Subjects -> ART (Total: 882 journals)
    - ART (468 journals)
    - DANCE (26 journals)
    - FILM AND AUDIOVISUALS (125 journals)
    - MUSIC (171 journals)
    - THEATER (92 journals)

THEATER (92 journals)

Showing 1 - 79 of 79 Journals sorted alphabetically
Adaptation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
African Arts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Agôn : Revue des arts de la scène     Open Access  
Applied Theatre Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Screen Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bulletin of Kyiv National University of Culture and Arts. Series in Stage Art     Open Access  
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cambridge Opera Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Comedy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Conceição/Conception     Open Access  
Contemporary Theatre Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Creative Artist : A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
DRAMA : Nordisk dramapedagogisk tidsskrift     Full-text available via subscription  
Drama Therapy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Dramatherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Dramaturgias     Open Access  
Drammaturgia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Early Theatre     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Forum Modernes Theater     Full-text available via subscription  
Horizons/Théâtre : Revue d'études théâtrales     Open Access  
Ibsen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Indian Theatre Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Itinera     Open Access  
Jeu : Revue de théâtre     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Adaptation in Film & Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
L'Atelier     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Latin American Theatre Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mask     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mechademia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Methis. Studia humaniora Estonica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Mime Journal     Open Access  
Mimesis Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modern Drama     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Multicultural Shakespeare     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
New Theatre Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Nineteenth Century Theatre and Film     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
NJ : Drama Australia Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Nordic Theatre Studies     Open Access  
PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Performance Research: A Journal of the Performing Arts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Performing Ethos: An International Journal of Ethics in Theatre & Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Peripeti     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
PesquisAtor. Revista do Centro de Pesquisa em Experimentação Cênica do Ator     Open Access  
Pitágoras 500     Open Access  
Renaissance Drama     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Research in Drama Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Scene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Shakespeare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Shakespeare Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Shakespeare Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Skenè. Journal of Theatre and Drama Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Slovenske divadlo / The Slovak Theatre     Open Access  
South African Theatre Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Stanislavski Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Studies in Musical Theatre     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Studies in Theatre and Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
TDR / The Drama Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Teatervitenskapelige studier     Open Access  
Teatro : Criação e Construção de Conhecimento     Open Access  
Teatro XXI     Open Access  
Telondefondo : Revista de Teoría y Crítica Teatral     Open Access  
Theatre and Performance Design     Hybrid Journal  
Theatre History Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Theatre Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Theatre Notebook     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Theatre Research in Canada / Recherches théâtrales au Canada     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Theatre Research International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Theatre Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Theatre Symposium     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Theatre Topics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Theatre, Dance and Performance Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Theatrical Colloquia     Open Access  
Western Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Women & Performance: a journal of feminist theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Youth Theatre Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Σκηνή / Skene     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Theatre History Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.101
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0733-2033 - ISSN (Online) 2166-9953
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Introduction

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      Abstract: This editor's introduction takes a somewhat different form.Stay with me, please.There are three sections to it, which I leave intentionally unconnected by my prose, intentionally without transition, a structure reflective of my process/processing of this moment in which I write.As I write this editor's introduction in August 2020, two refrains continue to surface in my mind:Walter Benjamin: "The tradition of the oppressed teaches us that the 'state of emergency' in which we live is not the exception but the rule."1George Orwell: "Who controls the past controls the future."2I am quite certain others also find their minds turning to these writings and writers. For me, over the last four years in the Americas ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Un-Reading Voltaire: The Ghost in the Cupboard of the House of Reason

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      Abstract: "We no longer believe in ghosts' Who says so'""Even the Enlightened individual has not completely overcome the old belief."When Gustav Flaubert was traveling in Egypt, in 1850, he wrote to his friend, the poet and playwright Louis Bouilhet, of his adventures (mostly in the brothel districts avec ces dames), but he also wrote of upright encounters on the Nile, like the miracles at Sheikh Sa'id, "a tomb-chapel built in honor of a Moslum saint where birds go of their own and drop food that is given to them—this food is then offered to poor travelers—(you and I, who have read Voltaire, don't believe this. But everyone is so backward here!)."1 For those of us "who have read Voltaire," that is, we of the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Caricatured, Marginalized, and Erased: African American Artists and
           Philadelphia's Negro Unit of the FTP, 1936–1939

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      Abstract: In July 1937, Federal Theatre Project (FTP) leadership engineered what they hoped would be a distinct course correction for the project's Negro Unit in Philadelphia. The Unit's two earlier productions—variety shows titled Truckin' Along and So What', mounted at the Drexel Hill Playhouse, in a suburb ten miles west of the city—had not lived up to the ambitions of the FTP. As Arthur R. Jarvis recounts, these performances were "crowd-pleasing effort[s] that made effective use of African-American talent" but amounted to little more than "buffoonery and low comedy"1 that hearkened back to the legacy of the minstrel stage. In contrast, Negro Units in other cities were conducting substantive theatrical experiments by ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Stop Your Sobbing: White Fragility, Slippery Empathy, and Historical
           Consciousness in Branden Jacobs-Jenkins's Appropriate

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      Abstract: When Brett Kavanaugh had an emotional breakdown during his 2018 Supreme Court hearings, the televised event became a prominent example of that rare contemporary social phenomenon "white men's tears." This particular type of public grief closes down any discussion of inequality and privilege and brings to a halt any social movement to address these issues, as resources that should be channeled to those being oppressed are instead redirected to those complicit, or even active, in the oppression. The suffering of the powerful supplants the suffering of the disempowered. This specific emotional indulgence is reflected in Branden Jacobs-Jenkins's 2014 play Appropriate, which culminates in the teary breakdown of the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Asia and Alwin Nikolais: Interdisciplinarity, Orientalist Tendencies, and
           Midcentury American Dance

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      Abstract: The dancers in Alwin Nikolais's Kaleidoscope (1953 and 1956) appear in fullbody leotards that bisect their bodies in blocks of black and white.1 Makeup covers one half of their faces in white and the other half in black. At one moment, a group of these harlequin-esque dancers wield large oar-like paddles painted with rough, bold strokes, evoking indigenous patterns of the South Pacific. At another, two dancers balance a long pole between them, sometimes on the tops of their flexed feet and at other times on their shoulders, as they balance in a yoga-style boat pose on the ground. To music listed simply as "ethnic" in the program, they move in a slow unison so as to keep the pole balanced between them, evoking the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Editor's Introduction to the Special Section: Shifting Shapes: Witch
           Characters and Witchy Performances

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      Abstract: "It's the witch from next door."The Baker's line in Into the Woods introduces the character moments before we gaze upon her: aging and hunched, dressed in tattered rags, and maybe even drooling. In this brief interstitial space between aural and visual perception, the audience erupts in hesitant laughter. Perhaps this is the elicited reaction because many audience members assume the Baker's subtextual intention is that the visitor is actually the bitch from next door. In contemporary US culture, these words often conflate to vilify intelligent, assertive women. And that is precisely what the Witch is in Into the Woods. She is a decisive, hardworking, single mother much maligned by her neighbors' ancestors and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • To Wright the Witch: The Case of Joanna Baillie's Witchcraft

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      Abstract: When contemporary playwrights imagine worlds that include witch characters, they frequently do so under the assumption that the accusation of witchcraftstems from ignorance, superstition, or discrimination. More often than not, their so-called witches are outspoken and powerful women who threaten the status quo but do not conjure spells or celebrate the cycles of the moon. The focus in these plays is rarely on literal witchcraft, then—rather, they are signaling the idea of the witch, usually in order to reveal injustice or misogyny. As one of today's most-cited experts on witch culture, Pam Grossman, puts it, "show me your witches, and I'll show you your feelings about women."1The "craft" in "witchcraft" suggests ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Nothing Wicked This Way Comes: Shakespeare's Subversion of Archetypal
           Witches in The Winter's Tale

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      Abstract: In the fall of 1485, the Inquisitor Heinrich Kramer began the trial of Helena Scheuberin, a woman of Innsbruck and an accused witch. Her trial did not go as planned. The Inquisitor insisted on focusing not on Scheuberin's links to malevolent acts, heresy, or the practicing of magic but, rather, on her sexual history. Local authorities quickly put an end to the trial and dismissed the charges, leaving Kramer humiliated. Following this incident, Kramer, along with Jacob Sprenger, began writing their seminal work on witchcraft, the Malleus Maleficarum, first published in 1487. Kramer and Sprenger's work links the practice of witchcraftalmost exclusively to women and what they view as disordered female sexuality.1 The ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Of Women and Witches: Performing the Female Body in Caryl Churchill's
           Vinegar Tom

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      Abstract: In patriarchy, women's attempts at recording their personal and collective stories against the metanarrative of recorded history have often been met with severe sociocultural prohibitions. From Lilith and Medusa to Joan of Arc, the examples of female persecution in mythology and history on grounds of their exceptionality and defiance are numerous. The British playwright Caryl Churchill takes issue with the seventeenth-century tradition of witch hunting in her 1976 play Vinegar Tom. The present article attempts to reread the play to understand how patriarchy interprets women's attempts at self-actualization as symptomatic of different incurable and inbred "feminine" abnormalities like physical sickness ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • (Un)Limited: The Influence of Mentorship and Father-Daughter Relationships
           on Elphaba's Heroine Journey in Wicked

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      Abstract: In her Unbecoming Women: British Women Writers and the Novel of Development, Susan Fraiman argues: "Becoming a woman may be thought of as, in Judith Butler's rephrasing of Simone de Beauvoir, 'an incessant project, a daily act of reconstruction and interpretation' (131). It is a lifelong act continuing well past any discrete season of youth, and it involves a struggle among diverse narratives: official and also oppositional stories of arriving at adult 'femininity.'"1 In the present study, I use the libretto and score from the musical Wicked (2004) in an attempt to understand how the central character, Elphaba, is constructed by the show's writers as a young witch who undertakes the heroine journey of development. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Immersive Witches: New York City under the Spell of Sleep No More and Then
           She Fell

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      Abstract: I'm sitting in a darkened room, waiting for someone to show up. I'm surrounded by elaborately designed rooms: an office, a hospital, a boudoir, a cemetery, a hotel lobby. Curiosity, fear, and excitement fill me. Characters enter the room, performing dance sequences solo and in pairs, and I'm drawn to the fantastic among them: covens of witches, White Rabbits, Mad Hatters, Red Queens. As I explore the five-story McKittrick Hotel complex or the corridors of the Kingsland Ward asylum, I lose myself, not knowing what lies behind a curtain, through a door, atop a staircase. Powerful female characters ignite my wonder; these witches contest "normalcy" with a set of upside-down rules and rituals. As I reflect on the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • New Conventions for a New Generation: High School Musicals and Broadway in
           the 2010s

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      Abstract: Scholars of musical theatre often point to midcentury musicals as constituting the so-called golden age of the art form, and the legacy of the time period looms large when studying subsequent musical genres and trends.1 In Changed for Good: A Feminist History of the Broadway Musical, Stacy Wolf offers a survey of musicals that she organizes by decade and analyzes through feminist and critical race lenses, beginning with the golden age. While gesturing to a broad range of musical styles and conventions, Wolf demonstrates that 1960s musicals often featured the Single Girl who sang and danced solo onstage but was often punished for her independence. The radical politics of the 1970s gave rise to the ensemble musical ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Edwin Forrest: A Biography and Performance History by Arthur W. Bloom
           (review)

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      Abstract: Arthur Bloom has done the field of theatre history estimable service with his biographies of Joseph Jefferson (2000) and Edwin Booth (2013). He adds to those achievements with this excellent biography of the great actor Edwin Forrest. The book's first half is a carefully researched biographical narrative. Here, general readers and historians get a clear view of Forrest's life, career, and controversies. Those interested in digging deeper have an admirable resource in its second half, which catalogues Forrest's performances day-by-day, with notes, and the author's sources year-by-year. The narrative includes the number of performances of his prominent roles, including King Lear, 353 times, Metamora, 392, The ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Political Dramaturgies and Theatre Spectatorship: Provocations for Change
           by Liz Tomlin (review)

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      Abstract: An important theoretical question animates Liz Tomlin's new book: How, given the swell of interest in enabling an autonomous, liberated spectator in theatre and theatre studies, can we keep sight of dramaturgies that still seek to guide their audiences toward specific liberatory futures' In asking this question, Tomlin pinpoints a crucial tension in recent post-Marxist scholarship on political theatre: the tension between a logic of autonomy, which invests the spectator with new levels of self-determination, and an egalitarian logic, which seeks to convince its audiences of specific political stances, what she calls "ideological steer." Grappling with both current conversations in the field of theatre studies and a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Unfair Labor' American Indians and the 1893 World's Columbian
           Exposition in Chicago by David R. M. Beck (review)

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      Abstract: In August 1891, Emma Reeves wrote to federal officials seeking employment at the Chicago World's Fair, offering her services as an Abenaki basket weaver who would dress in "Indian costume or in citizens dress" as directed (12). She was hired by the fair's anthropology director, Frederic Ward Putnam, to perform in his ethnological village … as an Iroquois. During the years 1891–1893, Fort Rupert Kwakwaka'wakw George Hunt traveled the Pacific Northwest, collecting items for the fair's Northwest Coast Canadian Indian exhibit, including ceremonial masks, dishes, tools, and a multifamily house (60). Hunt, who later became a noted ethnographer and linguist, was paid decently for his efforts, and the tribal communities ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Theatres of Contagion: Transmitting Early Modern to Contemporary
           Performance ed. by Fintan Walsh (review)

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      Abstract: As I read through this collection, concerns related to COVID-19 surrounded daily, and I regularly encountered evolving understandings of contagion's powerful and lasting effects. Arguments about transmission and contraction, two overarching themes in the new collection Theatres of Contagion, edited by Fintan Walsh, address the urgency of examining contagion on a global scale, including the contagious affective and emotional power of performance. As the collection shows, theatre scholarship should rightly take up contagion as a concept that expands performance's power to invigorate the stage, its audiences, and beyond.Theatres of Contagion: Transmitting Early Modern to Contemporary Performance speaks to our current ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Women Adapting: Bringing Three Serials of the Roaring Twenties to Stage
           and Screen by Bethany Wood (review)

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      Abstract: The measure of a piece of scholarship's contribution may be how many other modes of inquiry it inspires. In coining the term "adapturgy," Jane Barnette (2017) not only shed light on the poetics of adaptation but also forced a hard look at the means of production and the structures of labor surrounding a text. In her new book, Bethany Wood connects her work to Barnette's, conducting a case study of three early-twentieth-century adaptations, applying the material considerations of adapturgy to their historicized production processes. Focusing on a moment when film moguls consolidated power and aided and abetted constructions of white nationalist middle-class femininity, her chosen period is as edifying as it is ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Irish Drama and Theatre Since 1950 by Patrick Lonergan (review)

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      Abstract: Patrick Lonergan's history of Irish drama and theatre in the second half of the twentieth century begins where one might expect it to: the Abbey Theatre. But Lonergan does not start by calling back to the Irish Literary Revival, or the Abbey's epochal first few decades, when playwrights like J. M. Synge and W. B. Yeats premiered their new plays. Rather, he draws our attention to the hashtagged present, specifically the movement arising from #WakingTheFeminists (#WTF) that emerged following the programming announcement for the Abbey's 2016 season, a centenary remembrance of the 1916 Easter Rising. When this lineup of plays featured just one work by a female dramatist, Irish feminists mobilized to raise awareness ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Mixed Faith and Shared Feeling: Theater in Post-Reformation London by Musa
           Gurnis (review)

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      Abstract: Mixed Faith and Shared Feeling effectively challenges several misconceptions about playgoing and religious life in early modern London. The average Puritan, it turns out, was not the avid antitheatricalist one might have assumed. The book presents an image of London's theatregoing community as confessionally diverse, with devout Calvinists, recusant Catholics, and even your pious Puritan brushing shoulders at the theatre. Musa Gurnis's first monograph offers a meaningful exploration of the mixed-faith landscape of post-Reformation London theatre.Employing a cultural materialist framework, the book focuses on the playhouse as an agent of cultural change, not a mere reflection of dominant cultural ideology. It ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Haunted City: Three Centuries of Racial Impersonation in Philadelphia by
           Christian DuComb (review)

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      Abstract: In January 2020, the Froggy Carr Mummers Club danced down Broad Street in Philadelphia with their trademark "frog-face" umbrellas painted orange to match their black-and-orange costumes honoring Gritty, the media star and mascot of the Philadelphia Flyers. But the organization (which dates back to the 1930s) was disqualified from awards after at least one of its members was found to have been wearing blackface as part of their costume. The act drew condemnations from the Mayor of Philadelphia, other mummer groups, and the press—though one mummer told local media that wearing blackface "wasn't racist" to him or the African Americans he knows.1The Mummers Parade—which dates to the colonial history of the city and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Memory, Transitional Justice, and Theatre in Postdictatorship Argentina by
           Noe Montez (review)

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      Abstract: Noe Montez's Memory, Transitional Justice, and Theatre in Postdictatorship Argentina joins the rich archive of theatre and performance scholarship on politics, memory, and state violence in Argentina. A substantial study of theatre produced in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, the book engages with the legacy of Argentine theatre criticism from the dictatorship and democratic transition, namely, works from Catherine Boyle, Jean Graham-Jones, Ana Elena Puga, and Diana Taylor. Montez anchors and contextualizes each chapter within Argentina's post-dictatorship history, giving an illuminating account of the complex shifts in approaches to transitional justice, which he defines as "the practice of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Imagining Cleopatra: Performing Gender and Power in Early Modern England
           by Yasmin Arshad (review)

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      Abstract: Queen Cleopatra VII (69–30 BC), the last Ptolemaic ruler of Egypt, has held a prominent position in popular culture for centuries. From serious representations such as Joseph L. Mankiewicz's Cleopatra (1963) to more lighthearted send-ups like Gerald Thomas's Carry On Cleo (1964), Cleopatra has become one of the most recognizable figures from ancient history. As Yasmin Arshad's groundbreaking study reveals, similar sentiments are also true of Cleopatra's legacy in early modern England. However, while acknowledging that "the image that dominates popular culture now derives mainly from Shakespeare and is that of the sultry siren of the East lounging on a burnished golden barge" (1), Arshad's important monograph ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Occupying the Stage: The Theater of May '68 by Kate Bredeson (review)

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      Abstract: Kate Bredeson's Occupying the Stage: The Theater of May '68 is not only an excellent history of the often overlooked French theatre companies that engaged in the worker and student protests of 1968 but also remains topical in light of the worldwide protests seen since the book's publication in 2018. In four succinct chapters, Bredeson discusses the occupation of the Odéon Théâtre in Paris, the development of a new working style by the Théâtre du Soleil and the Théâtre de l'Aquarium, the creation and legacies of the non-Parisian theatres Théâtre Universitaire de Nancy and the Nouvelle Compagnie d'Avignon, and censorship of Théâtre du Chêne Noir and the Living Theatre as local French authorities began reacting to the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Playing Sick: Performances of Illness in the Age of Victorian Medicine by
           Meredith Conti (review)

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      Abstract: Meredith Conti's Playing Sick: Performances of Illness in the Age of Victorian Medicine offers a persuasive and comprehensive discussion of the dramatic representation of illness during the Victorian era. Specifically, it centers the performance of illness on the Victorian stage by analyzing embodiment, symptomology, and medicine against the representational strategies devised to portray them. Although Conti's focus is tripartite—ultimately settling on tuberculosis, drug addiction, and mental illness, "three of the era's most pervasive and provocative illnesses" (2)—by examining competing biomedical and sociocultural understandings of contagion, sickness, and public health, she also considers the broader landscape ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Staging Memory and Materiality in Eighteenth-Century Theatrical Biography
           by Amanda Weldy Boyd (review)

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      Abstract: Staging Memory and Materiality in Eighteenth-Century Theatrical Biography is a persuasive text that examines the rise of theatrical biography by considering its roots, ramifications, and roles in eighteenth-century literary and theatrical culture. Amanda Weldy Boyd places theatrical biography in a broader literary context by considering its exchange with the novel and the role of the reader in enacting a type of material memory-making when consuming these texts. She clarifies that the art of collecting was undertaken by both the biographer and the reader: The biographer gathered anecdotes and trivia, while the reader could undertake scrapbooking and marginalia. Using case studies of theatrical biographies of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Drama of Celebrity by Sharon Marcus (review)

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      Abstract: In concluding her detailed study of celebrity culture, Sharon Marcus notes that "most histories of celebrity culture emphasize change over time and variations across media; this one has highlighted continuities" (216). The Drama of Celebrity not only generates "a new theory of celebrity culture" (3) but also argues that there isn't anything "new" at all about modern celebrity. Instead, the interactions of modern celebrity culture are rooted in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, when "the modern meanings of the words 'celebrity' and 'star' first became widespread" (9). Alongside this new theory, The Drama of Celebrity carefully traces the beginnings of "celebrity culture" as we know it to the historical ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Books Received

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      Abstract: The Books Received list is updated regularly and is available at ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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