Subjects -> PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (Total: 284 journals)
    - MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT (9 journals)
    - PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (248 journals)
    - SECURITY (27 journals)

MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT (9 journals)

Showing 1 - 6 of 6 Journals sorted alphabetically
European Urban and Regional Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Gestão & Regionalidade     Open Access  
Journal of Local Government Issues     Open Access  
Policy Design and Practice     Open Access  
State and Local Government Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Terra : Revista de Desarrollo Local     Open Access  
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European Urban and Regional Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.182
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 26  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0969-7764 - ISSN (Online) 1461-7145
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • The economic geography of European Union’s discontent: Lessons from
           Greece

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      Authors: Panagiotis Artelaris
      Abstract: European Urban and Regional Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The regions of the European Union are currently experiencing a period of seismic change that has transformed their established voting patterns and increased anti–European Union voting. Applying objective economic measures, spatial econometrics and municipal voting data from recent elections and a referendum, this study examines the factors shaping anti–European Union votes in Greece. The results indicate a strong link between the country’s changing economic geography and the geography of the anti–European Union vote, providing evidence not only of the ‘geography of discontent’ and the ‘left-behind hypothesis’ but also of the ‘geography of austerity’ associated with the heterogeneous effects of fiscal consolidation and austerity policies.
      Citation: European Urban and Regional Studies
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T05:52:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09697764221101742
       
  • Precarious self-employment in urban Europe

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      Authors: Darja Reuschke, Mary Zhang
      Abstract: European Urban and Regional Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Urban and regional research has focused on opportunity entrepreneurship and how cities can promote growth through the ‘right’ type of entrepreneurship. This neglects the increasing risk of precarious self-employment reflected in the compositional change of self-employment towards self-employment with no employees (‘solo self-employment’). This article tests whether precarious self-employment is more prevalent in urban areas, in parallel to more entrepreneurial forms as shown in previous research. Based on the European Working Conditions Survey 2015 and including 30 countries, it proposes a multidimensional empirical framework of precariousness of self-employment. Findings show significant variations in the prevalence of precarious self-employment in urban versus non-urban areas across geographical regions. Some individual characteristics (gender) and job-related characteristics (industry and working at home) are related with an increased risk of precariousness in urban areas. Policies therefore need to go beyond regulatory and legal frameworks and target local conditions of self-employment.
      Citation: European Urban and Regional Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T10:41:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09697764221095756
       
  • Making it up: Adaptive approaches to bringing freelance cultural work to a
           cultural ecologies discourse

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      Authors: Ali FitzGibbon, Ioannis Tsioulakis
      Abstract: European Urban and Regional Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, a transdisciplinary cultural labour perspective is used to examine the evolving and spontaneous networks and grassroots collective movements of performing arts freelancers in two contexts: Belfast (Northern Ireland) and Athens (Greece) in response to the outbreak of COVID-19. With a principally methodological contribution, the article proposes that evolving cultural ecologies research should mirror the ecologies it studies by adopting more collaborative and improvisational research approaches, drawing on inclusive research methods from disability studies and decolonising approaches within anthropology to reveal deeper knowledge and offer mutual benefit. Furthermore, it proposes that artists, overlooked in cultural ecologies research to date, bring knowledge from their practice beyond lived experience of value to such inquiry. The researchers collaborated with practitioner experts, revealing insights to freelancers’ milieu; their alternate systems for inclusion, representation and radical mutual care; and their increasing vulnerability in the face of ongoing exclusion from cultural recovery strategies and wider political and policy apathy to their concerns. This raises important moral and ethical questions for how cultural ecologies research and researchers engage with practitioner knowledge and the purpose of research in rendering such groups as creative freelancers visible within research and in the implicit and explicit urban and regional recovery planning in different locales. In addition, it proposes the inter- or transdisciplinary nature of cultural ecologies research may be better served by keeping its boundaries fluid, not just in the potential strength of blending research disciplines but also in its boundaries between the formal academy and practice.
      Citation: European Urban and Regional Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T06:47:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09697764221095758
       
  • Spaces of the local, spaces of the nation: Intersectional bordering
           practices in post-Brexit Berlin

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      Authors: Christy Kulz
      Abstract: European Urban and Regional Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the relationship between bordering practices and processes of situated intersectionality by exploring how British migrants encounter and erect borders as they move through Berlin. Through exploring how research participants conceptualise and orientate themselves towards Berlin’s city spaces and how this relates to transnational and translocal processes of classification, I interrogate how processes of racialisation and classification move across European contexts to manifest within localised spaces. The research explores how these intersections work to minimise, accentuate or transfigure one another as inequalities come into being through urban space by placing feminist intersectional approaches in conversation with border studies. By uniquely focusing on a migrant group infrequently considered in European migration literatures, and often regarded as invisible or unproblematic, we can examine how race, class and gender intersect with nationality and how racialised exclusions from European belonging function through everyday processes. I highlight how classification processes have transnational portability and carry intra-European similarities, yet also assuming context-specific features.
      Citation: European Urban and Regional Studies
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T03:46:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09697764221087644
       
  • Engaging with precarious urban futures: From entrepreneurial to grounded
           cities

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      Authors: Jürgen Essletzbichler
      Abstract: European Urban and Regional Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In order to answer the question posed by the conference Urban Europe, Precarious Futures' the article examines the relationship between rising precariousness,the need for social-ecological transformation to keep socio-ecological environments manageable for future generations of Europeans and the provision of urban reliance systems as the key pillar of a possible transformation toward life within the planetary boundaries. The article has four goals: First, it establishes a link between the literatures on precarization, three possible political-economic development scenarios, and resulting modes of urban governance. Second, it develops the normative but theoretically and empirically backed claim that a strengthening of the foundational economy appears most suited to produce the necessary reductions in precarious living conditions and environmental destruction required for a socially and ecologically sustainable future. Third, the urban scale is argued to occupy a privileged position as a growing site of human habitation in Europe and for the design and provision of foundational infrastructure and universal basic services. The article links cities to the foundational economy via the concept of the Grounded City. Fourth, research on the provision of universal basic services in the City of Vienna is employed to illustrate that a narrow focus on cities as territorial-administrative containers ignoring their inter-territorial and inter-scalar relations is likely to produce socio-spatial rebound effects that may neutralize the gains of social-ecological investment in cities. Any effective social-ecological transformation thus requires coordination, cooperation, lobbying and political change at all scales of governance. In the European case, it requires the European Union to evolve from an economic to a social-ecological Union and for urban governance regimes across Europe to be altered to take into account the horizontal and intra-scalar relations that co-constitute cities.
      Citation: European Urban and Regional Studies
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T07:29:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09697764221087646
       
  • The assetisation of housing: A macroeconomic resource

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      Authors: Phoebe Stirling, Nick Gallent, Andrew Purves
      Abstract: European Urban and Regional Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The most significant episode in the assetisation of housing (underpinning its financialisation) is often understood to be the economic restructuring that took place during the 1980s – particularly deregulation of the banking sector and credit liberalisation. Research has reported on the housing ‘investor subject’ that emerged during this time, as an integral part of the transition towards financialised economies. This article provides new evidence about the housing consumer subject, and its place in this transition, by drilling into UK housing policy history and its discourses around the consumer relationship with housing. Using archive data from the Parliamentary and National Archives alongside interviews with key informers, we illustrate three cases of housing policy development in which the consumer demand for, and relationship with, housing is discursively reconditioned. We conclude that the housing investor subject was pursued in housing policy reform and its discourses well before the 1980s and the economic reforms commonly identified as the causes of financialisation. In addition, these discourses are found to have been reconditioned in order to align with broader macroeconomic policy concerns of the time. The article therefore provides a rare view of assetisation from within the state apparatus, revealing how housing policy and its discourses around consumption became functionally integrated within wider macroeconomic goals.
      Citation: European Urban and Regional Studies
      PubDate: 2022-03-29T11:20:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09697764221082621
       
  • In search of social equity in entrepreneurialism: The case of Israel’s
           municipal regeneration agencies

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      Authors: Yinnon Geva, Gillad Rosen
      Abstract: European Urban and Regional Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the roles of municipalities in Israel’s national, state-led urban regeneration program, contributing to the scholarship on the varied agendas of municipal entrepreneurialism. The Israeli urban regeneration program promotes the densification of private residential properties by incentivizing property deals between homeowners and developers. It has been criticized for attracting predatory practices and spurring conflicts between state, market, and community stakeholders. New intermediary bodies—Municipal Regeneration Agencies—were established as an effective policy response to both criticisms. We rely on 36 interviews and extensive document analysis to examine the roles and agendas of Municipal Regeneration Agencies, vis-à-vis the equity concerns associated with state-led urban regeneration. Municipal Regeneration Agencies support homeowners, increase regulation over private deal-making, and in two cases, direct entrepreneurial development of urban regeneration projects. We argue that these roles represent a model of equitable entrepreneurialism that attempts to reconcile the neoliberal logic of urban regeneration with a municipal commitment to social equity. This model allows municipalities to reassert their position in Israel’s centralized housing and planning policy but faces limitations due to municipalities’ varying capacities and continued reliance on market relations.
      Citation: European Urban and Regional Studies
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T10:05:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09697764221076343
       
  • Anticipating demand shocks: Patient capital and the supply of housing

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      Authors: Frances Brill, Mike Raco, Callum Ward
      Abstract: European Urban and Regional Studies, Ahead of Print.
      ‘Patient capital’ is presented by many policymakers as a panacea to address domestic (and sometimes city-level) gaps in financing urban development, particularly housing, that emerged in the post-2008 credit crunch. In this article, we analyse the complexities of patient investors’ entry into residential markets in London and their response to the first major, and unexpected, crisis of demand: the COVID-19 pandemic and immediate falls in market demand. We focus on how patient capital and the firms invested in the professionalised rental market, build to rent (BTR), have responded. We highlight three main responses: (1) advancing their lobbying efforts to secure a more supportive political environment; (2) protecting their income streams by offering new payment plans and adaptability to prevent void rates; (3) turning to a ‘reserve army’ of renters backed by the state – so-called Key Workers (KWs). We argue these demonstrate a continual and co-evolutionary dimension to policy promoting patient capital and the need for patient planning to govern patient investment in housing systems. Our findings are in ‘real-time’ and highlight the importance of structural uncertainties and the breakdown of long-term assumptions in shaping investment decisions.
      Citation: European Urban and Regional Studies
      PubDate: 2022-02-26T10:18:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09697764211069837
       
  • Tourism pressure as a driver of social inequalities: a BSEM estimation of
           housing instability in European urban areas

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      Authors: Riccardo Valente, Antonio Paolo Russo, Susan Vermeulen, Francesco Luigi Milone
      First page: 332
      Abstract: European Urban and Regional Studies, Ahead of Print.
      There is a certain agreement in the regional economics literature on tourism development as a lever of territorial cohesion and regional convergence. Yet, evidence about its impact on social inclusion within destination regions is scant. The emerging literature placing tourism development as a driver of inequality relies mostly on qualitative methods and individual case studies, thus overlooking a cross-national perspective. In this article, we address this gap by estimating the impacts of tourism growth between 2013 and 2018 on housing instability through its effects on rents and the perceived financial burden of housing costs. Based on a combination of data sourced from Eurostat and a geo-located dataset of Airbnb listings, a Bayesian path analysis model was specified with a sample of densely populated areas in 85 European regions. Results reveal the controversial influence of tourism on urban destinations, indicating how the increase in the number of visitors may benefit mean incomes and relieve the pressure on housing costs, while at the same time, driving a higher dispersion of income and residential displacement. A clear difference is established between homeowners and tenants to this regard: the former can use the opportunities of rent extraction in the platform economy to withstand the economic pressure of tourism, while the latter are more exposed to the risk of having to leave their homes.
      Citation: European Urban and Regional Studies
      PubDate: 2022-03-05T09:42:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09697764221078729
       
  • Urban alternative cultural production in Turin: An ecological community
           approach

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      Authors: Enrico Eraldo Bertacchini, Giangavino Pazzola, Francesco Puletti
      First page: 350
      Abstract: European Urban and Regional Studies, Ahead of Print.
      From the ashes of the creative city paradigm, there is a growing awareness of the urban creative economy as an adaptive complex system of intertwined actors and institutions. Yet, especially in the European context, little attention has been given to understanding informal and alternative art spaces and venues that contribute to the vibrancy of the urban cultural scene. Drawing on the emerging creative and cultural ecology literature, the article proposes a conceptual and empirical framework to analyze alternative cultural production as an ecological community. After providing a conceptualization of distinct types of alternative cultural organizations, we investigate the economic, spatial, and relational structure of more than 50 art spaces in Turin, Italy, an industrial city that has experienced a radical urban transformation based on culture-led development strategies. Using both a quantitative and qualitative approach, our findings unveil a distinction between centers pursuing artistic specialization and those more oriented toward aggregating diversified cultural activities. The two types of organizations coexist within the community, but the difference in their mission and operation influences the organizational structure, the involvement in neighborhood revitalization, and features of the local network of collaborations. From a spatial perspective, while the centers tend to cluster in the main peripheral areas of social and urban transformation, the analysis points out possible different locational choices and spatial dynamics for the two types of organizations in distinct areas of commercial and real-estate-led transformation.
      Citation: European Urban and Regional Studies
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T07:18:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09697764221076999
       
  • Selective inclusion: Civil society involvement in the smart city ecology
           of Amsterdam

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      Authors: Filipe Mello Rose, Joachim Thiel, Gernot Grabher
      First page: 369
      Abstract: European Urban and Regional Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Although research on smart cities increasingly acknowledges the involvement of civil society actors, most studies fall short when it comes to clarifying the specific modalities of civil society involvement. By probing into the smart city ecology that has developed around the Amsterdam Smart City-Foundation, we explore not only the extent to which the civil society is part of a smart city ecology but also what role civil society actors hold within this ecology. This article draws on data gathered and analyzed through quantitative and qualitative methods. The qualitative analysis focuses on analyzing the institutional dynamics that shape civil society involvement in Amsterdam’s smart city ecology. The quantitative data are used to unravel the relational dynamics by quantifying collaborative patterns between different types of organizations in Amsterdam’s smart city ecology. Our findings reveal that powerful institutional dynamics, manifested through normative pressures, favor the involvement of socially oriented civil society actors. At the same time, however, relational dynamics that shape the collaborative patterns in the projects of the ecology rather exclude the socially oriented civil society at the benefit of an economically oriented civil society. In other words, while the entire ecology rhetorically adheres to an ethos of pervasive civil society involvement, politically, socially, and civically oriented civil society actors lack inter-organizational collaboration—even in the supposedly inclusive context of Amsterdam.
      Citation: European Urban and Regional Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T04:54:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09697764221092587
       
  • ‘The countryside starts here’: How the urban-rural divide continues to
           matter in post-urban Flanders

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      Authors: Clemens de Olde, Stijn Oosterlynck
      First page: 281
      Abstract: European Urban and Regional Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Contemporary scholarship has critically interrogated categorical distinctions of urban and rural settlement types, shifting attention to processes of urbanisation instead. Yet, in some cases, the urban-rural dichotomy still proves an indispensable category to understand the governance of urbanisation. In this article, we explore this apparent contradiction: why is it that a distinction which is clearly inadequate in capturing the actual reality of urbanisation in post-urban regions still strongly informs the way a variety of actors involved in spatial planning think and act' This question is explored through an in-depth qualitative study of spatial governance in the fragmented post-urban settlement structure of Flanders, Belgium. Central to the study is the spatial governance instrument of demarcating ‘urban areas’, which is based on a strict urban-rural dichotomy in an attempt to counter sprawl. Through its implementation in the agglomerations of Antwerp and Mechelen, we show how this distinction tends to activate and reproduce a morally charged symbolic urban-rural divide. Combined with anti-urban identities and interests the distinction is instrumentalised in strategic actions of politicians and residents to undermine the instrument’s effectiveness. We conclude that arguments about the need for ‘new epistemologies of the urban’ should take the symbolic power of the urban-rural dichotomy seriously, as declaring these categories obsolete does not in itself lead to their disappearance.
      Citation: European Urban and Regional Studies
      PubDate: 2021-10-05T11:07:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09697764211043448
       
  • Decentralised development policy: A comparative study on local development
           interventions through municipalities in Sweden

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      Authors: Brita Hermelin, Kristina Trygg
      First page: 297
      Abstract: European Urban and Regional Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates how the international wave of decentralisation of development policy, promoted through ideals of place-based policy, becomes practice through development interventions made by municipalities in Sweden. Based on an extensive empirical study across Swedish municipalities, the article contributes with knowledge about how the decentralisation of development policies is formed through a combination of shared and relatively heterodox conditions for development interventions across the different categories of municipalities: cities, towns and rural settlements. The results describe the varying scope of local development interventions and how decentralisation involves differentiating the involvement of municipalities into vertical and horizontal relations within the planning sector. The article’s findings about the variations in local development interventions across the different categories of municipalities contribute to the debate within geography on the varying capacities of different geographical formations to mobilise for bottom-up development, leading to the weaker regions remaining weak. The results of this article also illustrate the importance of reflecting upon how particular national planning systems shape the implications of the general international trend towards the decentralisation of local development policy.
      Citation: European Urban and Regional Studies
      PubDate: 2021-11-01T09:07:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09697764211054773
       
  • Policy action for green restructuring in specialized industrial regions

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      Authors: Stig-Erik Jakobsen, Elvira Uyarra, Rune Njøs, Arnt Fløysand
      First page: 312
      Abstract: European Urban and Regional Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Combining insights from evolutionary economic geography and socio-technical transition studies, this article provides a conceptual framework and a theory-informed empirical analysis of policy dimensions for regional green restructuring. The combination of these two perspectives allows the application and confrontation of analytical concepts with the particularities of regions, with a specific focus on the role of policy to ensure directionality. Empirically our discussion is illustrated by a case study of Western Norway, a specialized industrial region. We focus on the role of policy for the development of new green technology pathways within this region. We observe that different industry transition pathways within a region are influenced by various combinations of policy action, and that policy for regional green restructuring includes complex policy mixes initiated at different levels of governance. Our framework provides a suitable scheme for assessing the role of policy for green restructuring in regions.
      Citation: European Urban and Regional Studies
      PubDate: 2021-10-05T11:09:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09697764211049116
       
  • Springboard, not roadblock: Discourse analysis of Facebook groups suggests
           that ethnic neighbourhoods in European cities might jump-start
           immigrants’ integration

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      Authors: Lena Hafner
      First page: 383
      Abstract: European Urban and Regional Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The age of migration finds its physical manifestation in the immigrant neighbourhoods of European cities. These ‘ethnic enclaves’ have received much attention from the public, as well as policy makers. Conventional wisdom holds that policies are required to confront such concentrations. Several European countries have implemented measures to achieve a spatial balance – be it through settlement bans or allocation quotas – in the name of fostering immigrants’ integration.However, the scholarly verdict on the relationship between segregation and integration is still pending. This article aims to contribute a novel approach, namely discourse analysis of immigrants’ Facebook groups. To this end, it first establishes the level of segregation in six cities (three in Germany and three in England) using data held by municipal archives. Second, it scrutinises 119 Facebook groups of Pakistanis and Turks in these cities, with a total of 2665 posts. This exploratory analysis suggests that desegregation might be causative for downwards assimilation and transnationalism, whereas ethnic enclaves might provide the basis for a pluralist mode of integration. Therefore, it argues for a re-evaluation of the suitability of dispersal policies for shaping the transformation of ever more European cities into multi-ethnic metropolises.
      Citation: European Urban and Regional Studies
      PubDate: 2021-11-26T04:25:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09697764211057490
       
 
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