Subjects -> CHEMISTRY (Total: 928 journals)
    - ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (59 journals)
    - CHEMISTRY (661 journals)
    - CRYSTALLOGRAPHY (23 journals)
    - ELECTROCHEMISTRY (28 journals)
    - INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (45 journals)
    - ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (47 journals)
    - PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (65 journals)

CHEMISTRY (661 journals)                  1 2 3 4 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 735 Journals sorted alphabetically
Accounts of Materials Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Accreditation and Quality Assurance: Journal for Quality, Comparability and Reliability in Chemical Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
ACS Applied Polymer Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
ACS Catalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
ACS Chemical Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
ACS Combinatorial Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
ACS Environmental Au     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
ACS Macro Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ACS Materials Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
ACS Nano     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 187)
ACS Photonics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
ACS Symposium Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
ACS Synthetic Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Acta Chemica Malaysia     Open Access  
Acta Chimica Slovaca     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Chimica Slovenica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Chromatographica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Acta Metallurgica Sinica (English Letters)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acta Scientifica Naturalis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
adhäsion KLEBEN & DICHTEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Adhesion Adhesives & Sealants     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Electronic Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Functional Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Advanced Journal of Chemistry, Section A     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advanced Journal of Chemistry, Section B     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advanced Science Focus     Free   (Followers: 6)
Advanced Theory and Simulations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Advanced Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Chemical Engineering and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 111)
Advances in Chemical Science     Open Access   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Environmental Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Enzyme Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Materials Physics and Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Advances in Nanoparticles     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Polymer Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Sample Preparation     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Aerosol Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
African Journal of Chemical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Pure and Applied Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Aggregate     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agrokémia és Talajtan     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Al-Kimia : Jurnal Penelitian Sains Kimia     Open Access  
Alchemy : Journal of Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Alchemy : Jurnal Penelitian Kimia     Open Access  
Alotrop     Open Access  
AMB Express     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ambix     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Biochemistry and Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 44)
American Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
American Journal of Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
American Journal of Plant Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Analytical Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Angewandte Chemie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 144)
Angewandte Chemie International Edition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 236)
Annales Universitatis Mariae Curie-Sklodowska, sectio AA – Chemia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annual Reports in Computational Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annual Reports Section A (Inorganic Chemistry)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Annual Review of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Annual Review of Food Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Organometallic Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Applied Surface Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Arabian Journal of Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
ARKIVOC     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Applied Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Biochemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Chemical Sciences     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Physical and Chemical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Australian Journal of Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Autophagy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Biochemical Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 203)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Biochemistry Research International     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BioChip Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Biointerface Research in Applied Chemistry     Open Access  
Biointerphases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Biology, Medicine, & Natural Product Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Biomacromolecules     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Biomass Conversion and Biorefinery     Partially Free   (Followers: 10)
Biomedical Chromatography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Biomolecular NMR Assignments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
BioNanoScience     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Bioorganic Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Biopolymers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Biosensors     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Biotechnic and Histochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Bitácora Digital     Open Access  
Boletin de la Sociedad Chilena de Quimica     Open Access  
Bulletin of Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Mongolian Academy of Sciences     Open Access  
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Japan     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Bulletin of the Korean Chemical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
C - Journal of Carbon Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Cakra Kimia (Indonesian E-Journal of Applied Chemistry)     Open Access  
Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Mineralogist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Carbohydrate Polymer Technologies and Applications     Open Access  
Carbohydrate Polymers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Carbohydrate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Carbon     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Carbon Capture Science & Technology     Open Access  
Carbon Trends     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Catalysis Reviews: Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Catalysis Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Catalysis Surveys from Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Catalysts     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Cell Reports Physical Science     Open Access  
Cellulose     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Cereal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Chem     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chem Catalysis     Hybrid Journal  
ChemBioEng Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
ChemCatChem     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Chemical and Engineering News     Free   (Followers: 22)
Chemical Bulletin of Kazakh National University     Open Access  
Chemical Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Chemical Engineering Research and Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Chemical Physics Impact     Full-text available via subscription  
Chemical Research in Chinese Universities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Chemical Research in Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Chemical Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 178)
Chemical Science     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Chemical Science International Journal     Open Access  
Chemical Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Chemical Thermodynamics and Thermal Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Chemical Vapor Deposition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Chemie in Unserer Zeit     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Chemie-Ingenieur-Technik (Cit)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
ChemInform     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Chemistry     Open Access  
Chemistry & Biodiversity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Chemistry & Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chemistry - A European Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 119)
Chemistry - An Asian Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Chemistry Africa : A Journal of the Tunisian Chemical Society     Hybrid Journal  
Chemistry and Materials Research     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Chemistry Central Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Chemistry Education Research and Practice     Free   (Followers: 6)
Chemistry Education Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chemistry in Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Chemistry Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
Chemistry of Heterocyclic Compounds     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Chemistry of Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 166)
Chemistry of Natural Compounds     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Chemistry World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Chemistry-Didactics-Ecology-Metrology     Open Access  
ChemistryOpen     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ChemistrySelect     Hybrid Journal  
Chemistry–Methods     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chemkon - Chemie Konkret, Forum Fuer Unterricht Und Didaktik     Hybrid Journal  
ChemNanoMat     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chemoecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Chemosensors     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ChemPhotoChem     Hybrid Journal  
ChemPhysChem     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
ChemPhysMater     Full-text available via subscription  
ChemPlusChem     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Chempublish Journal     Open Access  
ChemSystemsChem     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
ChemTexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CHIMIA International Journal for Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Chinese Journal of Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Chinese Journal of Polymer Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Chromatographia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Chromatography     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Chromatography Research International     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ciencia     Open Access  
Clay Minerals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cogent Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Colloid and Interface Science Communications     Open Access  
Colloid and Polymer Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Colloids and Interfaces     Open Access  
Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Combinatorial Chemistry & High Throughput Screening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Combustion Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Comments on Inorganic Chemistry: A Journal of Critical Discussion of the Current Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Communications Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Communications Materials     Open Access  
Composite Interfaces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Comptes Rendus : Chimie     Open Access  
Comptes Rendus : Physique     Open Access   (Followers: 3)

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Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.463
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0846-5371 - ISSN (Online) 1488-2361
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Strategies for Well-Being in Interventional Radiology

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      Authors: Amina Farooq, Barbara Hamilton
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Interventional radiologists (IRs) have a massive impact on their patients, communities, and healthcare at large. Yet, IRs have physical and emotional challenges that lead to a high rate of burnout compared with other medical specialties. A Medscape survey in 2013 showed a 37% burnout incidence among radiologists, which increased to 49% in 2015. This ranked radiology 7th out of 26 specialties with respect to burnout. Although the survey did not examine IR specifically, with the increasing demands on those in the profession, this number can only be expected to increase. A survey by Bundy et al demonstrated that interventional radiologists are in the upper range of burnout among physicians with 71.9% presenting with at least 1 manifestation of burnout. This is higher than that reported among surgeons or diagnostic radiologists. We must be proactive in addressing wellness in IR if we are to flourish both individually and as a group. The impact of suboptimal well-being in an IR goes beyond that of the individual, influencing patient care with ripple effects to society at large. At worst, severe burnout can lead to an early exit from medicine, with the cost of recruiting a replacement IR estimated at two to three times an annual physician salary. This is to say nothing of the experience, wisdom, and leadership that are lost when physicians burn out and drop out. Particularly in IR, where the work performed often improves the cost-effectiveness and quality of care, burnout is a threat to the physician workforce and healthcare at large. In this article, our goal is to share some elements of physician well-being and highlight opportunities to support well-being in IR.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T10:24:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221108464
       
  • Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion: Calling, Career, or Chore'

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      Authors: Jeffrey Ding, Charlotte J. Yong-Hing, Michael N. Patlas, Faisal Khosa
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T04:10:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221108633
       
  • Recommendations for Improving Canadian Radiology Equity, Diversity and
           Inclusion

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      Authors: Tasha Cusson, Kiana Lebel, Lucy Spalluto, Tracey Hillier, Kathryn Darras, Charlotte Yong-Hing
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Improving equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) within Canadian radiology is critical for optimal patient care and to reduce health disparities. Although there are increasing national EDI initiatives, there is a paucity of resources available to assist radiology departments as the culture of EDI evolves and faculty and institutions are expected to incorporate EDI in their practice. We present practical recommendations for radiology departments, radiology training programs, and individual radiologists wishing or mandated to improve EDI in the workplace. Actionable strategies for creating an environment that promotes EDI, attracting and supporting diverse trainees, and for how individual radiologists can be allies are presented. These EDI strategies are imperative to provide the best patient care and to strengthen the future of Canadian radiology.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T04:39:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221099956
       
  • Consent in Interventional Radiology—How Can We Make It Better'

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      Authors: Tia Forsman, Sara Silberstein, Eric J. Keller
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Informed consent is an important part of the clinician-patient relationship. However, studies suggest consent practices tend to be limited in consistency and completeness. This may be particularly challenging for interventional radiology given more limited public awareness and the often fast-paced, dynamic nature of our practices. This article reviews these challenges as well as ideal consent practices and potential approaches to improve consent in interventional radiology.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T08:53:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221101625
       
  • Canadian Association of Radiologists Guidance on Contrast Associated Acute
           Kidney Injury

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      Authors: D. Blair Macdonald, Casey Hurrell, Andreu F. Costa, Matthew D.F. McInnes, Martin E. O'Malley, Brendan Barrett, Pierre Antoine Brown, Edward G. Clark, Anastasia Hadjivassiliou, Iain D.C. Kirkpatrick, Jeremy L. Rempel, Paul M. Jeon, Swapnil Hiremath
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Iodinated contrast media (ICM) is one of the most frequently administered pharmaceuticals. In Canada, over 5.4 million computed tomography (CT) examinations were performed in 2019, of which 50% were contrast enhanced. Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurring after ICM administration was historically considered a common iatrogenic complication which was managed by screening patients, prophylactic strategies, and follow up evaluation of renal function. The Canadian Association of Radiologists (CAR) initially published guidelines on the prevention of contrast induced nephropathy in 2007, with an update in 2012. However, new developments in the field have led to the availability of safer contrast agents and changes in clinical practice, prompting a complete revision of the earlier recommendations. This revised guidance document was developed by a multidisciplinary CAR Working Group of radiologists and nephrologists, and summarizes changes in practice related to contrast administration, screening, and risk stratification since the last guideline. It reviews the scientific evidence for contrast associated AKI and provides consensus-based recommendations for its prevention and management in the Canadian healthcare context. This article is a joint publication in the Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal and Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease, intended to inform both communities of practice.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T11:29:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221083970
       
  • Low Tube Voltage Chest Computed Tomography With Enhancement Using
           Low-Concentration Iodinated Contrast Media: Comparison of 240 mg/mL
           Versus 300 mg/mL Iodinated Contrast Media

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      Authors: Suyon Chang, Jung Im Jung, Kyongmin S. Beck
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: To evaluate the image quality of low voltage chest computed tomography with enhancement (CECT) using low-concentration-iodine contrast media (LCCM). Method: From 9 December to 19 December 2019, three different protocols were used for 263 patients undergoing chest CECT. Chest CECT was done using routine (300 mgI/ml contrast media with 100 kVp) protocol (group 1), LCCM (240 mgI/ml contrast media)–100 kVp protocol (group 2) and LCCM–80 kVp protocol (group 3) in 91, 97 and 75 patients, respectively. The overall diagnostic acceptability, anatomical depiction, noise and contrast-related artifacts were assessed. Additionally, the mean attenuation, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and figure of merit (FOM) in the aorta and the main pulmonary trunk were measured. Results: The overall diagnostic acceptability scores were not significantly different between groups 1 and 2 (P = .261); group 3 demonstrated significantly lower overall diagnostic acceptability score compared with group 1 (P = .011) or group 2 (P < .001). However, in CECT with iterative reconstruction (IR), the overall diagnostic acceptability scores did not show significant difference among 3 groups. Group 3 showed significantly lower effective radiation dose compared with group 1 (2.33 vs 1.22 mSv, P < .001) or group 2 (2.28 vs .22 mSv, P < .001). Conclusions: In 100 kVp chest CECT, the image quality of using 240 mg/mL iodinated contrast media is comparable to that using 300 mg/mL iodine contrast media, regardless of application of IR; with IR, chest CECT using 80 kVp and 240 mg/mL iodinated contrast media results in acceptable image quality and lower radiation dose.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T08:50:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221102631
       
  • An Update on Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

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      Authors: Hang Yu, Iain D. C. Kirkpatrick
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is an uncommon yet highly lethal cause of acute abdomen in the emergency setting. Computed tomography (CT) imaging, in particular a biphasic protocol consisting of angiographic and venous phase scans, is widely used to corroborate non-specific clinical findings when suspicions of AMI are high. Techniques such as low kilovoltage peak scanning, dual energy acquisition, or a combined arterial/enteric phase can improve iodine conspicuity and evaluation of bowel enhancement. Biphasic CT with CT angiography is mandatory to directly assess for the 3 primary etiologies of AMI—arterial, venous, and non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI), and the CT angiographic findings may be the first visible in the disease. In addition, numerous non-vascular CT findings have also been reported. Bowel wall thickening, mesenteric stranding, and ascites are common but non-specific findings that correlate poorly with disease severity. Pneumatosis intestinalis and portomesenteric venous gas, while not pathognomonic for ischemia, are highly specific in cases of high clinical suspicion. Bowel wall hypoenhancement is an early and specific sign but requires a protocol optimizing iodine conspicuity to confidently identify. Finally, intraperitoneal free air and solid organ infarcts are also highly specific ancillary findings in AMI. AMI occurs as a complication in 10% of small bowel obstruction (SBO) patients, and understanding imaging findings of ischemia in the context of SBO is necessary to aid in treatment planning and reduce over- and under-diagnosis of strangulation. Familiarity with the imaging features of ischemia by radiologists is vital to establish an early diagnosis before irreversible necrosis occurs.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T05:03:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221094280
       
  • Elements of a Good Radiology Artificial Intelligence Paper

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      Authors: Bo Gong, Philippe Soyer, Matthew D. F. McInnes, Michael N. Patlas
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T07:03:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221101195
       
  • Influences of the Social Media Continuum Model in Radiology: Theory and
           Reality

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      Authors: Waleed Abdellatif, Jeffrey Ding, Bradley M. Spieler, Faisal Khosa, Abdelmohsen Radwan Hussien, Serageldin Kamel, Khaled M Elsayes, Tarek A. El-Diasty, Cecelia Brewington, Michael N. Patlas
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Social media utilization has been growing exponentially worldwide and has created a thriving venue for radiologists and the profession of radiology to engage in on both the academic and social levels. The aim of this article is to conduct updated literature review and address a gap in the literature by introducing a simple classification for social media utilization and a new theoretical model to outline the role and potential value of social media in the realm of radiology. We propose classifying social media through usage-driven and access-driven indices. Furthermore, we discuss the interdependency of radiologists, other physicians and non-physician stakeholders, scientific journals, conferences/meetings and the general public in an integrated social media continuum model. With the ongoing sub-specialization of radiology, social media helps mitigate the physical barriers of making connections with peers and audiences which would have otherwise been unfeasible. The constant evolution and diversification of social media platforms necessitates a novel approach to better understand its role through a radiological lens. With the looming fear of ‘ancillary service’ labelling, social media could be the golden plate to halt the path towards commoditization of radiology.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T11:51:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221096619
       
  • Pioneering EDI in Canadian Academic Radiology

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      Authors: Charlotte J. Yong-Hing, Michael N. Patlas, Faisal Khosa
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T06:08:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221099479
       
  • Emergency Radiology: Evolution, Current Status, and Future Directions

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      Authors: David Li, Raffaella Basilico, Ana Blanco, Cem Calli, Elizabeth Dick, Iain D. C. Kirkpatrick, Savvas Nicolaou, Michael N. Patlas
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Emergency Radiology is a clinical practice and an academic discipline that has rapidly gained increasing global recognition among radiology and emergency/critical care departments and trauma services around the world. As with other subspecialties, Emergency Radiology practice has a unique scope and purpose and presents with its own unique challenges. There are several advantages of having a dedicated Emergency Radiology section, perhaps most important of which is the broad clinical skillset that Emergency Radiologists are known for. This multi-society paper, representing the views of Emergency Radiology societies in Canada and Europe, outlines several value-oriented contributions of Emergency Radiologists and briefly discusses the current state of Emergency Radiology as a subspecialty.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T09:16:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221088924
       
  • Efficacy of Risk Prediction Models and Thresholds to Select Patients for
           Lung Cancer Screening

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      Authors: Richard J. Smith, Thurairajah Vijayaharan, Victoria Linehan, Zhuolu Sun, Jean Hai Ein Yong, Scott Harris, Hensley H. Mariathas, Rick Bhatia
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeScreening for lung cancer is recommended to reduce lung cancer mortality, but there is no consensus on patient selection for screening in Canada. Risk prediction models are more efficacious than the screening recommendations of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (CTFPHC), but it remains to be determined which model and threshold are optimal. MethodsWe retrospectively applied the PLCOm2012, PLCOall2014 and LLPv2 risk prediction models to 120 lung cancer patients from a Canadian province, at risk thresholds of ≥ 1.51% and ≥ 2.00%, to determine screening eligibility at time of diagnosis. OncoSim modelling was used to compare these risk thresholds. ResultsSensitivities of the risk prediction models at a threshold of ≥ 1.51% were similar with 93 (77.5%), 96 (80.0%), and 97 (80.8%) patients selected for screening, respectively. The PLCOm2012 and PLCOall2014 models selected significantly more patients for screening at a ≥ 1.51% threshold. The OncoSim simulation model estimated that the ≥ 1.51% threshold would detect 4 more cancers per 100 000 people than the ≥ 2.00% threshold. All risk prediction models, at both thresholds, achieved greater sensitivity than CTFPHC recommendations, which selected 56 (46.7%) patients for screening. ConclusionCommonly considered lung cancer screening risk thresholds (≥1.51% and ≥2.00%) are more sensitive than the CTFPHC 30-pack–years criterion to detect lung cancer. A lower risk threshold would achieve a larger population impact of lung cancer screening but would require more resources. Patients with limited or no smoking history, young patients, and patients with no history of COPD may be missed regardless of the model chosen.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T07:31:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221089899
       
  • Leadership in Interventional Radiology – Fostering a Culture of
           Excellence

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      Authors: Adrian P. Brady, Raman Uberoi, Michael J. Lee, Stefan Müller-Hülsbeck, Andreas Adam
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      This invited article reviews the current status of Interventional Radiology (IR), in terms of its status as a speciality, and outlines the conditions needed for IR to function optimally within healthcare settings. Guidance is offered in terms of developing an IR department, ensuring high-quality practice, dealing with administrative and political challenges, dealing with industry and creating a legacy.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T03:56:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221089249
       
  • Radiology’s Contribution to Individual Healthcare and to Society – a
           Shift from Volume to Value

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      Authors: Adrian P. Brady
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T01:29:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221093276
       
  • Parallel Line Sign—A New MRI Sign Associated With Chronic Sacroiliitis:
           Prevalence, Characteristics, and Associations

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      Authors: Timothy L. Miao, Shubreet Randhawa, Michael J. Roth, Yves Bureau, Joanne Howey, Gregory J. Garvin
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The purpose is to demonstrate the existence of the parallel line sign (PLS), a dark line parallel to the sacroiliac joint (SIJ), and determine its prevalence, characteristics, and associations. Methods: 200 consecutive SIJ MRIs referred by rheumatologists were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of the PLS. Presence and extent of imaging features of sacroiliitis (bone marrow edema, fatty infiltration, erosions, sclerosis, and ankylosis) were evaluated. Results: Prevalence of PLS was 11.5% (23/200), with 9 subjects having bilateral PLS, resulting in 32 SIJs showing a PLS. Every PLS involved the synovial portion of the SIJ, and almost all (31/32, 96.9%) involved the iliac (rather than sacral) side of the SIJ. Every PLS occurred with at least one established imaging feature of sacroiliitis. Presence of a PLS was associated with higher prevalence of erosions (78.3% vs 36.7% in those without PLS, P < .001), greater extent of SIJ involvement by erosions (3.6 ± 1.3 vs 2.3 ± 1.1 quadrants of the SIJ involved, P < .001), and higher density of erosions per centimeter (88.9% vs 46.2% with>2 erosions/cm, P = .001). There was higher prevalence of bone marrow edema, fatty infiltration, and sclerosis in those with PLS compared to those without PLS (P = .001, P < .001, and P = .006, respectively). Extent of involvement by any of these features was not significantly different between the two groups (P = .22, P = .16, and P = .46, respectively). Conclusions: The PLS is associated with imaging features of chronic sacroiliitis, especially erosions. Knowledge of the existence of the PLS may help avoid misdiagnosis of an insufficiency fracture and increase confidence in the diagnosis of sacroiliitis.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-03-29T10:54:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371211069493
       
  • Distinction Between Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Hypervascular Liver
           Metastases in Non-cirrhotic Patients Using Gadoxetate Disodium-Enhanced
           Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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      Authors: Shintaro Ichikawa, Hiroyuki Morisaka, Yoshie Omiya, Hiroshi Onishi
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study aims to identify the hallmarks of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging distinguishing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from hypervascular liver metastases (HLMs). Methods: Between January 2008 and October 2020, among patients who underwent gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI, those who met the following criteria were retrospectively included: without chronic hepatitis or liver stiffness ≤ 2.5 kPa on magnetic resonance elastography or F0/F1 on pathological assessment. Two blinded radiologists reviewed the imaging findings to judge the presence or absence of the enhancing capsule, nonperipheral washout, corona enhancement, hypointensity in the transitional/hepatobiliary phase (HBP), hyperintensity on T2-weighted/diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), mosaic architecture, and blood products/fat in mass. The lesion-to-liver signal intensity ratios in HBP and DWI were also calculated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the imaging hallmarks distinguishing HCC from HLM. Interobserver agreement was calculated using kappa values and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Results: The final study cohort comprised 72 lesions in 44 patients (mean age, 65.0±11.9 years). Univariate analysis revealed higher frequencies of the following features in HCC than in HLM (P < .10): nonperipheral washout, corona enhancement, transitional phase hypointensity, mosaic architecture, and fat in mass (P = .002-.073). Multivariate analysis revealed that nonperipheral washout and mosaic architecture favored the diagnosis of HCC over that of HLM with odds ratios of 7.66 and 14.6, respectively (P = .038 and .029, respectively). The interobserver agreement for each item was moderate or substantial (kappa or ICC = .447-.792). Conclusion: Peripheral washout and mosaic architecture may be reliable imaging hallmarks for distinguishing HCC from HLM.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-03-27T12:29:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221085516
       
  • The Role of Magnetic Resonance in Evaluating Abdominopelvic Trauma - Part
           2: Trauma in Pregnancy, Vascular, and Genitourinary Injuries

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      Authors: Mohamed Z. Rajput, Vincent M. Mellnick
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Trauma is an important cause of mortality, particularly in the young. While computed tomography (CT) is the mainstay of body imaging in the setting of trauma, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be useful in stable patients. Although more commonly used in spinal and musculoskeletal trauma, MR also has a role in abdominopelvic trauma. Broadly, its uses include clarification of equivocal cases, monitoring complications of trauma, particularly with solid organ injury, or as a primary imaging modality for patients with low suspicion for injury for whom avoiding ionizing radiation is a priority—namely, in pediatric and pregnant patients. In this two-part review article, we will review clinical scenarios where this may be encountered, utilizing case examples. Our second installment will focus on the use of MR in pregnant patients and in the characterization of vascular and genitourinary trauma. Body MR can be useful in pregnant patients in characterizing injuries both specific for and not specific for pregnancy. Placental injuries and hematomas in particular may be better seen on MR relative to CT, owing to its superior contrast resolution. MR angiography can be performed either without or with contrast and can be useful to monitor low-grade traumatic aortic injuries. Renal and ureteral injuries can be followed with MR to help identify urine leaks, either in a delayed presentation or in patients who have an iodinated contrast allergy. Lastly, penile injuries are often imaged with ultrasound, but may benefit from additional imaging with MR when the tunica albuginea cannot be completely seen due to overlying hematoma.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-03-13T08:48:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221077654
       
  • The Role of Magnetic Resonance in Evaluating Abdominopelvic Trauma - Part
           1: Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Injuries

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      Authors: Mohamed Z. Rajput, Vincent M. Mellnick
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Trauma is an important cause of mortality, particularly in the young. While computed tomography (CT) is the mainstay of body imaging in the setting of trauma, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be useful in stable patients. Although more commonly used in spinal and musculoskeletal trauma, MR also has a role in abdominopelvic trauma. Broadly, its uses include clarification of equivocal cases, monitoring complications of trauma, particularly with solid organ injury, or as a primary imaging modality for patients with low suspicion for injury for whom avoiding ionizing radiation is a priority—namely, in pediatric and pregnant patients. In this two-part review article, we will review clinical scenarios where this may be encountered, utilizing case examples. This first installment will focus on pancreatic and hepatobiliary injuries. Pancreatic trauma may be difficult to diagnose on CT, and MR may aid in demonstrating pancreatic duct disruption, allowing for accurate grading according to American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) criteria. It may also be a useful modality for monitoring evolution of pancreatic injuries and/or pseudocyst development, guiding potential stenting, and/or drainage. Biliary injuries are also optimally evaluated with MR, particularly when aided by the use of hepatobiliary contrast material. This can allow for accurate delineation of biliary ductal anatomy and aid in planning percutaneous or endoscopic treatment of bile leaks.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-03-13T08:41:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221077650
       
  • 2021 Year in Review

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      Authors: Bo Gong, Fateme Salehi, Casey Hurrell, Michael N. Patlas
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T09:58:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221083860
       
  • The Canadian Society of Breast Imaging Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging
           Working Group Report

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      Authors: El Khoury M, Yong-Hing CJ, Scaranelo AM, Kornecki A, Hapgood C, Horwitz T, Grimes J, Cloutier MJ, Seely JM
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-03-08T02:05:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221084047
       
  • Pediatric Petrous Apex Lesions: A Radiological Classification and
           Diagnostic Algorithm

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      Authors: Neetika Gupta, Shivaprakash Hiremath, Claudia Martinez-Rios, Santanu Chakraborty, Elka Miller
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      The petrous apex (PA) is involved in a myriad of pathological conditions, some of which are exclusive in children. Diagnosis may be difficult due to vague clinical presentation, and local examination is challenging owing to its inaccessible location. This is further complicated by multiple unfused sutures and ongoing PA pneumatization in children. Cross-sectional imaging is vital for the evaluation of the PA lesions, due to their precarious location and proximity to the major neurovascular structures. Several classification systems have been proposed for these lesions based on their site of origin, solid or cystic appearance, surgical or non-surgical (no touch lesions) management, and benign or malignant nature. In this article, we emphasize the distinctive role of different cross-sectional imaging modalities in the diagnosis of pediatric PA lesions, with special attention to normal variants that should not be mistaken for pathology. We also propose a radiological classification and algorithmic approach to aid in the precise diagnosis and facilitate appropriate management of the various PA lesions in children.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T11:25:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221074880
       
  • Dual-Energy Computed Tomography: Increasing Clinical Applications of an
           Emerging Diagnostic Tool in Musculoskeletal Radiology

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      Authors: Antonio Barile
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T04:19:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221086482
       
  • Confronting Our Blind Spots; the Persistent Use of Gender-specific
           Terminology in Radiology is Harmful

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      Authors: Hang Yu, Daria Manos
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T10:31:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221079196
       
  • Magnetic resonance imaging in abdominal trauma—More relevant than
           ever

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      Authors: Devang Odedra, Mariano Scaglione, Raffaella Basilico, Michael N. Patlas
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-03-02T12:48:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221080058
       
  • Lessons Learned from a Cyberattack on the Healthcare System of
           Newfoundland and Labrador: A Radiology Perspective

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      Authors: Hilary Strong, Angela Pickles, Angus Hartery
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T10:46:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221081549
       
  • Integration of Prostate Biopsy Results with Pre-Biopsy Multiparametric
           Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings Improves Local Staging of Prostate
           Cancer

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      Authors: Iztok Caglic, Nikita Sushentsev, Nimish Shah, Anne Y. Warren, Benjamin W. Lamb, Tristan Barrett
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: To assess the added value of histological information for local staging of prostate cancer (PCa) by comparing the accuracy of multiparametric MRI alone (mpMRI) and mpMRI with biopsy Gleason grade (mpMRI+Bx). Methods: 133 consecutive patients who underwent preoperative 3T-MRI and subsequent radical prostatectomy for PCa were included in this single-centre retrospective study. mpMRI imaging was reviewed independently by two uroradiologists for the presence of extracapsular extension (ECE) and seminal vesicle invasion (SVI) on a 5-point Likert scale. For second reads, the radiologists received results of targeted fused MR/US biopsy (mpMRI+Bx) prior to re-staging. Results: The median patient age was 63 years (interquartile range (IQR) 58-67 years) and median PSA was 6.5 ng/mL (IQR 5.0-10.0 ng/mL). Extracapsular extension was present in 85/133 (63.9%) patients and SVI was present in 22/133 (16.5%) patients. For ECE prediction, mpMRI showed sensitivity and specificity of 63.5% and 81.3%, respectively, compared to 77.7% and 81.3% achieved by mpMRI+Bx. At an optimal cut-off value of Likert score ≥ 3, areas under the curves (AUCs) was .85 for mpMRI+Bx and .78 for mpMRI, P < .01. For SVI prediction, AUC was .95 for mpMRI+Bx compared to .92 for mpMRI; P = .20. Inter-reader agreement for ECE and SVI prediction was substantial for mpMRI (k range, .78-.79) and mpMRI+Bx (k range, .74-.79). Conclusions: MpMRI+Bx showed superior diagnostic performance with an increased sensitivity for ECE prediction but no significant difference for SVI prediction. Inter-reader agreement was substantial for both protocols. Integration of biopsy information adds value when staging prostate mpMRI.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T01:02:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371211073158
       
  • The Impact of Slice Thickness on Diagnostic Accuracy in Digital Breast
           Tomosynthesis

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      Authors: Yen Zhi Tang, Amna Al-Arnawoot, Abdullah Alabousi
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo evaluate the effect of slice thickness on diagnostic accuracy in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT).MethodTwo readers retrospectively interpreted 150 DBT (125 normal and 25 pathology-proven cancer) cases scanned between October 2017–November 2020. The DBT studies were randomised and reviewed independently by the two readers. DBT studies were reviewed using a standard protocol (1 mm slices, no overlap and synthetic 2D-mammography (SM)) and an experimental protocol (10 mm slabs, 5 mm overlap and SM). Any abnormality and BIRADS scores were recorded by each reader. Sensitivity, specificity, interobserver and intraobserver agreement were calculated (Cohen’s Kappa κ). For diagnostic accuracy, the reference standard was histopathology or a normal mammogram at 2 years.ResultsThe sensitivity and specificity for reader 1 and 2 for cancer detection was reader 1 (97% and 79% for the standard protocol, 97% and 76% for the experimental protocol) and reader 2 (97% and 74% for both protocols). Reader 1 had 97.6% intraobserver agreement (κ .95) and reader 2 had 96.4% intraobserver agreement (κ .92) when assessing the standard and experimental protocols. There was 90.5% agreement between the readers for the standard protocol (κ .80). There was 90.9% agreement between the readers for the experimental protocol (κ .81). Of the 25 DBT studies with pathology-proven cancer, one cancer was missed by both readers using both protocols.ConclusionThe diagnostic accuracy was similar between the standard and experimental DBT protocols, demonstrating excellent interobserver and intraobserver agreement. This suggests 10-mm thick slabs can potentially replace 1-mm thin slices in the interpretation of DBT.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T09:24:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371211068200
       
  • Lessons Learned From Commonly Missed Head and Neck Cancers on
           Cross-Sectional Imaging

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      Authors: Fangshi Lu, John T. Lysack
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T08:50:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221079107
       
  • Microaggressions in Radiology: “Death by a thousand cuts”

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      Authors: Muhammad Mustafa Memon, Judy Yee, Faisal Khosa
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-02-07T08:30:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221077683
       
  • Restoring Timely Access to Medical Imaging in Canada: A Prescription for
           Renewed Radiology Investments

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      Authors: Gilles Soulez, Ania Kielar, Casey Hurrell, Heidi Schmidt
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-02-07T08:27:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221075617
       
  • Annual Mammographic Screening Reduces the Risk of Interval or Higher Stage
           Invasive Breast Cancers: Lessons for Today and Tomorrow

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      Authors: Abdullah Alabousi, Michael N. Patlas
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-01-29T08:58:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371211070555
       
  • Gender Distribution of Faculty Is Strongly Correlated With Resident Gender
           at Canadian Radiology Residency Programs

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      Authors: Morgan Lawley, Jessica Dobson, Francine Heelan, Daria Manos
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: Women are underrepresented in radiology overall, in radiology subspecialties, and in radiology leadership and academic positions. It is unclear why this disparity persists despite greater gender diversification in medicine. We sought to determine if a correlation exists between the proportion of female faculty at an institution, and the proportion of female residents in the associated residency program across Canada. Methods: Faculty gender for each Canadian Diagnostic Imaging Residency Program was obtained through publicly available sources (departmental websites and provincial physician registries) in the fall of 2020. Resident gender data was obtained through a survey emailed to programs following the April 2021 CaRMS match. Data was analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Research ethics approval was obtained. Results: Faculty information was available for 15 of the 16 Canadian radiology residency programs (94%) and resident information was obtained for 16 programs (100% response rate). Overall, women accounted for 31.4% of radiologist faculty and 31.9% of radiology residents, with a wide range between institutions (19.5–47.8% for faculty and 13.3%–47.1% for residents). There was a strong positive correlation between the proportion of female faculty and the proportion of female residents within individual programs (r=0.73; R2=0.54; p=0.002). Conclusion: Approximately one third of faculty and residents at Canadian Diagnostic Radiology residency programs were female but there was a wide range across the country with a strong correlation between faculty and resident gender distribution. Further exploration is warranted to determine causes of this correlation including the possible influence of role modeling, mentoring, female-friendly culture, and bias.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-01-28T08:48:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371211069325
       
  • Reply to “Structural And/Or Functional Underpinnings of Magnetic
           Resonance Imaging Bi-Atrial Strain Impairment in Patients With Takotsubo
           Syndrome”

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      Authors: Riccardo Cau, Pierpaolo Bassareo, Jasjit S Suri, Luca Saba
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-01-28T02:37:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371211073915
       
  • CAR Peer Learning Guide

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      Authors: Felipe Soares Torres, Andreu F. Costa, Yoan K. Kagoma, Martin Arrigan, Malcolm Scott, Brian Yemen, Casey Hurrell, Ania Kielar
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Peer learning is a quality initiative used to identify potential areas of practice improvement, both on a patient level and on a systemic level. Opportunities for peer learning include review of prior imaging studies, evaluation of cases from multidisciplinary case conferences, and review of radiology trainees’ call cases. Peer learning is non-punitive and focuses on promoting life-long learning. It seeks to identify and disseminate learning opportunities and areas for systems improvement compared to traditional peer review. Learning opportunities arise from peer learning through both individual communication of cases reviewed for routine work, as well as through anonymous presentation of aggregate cases in an educational format. In conjunction with other tools such as root cause analysis, peer learning can be used to guide future practice improvement opportunities. This guide provides definitions of terms and a synthetic evidence review regarding peer review and peer learning, as well as medicolegal and jurisdictional considerations. Important aspects of what makes an effective peer learning program and best practices for implementing such a program are presented. The guide is intended to be a living document that will be updated regularly as new data emerges and peer learning continues to evolve in radiology practices.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-01-25T08:47:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371211065454
       
  • Annual Mammographic Screening Reduces the Risk of Interval or Higher Stage
           Invasive Breast Cancers Among Postmenopausal Women in the Ontario Breast
           Screening Program

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      Authors: Kristina M Blackmore, Anna M Chiarelli, Lucia Mirea, Nicole Mittmann, Derek Muradali, Linda Rabeneck, Susan J Done
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: In the Ontario Breast Screening Program (OBSP) annual screening improved breast cancer detection for women 50–74 years with a family/personal history compared to biennial, while detection was equivalent for women screened annually for mammographic density ≥75%. This study compares the risk of interval or higher stage invasive cancers among postmenopausal women screened annually vs biennially by age and estrogen use. Methods: A retrospective design identified 4247 invasive breast cancers diagnosed among concurrent cohorts of women 50–74 screened in the OBSP with digital mammography between 2011 and 2014, followed until 2016. Polytomous logistic regression estimated the risk of interval or higher stage breast cancers by age and estrogen use between women screened annually because of first-degree relative with breast or ovarian cancer or personal history of ovarian cancer, or mammographic density ≥75%, and those screened biennially. Results: The risk of interval vs screen-detected cancers was significantly reduced in women screened annually for family/personal history (OR=.64; 95%CI:0.51–.80), particularly those 60–74 years (OR=.59; 95%CI:0.45–.77) or not currently using estrogen (OR=.66; 95%CI:0.52–.83) compared to those screened biennially. The risk of stage II–IV vs stage I tumors was also lower in women 60–74 years screened annually for family/personal history (OR=.79; 95%CI:0.64–.97) and in those screened annually for mammographic density ≥75% currently using estrogen (OR=.51; 95%CI:0.26–1.01) compared to women screened biennially. Conclusion: Postmenopausal women at increased risk screened annually had equivalent or reduced risks of interval or higher stage invasive breast cancers than those screened biennially, further supporting risk-based screening in this population.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T12:17:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371211062883
       
  • Presentation at the Canadian Association of Radiologists Annual General
           Meeting Is Associated With Higher Likelihood of Publication of Canadian
           Radiology Resident Research Day Presentations

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      Authors: Martin Matuszczak, Sarah Melendez, David A. Leswick
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: Determine how many radiology resident research day projects are presented at the Canadian Association of Radiologists Annual Scientific Meeting (CAR ASM) and if presentation at the CAR ASM is associated with increased rates of publication. Methods: A database of radiology resident presentations from 2012 to 2017 research days at seven Canadian radiology programs was utilized. Each presenting resident was searched for in 2011–2019 CAR ASM books of abstracts to identify all CAR ASM presentations both related to and separate from their research day projects. These presentations were matched with resident research day presentations and their publication status. Descriptive statistical analysis and calculation of relative risk (RR) between publication of research day projects and presentation at CAR was performed. Results: 208 residents presented 288 projects at internal research days. 93 of the 208 residents had a total of 195 presentations at CAR (mean .94 +/− 1.91 SD). 36 of the 288 (13%) research day projects were presented at a CAR ASM, of which 18/36 (50%) were published. 83 of the 252 (32%) research day projects not presented at CAR were published. CAR ASM presentation of a research day project was associated with an increased rate of publication (RR 1.537 P=.0396). There was no significant association between research day project publication and unrelated CAR ASM presentations (P=.275). Most research day projects both presented at CAR ASM and published (56%) were in the Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal. Conclusion: CAR ASM presentation of research day projects is associated with an increased rate of publication.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-01-19T09:34:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371211067159
       
  • Papilledema: A Review of the Pathophysiology, Imaging Findings, and Mimics

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      Authors: Angela Guarnizo, Danah Albreiki, Juan Pablo Cruz, Laurent Létourneau-Guillon, Dana Iancu, Carlos Torres
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Increased intracranial pressure is the most common cause of papilledema. Multiple etiologies such as cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, space occupying lesions, infection, and idiopathic intracranial hypertension among others should be considered. Imaging plays a critical role in the detection of pathologies that can cause papilledema. MRI with contrast and CE-MRV, in particular, are key for the diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. This review will focus in common and infrequent causes of papilledema, the role of imaging in patients with papilledema as well as its potential mimickers.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-01-19T02:17:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371211061660
       
  • Gender-Inclusive Fellowship Naming and Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in
           Radiology: An Analysis of Radiology Department Websites in Canada and the
           United States

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      Authors: Tyler D. Yan, Lauren E. Mak, Evelyn F. Carroll, Faisal Khosa, Charlotte J. Yong-Hing
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Transgender and gender non-binary (TGNB) individuals face numerous inequalities in healthcare and there is substantial work to be done in fostering TGNB culturally competent care in radiology. A radiology department’s online presence and use of gender-inclusive language are essential in promoting an environment of equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI). The naming of radiology fellowships and continuing medical education (CME) courses with terminology such as “Women’s Imaging” indicates a lack of inclusivity to TGNB patients and providers, which could result in suboptimal patient care. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of all institutions in Canada and the United States (US) offering training in Breast Imaging, Women’s Imaging, or Breast and Body Imaging. Data was collected from each institution’s radiology department website pertaining to fellowship names, EDI involvement, and CME courses. Results: 8 Canadian and 71 US radiology fellowships were identified. 75% of Canadian and 90% of US fellowships had gender-inclusive names. One (12.5%) Canadian and 29 (41%) US institutions had EDI Committees mentioned on their websites. Among institutions publicly displaying CME courses about breast/body or women’s imaging, gender-inclusive names were used in only 1 (25%) of the Canadian CME courses, compared to 81% of the US institutions. Conclusions: Most institutions in Canada and the US have gender-inclusive names for their radiology fellowships pertaining to breast and body imaging. However, there is much opportunity to and arguably the responsibility for institutions in both countries to increase the impact and visibility of their EDI efforts through creation of department-specific committees and CME courses.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-01-12T02:20:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371211066104
       
  • The Role of a Virtual Noncalcium Dual-Energy CT Application in the
           Detection of Bone Marrow Edema in Peripheral Osteomyelitis

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      Authors: Yet Yen Yan, Hugue A. Ouellette, Mayuran Saththianathan, Peter L. Munk, Paul I. Mallinson, Adnan Sheikh
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: To determine the sensitivity and specificity of dual-energy CT (DECT) virtual noncalcium images (VNCa) with bone and soft tissue reconstructions in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. Materials & Methods: Between December 1, 2014 to December 1, 2020, 91 patients who had 99 DECT performed for a clinical indication of osteomyelitis with corresponding MRI, triphasic bone scan and/or white blood cell scintigraphy with CT/SPECT performed either 2 weeks before or 1 month after the DECT were retrospectively identified. The presence or absence of osteomyelitis was established using a second imaging test, bone biopsy or surgery. Two radiologists interpreted VNCa images alone and with bone and soft tissue reconstructions for osteomyelitis. Fleiss k statistics was used to assess inter-level agreement. Results: Osteomyelitis was present in 26 cases (26.2%), of which 4 cases (4%) had co-existing septic arthritis. DECT was performed at the following sites: ankle/foot (n = 59), calf (n = 12), knee (n = 3), thigh (n = 7), hip (n = 9), pelvis (n = 6), wrist/hand (n = 1), and shoulder (n = 2). Sensitivity with VNCa images alone was 53.8% and 73.1% and specificity was 84.9% and 71.2%. Sensitivity with VNCa images and bone and soft tissue reconstructions was 80.8% and 80.8% and specificity was 80.8% and 72.6%. Interobserver agreement was 76.7% (76 of 99 cases), for VNCa images alone (k = .487), and 66.7% (66 of 99 patients) for bone and soft tissue reconstructions with VNCa images together (k = .390). Conclusion: When VNCa images were combined with bone and soft tissue reconstructions, there is improved sensitivity in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-01-10T03:14:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371211065181
       
  • Is Oral Contrast Beneficial for Visualization of the Appendix in
           Low-Weight Children'

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      Authors: Gali Shapira-Zaltsberg, Maria Dien Esquivel, Nicholas Mitsakakis, Lamia Hayawi, Elka Miller
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: It has been shown that oral contrast does not improve the diagnostic accuracy of Computed Tomography (CT) for appendicitis in pediatric patients; however, the cohorts in these studies were not stratified by weight or body mass index. The purpose of this study is to assess the benefit of oral contrast administration for identifying the appendix in younger children in the lower weight quartile. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study comprised 100 patients (2–10 years) in lower weight quartile who had intravenous contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis, 37 of which with oral contrast, and 63 without. A pediatric radiologist and a pediatric radiology fellow independently assessed whether the appendix was visualized or not. In case of discrepancy, an additional pediatric radiologist was the “tie-breaker.” Chi-squared test was used to compare the proportion of visualized appendix between the groups (with and without oral contrast). Inter-rater reliability was determined using Cohen’s Kappa coefficient. Results: There was no significant difference in the visualization of the appendix between the group with oral contrast and without (P = 1). The Cohen Kappa coefficients were .33 (.05, .62) and .91 (.73, 1.00) for the “no oral” and “oral” groups, respectively, yielding evidence of a difference (P = .007). Conclusions: There was no significant difference in the visualization of the appendix using CT with or without oral contrast in low-weight pediatric patients. The inter-rater reliability, however, was significantly higher in the group given oral contrast. Additional studies assessing the value of oral contrast for the sole indication of appendicitis may provide clearer results.
      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-01-06T10:55:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371211064315
       
  • Hope and Mentorship in the Time of COVID-19

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      Authors: Juvel Lee
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-01-06T03:45:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371211063778
       
  • Climate Change: How Radiologists can Help

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      Authors: Maura J. Brown, Bruce B. Forster
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-01-06T03:32:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371211064217
       
  • Erratum to What’s Hot in Breast MRI

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      First page: 433
      Abstract: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      PubDate: 2022-02-11T08:56:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08465371221081712
       
 
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