Subjects -> ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (Total: 960 journals)
    - ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (853 journals)
    - POLLUTION (31 journals)
    - TOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY (58 journals)
    - WASTE MANAGEMENT (18 journals)

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (853 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 378 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACS Chemical Health & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
ACS ES&T Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Acta Brasiliensis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Acta Environmentalica Universitatis Comenianae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Limnologica Brasiliensia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Acta Regionalia et Environmentalica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advanced Electronic Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Energy and Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Sustainable Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45)
Advances in Environmental Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Environmental Sciences - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Environmental Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Life Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Tropical Biodiversity and Environmental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Agricultura Tecnica     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Agricultural & Environmental Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agro-Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agroecological journal     Open Access  
Agronomy for Sustainable Development     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Amazon's Research and Environmental Law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ambiência     Open Access  
Ambiens. Revista Iberoamericana Universitaria en Ambiente, Sociedad y Sustentabilidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ambiente & sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ambiente & Agua : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Applied Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Energy and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Environmental Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Environmental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
American Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 85)
Annals of Civil and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Environmental Science and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of GIS     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 89)
Annual Review of Environment and Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Annual Review of Resource Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Applied and Environmental Soil Science     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Applied Environmental Education & Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Applied Journal of Environmental Engineering Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aquatic Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Aquatic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Arcada : Revista de conservación del patrimonio cultural     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Architecture, Civil Engineering, Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archives des Maladies Professionnelles et de l'Environnement     Full-text available via subscription  
Archives of Environmental and Occupational Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Archives of Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Arctic Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Environment & Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Asian Review of Environmental and Earth Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ATBU Journal of Environmental Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Atmospheric and Climate Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Augm Domus : Revista electrónica del Comité de Medio Ambiente de AUGM     Open Access  
Austral Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Australasian Journal of Environmental Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Journal of Environmental Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Basic and Applied Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Behavioral Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Biocenosis     Open Access  
Biochar     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Biodegradation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Biodiversity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Biofouling: The Journal of Bioadhesion and Biofilm Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Bioremediation Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
BioRisk     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
BMC Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Boletín Instituto de Derecho Ambiental y de los Recursos Naturales     Open Access  
Boletín Semillas Ambientales     Open Access  
Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bothalia : African Biodiversity & Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Built Environment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 51)
Bumi Lestari Journal of Environment     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 50)
Canadian Journal of Soil Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Canadian Water Resources Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Capitalism Nature Socialism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Carbon Resources Conversion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Studies in Chemical and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Casopis Slezskeho Zemskeho Muzea - serie A - vedy prirodni     Open Access  
Cell Biology and Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Challenges in Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Chemical Research in Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Chemico-Biological Interactions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Chemosphere     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Child and Adolescent Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
China Population, Resources and Environment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
City and Environment Interactions     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Civil and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Civil and Environmental Engineering Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Civil and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
CLEAN - Soil, Air, Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Clean Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clean Technologies and Environmental Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cleanroom Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Climate Change Ecology     Open Access  
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Coastal Engineering Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Cogent Environmental Science     Open Access  
Columbia Journal of Environmental Law     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Computational Ecology and Software     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Computational Water, Energy, and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Conservation Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 51)
Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Consilience : The Journal of Sustainable Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Problems of Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Reviews in Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Cuadernos de Investigación Geográfica / Geographical Research Letters     Open Access  
Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Current Environmental Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Current Environmental Health Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Forestry Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Opinion in Environmental Science & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Current Research in Ecological and Social Psychology     Open Access  
Current Research in Environmental Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Current Research in Green and Sustainable Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Research in Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Current Sustainable/Renewable Energy Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Current World Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Developments in Atmospheric Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Developments in Earth and Environmental Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Developments in Earth Surface Processes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Developments in Environmental Modelling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Developments in Environmental Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Developments in Integrated Environmental Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Die Bodenkultur : Journal of Land Management, Food and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Discover Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
disP - The Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Divulgación Científica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Drug and Chemical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Duke Environmental Law & Policy Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Dynamiques Environnementales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
E3S Web of Conferences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Earth Interactions     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Earth Science Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Earth System Governance     Open Access  
Earth System Science Data (ESSD)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Earthquake Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
EchoGéo     Open Access  
Eco-Thinking     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ecocycles     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ecohydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ecohydrology & Hydrobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ecologia Aplicada     Open Access  
Ecología en Bolivia     Open Access  
Ecological Applications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 214)
Ecological Chemistry and Engineering S     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ecological Complexity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ecological Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ecological Engineering : X     Open Access  
Ecological Indicators     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Ecological Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ecological Management & Restoration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Ecological Modelling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 96)
Ecological Monographs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Ecological Processes     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ecological Questions     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ecological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ecological Restoration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Ecologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Ecology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 481)
Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 104)
Ecology Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 341)
EcoMat : Functional Materials for Green Energy and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Economics and Policy of Energy and the Environment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Économie rurale     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ecoprint : An International Journal of Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ecopsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ecosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Ecosystem Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Ecosystems and People     Open Access   (Followers: 3)

        1 2 3 4 5 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Aquatic Ecology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.656
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 39  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-5125 - ISSN (Online) 1386-2588
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2658 journals]
  • Biometry and size distribution of Crambionella annandalei and Chrysaora
           spp. along the coast of Andhra Pradesh, India

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      Abstract: The biometry and seasonal size distribution of the medusae, Crambionella annandalei and Chrysaora spp. were investigated from fortnightly gillnet landings between January 2017 and December 2018 along the West coast of the Bay of Bengal. Although both taxa exhibited strong patterns of seasonality in abundance and growth, being commonest and smallest in summer, C. annandalei were largely absent in the monsoon and post-monsoon seasons, while Chrysaora spp. could be recorded throughout the year in a variety of size groups. There was a strong cohesion in pattern between years, suggesting that the monsoon impacts populations of both species, albeit in slightly different ways. We provide rare, field-based measurements of growth for both species that are in broad agreement with the data published for similar taxa elsewhere: our length–weight data provide useful contributions to baseline information.
      PubDate: 2021-10-15
       
  • Exceptional color preferences for flying adult aquatic insects

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      Abstract: This study tested the hypothesis that color affects the behavior of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) adults in the riparian zone of a gravel-bed river in northern Japan. EPT abundance was measured using plot scale surveys and a color-choice experiment that utilized non-shiny sticky traps in two contrasting colors, yellow and blue. Chloroperlidae and Hydrobiosidae were caught more abundantly in yellow and blue traps, respectively, whereas other taxa exhibited little or no color-affected responses. We proposed that Chloroperlidae responses were driven by relatively strong diurnal activity compared with those of other taxa. Hydrobiosidae’s preference of blue remained unknown. Understanding the evolutionary background of color preferences in relation to other possibly interfering factors, such as reflection–polarization characteristics, at the species level will help advance the visual sensory ecology of aquatic insects.
      PubDate: 2021-10-13
       
  • Influence of spatial and environmental factors on the structure of a
           zooplankton metacommunity in an intermittent river

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      Abstract: Hydrological disconnection in intermittent rivers is known to increase β-diversity by limiting the dispersal of species and decreasing environmental similarity between sites. Knowledge of the mechanisms driving variation within and between local communities helps elucidate the role of environmental and spatial processes responsible for community composition at multiple scales in intermittent rivers. In this study, we investigated the spatial and environmental patterns of zooplankton β-diversity in an intermittent river in a semiarid region in Brazil. We hypothesized that (1) the zooplankton metacommunity is determined primarily by turnover, and (2) the structure of the zooplankton metacommunity is more heavily influenced by environmental than spatial factors. Our samples yielded 46 taxa of rotifers and cladocerans. β-taxonomic diversity was high, with a predominance of turnover compared with nestedness. The partitioning analysis showed that environmental and spatial processes had a significant influence on the distribution of zooplankton species, but the former had the greatest explanatory power. In the redundancy analysis, high values of temperature, oxygen and submersed macrophytes were significantly correlated with species variation. The observed β-diversity values closely reflected the turnover pattern, whereas Cladocera and Rotifera diverged between predictive processes. Our results highlight the importance of adopting appropriate conservation measures for intermittent river networks as a whole.
      PubDate: 2021-10-13
       
  • Can artificial light promote submerged macrophyte growth in summer'

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      Abstract: Loss of submerged macrophytes resulting from high turbidity has become a global environmental problem in shallow lakes, associated with eutrophication. To help macrophyte recovery, application of artificial light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has been proposed to complement nutrient load reductions. We set up a mesocosm experiment to test if LEDs could compensate for shading effects from phytoplankton. We incubated three submerged macrophytes (Vallisneria natans, Myriophyllum spicatum and Ceratophyllum demersum) in 12 tanks of 1000 L under three artificial LED light treatments (red, blue and white) for 94 days in summer. The results showed that 1) growth of V. natans and M. spicatum was stimulated in all the LED light treatments, while C. demersum died in the end of the experiment in all treatments. The growth variables (MLShoot, DMShoot) of V. natans in blue, red and white treatments were 1.8–4.5 times greater than those in the control treatment. For M. spicatum, all plants only survived in the treatments with artificial light supplement. 2) Growing status of V. natans was similar among the treatments of different light colors, while M. spicatum grew best in the red light treatment. The results suggest that artificial light, particularly red light, can promote the recovery of submerged macrophytes in waters where impaired light climate would prevent or delay growth of macrophytes and recovery from eutrophication. Further large-scale field studies are, however, needed to fully elucidate the potential of using artificial light to stimulate growth and recovery of submerged macrophytes in shallow lakes.
      PubDate: 2021-10-13
       
  • Segregation of diets by sex and individual in South American fur seals

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      Abstract: Trophic niche width and individual specialization among marine predators are often subjected to seasonal constraints. Differences are expected to arise for sexually dimorphic species exposed to distinct ecological opportunities, as well as intrinsic differences in physiological abilities or energetic requirements. We assess seasonal and sexual differences in isotopic niche overlap and width and analyze inter-individual foraging variation throughout the year of the South American fur seal (Arctocephalus australis). We obtained chronologically ordered δ13C and δ15N data from vibrissae of 25 males and 24 females from southern Brazil and Uruguay. There were significant differences between sexes for both isotopes with males showing higher values (δ13C = − 14.5 ± 0.5‰; δ15N = 18.9 ± 1.2‰) than females (δ13C = − 15.2 ± 0.5‰; δ15N = 17.8 ± 1.2‰), but not among seasons or years. A very small isotopic niche overlap found between sexes (1.1–9.5%), with limited seasonal variation, likely resulted from differences in prey consumption and foraging habitats. Compared to other seasons, females had a wider isotopic niche in spring. While males showed seasonal stability in the foraging niche, females showed some small variation, which is probably influenced by central place foraging. Both sexes had considerable interindividual variation in estimated dietary composition and had different proportions of potential prey contribution at the population level. These findings enlighten the knowledge of South American fur seal trophic ecology, and how they may seasonally and spatially shift their foraging strategies according to their distinct life histories. It ultimately reflects in a small niche partitioning and possibly low intraspecific competition at the species northernmost area of occurrence in the western South Atlantic.
      PubDate: 2021-10-12
       
  • Chemical cues affecting recruitment and juvenile habitat selection in
           marine versus freshwater systems

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      Abstract: Marine and freshwater ecosystems differ in persistence, size, population connectivity, and the variance in physical and biotic conditions they experience. These differences may select for differing reproductive modes, life histories, dispersal strategies, and chemically cued recruitment behaviors. In marine systems, adults are commonly less mobile, while larvae spend hours to weeks to months dispersing in the plankton and may move over great distances. It is these immature larval stages that must select appropriate recruitment sites in marine environments. In freshwater systems, the fully developed adults more commonly disperse over greater distances, and it is usually adults that determine juvenile recruitment sites via their placement of larvae or fertilized eggs. Thus, in terms of large-scale habitat choices involving chemical cuing, adult stages should be selected to detect and react to habitat cues among most freshwater species, while juveniles should play this role among most marine species. Few studies assess this hypothesis, but adults of freshwater organisms as different as mosquitoes and frogs do key on chemical cues to select sites for depositing eggs or larvae, while chemical cuing of recruitment in marine systems occurs primarily among the larval stages of the numerous fishes and marine invertebrates investigated to date. Cues to general habitat features, to predators or competitors, and to specific prey or hosts have all been shown to affect recruitment. Here, we review chemically mediated recruitment in marine versus freshwater systems, summarizing what is known and suggesting unknowns that may be productive to investigate.
      PubDate: 2021-10-09
       
  • Competitive exclusion of toxic cyanobacterial species by an
           allelopathic strain of Phormidium

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      Abstract: Blooms of freshwater toxic cyanobacteria are a growing environmental health problem, enhanced by anthropogenic eutrophication and climate change. A variety of techniques were tested for their remediation, from physical methods using artificial mixing or flocculation, to chemical methods employing synthetic and natural compounds, as well as constructed wetlands. In this work, we conducted an evaluation at microcosm scale of the usefulness of the allelochemicals produced by a strain of the filamentous cyanobacteria Phormidium sp. for the bioremediation of proliferations of four strains of toxic freshwater cyanobacteria (Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, Chrysosporum ovalisporum, Anabaena sp. and Nodularia sp.). Allelochemicals produced by this strain of Phormidium sp. belong to the portoamides compounds family. Their effect was tested in bioassays using cell-free filtrate, the results showing that all the four strains were sensitive. In addition, we performed phosphate-limited long-term competition experiments in continuous cultures, in which Phormidium sp. was co-cultured with each of the toxic cyanobacterial strains. The purpose of these later experiments was to demonstrate that allelopathy and not resource competition was responsible for the ecological exclusion of the toxic cyanobacteria strains, and also to employ higher population abundances to test the effectiveness of the allelochemicals. Before that, we needed to estimate the competitive ability of each species to limit the resource that we employed (phosphate). Phormidium sp. were clearly a better competitor for phosphate than Anabaena sp., worse than Nodularia sp., and very similar to C. raciborskii and C. ovalisporum. Only in the case of Nodularia sp. could we demonstrate that the ecological exclusion of the toxic cyanobacteria was caused by allelopathy. However, the rapid exclusion shown in our experiments suggests that allelopathy was the main cause in all cases. An inter-specific competition model including only competition for phosphate and an allelopathic interaction was able to accurately describe the patterns of population dynamics observed in our experiments.
      PubDate: 2021-10-09
       
  • The alien octocoral Carijoa riisei is a biogenic substrate multiplier in
           artificial Brazilian shipwrecks

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      Abstract: Despite the obvious negative effects caused by invasive species, some recent studies have shown that the impacts at local scale are diverse and not necessarily negative. Arborescent benthic organisms such as octocorals form three-dimensional structures capable of increasing the amount of substrate available and providing shelter for epibiont species. We investigated the role of the alien octocoral Carijoa riisei on the diversity of benthic communities in three shipwrecks on the north-eastern coast of Brazil. We expected that (a) the fauna associated with the octocoral are richer and more diverse compared to the adjacent; (b) some species are exclusively associated with C. riisei; (c) the species that are present both in the areas with and without C. riisei have a greater abundance when associated with the octocoral. For this, we compared the macrobenthic communities associated with C. riisei to those found in adjacent areas where the octocoral was absent. Our study showed that the communities associated with the octocoral were 1.5 times richer and 10 times more abundant than adjacent communities, with 29 exclusive taxa. The dominant taxa were the amphipods Ericthonius brasiliensis and Podocerus brasiliensis and polychaetes of the family Syllidae. These taxa were present in areas with presence and absence of C. riisei, but their abundance was significantly greater where the octocoral was present. Our results reinforce the idea that Carijoa riisei acts as an ecosystem engineer in coastal reefs, creating new habitats and increasing diversity at a local scale, even though it is an alien species.
      PubDate: 2021-10-08
       
  • Macroinvertebrate species occupancy frequency distribution patterns in
           eutrophic lakes

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      Abstract: Metacommunity models describe species occupancy frequency distribution (hereinafter ‘SOFD’). Our goal is to present how the differences in eight macroinvertebrate orders dispersal ability affect SOFD patterns. A total of 293 species from eight macroinvertebrate orders were observed in 14 eutrophic lakes in southern Finland. Species occupancy ranged from 1 to 14. About 30% (89 out of 293) of the species were found in only one lake, yielding a surprisingly high number of rare species. So, there were few widely distributed common species and numerous rare species with a restricted distribution. Combined data from eight macroinvertebrate orders supported the bimodal truncated SOFD pattern. Similarly, the low dispersal ability orders, watermites and mayflies, fitted the bimodal truncated SOFD pattern. However, bimodal symmetric SOFD pattern also fitted relatively well to the dragonflies and damselflies with high dispersal ability. It seems that differences in dispersal ability among different macroinvertebrate orders may partly explain observed differences. Moreover, our results supported slightly more a niche-based model rather than a metapopulation dynamics model in eutrophic lakes littoral macroinvertebrate metacommunities. Our results highlight that the dispersal ability is important trait for species conservation in patchily distributed habitat.
      PubDate: 2021-10-08
       
  • Effects of short-term decomposition on isotope values of fish tissues
           under natural conditions

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      Abstract: Dead animals may be an important or the only source of tissues to analyze for stable isotopes, with the goal of making inferences about an animal’s past ecological history. However, in nature, stable isotope values may be affected by myriad decomposition processes, such as abiotic environmental conditions and bacterial and fungal decay, potentially reducing the accuracy of derived ecological conclusions. We used Pacific salmon carcasses left in air or submerged under water to test whether stable isotope values of metabolically active (skin, muscle, and adipose fin) and inactive (scale) tissues changed over time. We found that the δ13C values of active tissues were all affected by decomposition but not in a predictable direction, and hard scale tissue was not. In contrast, there was no effect on δ15N values for any tissue up to 4 days under water or 8 days in air. This suggests that tissues can be analyzed for nitrogen stable isotope values even after several days in water and even if covered in fungus on the surface. For populations within which dead animals are frequently encountered, e.g., salmonid carcass surveys, hard tissues of fish (scales, otoliths) and other animals (baleen, bone, hair, feathers) will likely yield relevant biological information even if soft tissue is rotting, providing another avenue to collect important data about the life history of those animals.
      PubDate: 2021-10-05
       
  • Preface: the central role of zooplankton in freshwaters, a special issue
           in honour of late Ramesh D. Gulati

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      PubDate: 2021-10-04
       
  • Riparian vegetation structure and seasonality influence functional
           diversity more than taxonomic diversity of stream fish assemblages in the
           Colombian Amazon

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      Abstract: The Amazon rainforest has experienced rapid land-use changes, including extensive deforestation of riparian areas, putting at risk among the most diverse freshwater fish assemblages on the planet. At nine study reaches distributed among three Colombian blackwater streams, we described and quantified how variability in riparian vegetation structure—during both dry and rainy seasons—influenced the taxonomic and functional diversity of fish assemblages. We observed 117 species across our study reaches, but taxonomic measures such as species richness and evenness were not different among low, intermediate, or high levels of riparian vegetation coverage. Fish assemblage composition was also not different by riparian vegetation, although we observed significant seasonal shifts—only 16% of species were observed in both rainy and dry seasons. Evenness and effective number of species derived from Simpson’s Index were 7 and 38% greater in the dry season than in the rainy season, respectively. Diet varied by riparian zone condition: 56% of fish stomach contents were of allochthonous origin in stream reaches with intact vegetation versus 37% in streams with altered riparian vegetation. We also observed that the relative proportion of detritivorous fishes was 13% greater in the rainy season, while the proportion of invertivores was 26% greater in the dry season. Both functional divergence and dispersion—measures of the variability of species’ traits—were higher in reaches with more intact vegetation during the rainy season. Our findings highlight the importance of the interaction of riparian vegetation and seasonality, and both longitudinal and lateral hydrological connectivity, for fish functional diversity of Amazonian streams.
      PubDate: 2021-10-03
       
  • Medusae (Scyphozoa and hydrozoa) from the Moroccan Mediterranean coast:
           abundance and spatiotemporal dynamics and their economic impact

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      Abstract: Pelagic cnidarians have been observed stranding annually in the Tetouanise Sea, a site of intense human recreation in northwest Morocco. The abundance and size of jellyfish stranded, between January 2018 and December 2020, on the beaches of the Moroccan Mediterranean were investigated. We present data on the temporal and spatial distribution of the species in relation to environmental variables (e.g., sea surface temperature, salinity, chlorophyll and wind direction). We also examined the negative impacts of jellyfish on human activities in the Moroccan Mediterranean. Five species that represented three scyphozoans and two hydrozoans were frequently observed: Pelagia noctiluca, Velella velella, Physalia physalis, Rhizostoma pulmo and Chrysaora hysoscella. Three different models of seasonal occurrence of jellyfish were identified in this study: (1) P. noctiluca appears throughout the year but with a higher frequency during the summer, (2) P. physalis and V. velella appear in March–May and (3) the late appearing R. pulmo and C. hysoscella from July to August. The abundance of jellyfish varied from season to season, but did not differ between sampling sites. Interannual variations in the abundance of jellyfish were not significantly correlated with the environmental factors examined. However, the east wind played an important role in the stranding and formation of hotspots for jellyfish in the Moroccan coast. Continuous monitoring is needed for a more profound knowledge on the jellyfish bloom dynamics and their potential impacts on ecosystem functioning and socioeconomic activities in the Moroccan Mediterranean.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
       
  • Effects of laboratory-induced desiccation on fecundity and survival of
           Bulinus globosus (Gastropoda: Planorbidae)

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      Abstract: Bulinus globosus snails inhabiting ephemeral rivers and ponds in sub-Saharan Africa experience seasonal water-level fluctuations and habitat desiccation. These environmental changes can instigate the aestivation of snails as a survival strategy. However, the net effect of these changes on snail population size following a period of desiccation and resuscitation is poorly understood. To lessen this knowledge gap, we evaluated the effects of desiccation on the fecundity and longevity of Bulinus globosus snails under laboratory conditions. The periods of desiccation used were 57, 64, 71 and 78 days. Our results showed that an increase in desiccation time from 57 to 78 days was associated with a twofold reduction in fecundity. Furthermore, the survival time of B. globosus snails decreased linearly with desiccation time. The median survival time of snails exposed to desiccation for 57 and 78 days was 63 days and 35 days, respectively. Reduction in the fecundity and snail survival post-desiccation may lead to population shrinkage of B. globosus.
      PubDate: 2021-09-21
       
  • Community assembly within ponds: the roles of space, time, and
           environmental gradients

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      Abstract: Environmental and spatial–temporal processes are proposed as important mechanisms regulating permanent pond communities, but comprehensive research of these factors at fine scales (i.e. patches or microhabitats) is still lacking. Here, we investigated environmental, spatial, and temporal variables influencing community structure and diversity (α, β, γ) in pond microhabitats over one annual cycle (i.e. four seasons). Standardized surveys were conducted monthly for one year, and a suite of biotic and abiotic variables were recorded at each microhabitat to test which assembly processes are important in structuring pond communities. As expected, spatial and environmental variables influenced local species organization at both the annual and seasonal scale. The high β diversity among pond microhabitats was mainly attributed to species turnover from one microhabitat to another rather than richness differences. Habitat heterogeneity largely explained the variation on α and β diversity among pond microhabitats. Overall, our results suggest that multiple ecological processes affect community assembly dynamics in permanent ponds. First, the temporal variation on the distribution of species across pond microhabitats that was associated with environmental fluctuations (mainly temperature, dissolved oxygen, substrate composition, and emergent vegetation) inferred that species sorting (i.e. niche-based processes) is an important driver of the observed community patterns, while the spatiotemporal turnover in species composition and density can be explained by colonization and dispersal events occurring within microhabitats. Our study emphasizes the need to include time, space and environmental variables in studies assessing communities in permanent pond systems, as they appear to be related to distinct processes regulating communities at fine scales.
      PubDate: 2021-09-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s10452-021-09902-0
       
  • Macroinvertebrates at the source: flow duration and seasonality drive
           biodiversity and trait composition in rheocrene springs of the Western
           Allegheny Plateau, USA

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      Abstract: Documenting flow regimes and the ecology of source headwater streams has gained considerable attention for scientific and regulatory purposes. These streams do not appear on standard maps, and local physiographic and climatologic conditions can control their origins. We investigated macroinvertebrate assemblages seasonally and in relation to flow duration, catchment and habitat variables within 14 source headwaters (< 1 ha) in the Western Allegheny Plateau over a 19-month period. We classified 6 perennial (P) and 8 intermittent (I) streams directly with continuous flow data loggers. Several biological and trait-based metrics could distinguish flow class, but few instream physical measures could. Macroinvertebrate metrics and assemblage dispersion varied seasonally and responded significantly along a gradient of total flow duration. Separate indicator species analyses generated 22 genera and 15 families with significant affinities to P streams. Richness of P-indicator taxa was also strongly correlated with flow duration gradients, and we estimated a total flow duration changepoint at 77% (3 indicator families) followed by a sharp increase in richness. Two rapid field-based flow duration methods (NC Stream Identification index and OH Headwater Habitat Evaluation index) could distinguish upstream ephemeral reaches from P and I reaches, but misclassified P as I more frequently. Our findings highlight that diverse coldwater macroinvertebrate assemblages inhabited extremely small, low-discharge springs in the region, and responded with flow duration. These source headwater habitats are susceptible to human disturbance and should be monitored as is routinely done in larger lotic systems.
      PubDate: 2021-09-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s10452-021-09900-2
       
  • The effects of novel leaf litter deposition on competitive,
           predator–prey and host–parasite interactions of American toad larvae

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      Abstract: Wetland plant communities are changing rapidly due to a wide range of human activities. The deposition of leaf litter from novel plant communities can alter both the chemical and physical habitat of aquatic ecosystems. Lesser understood are the ecological consequences of novel leaf litter inputs in aquatic communities. Toward this goal, we used two plant invasion scenarios (comparing native black huckleberry to exotic autumn olive and native swamp loosestrife to exotic purple loosestrife) to simulate a shift in wetland plant communities. In this study, we investigated the effects of novel leaf litter leachates on three aquatic ecological interactions: intraspecific competition, predation and parasitism. We examined how leaf litter leachates influence the interactions of American toad larvae (Anaxyrus americanus) with their conspecifics, a dragonfly predator (Anax spp.) and a trematode parasite (Echinostomatidae). We found that leaf litter type influenced competitive interactions only for the huckleberry versus autumn olive comparison. We did not detect any effects of leaf litter type on predator–prey interactions. Finally, litter type strongly influenced host–parasite interactions for both leaf litter comparisons, altering host susceptibility, parasite survival and net infection rates. These results highlight the breadth of potential ecological repercussions of shifting wetland plant communities for native ecosystems.
      PubDate: 2021-09-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s10452-021-09893-y
       
  • Can zooplankton species be used as indicators of trophic status and
           ecological potential of reservoirs'

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      Abstract: The European Water Framework Directive implements the policies to achieve a good ecological status of all European waterbodies. To determine the ecological potential in freshwater environments, abiotic (morphology, physical and chemical variables) and biotics (algae, fishes, etc.) metrics are used. Despite their importance in trophic web, zooplankton was not included as one of the Biological Quality Elements (BQE) to determine the water quality. In the present research, we studied the zooplankton species that can be considered as indicators of trophic status and ecological potential for more than 60 water reservoirs. The data were obtained from more of 300 samples collected during 10 years from reservoirs at Ebro River watershed, which is the largest basin in Spain. According to their physicochemical and biological elements, the trophic status and ecological potential of these reservoirs were established. More than 150 zooplankton species were identified during the study. The results from this research indicate that species that are related with low water quality are: Acanthocyclops americanus, Ceriodaphnia spp., Daphnia cucullata, Daphnia párvula, Diaphanosoma brachyurum, Brachionus angularis, Keratella cochlearis and Phompolyx sulcata. An indicator of moderate quality was Bosmina longirostris, while Daphnia longispina, Ascomorpha ovalis and Ascomorpha saltans were considered as indicators of good water quality. The data obtained suggest that zooplankton species can be used as a valuable tool to determine the water quality status and should be considered, in a near future, as one more of the BQE within the WFD metrics.
      PubDate: 2021-09-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s10452-021-09897-8
       
  • Plasticity in depth selection behavior and heat shock proteins in Daphnia

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      Abstract: Habitat selection behavior by aquatic and terrestrial animals is influenced by both abiotic (e.g., temperature) and biotic (e.g., threat from predators) environmental factors. In this study, the mechanisms underlying the variability in behavior of habitat selection of Daphnia under environmental stress were examined. Experiments were conducted using five Daphnia clones with different environmental preferences and, consequently, with a different width of the reaction norm. These clones also showed variation in their constitutive levels of stress-related heat shock proteins (HSP60, HSP70 and HSP90), but none of the tested stress factors had any direct effect on their expression. However, behavioral plasticity was significantly positively correlated with the constitutive level of HSP70. It is likely that animals with a high constitutive HSP70 level can cope better with sudden changes in environment conditions that they experience, e.g., during vertical migrations. In contrast, non-migrating animals with low HSP levels do not allocate energy to the synthesis of stress proteins and have a narrow range of behavioral plasticity.
      PubDate: 2021-09-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s10452-021-09895-w
       
  • Phenotypic plasticity and developmental noise in hybrid and parental
           clones of Daphnia longispina complex

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      Abstract: According to the “temporal hybrid superiority hypothesis”, seasonal variability in environmental factors in temperate lakes gives hybrid clones within the D. longispina complex a temporary fitness advantage, thus allowing long-term, dynamic coexistence of hybrids and maternal taxa. However, the maintenance of hybrids would not require their superiority under any given set of environmental conditions if their average fitness over longer periods surpassed that of more specialized and less flexible parental clones. Phenotypic plasticity and developmental noise of several hybrid and maternal clones of Daphnia (Daphnia galeata, Daphnia hyalina, their hybrids and backcrosses) were compared in a series of laboratory experiments. Changes in depth selection and body size at first reproduction were scored in Daphnia exposed to predator (planktivorous fish) threat, to the presence of filamentous cyanobacteria (Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii), and to the presence of toxic compounds (PCB52 and PCB153). The hybrid clones were found to exhibit the broadest phenotypic plasticity of the studied traits in response to the different stress factors. Developmental noise in depth selection behaviour was the lowest in Daphnia galeata, the highest in Daphnia hyalina, and intermediate in hybrid and backcross clones. This diversity of reaction norms might permit the coexistence of closely related Daphnia clones in the variable and often unpredictable lake environment.
      PubDate: 2021-09-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s10452-021-09898-7
       
 
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