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  Subjects -> CHEMISTRY (Total: 849 journals)
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CHEMISTRY (598 journals)                  1 2 3 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 735 Journals sorted alphabetically
2D Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Accreditation and Quality Assurance: Journal for Quality, Comparability and Reliability in Chemical Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
ACS Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
ACS Chemical Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
ACS Combinatorial Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
ACS Macro Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
ACS Nano     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 226)
ACS Photonics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
ACS Synthetic Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Acta Chemica Iasi     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Chimica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Chimica Slovaca     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Chromatographica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Acta Facultatis Medicae Naissensis     Open Access  
Acta Metallurgica Sinica (English Letters)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Acta Scientifica Naturalis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
adhäsion KLEBEN & DICHTEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Adhesion Adhesives & Sealants     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advanced Functional Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Advanced Science Focus     Free   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Chemical Engineering and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 53)
Advances in Chemical Science     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Enzyme Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Materials Physics and Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Nanoparticles     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Polymer Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
African Journal of Bacteriology Research     Open Access  
African Journal of Chemical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Journal of Pure and Applied Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Agrokémia és Talajtan     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
AMB Express     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ambix     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Biochemistry and Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 67)
American Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Plant Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
American Mineralogist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Analyst     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Angewandte Chemie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 159)
Angewandte Chemie International Edition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 210)
Annales UMCS, Chemia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annual Reports in Computational Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annual Reports Section A (Inorganic Chemistry)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annual Reports Section B (Organic Chemistry)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Annual Review of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Annual Review of Food Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anti-Infective Agents     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Hybrid Journal  
Applied Organometallic Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Applied Surface Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Arabian Journal of Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
ARKIVOC     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Biochemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Atomization and Sprays     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Journal of Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Autophagy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Avances en Quimica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Biochemical Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 282)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Biochemistry Research International     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
BioChip Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Bioinspired Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Biointerface Research in Applied Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Biointerphases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Biology, Medicine, & Natural Product Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Biomacromolecules     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Biomass Conversion and Biorefinery     Partially Free   (Followers: 10)
Biomedical Chromatography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Biomolecular NMR Assignments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
BioNanoScience     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 108)
Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 93)
Bioorganic Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Biopolymers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Biosensors     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Biotechnic and Histochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bitácora Digital     Open Access  
Boletin de la Sociedad Chilena de Quimica     Open Access  
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Japan     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Bulletin of the Korean Chemical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
C - Journal of Carbon Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cakra Kimia (Indonesian E-Journal of Applied Chemistry)     Open Access  
Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal of Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Canadian Mineralogist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Carbohydrate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Carbon     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Catalysis for Sustainable Energy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Catalysis Reviews: Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Catalysis Science and Technology     Free   (Followers: 6)
Catalysis Surveys from Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Catalysts     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Cellulose     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Cereal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
ChemBioEng Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
ChemCatChem     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Chemical and Engineering News     Free   (Followers: 12)
Chemical Bulletin of Kazakh National University     Open Access  
Chemical Communications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 70)
Chemical Engineering Research and Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Chemical Research in Chinese Universities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Chemical Research in Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Chemical Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 173)
Chemical Science     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Chemical Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Chemical Vapor Deposition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Chemical Week     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Chemie in Unserer Zeit     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Chemie-Ingenieur-Technik (Cit)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ChemInform     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Chemistry & Biodiversity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Chemistry & Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Chemistry & Industry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Chemistry - A European Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 147)
Chemistry - An Asian Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Chemistry and Materials Research     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Chemistry Central Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Chemistry Education Research and Practice     Free   (Followers: 5)
Chemistry in Education     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Chemistry International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Chemistry Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45)
Chemistry of Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 250)
Chemistry of Natural Compounds     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Chemistry World     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Chemistry-Didactics-Ecology-Metrology     Open Access  
ChemistryOpen     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Chemkon - Chemie Konkret, Forum Fuer Unterricht Und Didaktik     Hybrid Journal  
Chemoecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Chemosensors     Open Access  
ChemPhysChem     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
ChemPlusChem     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
ChemTexts     Hybrid Journal  
CHIMIA International Journal for Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Chinese Journal of Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Chinese Journal of Polymer Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Chromatographia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Chromatography Research International     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Clay Minerals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Cogent Chemistry     Open Access  
Colloid and Interface Science Communications     Open Access  
Colloid and Polymer Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Combinatorial Chemistry & High Throughput Screening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Combustion Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Comments on Inorganic Chemistry: A Journal of Critical Discussion of the Current Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Composite Interfaces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Comprehensive Chemical Kinetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Comptes Rendus Chimie     Full-text available via subscription  
Comptes Rendus Physique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Computational and Theoretical Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Computational Biology and Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Computational Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Computers & Chemical Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Coordination Chemistry Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Copernican Letters     Open Access  
Critical Reviews in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Crystal Structure Theory and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
CrystEngComm     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Current Catalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Metabolomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Current Research in Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Current Science     Open Access   (Followers: 57)
Dalton Transactions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Detection     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Developments in Geochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Diamond and Related Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Dislocations in Solids     Full-text available via subscription  
Doklady Chemistry     Hybrid Journal  
Drying Technology: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Eclética Química     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ecological Chemistry and Engineering S     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ecotoxicology and Environmental Contamination     Open Access  
Educación Química     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Education for Chemical Engineers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
EJNMMI Radiopharmacy and Chemistry     Open Access  
Elements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Environmental Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Environmental Chemistry Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Science & Technology Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)

        1 2 3 | Last

Journal Cover Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
  [SJR: 0.349]   [H-I: 26]   [2 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Online) 0846-5371
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3042 journals]
  • The Paradigm Shift
    • Authors: Peter L. Munk; Kieran J. Murphy
      First page: 97
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Volume 68, Issue 2
      Author(s): Peter L. Munk, Kieran J. Murphy


      PubDate: 2017-04-22T20:25:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2017.03.001
       
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Neurologic Complications Through the
           Treatment of Childhood Leukaemia and Lymphoma
    • Authors: Taner Arpaci; Anil Ozgur; Tugana Akbas; Rabia B. Arpaci; Barbaros S. Karagun; Gamze Ugurluer
      Pages: 98 - 105
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Volume 68, Issue 2
      Author(s): Taner Arpaci, Anil Ozgur, Tugana Akbas, Rabia B. Arpaci, Barbaros S. Karagun, Gamze Ugurluer


      PubDate: 2017-04-22T20:25:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2015.10.004
       
  • Imaging Findings in Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Pictorial Essay
    • Authors: Niamh Coffey; Carlos Torres; Rafael Glikstein; Taleb Al Mansoori; Raquel del Carpio-O'Donovan; Satya Patro
      Pages: 106 - 115
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Volume 68, Issue 2
      Author(s): Niamh Coffey, Carlos Torres, Rafael Glikstein, Taleb Al Mansoori, Raquel del Carpio-O'Donovan, Satya Patro


      PubDate: 2017-04-22T20:25:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2015.12.001
       
  • Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cholesteatoma Using
           PROPELLER at 1.5T: A Single-Centre Retrospective Study
    • Authors: Sharon E. Clarke; Dipan Mistry; Talal AlThubaiti; M. Naeem Khan; David Morris; Manohar Bance
      Pages: 116 - 121
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Volume 68, Issue 2
      Author(s): Sharon E. Clarke, Dipan Mistry, Talal AlThubaiti, M. Naeem Khan, David Morris, Manohar Bance
      Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the diffusion-weighted periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) technique in the detection of cholesteatoma at our institution with surgical confirmation in all cases. Methods A retrospective review of 21 consecutive patients who underwent diffusion-weighted PROPELLER magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on a 1.5T MRI scanner prior to primary or revision/second-look surgery for suspected cholesteatoma from 2009-2012 was performed. Results Diffusion-weighted PROPELLER had a sensitivity of 75%, specificity of 60%, positive predictive value of 86%, and negative predictive value of 43%. In the 15 patients for whom the presence or absence of cholesteatoma was correctly predicted, there were 2 cases where the reported locations of diffusion restriction did not correspond to the location of the cholesteatoma observed at surgery. Conclusion On the basis of our retrospective study, we conclude that diffusion-weighted PROPELLER MRI is not sufficiently accurate to replace second look surgery at our institution.

      PubDate: 2017-04-22T20:25:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.05.002
       
  • Intradiscal O2O3: Rationale, Injection Technique, Short- and Long-term
           Outcomes for the Treatment of Low Back Pain Due to Disc Herniation
    • Authors: Francesco Giurazza; Gianluigi Guarnieri; Kieran J. Murphy; Mario Muto
      Pages: 171 - 177
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Volume 68, Issue 2
      Author(s): Francesco Giurazza, Gianluigi Guarnieri, Kieran J. Murphy, Mario Muto
      The management of low back pain should always start with a conservative approach; however, when it fails, intervention is required and at that moment the most appropriate choice remains unclear. Before invasive surgery, minimally invasive techniques can be adopted. In European trials and in a trans-Canadian clinical trial 03 ozone has been used successfully. In total over 50,000 patients have been treated safely. Ozone is a gas normally present in the atmosphere with potent oxidizing power; it has been used for percutaneous intradiscal injection combined with oxygen (O2O3) at very low concentrations for 15 years in Europe. The main indication is back pain with or without radicular pain but without motor deficits, which is refractory to 4-6 weeks of conservative therapies. Its mechanism of action on the disc is mechanical (volume reduction by subtle dehydration of the nucleus pulposis) and antinflammatory. The intradiscal ozone injection is performed with a thin needle (18-22 gauge) image guided by computed tomography or angiofluoroscopy and is usually complimented by periganglionic injection of corticosteroids and anesthetics. This combination gives immediate pain relief and allows time for the ozone to act. It is a cost-effective procedure that presents a very low complication rate (0.1%). The radicular pain is resolved before the back pain does, as is seen with microdiscectomy. Peer-reviewed publications of large randomized trials, case series, and meta analysis from large samples of patients have demonstrated the procedure to be safe and effective in the short and the long terms, with benefits recognized up to 10 years after treatment. We aim to review the principles of action of O2O3 and report the injection techniques, complications, and short- and long-term outcomes.

      PubDate: 2017-04-22T20:25:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.12.007
       
  • Fungal Rhinosinusitis: A Radiological Review With Intraoperative
           Correlation
    • Authors: Elaine Ni Mhurchu; Javier Ospina; Arif S. Janjua; Jason R. Shewchuk; Alexandra T. Vertinsky
      Pages: 178 - 186
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Volume 68, Issue 2
      Author(s): Elaine Ni Mhurchu, Javier Ospina, Arif S. Janjua, Jason R. Shewchuk, Alexandra T. Vertinsky
      The interaction between fungi and the sinonasal tract results in a range of clinical presentations with a broad spectrum of clinical severity. The most commonly accepted classification system divides fungal rhinosinusitis into invasive and noninvasive subtypes based on histopathological evidence of tissue invasion by fungi. Invasive fungal rhinosinusitis is subdivided into acute invasive and chronic invasive categories. The chronic invasive category includes a subcategory of chronic granulomatous disease. Noninvasive fungal disease includes localized fungal colonization, fungal ball, and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis. Noninvasive disease is simply fungal material (or the products of the inflammatory reaction of the sinus mucosa) that fills the sinuses but does not invade tissue. Bone loss is related to expansion of the sinus(es). Invasive disease causes tissue destruction, such that it expands past the bony confines of the sinuses. It can rapidly spread, causing acute necrosis. Alternatively, there may be slow tissue invasion characterized by symptoms confused with normal sinusitis, but destruction of normal nasal and paranasal structures.

      PubDate: 2017-04-22T20:25:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.12.009
       
  • Adverse Reactions to Contrast Material: A Canadian Update
    • Authors: Alexander Morzycki; Anuj Bhatia; Kieran J. Murphy
      Pages: 187 - 193
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Volume 68, Issue 2
      Author(s): Alexander Morzycki, Anuj Bhatia, Kieran J. Murphy
      Imaging techniques frequently employ contrast agents to improve image resolution and enhance pathology detection. These gadolinium- and iodine-based media, although generally considered safe, are associated with a number of adverse effects ranging from mild to severe. Reactions are classified as either anaphylactoid (“anaphylaxis-like”) or nonanaphylactoid, depending on a number of elements that will be reviewed. Herein, we have summarized predisposing risk factors for adverse events resulting from the use of contrast, their associated pathophysiological mechanisms as well as known prophylaxis for the antitreatment of high-risk patients. In the unlikely event that a serious adverse reaction does occur, we have provided a comprehensive summary of treatment protocols. Our goal was to thoroughly evaluate the current literature regarding adverse reactions to radiocontrast agents and provide an up to date review for the health care provider.

      PubDate: 2017-04-22T20:25:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.05.006
       
  • Visibility of Different Intraorbital Foreign Bodies Using Plain
           Radiography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and
           Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: An In Vitro Study
    • Authors: Reza Javadrashid; Masoud Golamian; Maryam Shahrzad; Parisa Hajalioghli; Zahra Shahmorady; Daniel F. Fouladi; Shohreh Sadrarhami; Leila Akhoundzadeh
      Pages: 194 - 201
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Volume 68, Issue 2
      Author(s): Reza Javadrashid, Masoud Golamian, Maryam Shahrzad, Parisa Hajalioghli, Zahra Shahmorady, Daniel F. Fouladi, Shohreh Sadrarhami, Leila Akhoundzadeh
      Purpose The study sought to compare the usefulness of 4 imaging modalities in visualizing various intraorbital foreign bodies (IOFBs) in different sizes. Methods Six different materials including metal, wood, plastic, stone, glass. and graphite were cut in cylindrical shapes in 4 sizes (dimensions: 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mm) and placed intraorbitally in the extraocular space of fresh sheep's head. Four skilled radiologists rated the visibility of the objects individually using plain radiography, spiral computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in accordance with a previously described grading system. Results Excluding wood, all embedded foreign bodies were best visualized in CT and CBCT images with almost equal accuracies. Wood could only be detected using MRI, and then only when fragments were more than 2 mm in size. There were 3 false-positive MRI reports, suggesting air bubbles as wood IOFBs. Conclusions Because of lower cost and using less radiation in comparison with conventional CT, CBCT can be used as the initial imaging technique in cases with suspected IOFBs. Optimal imaging technique for wood IOFBs is yet to be defined.

      PubDate: 2017-04-22T20:25:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2015.09.011
       
  • Caution Without Paralysis: Does Magnetic Resonance Imaging Affect DNA
           Integrity?
    • Authors: Peter L. Munk; Kieran J. Murphy
      First page: 1
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Volume 68, Issue 1
      Author(s): Peter L. Munk, Kieran J. Murphy


      PubDate: 2017-01-28T10:39:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.12.005
       
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Induced DNA Damage
    • Authors: Hussein Jaffer; Kieran J. Murphy
      Pages: 2 - 3
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Volume 68, Issue 1
      Author(s): Hussein Jaffer, Kieran J. Murphy


      PubDate: 2017-01-28T10:39:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.12.004
       
  • Congenital Anomalies of the Superior Vena Cava: Embryological Correlation,
           Imaging Perspectives, and Clinical Relevance
    • Authors: Abed Ghandour; Karunakaravel Karuppasamy; Prabhakar Rajiah
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 July 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Abed Ghandour, Karunakaravel Karuppasamy, Prabhakar Rajiah
      There is a wide spectrum of congenital anomalies of the superior vena cava, which are more increasingly recognized in cross-sectional imaging. Although some of these anomalies are asymptomatic, others have important clinical and interventional implications. Imaging modalities such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging play an important role in the accurate characterization of these anomalies, which is essential for mapping prior to surgeries or interventions. In this article, we review a wide range of anomalies of the superior vena cava, including the embryological basis, cross-sectional imaging findings, and clinical implications, particularly from an interventional radiology perspective. We also discuss the treatments and complications of these anomalies.

      PubDate: 2017-07-15T06:27:50Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.11.003
       
  • Managing Incidentalomas Safely: Do Computed Tomography Requisitions Tell
           Us What We Need to Know'
    • Authors: Matthew Walker; Joy Borgaonkar; Daria Manos
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 July 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Matthew Walker, Joy Borgaonkar, Daria Manos
      Purpose Technological advancements and the ever-increasing use of computed tomography (CT) have greatly increased the detection of incidental findings, including tiny pulmonary nodules. The management of many “incidentalomas” is significantly influenced by a patient's history of cancer. The study aim is to determine if CT requisitions include prior history of malignancy. Methods Requisitions for chest CTs performed at our adult tertiary care hospital during April 2012 were compared to a cancer history questionnaire, administered to patients at the time of CT scan. Patients were excluded from the study if the patient questionnaire was incomplete or if the purpose of the CT was for cancer staging or cancer follow-up. Results A total of 569 CTs of the chest were performed. Of the 327 patients that met inclusion criteria, 79 reported a history of cancer. After excluding patients for whom a history of malignancy could not be confirmed through a chart review and excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer, dysplasia, and in situ neoplasm, 68 patients were identified as having a history of malignancy. We found 44% (95% confidence interval [0.32-0.57]) of the chest CT requisitions for these 68 patients did not include the patient's history of cancer. Of the malignancies that were identified by patient questionnaire but omitted from the clinical history provided on the requisitions, 47% were malignancies that commonly metastasize to the lung. Conclusions A significant number of requisitions failed to disclose a history of cancer. Without knowledge of prior malignancy, radiologists cannot comply with current guidelines regarding the reporting and management of incidental findings.

      PubDate: 2017-07-15T06:27:50Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.11.004
       
  • Canadian Association of Radiologists: Guide on Computed Tomography
           Screening for Lung Cancer
    • Authors: Jana Taylor; Daria Manos; Heidi Schmidt; Marie-Hélène Lévesque; Micheal C. McInnis
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 June 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Jana Taylor, Daria Manos, Heidi Schmidt, Marie-Hélène Lévesque, Micheal C. McInnis


      PubDate: 2017-06-27T06:13:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2017.01.002
       
  • A Pictorial Review of Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging With
           Hepatocyte-Specific Contrast Agents: Uses, Findings, and Pitfalls of
           Gadoxetate Disodium and Gadobenate Dimeglumine
    • Authors: Elena P. Scali; Triona Walshe; Hina Arif Tiwari; Alison C. Harris; Silvia D. Chang
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 June 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Elena P. Scali, Triona Walshe, Hina Arif Tiwari, Alison C. Harris, Silvia D. Chang
      Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a well-established role as a highly specific and accurate modality for characterizing benign and malignant focal liver lesions. In particular, contrast-enhanced MRI using hepatocyte-specific contrast agents (HSCAs) improves lesion detection and characterization compared to other imaging modalities and MRI techniques. In this pictorial review, the mechanism of action of gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents, with a focus on HSCAs, is described. The clinical indications, protocols, and emerging uses of the 2 commercially available combined contrast agents available in the United States, gadoxetate disodium and gadobenate dimeglumine, are discussed. The MRI features of these agents are compared with examples of focal hepatic masses, many of which have been obtained within the same patient therefore allowing direct lesion comparison. Finally, the pitfalls in the use of combined contrast agents in liver MRI are highlighted.

      PubDate: 2017-06-05T05:08:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.10.008
       
  • Imaging Intra-abdominal Burkitt's Lymphoma: From Discrete Bowel Wall
           Thickening to Diffuse Soft Tissue Infiltration
    • Authors: Alison C. Harris; Kelly A. MacLean; Gilat L. Grunau; Silvia D. Chang; Nancy Martin
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 May 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Alison C. Harris, Kelly A. MacLean, Gilat L. Grunau, Silvia D. Chang, Nancy Martin
      Burkitt's lymphoma is a highly aggressive non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma, which often presents with intra-abdominal involvement. The purpose of this pictorial review is to illustrate the various intra-abdominal imaging findings of Burkitt's lymphoma. Extranodal disease at presentation is common, including involvement of the bowel, stomach, pancreas, spleen, and mesentery.

      PubDate: 2017-06-05T05:08:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.08.007
       
  • Clinical Decision Support in Computerized Providers' Order Entry for
           Imaging Tests in Canada
    • Authors: Santanu Chakraborty; Martin Reed; Frank J. Rybicki; James Fraser; Phyllis Glanc; Jacques Lévesque; Deljit Dhanoa; Matthias Schmidt; William Miller
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 May 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Santanu Chakraborty, Martin Reed, Frank J. Rybicki, James Fraser, Phyllis Glanc, Jacques Lévesque, Deljit Dhanoa, Matthias Schmidt, William Miller


      PubDate: 2017-06-05T05:08:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2017.01.003
       
  • Development of an Undergraduate Radiology Curriculum: Ten-Year Experience
           From the University of British Columbia
    • Authors: Kathryn E. Darras; Sheldon J. Clark; David K. Tso; Teresa I. Liang; Claudia Krebs; R. Petter Tonseth; Silvia D. Chang; Bruce B. Forster; Savvas Nicolaou
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 May 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Kathryn E. Darras, Sheldon J. Clark, David K. Tso, Teresa I. Liang, Claudia Krebs, R. Petter Tonseth, Silvia D. Chang, Bruce B. Forster, Savvas Nicolaou


      PubDate: 2017-05-31T03:49:07Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.12.008
       
  • Greening the Radiology Department: Not a Big Mountain to Climb
    • Authors: Ashish Chawla; Dinesh Chinchure; Laurel Owen Marchinkow; Peter L. Munk; Wilfred C.G. Peh
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 May 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Ashish Chawla, Dinesh Chinchure, Laurel Owen Marchinkow, Peter L. Munk, Wilfred C.G. Peh
      An environmental-friendly radiology department should be a requirement of the future era. The aim of this article is to make radiologists aware of their responsibilities for a greener world. We have suggested a number of minor but important changes in various sections of a radiology department that can make the radiology department more environmentally friendly. These small steps require relatively little effort on our part but cumulatively, may have a huge positive impact on our environment.

      PubDate: 2017-05-15T22:01:30Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.10.009
       
  • Radiology Exposure in the Undergraduate Curriculum: A Medical Student
           Perspective on Quality and Opportunities for Positive Change
    • Authors: Kari L. Visscher; Lisa Faden; Georges Nassrallah; Stacey Speer; Daniele Wiseman
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 May 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Kari L. Visscher, Lisa Faden, Georges Nassrallah, Stacey Speer, Daniele Wiseman
      Purpose This article is a continuation of a qualitative study designed to explore how radiology exposures can impact medical student opinions and perceptions of radiology and radiologists. We focused on: 1) conducting a radiology exposure inventory from the perspective of the medical student; 2) student evaluation of the quality of the radiology exposures and suggestions for positive change; and 3) development of a framework to address the needs of medical students as it relates to radiology education in the undergraduate medical curriculum. Methods Research methodology and design for this qualitative study were described in detail in a previous article by Visscher et al [1]. Results Participants included 28 medical students; 18 were in medical school years 1 and 2 (preclerkship), and 10 were in years 3 and 4 (clerkship). Specific to the focus of this article, the data revealed 3 major findings: 1) multiple exposures to radiology exist, and they are received and valued differently depending on the medical student's stage of professional development; 2) medical students value radiology education and want their radiology exposure to be comprehensive and high quality; 3) Medical students have constructive suggestions for improving the quality of both formal and informal radiology exposures. Conclusions Performing a radiology exposure inventory from a medical student perspective is a useful way to explore how students receive and value radiology instruction. Medical students want a more comprehensive radiology education that can be summarized using the 5 C's of Radiology Education framework. The 5 C's (curriculum, coaching, collaborating, career and commitment) reflect medical students' desires to learn content that will support them in clinical practice, be supported in their professional development, and have the necessary information to make informed career decisions.

      PubDate: 2017-05-15T22:01:30Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.10.004
       
  • Early Radiographic and Tomographic Manifestations of Legionnaires' Disease
    • Authors: Rémi Poirier; Jean Rodrigue; Jasmin Villeneuve; Yves Lacasse
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 May 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Rémi Poirier, Jean Rodrigue, Jasmin Villeneuve, Yves Lacasse
      Purpose Legionnaires' disease (LD) may occur sporadically or in the course of outbreaks, where the typical radiological manifestations of the disease may better be delineated. We took advantage of a rare community-based epidemic of LD (181 patients) that occurred in 2012 in Quebec City, Canada, to describe the radiographic features of LD and compare the its tomographic presentation with that of community-acquired pneumonia caused by common bacteria other than Legionella pneumophila. Methods From the 181 individuals affected in the outbreak, we obtained the chest radiographs of 159 individuals (mean 63 ± 15 years of age) for detailed analysis; 33 patients had a computed tomography (CT) scan performed during the course of their illness. In a case-control study, we compared the CT scans of patients with LD with those of patients who had received a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia caused by a pathogen other than Legionella and confirmed by chest CT scan. Results Overall, LD most often presented as an airspace consolidation involving 1 of the lower lobes. Pleural effusion and mediastinal adenopathies were apparent only in a minority, whereas no pneumothorax or cavitation was noted. We did not find any significant difference in chest CT scan findings in patients with LD vs those with community-acquired pneumonia from other bacterial origin. No radiological finding was clearly associated with an increased risk of intensive care unit admission or mortality. Conclusions The early radiographic and tomographic manifestations of LD are nonspecific and similar to those found in community-acquired pneumonia from other bacterial origin.

      PubDate: 2017-05-05T21:21:07Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.10.005
       
  • Classified Advertising
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Volume 68, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2017-04-22T20:25:20Z
       
  • Classified Advertising
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Volume 68, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2017-04-22T20:25:20Z
       
  • Tomosynthesis-Directed Coaxial Core Biopsy of Tomosynthesis-Detected
           Architectural Distortion: Indications and Logistics
    • Authors: Priscilla J. Slanetz; Ann L. Brown; Marissa Bradley; E. Jane Karimova
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Priscilla J. Slanetz, Ann L. Brown, Marissa Bradley, E. Jane Karimova


      PubDate: 2017-04-08T17:16:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.11.001
       
  • Gender Identity and Bone Densitometry
    • Authors: Ian Hammond; Brian Lentle; Lucretia van den Berg; Megan Vitols-McKay
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Ian Hammond, Brian Lentle, Lucretia van den Berg, Megan Vitols-McKay


      PubDate: 2017-04-08T17:16:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.10.006
       
  • Transradial Access for Interventional Radiology: Single-Centre
           Procedural and Clinical Outcome Analysis
    • Authors: Avnesh S. Thakor; Mohammed T. Alshammari; David M. Liu; John Chung; Stephen G.F. Ho; Gerald M. Legiehn; Lindsay Machan; Aaron M. Fischman; Rahul S. Patel; Darren Klass
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Avnesh S. Thakor, Mohammed T. Alshammari, David M. Liu, John Chung, Stephen G.F. Ho, Gerald M. Legiehn, Lindsay Machan, Aaron M. Fischman, Rahul S. Patel, Darren Klass
      Purpose The study sought to describe a single centre's technical approach to transradial intervention and report on clinical outcomes and safety. Methods A total of 749 transradial access (TRA) procedures were performed at a single hospital in 562 patients (174 women and 388 men). Procedures included 445 bland embolizations or chemoembolizations of the liver, 88 uterine artery embolizations, and 148 procedures for Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (Y90), which included mapping and administration. The mean age of the patients was 62 years (range 27–96 years). Results Four cases (0.5%) required crossover to transfemoral (tortuous anatomy, inability to secure a stable position for embolization, vessel spasm and base catheter not being of a sufficient length). A single asymptomatic, short-segment radial artery occlusion occurred (0.3%), 3 patients (0.4%) developed small hematomas postprocedurally, and 2 patients (0.7%) had transient neurological pain, which was resolved within a week without treatment. It was found that 98% of patients who had a previous femoral access procedure would choose radial access for subsequent procedures. Conclusions Transradial access is a safe, effective technique, with a learning curve; however, this procedure has the potential to significantly improve departmental workflow and cost savings for the department and patient experience.

      PubDate: 2017-04-08T17:16:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.09.003
       
  • Disinfection of the Radiologist Workstation and Radiologist Hand Hygiene:
           A Single Institution Practice Quality Improvement Project
    • Authors: Jeffrey S. Quon; Marc Dilauro; John G. Ryan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Jeffrey S. Quon, Marc Dilauro, John G. Ryan
      Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the workstation disinfection rates and hand hygiene of radiologists and trainees at shared departmental workstations and assess the impact of education and reminder placards on daily habits. Methods A 10-question survey was administered to all staff radiologists, fellows, and residents at our institution. The questions pertained to workstation disinfection, hand hygiene habits, and accessibility to disinfectant wipes and hand sanitizer stations. Subsequently, a short educational PowerPoint presentation was emailed to the department and small reminder placards were placed at each workstation. A follow-up survey was administered. Chi-square and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to analyse the results. Results The percentage of participants who disinfect their workstations 1-2 times/week, 3-4 times/week or everyday increased from 53.4% (45 of 84 participants) to 74.3% (55 of 74 participants; P = .01), while the number who disinfect their workstation <1 time/week or never decreased from 46.4% (39 of 84 participants) to 25.7% (19 of 74 participants; P = .01). Hand washing before working at the workstation increased from 41.6% (35 of 84 participants) to 48.7% (36 of 74 participants; P = .76) and hand washing after working at the workstation increased from 50.0% (42 of 84 participants) to 56.8% (42 of 74 participants; P = .49). Conclusions At our institution, the implementation of daily reminder placards at each workstation and the administration of an educational PowerPoint presentation improved the rate of radiologist workstation disinfection.

      PubDate: 2017-04-08T17:16:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.09.004
       
  • Canadian Radiologists Do Not Support Screening Mammography Guidelines of
           the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care
    • Authors: Jean M. Seely; Jiyon Lee; Gary J. Whitman; Paula B. Gordon
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 March 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Jean M. Seely, Jiyon Lee, Gary J. Whitman, Paula B. Gordon
      Purpose The study sought to determine screening mammography recommendations that radiologists in Canada promote to average-risk patients and family or friends, and do or would do for themselves. Methods An online survey was delivered from February 19, 2014, to July 11, 2014. Data included radiologists' recommendations for mammography and their personal screening habits based on gender. The 3 radiologists' cohorts were women ≥40 years of age, women <40 years of age, and men. The distribution of responses for each question was summarized, and proportions for the entire group and individual cohorts were computed. Results Of 402 surveys collected, 97% (299 of 309) radiologists recommended screening every 1-2 years, 62% (192 of 309) starting ≥40 years of age and 2% (5 of 309) recommended screening every 2-3 years for women 50-74 years of age. Recommendations were similar for family and friends: 96% (294 of 305) recommended screening every 1-2 years, 66% (202 of 305) recommended screening every 1-2 years for women ≥40 years of age, and 2% (5 of 305) recommended screening every 2-3 years. For women radiologists ≥40 years of age, 76% (48 of 63) underwent screening every 1-2 years and started at 40 years of age, 76% (16 of 21) female radiologists <40 years of age would undergo screening ≥40 years of age, 100% every 1-2 years, and 90% (151 of 167) male radiologists would undergo screening every 1-2 years, with 71% (120 of 169) beginning at 40 years of age. Conclusion The majority of Canadian radiologists recommend screening mammography every 1-2 years for average-risk women ≥40 years of age, whether they are patients or family and friends.

      PubDate: 2017-03-26T12:35:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.08.004
       
  • Can Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Predict the Clinical Outcome
           in Drowned Children'
    • Authors: Adrian Hruşcã; Andreea Liana Rãchişan; Siegfried Rödl; Erich Sorantin
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 March 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Adrian Hruşcã, Andreea Liana Rãchişan, Siegfried Rödl, Erich Sorantin
      Introduction Pediatric cerebral hypoxic-ischemic injury frequently results in severe neurological outcome. Imaging with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWi) demonstrates that the acute cerebral injury and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) allow the assessment of the severity of brain damage. The main objective was to examine if spatial distribution of reductions in ADC values is associated with clinical outcome in drowned children. Methods This is a retrospective study of 7 children (7 examinations) suffering from a hypoxic-ischemic event who underwent DWi. Seven subjects with normal DWi served as controls. The mean patient age was 4.88 ± 2.93 years and the male-to-female ratio was 5:2. The neurological outcome was divided into 2 categories: 4 children with Apallic syndrome and 3 deaths. We analysed the differences between the drowned children and the control group regarding clinical data, DWi abnormalities, and ADC values. Results The ADC values in the occipital and parietal grey matter were significantly different between the drowned children (765.14 ± 65.47 vs 920.95 ± 69.62; P = .003) and the control group (670.82 ± 233.99 vs 900.66 ± 92.72; P = .005). The ADC showed low values in the precentral area also (P = .044). Conclusion The ADC reduction may be useful to predict the poor outcome in drowned children and can be a valuable tool for clinical assessment.

      PubDate: 2017-03-26T12:35:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.12.001
       
  • Central Nervous System Tuberculosis: An Imaging Perspective
    • Authors: Vikas Chaudhary; Shahina Bano; Umesh Chandra Garga
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 March 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Vikas Chaudhary, Shahina Bano, Umesh Chandra Garga
      The increasing prevalence of tuberculosis in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals in recent years makes the disease a topic of universal concern. It has insidious onset and can affect virtually any organ system in the body, including the central nervous system (CNS). CNS tuberculosis (TB) is becoming more and more complex and atypical with onset of multidrug-resistant TB. Routine diagnostic techniques using serology and body tissue are time consuming and may delay the definitive management. Hence, it is important to be familiar with various radiologic features of CNS TB to ensure early and accurate diagnosis, thereby reducing high morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. The newer imaging techniques further help to improve the characterization and diagnosis of atypical CNS TB. The authors review the imaging characteristics of different forms of CNS tuberculosis involving the brain and spine and discuss the role of advanced imaging modalities in differentiating CNS TB from other disease process.

      PubDate: 2017-03-07T23:28:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.10.007
       
  • Guidelines for Use of Computed Tomography Angiogram as an Ancillary Test
           for Diagnosis of Suspected Brain Death
    • Authors: Santanu Chakraborty; Sonny Dhanani
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 February 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Santanu Chakraborty, Sonny Dhanani


      PubDate: 2017-02-28T20:23:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.12.002
       
  • Association Between Measures of Vertebral Endplate Morphology and Lumbar
           Intervertebral Disc Degeneration
    • Authors: Semra Duran; Mehtap Cavusoglu; Hatice Gul Hatipoglu; Deniz Sozmen Cılız; Bulent Sakman
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 February 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Semra Duran, Mehtap Cavusoglu, Hatice Gul Hatipoglu, Deniz Sozmen Cılız, Bulent Sakman
      Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between vertebral endplate morphology and the degree of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods In total, 150 patients who met the inclusion criteria and were 20–60 years of age were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were evaluated for the presence of intervertebral disc degeneration or herniation, and the degree of degeneration was assessed at all lumbar levels. Vertebral endplate morphology was evaluated based on the endplate sagittal diameter, endplate sagittal concave angle (ECA), and endplate sagittal concave depth (ECD) on sagittal MRI. The association between intervertebral disc degeneration or herniation and endplate morphological measurements was analysed. Results In MRI, superior endplates (ie, inferior endplates of the superior vertebra) were concave and inferior endplates (ie, superior endplates of the inferior vertebra) were flat at all disc levels. A decrease in ECD and an increase in ECA were detected at all lumbar levels as disc degeneration increased (P < .05). At the L4-L5 and L5-S1 levels, a decrease in ECD and an increase in ECA were detected in the group with herniated lumbar discs (P < .05). There was no association between lumbar disc degeneration or herniation and endplate sagittal diameter at lumbar intervertebral levels (P > .05). At all levels, ECD of women was significantly lesser than that of men and ECA of women was significantly greater than that of men (P < .05). Conclusions There is an association between vertebral endplate morphology and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration. Vertebral endplates at the degenerated disc level become flat; the severity of this flattening is correlated with the degree of disc degeneration.

      PubDate: 2017-02-21T19:34:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.11.002
       
  • Erratum
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Volume 68, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2017-01-28T10:39:17Z
       
  • Diffusion-Weighted Imaging of the Brain: Beyond Stroke
    • Authors: Adam A. Dmytriw; Vijay Sawlani; Jai Shankar
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 January 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Adam A. Dmytriw, Vijay Sawlani, Jai Shankar
      Diffusion-weighted imaging provides image contrast that is different from that provided by conventional magnetic resonance imaging techniques. It is highly sensitive for detection of cytotoxic oedema, and as such has gained favor in the detection of acute infarcts. However, diffusion-weighted imaging is underrepresented in the characterisation of many other disease processes. Our objective is to differentiate diseases that manifest with various neurological disorders, based on diffusion contrast and apparent diffusion coefficient values and review of hyper- and hypointense lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging.

      PubDate: 2017-01-28T10:39:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.10.001
       
  • Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome: A Review
    • Authors: Jai Shankar; Jillian Banfield
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 January 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Jai Shankar, Jillian Banfield
      Radiologists may be the first to suggest the diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). PRES is associated with many diverse clinical entities, the most common of which are eclampsia, hypertension, and immunosuppressive treatment. Radiologists should be aware of the spectrum of imaging findings in PRES. When promptly recognized and treated, the symptoms and radiological abnormalities can be completely reversed. When unrecognized, patients can progress to ischemia, massive infarction, and death. In this review, we present an overview of the unique signs observed on computed tomography and magnetic resonance images in PRES that can help in the early diagnosis and treatment that is highly effective in this syndrome.

      PubDate: 2017-01-28T10:39:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.08.005
       
  • Rapid Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke: What a General
           Radiologist Should Know
    • Authors: Elizabeth H.Y. Du; Jai J.S. Shankar
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 January 2017
      Source:Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal
      Author(s): Elizabeth H.Y. Du, Jai J.S. Shankar
      Stroke is the second leading cause of mortality and the third leading cause of disability-adjusted life-years worldwide. For each minute of an ischemic stroke, an estimated 1.9 million brain cells die. The year 2015 saw the unprecedented publication of 5 multicentre, randomized, controlled trials. These studies showed that patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by large-vessel thrombus occlusion of the proximal anterior circulation had significantly reduced disability at 90 days when treated with endovascular thrombectomy and usual stroke care compared to usual stroke care alone. As a result, endovascular thrombectomy is now the new North American and European standard of care for suitable patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by large-vessel proximal anterior circulation occlusion. We review key take-home messages in this paradigm shift for radiologists, including the importance of time and workflow efficiency, what currently constitutes appropriate preimaging patient selection and imaging criteria, the use of newer generation thrombectomy devices, safety outcomes, as well as further areas still in need of elucidation.

      PubDate: 2017-01-28T10:39:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.carj.2016.10.002
       
 
 
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