientalismo     Open Access  
Revista de Direito e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista de Gestão Ambiental e Sustentabilidade - GeAS     Open Access  
Revista de Investigación en Agroproducción Sustentable     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Ambiental     Open Access  
Revista ECOVIDA     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Eletrônica de Gestão e Tecnologias Ambientais     Open Access  
Revista Geama     Open Access  
Revista Hábitat Sustenable     Open Access  
Revista Iberoamericana Ambiente & Sustentabilidad     Open Access  
Revista Kawsaypacha: Sociedad y Medio Ambiente     Open Access  
Revista Laborativa     Open Access  
Revista Meio Ambiente e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista Mundi Meio Ambiente e Agrárias     Open Access  
Revista Verde de Agroecologia e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rivista di Studi sulla Sostenibilità     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
RUDN Journal of Ecology and Life Safety     Open Access  
Russian Journal of Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Safety Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
San Francisco Estuary and Watershed Science     Open Access  
SAR and QSAR in Environmental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Saúde e Meio Ambiente : Revista Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
Science of The Total Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Sciences Eaux & Territoires : la Revue du Cemagref     Open Access  
Social and Environmental Accountability Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sociedad y Ambiente     Open Access  
Soil and Sediment Contamination: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Soil and Tillage Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
South Australian Geographical Journal     Open Access  
South Pacific Journal of Natural and Applied Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
Southern African Journal of Environmental Education     Open Access  
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sriwijaya Journal of Environment     Open Access  
Stochastic Environmental Research and Risk Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Strategic Planning for Energy and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Sustainability Agri Food and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sustainability in Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure     Hybrid Journal  
Sustainable Cities and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Sustainable Development Law & Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Sustainable Development Strategy and Practise     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sustainable Horizons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sustainable Technology and Entrepreneurship     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sustinere : Journal of Environment and Sustainability     Open Access  
TECHNE - Journal of Technology for Architecture and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Tecnogestión     Open Access  
Territorio della Ricerca su Insediamenti e Ambiente. Rivista internazionale di cultura urbanistica     Open Access  
The Historic Environment : Policy & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The International Journal on Media Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
The Ring     Open Access  
Theoretical Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Toxicologic Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Toxicological & Environmental Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Toxicological Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Toxicology and Industrial Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Toxicology in Vitro     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Toxicology Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Toxicon     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Toxicon : X     Open Access  
Toxin Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Transactions on Environment and Electrical Engineering     Open Access  
Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Transportation Safety and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transylvanian Review of Systematical and Ecological Research     Open Access  
Trends in Ecology & Evolution     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 230)
Trends in Environmental Analytical Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trends in Pharmacological Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Tropicultura     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Engineering and Environmental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
UCLA Journal of Environmental Law and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
UD y la Geomática     Open Access  
Universidad y Ciencia     Open Access  
Universidad y Ciencia     Open Access  
UNM Environmental Journals     Open Access  
Urban Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Urban Transformations     Open Access  
Veredas do Direito : Direito Ambiental e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access  
VertigO - la revue électronique en sciences de l’environnement     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Villanova Environmental Law Journal     Open Access  
Waste Management & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Water Environment Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43)
Water International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Water Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Water, Air, & Soil Pollution : Focus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Water, Air, & Soil Pollution     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Weather, Climate, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Web Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Wetlands     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Wilderness & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Wetlands
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.755
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 24  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0277-5212 - ISSN (Online) 1943-6246
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Hydrological Instability of Ponds Reduces Functional Diversity of
           Freshwater Molluscs in Protected Wetlands

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      Abstract: Abstract Different facets of biodiversity of freshwater molluscs were compared in 21 small ponds located in the wetland area around Lake Łuknajno (Nature Reserve protected by Ramsar Convention, UNESCO Biosphere Reserve). The ponds examined between 2010 and 2019 differed in their susceptibility to periodical drying out. In addition, the hydrological stability of many of them was significantly reduced in 2015-19 as a result of climatic changes (decrease in precipitation, shortening of the snow cover period, increase in the average temperature during the growing season, increase in the frequency of heat waves). The functional diversity of molluscs decreased linearly and monotonically with the increase in the frequency and intensity of drying up of ponds, so it can be treated as a good indicator of their hydrological instability. Other facets of biological diversity - taxonomic and phylogenetic - were unimodally related to differences in stability. Along time, species resistant to desiccation being specialized inhabitants of temporary water bodies clearly increase their percentage, and the share of species less resistant decreases.
      PubDate: 2022-05-18
       
  • A Tale of Two Complexes: Secretive Marsh Bird Abundance Differs in the
           Sandhills and Rainwater Basin, Nebraska

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      Abstract: Wetland complexes in the Great Plains are critical for many bird populations. In Nebraska, two large and important wetland complexes are the Rainwater Basin (RWB) and Sandhills. The RWB is a highly altered landscape where most historic playa wetlands have been destroyed and remaining isolated wetlands are altered. The extensive wetlands of the Sandhills are influenced by water table levels and the wetlands and overall landscape are, by comparison, far less altered. Secretive marsh birds (SMBs; bitterns, rails, gallinules and certain species of grebes) are a group of difficult-to-detect species which have received little attention in both complexes. Standardized SMB surveys were conducted in both regions to determine whether (1) conservation actions in the RWB have the potential to benefit breeding SMBs, (2) SMB species assemblages are similar between the two complexes, and (3) whether certain habitat conditions influence SMBs abundance in each complex. Most SMB species, especially Virginia Rail, Least Bittern, Pied-billed Grebe, and American Bittern, were numerous in the Sandhills as expected, but moderate densities of Pied-billed Grebe, Sora and American Bittern were also present in the RWB. While certain SMBs were found in both complexes, overall SMB communities differed between the complexes. Water level and complex were important variables influencing SMB abundance. The purchase, restoration and management of additional wetlands in the RWB, as well as proactively working with private landowners to maintain the Sandhills as a working landscape, will benefit SMBs in Nebraska.
      PubDate: 2022-05-13
       
  • Physical Protection in Aggregates and Organo-Mineral Associations
           Contribute to Carbon Stabilization at the Transition Zone of Seasonally
           Saturated Wetlands

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      Abstract: Wetlands store significant soil organic carbon (SOC) globally due to anoxic conditions that suppress SOC loss. However, stored SOC may become vulnerable to decomposition where climate and land use change alter wetland hydrology. Seasonally saturated wetlands experience fluctuating hydrologic conditions that could promote physicochemical mechanisms known to stabilize terrestrial SOC. These wetlands are therefore likely to be important for SOC storage at the landscape-scale. This study examined physicochemical stabilization of SOC within five seasonally saturated wetlands across a hydrologic gradient from the frequently saturated basin edge to the rarely saturated upland. At each wetland, we monitored water level and collected soil samples from the top two mineral horizons across five transect points to quantify physical protection of SOC in aggregates and organo-mineral associations between SOC and iron (Fe). As expected, both SOC concentrations and SOC stocks from 10–50 cm decreased across the transect from frequently saturated soils to rarely saturated soils. However, SOC stocks from 0–10 cm increased along this gradient, indicating diverging SOC dynamics throughout the soil profile. The majority of SOC was associated with macroaggregates across the transect, suggesting that macroaggregates are likely to physically protect wetland SOC during seasonal drying. By contrast, Fe-associated SOC was low across the transect, though modest accumulations of Fe (5 mg Fe g−1 soil) were observed in the transition zone where saturation was most dynamic throughout the year. Our results suggest that SOC stabilization occurs via physical protection within macroaggregates and, to a lesser extent, organo-mineral associations during dry periods in and around seasonally saturated wetlands. As climate scenarios predict intensified wet and dry cycles in many wetlands, understanding SOC stabilization is critical to predicting vulnerability to future change.
      PubDate: 2022-05-11
       
  • Modeling Present Distribution Commercial Fish and Shrimps Using MaxEnt

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      Abstract: Abstract Most fish and shrimps have valuable ecological and commercial benefits. The difficulties of the collection of distribution records and volatile nature these marine organisms have limited their monitoring and conserving. MaxEnt modeling technique is ideal option for modeling distribution and habitat preference of different marine organisms. In this study, the present distribution of commercial fish and shrimps including orange-spotted grouper John’s snapper, tigertooth croaker, banana and Jinga shrimps was predicted using MaxEnt and a set of environmental layers. Distribution modeling findings showed that this technique reflects well the actual distribution of species. Environmental predictors including iron, calcite, temperature, primary productivity and depth were the most important environmental factors determining the distribution of species. Finding of habitat preferences indicated that the recent habitats of the species have suitable environmental conditions for the species. The Persian Gulf, the Sea of Oman, the North Arabian Sea and Australia coasts of the South Pacific were predicted as the most suitable habitats for species. The finding of this study provided basic data to identify distribution areas and habitat preferences of commercial fish and shrimps for their recent management plans and conservation development.
      PubDate: 2022-04-29
       
  • Late Holocene Vegetation and Environmental Changes of Coastal Lowlands in
           Northern Iran: Possible Role of Climate, Human Impact and Caspian Sea
           Level Fluctuations

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      Abstract: Abstract Coastal forests and wetlands play an important role in supporting biodiversity, protecting the hinterlands and shorelines from erosion and also contributing to carbon sequestration and freshwater storage. To reconstruct late Holocene vegetation and environmental dynamics in the coastal lowlands of northern Iran and to detect the possible role of climate, human and Caspian Sea level fluctuation on coastal ecosystems, multi-proxy analysis was applied on the sediment cores from the inland Eynak (EYK) lagoon and near coast Bibi Heybat (BBH) alder swamp. Results shows that in the last 170 years, strong reduction of alder forest occurred around Eynak lagoon, while an expansion occurred in the coastal area in the last 100 years. This indicates that human impact shifted from the near coast to elevated inland, which might be due to the raised water level from the Caspian Sea and the coastal area of BBH region was flooded by brackish water from the Caspian Sea, and was not so suitable for agriculture anymore. This study indicate that alder swamp extent is different between coastal and inland sites, suggesting that further studies of multiple records across the region are needed. Moreover, this study helps to distangle human impacts from wetland processes and thus will be an important contribution to effective climate mitigation and conservation strategies. This multi-proxy study presents important palynological records, which helps to understand past and future impacts of various drivers, such as climate, human impact and sea level changes on wetland ecosystems both regionally and globally.
      PubDate: 2022-04-28
       
  • Predicting greenhouse gas fluxes in coastal salt marshes using artificial
           neural networks

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      Abstract: Abstract Prediction of wetland greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes has been a challenging undertaking. Machine learning techniques such as the artificial neural network (ANN) has a strong potential to provide high quality predictions of the wetland GHG fluxes. We developed eight different ANN models and investigated their suitability to predict the major GHG fluxes (CO2 and CH4) in coastal salt marshes (dominated by Spartina alterniflora) of Waquoit Bay, Massachusetts, USA. Based on the dominant environmental drivers, the daytime net uptake fluxes of CO2 were predicted as a function of photosynthetically active radiation, soil temperature (ST), and porewater salinity (SS). The net emission fluxes of CH4 were predicted as a function of ST and SS. Our models with the radial basis function neural network (RBNN) provided the most accurate and least-biased predictions of the net CO2 uptake (Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency, NSE = 0.98) and CH4 emission (NSE = 0.90-0.92). The linear layer neural network generated the least successful and most biased predictions of the GHG fluxes (NSE = 0.48-0.80). Other ANNs, including the commonly-used feed forward neural network (FFNN), provided less accurate and more biased predictions of the CO2 (NSE = 0.86-0.97) and CH4 (NSE = 0.73-0.89) fluxes than the RBNN. We, therefore, recommend using RBNN as the first choice and FFNN (or its variant) as the second choice for predicting the GHG fluxes in coastal salt marshes. Our findings and tools would help derive plausible scenarios and guidelines for restoration, monitoring, and maintenance of coastal salt marshes in the U.S. and beyond.
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
       
  • Responses of Soil Active Organic Carbon Fractions and Enzyme Activities to
           Freeze-thaw Cycles in Wetlands

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      Abstract: Abstract In order to clarify the response of soil active organic carbon fractions and enzyme activities in different type of wetlands to freeze-thaw cycles (FTCs), a FTCs simulation experiment of different type wetland soils were carried out. In the study, samples were collected from three soil layers of (0–10, 10–20 and 20–30 cm) undisturbed Deyeuxia purpurea wetland (UDPW), disturbed Deyeuxia purpurea wetland (DDPW) and rice paddy field (RP), and then exposed to FTCs at large (-10 to 10℃) or small (-5 to 5℃) amplitudes, respectively. The results showed that FTCs increased the soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in the three soil layers of UDPW, DDPW and RP by approximately 4.7–45.1%, 3.8–41.9% and 1.1–32.7% at large amplitude, and 8.7–48.1%, 5.2–43.4% and 2.2–31.8% at small amplitude. The interaction between small amplitude and higher water content resulted in the maximum increment of DOC concentration. However, FTCs decreased microbial biomass carbon (MBC) concentration and cellulase, invertase and catalase activities, and particularly the interaction between the large amplitude and higher water content exerted the most significant effect. As the increase of freeze-thaw frequency, DOC concentrations increased firstly and then decreased, while MBC concentrations and the three enzyme activities were opposite to DOC. The average change in DOC and MBC concentrations and enzyme activities due to the effects of FTCs varied from soil type, and the variation of DOC, MBC and enzyme activities across different type wetlands were as follows: UDPW > DDPW > RP. As the soil depth increased, the FTCs effect gradually weakened, which was manifested as 0–10 cm > 10–20 cm > 20–30 cm. For the three wetland soils, the significant correlations between active organic carbon fractions and enzyme activities indicate that the increase in DOC due to FTCs plays an important role on soil microbes and enzyme activities. However, the correlation was weak in RP soil, which might be related to strong disturbance of human.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
       
  • Distributions of the Non-Native Mangrove Sonneratia apetala in China:
           Based on Google Earth Imagery and Field Survey

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      Abstract: Abstract The non-native mangrove species, Sonneratia apetala, was widely planted in coastal restoration projects of China in the past three decades, and dispersed in mangrove habitats in some introduction areas, which aroused wide attention from scientists and forest managers. Therefore, it is an urgent need to investigate their distributing patterns and build a dataset with basic information for natural mangrove conservation and restoration. The techniques combined field survey and visual interpretation based on sub-meter spatial resolution imagery from Google Earth (GE). The results showed that the boundary of stable S. apetala populations was ranged from 18°15′ N to 25°36′ N, with a total area of 3,804.86 ha in China in 2020. Guangdong had the largest distribution area of 3,217.34 ha, accounting for 84.56% of the total S. apetala populations in China, within which Zhanjiang (20°35'-21°30' N) took the largest amount. The spatial distribution of S. apetala in China followed the following three characteristics, 1) S. apetala was concentrated in the mid-latitude region (20°00'-23°00' N) of the southeast coast of China, especially along the coasts of Leizhou Bay (20°35'-21°30' N) in Guangdong; 2) S. apetala populations were commonly found in the middle to low tidal zones and at the seaward edges of native mangroves; 3) the dispersal S. apetala populations were found along rivers, tidal creeks, and other water systems, which also concentrated in estuaries or bays with freshwater inflow, on the coastal zones with low salinity, and in bare mudflat or low-shading forest edges, and forest gaps as well.
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
       
  • Extent of Sedge-Grass Meadow in a Lake Michigan Drowned River Mouth
           Wetland Dictated by Topography and Lake Level

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      Abstract: Abstract Water-level fluctuations are critical in maintaining diversity of plant communities in Great Lakes wetlands. Sedge-grass meadows are especially sensitive to such fluctuations. We conducted vegetation sampling in a sedge-grass dominated Lake Michigan drowned river mouth wetland in 1995, 2002, and 2010 following high lake levels in 1986 and 1997. We also conducted photointerpretation studies in 16 years dating back to 1965 to include responses to high lake levels in 1952 and 1974. Topographic data were collected to assess their influence on areal extent of sedge-grass meadow. Dominant species in short emergent and submersed/floating plant communities changed with water availability from 1995 to extreme low lake levels in 2002 and 2010. Sedge-grass meadow was dominated by Calamagrostis canadensis and Carex stricta in all years sampled, but Importance Values differed among years partly due to sampling in newly exposed areas. Photointerpretation studies showed a significant relation between percent of wetland in sedge-grass meadow and summer lake level, as well as the number of years since an extreme high lake level. From the topographic map created, we calculated the cumulative area above each 0.2-m contour to determine the percent of wetland dewatered in select years following extreme high lake levels. When compared with percent sedge-grass meadow in those years, relative changes in both predicted land surface and sedge-grass meadow demonstrated that accuracy of lake level as a predictor of area of sedge-grass meadow is dependent on topography. Our results regarding relations of plant-community response to hydrology are applicable to other Great Lakes wetlands.
      PubDate: 2022-04-11
       
  • Spatial and Temporal Variation in Macrophyte Litter Decomposition in a
           Rare Chain-of-ponds, an Intermittent Stream and Wetland System

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      Abstract: Abstract Ponds and wetlands around the world face anthropogenic pressures that threaten key ecosystem processes such as nutrient and organic matter cycling. Wetlands in arid and semi-arid regions are particularly at risk from uncertainty of water availability and competing pressures for use. Such threats are most acute for non-perennial systems that rely on occasional surface water flows to maintain important ecological functions. This study investigates the decomposition of an endemic macrophyte Cycnogeton procerum (R.Br.) Buchenau as a key ecosystem process in a chain-of-ponds wetland system, located in the intermittently flowing Mulwaree River, New South Wales, Australia. The aims of this study were to identify spatial and temporal patterns and the relative importance of microbial activity in macrophyte decomposition to improve our understanding of ecological processes in these intermittent systems. Exponential decomposition rates (proportional mass loss (g)) were highest during spring and summer (0.07-0.10 kd-1) and slower during autumn and winter (0.03-0.04 kd-1), reflecting seasonal drivers. Decomposition was significantly different in 9 mm and 150 μm mesh bags only during spring, suggesting decomposition was mostly performed by microbes, with invertebrate herbivores possibly only a factor during spring lotic conditions. Mesotrophic conditions, regulated by flow and internal macrophyte and algal dynamics appear to maintain a highly productive, macrophyte-dominated aquatic wetland system. Temperature was a major factor in decomposition rates and expected increases due to climate change will accentuate pressure on the resilience of the macrophyte community. Alterations caused by changing climate and anthropogenic land use place the ponds at high risk.
      PubDate: 2022-04-09
       
  • Mid- to Late Holocene Environmental Evolution of a High Mountain Wetland
           in the Subtropical Andes Cordillera of Argentina

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      Abstract: Abstract Wetlands in mountains are highly dynamic and provide ecosystem services to human wellbeing. Understanding temporal and spatial wetland dynamics is crucial for successful management. This paper presents the reconstruction of a mire evolution at a high-altitude Andean valley in central-western Argentina, in subtropical South America (30°-36° S), during the Mid- and Late Holocene. The research is based on sedimentological and pollen analysis from a sedimentary section of 3.2 m thick exposed at the El Peñón valley. The record begins with an outwash environment after ca. 5700 cal. yrs BP associated with Pteridophytes dominance, followed by the development of a mire environment after ca. 3700 cal. yrs BP associated with Cyperaceae dominance. The environmental and vegetation changes are hypothesised to have occurred in response to a shift from cold to warmer conditions. Colder environments may have occurred again between 800 until < 600 cal. yrs BP, probably associated with the Little Ice Age. Tephra inputs are evidenced in the record from 1200 years BP onwards. However, the results do not show any conclusive evidence about the impact of volcanism in the dynamics of the wetland. High Amaranthaceae proportions would evidence human activities in the high-altitude valleys of the southern Andes, probably for the last 250 cal. yrs BP. This work permitted us to infer the evolution of the El Peñón wetland under multiple concurrent forcing factors from the Mid- Holocene onwards at different temporal scales, i.e. climate during the last 5700 yrs, and volcanism and anthropogenic impacts during the last millennium.
      PubDate: 2022-04-02
       
  • Pollution levels and toxicity risks of heavy metals in different reed
           wetland soils following channel diversion in the Yellow River Delta

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      Abstract: Abstract The spatial distribution characteristics of soil elements in estuarine wetlands, which are important indicators for the health of estuaries, are affected by the dynamic changes of river flow paths. To reveal the differences of the spatial distribution characteristics of soil elements following channel diversion, we selected three typical reed (Phragmites australis) communities in the Yellow River Delta: the abandoned Yellow River course (OC): the reed community in the riparian zone of the old course of the Yellow River, which was diverted in 1996; the new Yellow River course (NC): the reed community on the current river bank; the intertidal area (TC): reed communities on tidal flats not affected by the Yellow River but frequently by tides. The soil properties and spatial distribution characteristics of 17 soil elements were analyzed, and the Geoaccumulation Index (Igeo), Enrichment Factor (EF), Toxin Units (TUs) and New Toxicity Index (TRI) were used to evaluate the ecotoxicity of heavy metals. The mean pH value followed the order TC site (8.05) > NC site (7.97) > OC site (7.87). The electrical conductivity at the NC site (4.10 mS cm−1) was significantly lower than at the OC site (6.46 mS cm−1) and TC site (6.86 mS cm−1) (p < 0.05). The mean concentrations of P, Mo, Fe, Zn, Cu, Cr, Ni and As in the surface soil (0–20 cm) at the NC site were lower than those at the OC site and TC site (p < 0.05). The results of vertical distribution of elements showed that the concentrations of most heavy metals at the OC and TC site decreased along the depth of the soil layers and the highest values appeared in the upper soil layers. While the NC site was different, the highest heavy metal concentrations were found in the lower soil layers. The values of Igeo indicated that Ni, As and Mo at the OC and TC site, and As and Hg at the NC site showed high toxicity risks. The EF values for Cu, Ni, As, Mo and Hg of all three sites exceeded 1.5, implying that these elements might come mostly from anthropogenic sources. In addition, Ni, As and Cr exhibited higher contribution ratios based on TRI values and ΣTUs. Meantime, the ΣTUs and TRI values indicated that the TC site had the highest, and the NC site had the lowest toxicity risk. The channel diversion increased the risk of soil pollution at the OC site. It is necessary to carry out long-term monitoring and control measures to avoid potential ecological damage.
      PubDate: 2022-03-28
       
  • Assessment of Restoration Effects in Riparian Wetlands using Satellite
           Imagery. Case Study on the Lower Danube River

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      Abstract: Abstract To better understand the outcomes of river restoration, our paper analyzes the variability of the water content in a restored riparian wetland. We focused our demonstration on the case study of the Babina Islet located in the northern Danube Delta. This site was restored in 1994 by opening levees to regain the pristine hydrological regime with both flooding and dry phases depending on the water level of the Danube River. We monitored the wetland by using the Normal Difference Water Index (NDWI) estimated on Landsat scenes for the period 1984–2020. When compared to pre-restoration conditions, we found an increase of the surface-water area. The maximum surface-water area corresponded to the restoration works. Post-implementation of the restoration solution in 1994, the surface-water area is decreasing. The surface-water area pre-restoration is smaller than the surface-water area in present-day conditions, similar to the control site (Small Islet of Brăila), thus confirming the role of hydrology in maintaining the effects of restoration works. Moreover, we detected the increase of drought area since 1984 on both the restored and the control site. This finding appears to be a new challenge for restoring the riparian wetlands of the Lower Danube River. Our paper recommends the use of standardized indicators via satellite remote sensing to understand riparian wetlands functioning at large scale, which could help to design a coherent strategy of river restoration.
      PubDate: 2022-03-24
       
  • Ecosystem Carbon Stock and Stable Isotopic Signatures of Soil Organic
           Carbon Sources Across the Mangrove Ecosystems of Kerala, Southern India

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      Abstract: Abstract Mangrove ecosystems have high carbon storage and sequestration rates and become substantial sources of greenhouse gases when disturbed by land-use change. Thus, they are extremely valuable for inclusion in climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. However in Kerala, a west coast state of India, has lost 95% of its mangroves in the last three decades, posing a serious threat to global climate. The regional carbon stock data of mangroves that are at risk of depletion are rarely reported, despite the fact that they are crucial for mitigating and managing climate change impacts. In response, the study estimated the ecosystem carbon stocks and soil organic carbon sources of three different estuarine mangrove habitats of Kerala. The mean total ecosystem carbon stock of Kerala mangroves was estimated to be 218.98 ± 169.86 Mg C ha− 1 which is equivalent to 803.66 ± 621.47 Mg CO2 ha− 1, contributing a substantial amount of carbon to the global ecosystem carbon. Further 88% of the estimated ecosystem carbon stock was represented by vegetation biomass and 22% by the soil carbon stock. The stable isotopic signatures revealed that the accumulated autochthonous mangrove source attributed to the organic carbon in the soils of site 1 (Munroe island) and site 3 (Vypin) while the suspended organic matter in tidal water contributed to the soil organic carbon of site 2 (Ayiramthengu) mangroves. Mangrove structure, salinity, soil pH and bulk density were found to be the correlating factors for the carbon stock variations across the study sites. Hence, the understanding of the amount of carbon stocks in the mangroves of Kerala coupled with other ecosystem services they offer highlights their importance in the creation of conservation, restoration and climate change mitigation plans in the country.
      PubDate: 2022-03-23
       
  • Long-Term Hydrologic Sustainability of Calcareous Fens along the Glacial
           Lake Agassiz Beach Ridges, Northwestern Minnesota, USA

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      Abstract: Abstract Calcareous fens are peat-accumulating wetlands fed by calcium-rich groundwater that support several threatened species of plants that thrive in these geochemical conditions. This investigation characterized the hydrology of two calcareous fens in the Glacial Lake Agassiz beach ridge complex in northwestern Minnesota, USA. Sandy surficial beach ridge aquifers and underlying buried glacial aquifers were considered as sources of groundwater to the fen. A combination of the two sources influenced by seasonal hydrology was also considered. Synchronous hydrologic responses to rainfall events and hydraulic gradients indicate the calcareous fens are well-connected to the beach-ridge aquifers. Chemistry of water discharging to the fens is calcium-magnesium-bicarbonate type similar to the beach ridge aquifers, and distinct from buried aquifers that have significant sodium and chloride. High tritium values and oxygen isotope signatures similar to the beach ridge aquifers characterized fen water. Beach ridge aquifer complexes are relatively thin (8–10 m) and overlie thick clay/clay loam till. These beach ridges exhibit high seasonal recharge and have permanent saturated zones, providing a continual source of calcium-rich water for the fens. Electrical resistivity profiles characterized the glacial stratigraphy and highlighted the well-developed physical connection between beach ridge aquifers and calcareous fens. The results of this study allow evaluation of the potential impacts of irrigation and aggregate quarrying on calcareous fens along sand and gravel beach ridges.
      PubDate: 2022-03-22
       
  • Aquatic Macrophytes in Southern Amazonia, Brazil: Richness, Endemism, and
           Comparative Floristics

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      Abstract: Abstract Southern Amazonia harbors a wide diversity of aquatic macrophyte species because of its diverse wetland habitats and location in the Amazon-Cerrado transition zone, which spans the two largest biogeographic domains in South America. We investigated the taxonomic diversity of aquatic macrophytes in the region with a focus on endemism, species richness, and life forms. We present new records of aquatic macrophyte species and compare our results with other Brazilian phytogeographic domains. We found a high number of species of aquatic macrophytes for the southern Amazon region, comparable to extensive inventories in southern, northeastern, and northern regions of Brazil. We recorded 709 species of aquatic macrophytes in 313 genera and 97 families, which includes 90 species endemic to Brazil and five species endemic to the Brazilian Amazonia. The macrophyte species list of southern Amazonia showed < 25% similarity to inventories in Amazonia and Cerrado. This high diversity of aquatic macrophytes in southern Amazonia, with endemic species and others with restricted ranges, emphasizes the need for conserving these wetlands and vegetation types.
      PubDate: 2022-03-22
       
  • Comparison of Soil Nutrient Supply Patterns among Full and Drained Beaver
           Ponds and Undisturbed Peat in a Rocky Mountain Fen

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      Abstract: Abstract Beavers are a keystone species known to strategically impound streamflow by building dams. Beaver colonization involves upstream ponding; after abandonment, the dams degrade, and the ponds slowly drain. This ponding-draining cycle likely modifies peatland nutrient availability, which is an important control on vegetation distribution and productivity. We compared soil mineral nutrient supply patterns in a beaver-dammed peatland in the Canadian Rocky Mountains over the growing and senescence study seasons during 2020. We used a nested design, comparing nutrient supply with ion-exchange probes among a full beaver pond (FBP with deep and shallow ponding), a drained beaver pond (DBP at its centre and margin) and unimpacted fen (UF at hummock and hollow hydrologic zones). Overall, FBP had lower soil total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) and nitrate (NO3), and higher ammonium (NH4) and phosphorus (PO4) supplies compared to UF. Interestingly, beaver pond drainage tended to restore the nutrient supply to its original status. The patterns we found in nutrient supply were consistent between the growing and senescence seasons. The key drivers of nutrient dynamics were water table level and soil temperature at 5 cm depth (TSoil); however, the controls affected each of the nutrients differently. Deepening of the water table level and higher TSoil non-linearly increased TIN/NO3 but decreased NH4 and PO4. We suggest that the variations in peatland nutrient availabilities in response to the beaver’s ponding-draining cycle may support downstream ecosystem heterogeneity and plant community composition diversity at a longer time scale.
      PubDate: 2022-03-19
       
  • Estimating Detection and Occupancy of Secretive Marsh Bird Species in Low
           and High Saline Marshes in Southwestern Louisiana Using Automated
           Recording Units

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      Abstract: Abstract Secretive marsh birds (SMBs) are important indicator species of coastal wetlands but are difficult to detect and monitor. In coastal Louisiana, an important stronghold for these species, climate and hydrological models predict that freshwater and intermediate marshes will expand in the next 50 years, while brackish marshes will shrink. We used a multi-species Bayesian hierarchical occupancy model to estimate detection and occupancy probabilities for 11 SMB species in low and high saline marshes using data from automated recording units at 33 sites in southwestern Louisiana from February–June 2012. A quadratic effect of Julian date, but not minimum daily temperature nor precipitation affected detection of SMB species. King Rail (Rallus elegans), American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus), Common Gallinule (Gallinula galeata), and Pied-billed Grebe (Podilymbus podiceps) occupied mainly freshwater and intermediate marshes. Clapper Rail (Rallus crepitans), Seaside Sparrow (Ammospiza maritima), and Sora (Porzana carolina) predominantly occupied brackish and salt marshes. American Coot (Fulica americana), Purple Gallinule (Porphyrio martinica), Least Bittern (Ixobrychus exilis), and Marsh Wren (Cistothorus palustris) occupied both low and high saline marshes, showing flexibility that could maintain populations of these species as marsh salinities change in the future. If the current distribution of SMB species persists as marsh availability changes under future conditions, populations of the 4 species we found in low saline marshes may increase, whereas populations of at least 2 species found primarily in high saline marshes may decrease. Our modeling indicates that automatic recording units can produce comparable detection probabilities to other studies using traditional SMB sampling methods.
      PubDate: 2022-03-19
       
  • Effects of spatial expansion between Phragmites australis and Cyperus
           malaccensis on temporal variations and bioaccumulation of vanadium in
           coastal marshes of the Min River estuary, Southeast China

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      Abstract: Abstract Vanadium (V) plays an important role in physio-ecological processes of marsh plants. The effects of spatial expansion between invasive species (Phragmites australis, PA) and native species (Cyperus malaccensis, CM) on temporal variations and bioaccumulation of V in coastal marshes of the Min River estuary were investigated by space-for-time substitution method. In situ filed sampling was conducted in PA marsh (PAM, before expansion), CM marsh (CMM, before expansion) and ecotonal marsh (EM, during expansion, marsh plants were denoted by PA' and CM') in different seasons. Results showed that, over all sampling seasons, the mean V contents in marsh soils ranged from 99.71 to 108.41 mg·kg−1 which exceeded its background value in soils of Fujian province (78.3 mg·kg−1). The V levels in soils differed among seasons or marshes and higher values in PAM, EM and CMM soils were generally observed in spring and winter. The temporal variation of V levels in EM soil rested with the alterations of pH, SOM and plant ecological traits during spatial expansion. The V contents in PA, PA', CM' and CM differed among tissues and higher bioaccumulation occurred in roots. The V levels in tissues differed among species or seasons, which could be ascribed to the differences in ecological traits among plants and the competitive absorption for V by plants during spatial expansion. This paper confirmed that the V in marsh soils of the Min River estuary existed enrichment process and the spatial expansion between PA and CM promoted its enrichment in soils and its bioaccumulation by plants. The findings of this study were favorable for understanding the biogeochemical behaviors of V in marsh ecosystem and strengthening the marsh conservation by regulating its bioavailability in soils.
      PubDate: 2022-03-16
       
  • A Re-evaluation of Wetland Carbon Sink Mitigation Concepts and
           Measurements: A Diagenetic Solution

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      Abstract: Abstract The capacity of wetlands to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is the sum of two services: the protection of vulnerable organic stocks from remineralisation, and the capacity to sequester GHGs relative to their anthropogenic replacements. Organic carbon accumulation (CA) down through the sediment column is often taken as the measure of sequestration because of its capacity to record long-term variability and trends. However, we demonstrate that: i) CA is not equivalent to sequestration as net ecosystem production (NEP) for open systems; it requires the subtraction of the initial deposition rate of labile allochthonous carbon sources; ii) CA also requires subtraction of intrinsically allochthonous recalcitrants down through the sediment column, and together with subtraction of autochthonous recalcitrants from organic stock services; iii) CA as a climatic mitigation service also requires a diagenetic correction, as the annual deposition of labile organic carbon continues to remineralise over the long-term; and iv) preserving of a wetland has a significantly greater mitigation potential than restoring one. To address the above concerns, a global diagenetic solution is proposed, applied and tested for a tropical seagrass and mangrove. As expected, traditional CA estimates were disproportionately larger than their respective diagenetically modelled NEPs, and together with stocks fell within the ranges reported in the literature, with a final carbon accreditation highly dependent on the choice of their anthropogenic replacements. The review demonstrates that mitigation concepts and measurements for natural carbon sequestration solutions require re-evaluation to avoid GHG emissions above their capacity or reduce the ability to fulfil emission targets.
      PubDate: 2022-03-14
       
 
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