Subjects -> PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (Total: 284 journals)
    - MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT (9 journals)
    - PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (248 journals)
    - SECURITY (27 journals)

MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT (9 journals)

Showing 1 - 6 of 6 Journals sorted alphabetically
European Urban and Regional Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Gestão & Regionalidade     Open Access  
Journal of Local Government Issues     Open Access  
Policy Design and Practice     Open Access  
State and Local Government Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Terra : Revista de Desarrollo Local     Open Access  
Similar Journals
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State and Local Government Review
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0160-323X - ISSN (Online) 1943-3409
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • SLGR – The Year Behind, the Year Ahead

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      Authors: Kimberly Nelson, Eric Zeemering
      Pages: 3 - 4
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Volume 54, Issue 1, Page 3-4, March 2022.

      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T10:33:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221092077
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Welcome to New Editorial Board Members for 2022

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      Pages: 5 - 6
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Volume 54, Issue 1, Page 5-6, March 2022.

      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T10:30:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221091909
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Is Florida Really that Interesting' State Geographic Bias in Public
           Administration Research

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      Authors: Luke Fowler, Dalten Fox
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Ahead of Print.
      The authors examine whether there are geographic biases in public administration research. They use a dataset of 557 research articles from top public administration journals in which specific state names appear in the title or abstract. Findings suggest that not only is a mass of public administration research concentrated in four states (Florida, California, New York, and Texas), but specific thematic topics and policy areas are associated with each of those states. In general, this suggests that authors need to consider if continuing these trends creates a blind spot for research bias in the field, where the collective understanding of a specific topic is disproportionately influenced by data from a single state. The broad implications are that how states serve as a research setting should be actively considered by authors.
      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T05:22:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221110484
       
  • The Road to Routinization: A Functional Collective Action Approach for
           Local Sustainability Planning and Performance Management

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      Authors: Aaron Deslatte, Rachel M. Krause, Christopher V. Hawkins
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Ahead of Print.
      When confronting complex challenges, governments use basic bureaucratic design heuristics -- centralization and specialization. The complexity of environmental and climate issues has drawn recent attention to the ways in which fragmented authority influences, and often challenges, the policy choices and institutional effectiveness of local governments. Sustainability planning and improved performance are potential benefits stemming from the integration of responsibilities across silos. Our central proposition is that institutionalized collective-action mechanisms, which break down siloed decision-making, foster more successful implementation of sustainability policies. We empirically examine this using two surveys of U.S. cities and find evidence that formal collective-action mechanisms positively mediate the relationship between broader agency involvement and more comprehensive performance information collection and use. However, we identify limits to the role of planning in fostering a performance culture. Specifically, cities that have engaged in broader planning conduct less-comprehensive performance management, likely due to measurement difficulty and goal ambiguity.
      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-06-27T07:11:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221111065
       
  • Everything Universities Wanted to Know About Public Opinion* (*but Were
           Afraid to Ask)

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      Authors: Stephen M. Gavazzi, E. Gordon Gee
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-06-24T06:20:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221109472
       
  • Learning from Cemetery Managers About Citizen–State Encounters and
           Emotional Labor

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      Authors: Staci M. Zavattaro, Mary Ellen Guy
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Ahead of Print.
      Using stories from cemetery managers to make the case, this paper first argues that the emotive component in the citizen-state encounter is as essential, if not more essential, than its cognitive component. This is because emotion creates lasting impressions that are positive or negative. To advance theory building, a holistic framework of the citizen-state encounter is then presented. Data to inform the model were collected through interviews with 35 U.S. municipal cemetery managers, an essential administrative function in local governments. The resulting holistic framework incorporates both affective and cognitive dimensions and accentuates how public officials are the nerve endings of public policy, connecting with the public and bringing government to life. Hypotheses are suggested for testing the model.
      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T05:32:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221109456
       
  • Gender Equity Commission Priorities: An Archival Study and Prospects for
           the Future

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      Authors: Maria J. D’Agostino, Nicole M. Elias
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Ahead of Print.
      This research explores the priorities of the gender equity commission in New York City over forty-five years. Archival commission data was organized thematically to understand the history of gender equity and suggest future possibilities for gender equity beyond New York City. In our historical analysis, we see an expansion of the definition of gender and an adoption of an intersectional approach to gender. We identify four historical gender priorities: sexual harassment and violence, pay equity and economic advancement, health and safety, and gender recognition and celebration. To address systemic issues of gender inequity, we recommend local level administrators embed an intersectional approach in their policies and programming and move away from the commission model to one of a permanent office or agency. These recommendations will better equip municipalities with the resources to increase gender equity, particularly during COVID-19 recovery.
      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T04:21:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221101559
       
  • Flexible Aid in an Uncertain World: The Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal
           Recovery Funds Program

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      Authors: Philip Rocco, Amanda Kass
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Ahead of Print.
      Emergency fiscal transfers to state, local, tribal, and territorial governments have been at the core of the U.S. federal government's response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The most extensive of these transfer programs is the Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds (CSLFRF) program, contained in the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021. The CSLFRF is not only larger than prior rounds of emergency aid, it was also designed to address a broader series of crises, address pre-existing inequities, and provide greater discretion to public officials in deciding how to allocate funds. In this article, we consider the extent to which this program represents a departure from what some have called “fend for yourself” federalism. We conclude that while the coordinated effort of intergovernmental organizations resulted in a greater measure of federal fiscal activism and flexibility than might have been anticipated, lingering political conflicts and legacies of austerity will continue to inflect the CSLFRF's implementation.
      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T07:50:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221101005
       
  • Patterns in Local Economic Development in Light of COVID-19

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      Authors: Brad A. M. Johnson, Darrin Wilson, Eric Stokan, Michael Overton
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic pressured local governments to employ creative and untested economic development strategies to stabilize private businesses. To explore how the uncertainty of the pandemic impacted the priorities and strategies of economic development officials, we surveyed officials about their initial economic development response to the pandemic coupled with subsequent in-depth interviews in the Cincinnati metropolitan region. Our analysis suggests that local officials did not drastically alter their use of supply-side tools during the pandemic. However, they did start coupling supply-side with demand-side policies in unique ways compared to past economic crises. This study also finds that the pandemic affected collaboration processes, leading officials to deepen and forge relationships with other local governments. We find that these shifts have proven durable over the past year as municipalities continue to grapple with changing economic conditions due to COVID-19. As additional waves are likely, we suggest that administrators must consider the skills required to manage evolving economic conditions as well as both the supply and demand sides of local economic development.
      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T11:54:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221097711
       
  • How Do Balanced Budget Rules Impact Fiscal Performance Based On Revenue
           Structure': Evidence From U.S. States

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      Authors: Sungchan Kim, Soyoung Park
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Ahead of Print.
      Revenue condition needs to be considered in the design of balanced budget rules (BBRs), because revenue stream, which varies across state governments, is an important factor in balancing the budget. Also, revenue factors may influence state responses to economic crises through the employment of BBRs.Thus, this study examines the influence of BBRs on states’ fiscal performance depending on revenue structure using a panel data set from 1997 to 2016. The results demonstrate that the strongest BBRs are effective in reducing deficit shocks, although this amplifies fiscal volatility. However, the weakest BBRs play a role in stabilizing volatility. Considering revenue structure, if a state government is concerned about deficit shocks, it would do well to adopt the strongest BBRs, with lower levels of own-source revenue. Conversely, if a state government wishes to pursue fiscal stabilization, it should adopt the weakest BBRs, with lower levels of own-source revenue and less diversified source.
      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T06:14:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221094805
       
  • State Interventions and Interlocal Collaborations Across the Three Pillars
           of Sustainability

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      Authors: Jayce L. Farmer
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Ahead of Print.
      The literature on interlocal sustainability has acknowledged that the resources and authority of state governments influence the collaborative sustainability policy actions of local governments. However, there is an absence of empirical evidence that shows how this influence varies across the environmental protection, economic development, and social equity pillars of sustainability. This study uses data from a 2015 national survey of U.S. cities to shed light on the connection between state-level interventions and regional partnerships across the three primary sustainability policy dimensions. With an understanding gleaned from the concept of contested federalism, this analysis employed Bayesian techniques to examine how state fiscal support for sustainability, along with fiscal and functional decentralization in state systems, affect municipal collaborative policy efforts. The findings suggest a positive link between supportive state-level endeavors and local-level collaborations. However, state influences can have different implications across the three pillars of sustainability.
      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-30T07:05:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221089664
       
  • Local Autonomy and Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Dana Patton, Ann Durand, Kyle Whipple, David L. Albright
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Ahead of Print.
      We examine local government response to the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States utilizing a unique dataset created by the National League of Cities. The most common action by local governments was changing administrative procedures and implementing policies aimed at prevention or “flattening the curve”. The general public was the most common population target. In addition to detailing the most common local action types, policy areas, and population targets, we analyze local response based on the autonomy granted to local governments by states. We expected local governments with greater levels of autonomy would have a greater level of response; however, some local governments did not ‘behave’ as expected based on their degree of policymaking autonomy granted by state governments. Some states with higher levels of autonomy enacted relatively few local actions in response to the pandemic, whereas some with little autonomy engaged in considerable activity to address COVID-19.
      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-30T07:04:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221089661
       
  • An Antiracist Index for State Level Assessment

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      Authors: Samantha June Larson
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Ahead of Print.
      In 2020, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security identified white supremacists as the most lethal threat in America. White supremacy is a system rooted in racist policies and ideas that produce and normalize racial inequities. Combatting white supremacism thus requires identification and promotion of antiracist policies, actions, and systemic changes. This study constructs an Antiracist Index comprised of 15 indicators to assess the degree to which American states exhibit antiracist conditions across political, economic, and cultural dimensions. Indices are rank-ordered for all 50 states, from Very High to Very Low scores. Results demonstrate that three indicators—self-defense laws, gun ownership, and support for Black Lives Matter—primarily impact both high and low ranking states. The Antiracism Index thus serves as an exploratory assessment tool which enables state-by-state comparisons, identification of antiracist indicators, and the ability to monitor changes in racism and antiracism moving forward.
      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T05:36:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221089639
       
  • Accountability and Collaboration for Intergovernmental Performance
           Management: Communicating Goals through the HUD Grantmaking Process

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      Authors: Juliet Musso, Christopher Weare, J. Woody Stanley
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Ahead of Print.
      This paper presents an exploratory case study of a performance-based intergovernmental grant program, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's (HUD) homeless assistance grants to local Continuums of Care (CoC). The goal is to illuminate the mechanisms by which a federal agency may communicate its priority goals to local grant recipients and seek to promote local actions that further those goals. The mixed-methods case study finds that meeting HUD performance targets does not lead to larger awards in the competitive grant process, casting doubt on the strength of incentives provided by the competitive grants. Nevertheless, the grant making process plays an important role in communicating federal priorities. The system performance metrics emphasized in the grant process coupled with targeted technical assistance appear to promote a focus on performance at the local level and play a role in system reform and capacity building.
      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T03:04:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221081515
       
  • Performance Management Research for State and Local Government: Where It
           Should Go Next

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      Authors: David N. Ammons
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T01:15:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221084751
       
  • Managing Performance for Capital Projects

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      Authors: Andrew J. Grandage
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Ahead of Print.
      This study contributes to our understanding of public performance with original research on Earned Value Management (EVM), a practice used for managing cost and schedule performance for capital projects throughout execution. Recently, EVM has emerged in some states as part of their performance management strategy for major Information Technology acquisitions but research has yet to study implementation. Overall, results indicate that EVM can support proactive cost and schedule management and help achieve performance objectives but that it is not fully embedded into work routines. Findings also illustrate that successful implementation is contingent on several organizational, human capital, and policy variables.
      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T04:25:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221079675
       
  • Declining Civility and Growing Political Violence at the Local Level: A
           Threat to American Democracy

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      Authors: Vince Williams, Jacob Gottlieb, Tina Lee
      First page: 7
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T05:20:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221089945
       
  • Diffusion of Data-Driven Practices: How the Opinion Leading U.S. Cities
           are Advancing the use of Data in Local Government

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      Authors: Ruth Puttick, Lisa Mae Fiedler, Jennifer Park
      First page: 52
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Ahead of Print.
      Understanding why cities are leaders in data-driven local government can help diffuse best practices to support better decision-making and improve government services. This study surveyed US local government professionals and generated a new practitioner-led definition of data-driven local government and it identified the opinion leader cities viewed as exemplars in their use of data. To our knowledge, this study is the first practitioner-generated definition of data-driven local government and the first depiction of a local government network of data-driven efforts.
      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-29T08:12:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221088017
       
  • Understanding Local Government Coordination: An Assessment of District
           Coordination Committees in Nepal

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      Authors: Thaneshwar Bhusal
      First page: 68
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Ahead of Print.
      This observational study of local government coordination brings fresh assessment of institutions and processes of District Coordination Committees (DCCs) in facilitating horizontal coordination across local governments and vertical coordination between federal, provincial, and local governments in Nepal. Necessary qualitative data – observational notes, interview transcripts and selected official publications – were generated based on researcher's two year's professional experience at the DCC in a remote district of Rasuwa in Nepal. Analysis is conducted in line with what John Halligan (2020) has explained as analytical elements of horizontal and vertical coordination. Findings suggest that although DCCs seem less effective local institutions in fostering both horizontal and vertical coordination, they are increasingly providing the most plausible avenues for politicians, administrators, and ordinary people to get together in materialising the constitutional thirst to implement cooperative federalism in Nepal.
      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T08:28:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221087909
       
  • Public Service Motivation of Street- Level Bureaucrats Amidst the COVID-19
           Pandemic: An Analysis of Experiences in Implementation of an at-Home
           Vaccination Program

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      Authors: Beth M. Rauhaus
      First page: 82
      Abstract: State and Local Government Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article details public service motivation of emergency medical services (EMS) personnel within a local fire department in Texas, as they implemented an at-home vaccination program, amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. EMS personnel were surveyed and interviewed to learn more about their professional experiences. Using mixed methods, this work finds that EMS personnel in the local department exhibit high levels of public service motivation in both deciding to participate in the at-home vaccination program and throughout their experience in administering the vaccine to community members. This research offers insight local public servants’ motives during a time of crisis and while working in a new, innovative capacity.
      Citation: State and Local Government Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T04:25:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0160323X221079242
       
 
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