Subjects -> ART (Total: 882 journals)
    - ART (468 journals)
    - DANCE (26 journals)
    - FILM AND AUDIOVISUALS (125 journals)
    - MUSIC (171 journals)
    - THEATER (92 journals)

THEATER (92 journals)

Showing 1 - 79 of 79 Journals sorted alphabetically
Adaptation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
African Arts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Agôn : Revue des arts de la scène     Open Access  
Applied Theatre Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Screen Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bulletin of Kyiv National University of Culture and Arts. Series in Stage Art     Open Access  
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cambridge Opera Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Comedy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Conceição/Conception     Open Access  
Contemporary Theatre Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Creative Artist : A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
DRAMA : Nordisk dramapedagogisk tidsskrift     Full-text available via subscription  
Drama Therapy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Dramatherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Dramaturgias     Open Access  
Drammaturgia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Early Theatre     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Forum Modernes Theater     Full-text available via subscription  
Horizons/Théâtre : Revue d'études théâtrales     Open Access  
Ibsen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Indian Theatre Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Itinera     Open Access  
Jeu : Revue de théâtre     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Adaptation in Film & Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
L'Atelier     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Latin American Theatre Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mask     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mechademia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Methis. Studia humaniora Estonica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Mime Journal     Open Access  
Mimesis Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modern Drama     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Multicultural Shakespeare     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
New Theatre Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Nineteenth Century Theatre and Film     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
NJ : Drama Australia Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Nordic Theatre Studies     Open Access  
PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Performance Research: A Journal of the Performing Arts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Performing Ethos: An International Journal of Ethics in Theatre & Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Peripeti     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
PesquisAtor. Revista do Centro de Pesquisa em Experimentação Cênica do Ator     Open Access  
Pitágoras 500     Open Access  
Renaissance Drama     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Research in Drama Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Scene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Shakespeare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Shakespeare Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Shakespeare Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Skenè. Journal of Theatre and Drama Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Slovenske divadlo / The Slovak Theatre     Open Access  
South African Theatre Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Stanislavski Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Studies in Musical Theatre     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Studies in Theatre and Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
TDR / The Drama Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Teatervitenskapelige studier     Open Access  
Teatro : Criação e Construção de Conhecimento     Open Access  
Teatro XXI     Open Access  
Telondefondo : Revista de Teoría y Crítica Teatral     Open Access  
Theatre and Performance Design     Hybrid Journal  
Theatre History Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Theatre Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Theatre Notebook     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Theatre Research in Canada / Recherches théâtrales au Canada     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Theatre Research International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Theatre Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Theatre Symposium     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Theatre Topics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Theatre, Dance and Performance Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Theatrical Colloquia     Open Access  
Western Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Women & Performance: a journal of feminist theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Youth Theatre Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Σκηνή / Skene     Open Access  
Similar Journals
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Shakespeare Bulletin
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0748-2558 - ISSN (Online) 1931-1427
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Incomplete Dramaturgies

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      Abstract: In recent years, attempts by theaters to address the misogyny of early modern plays have yielded mixed results. I argue in this article that many of these attempts have failed to recognize the ways in which early modern plays have misogyny baked in as an essential component of their dramaturgies. The results of this failure are what I call incomplete dramaturgies. The misogyny of these works goes deeper than line counts and casting, down to the structures, logics, and assumptions that hold the plays together. The problems that these plays present for twenty-first-century audiences, readers, and theater practitioners, then, are neither superficial nor merely historically contingent (i.e. “of their time”). Rather ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Iago as the Racist-Function in Othello

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      Abstract: “There’s something about this play because it was written for a white man in blackface that is, of course, feeling like it’s damaging your soul.”In the above epigraph, Ayanna Thompson describes to the hosts of NPR’s Code Switch why she is often asked to perform the role of “Othello Whisperer”: “Because theater companies—big theater companies [. . .] would put on productions of Othello and the actor of color who was playing Othello, who’s been trained his whole life to strive for this role, was having, you know, a mental breakdown.” As Robin DiAngelo has written, white spaces are insulated to avoid circumstances that might provoke white racial anxiety, and instead build expectations for white racial comfort, thereby ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Audiences, American Sign Language, and Deafness in Shakespeare Performance

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      Abstract: Theater productions incorporating American Sign Language (ASL) and deaf actors have been only superficially discussed by Shakespeare performance scholars. And while the premise that the dynamic co-presence of actors and audience creates the meanings of performance is fundamental to performance studies, this sparse scholarship does not consider how productions might generate different performative meanings and experiences for deaf audiences than for hearing ones. As a result, the key element of accessibility has been overlooked. In this essay, I examine four North American productions of Shakespeare combining spoken English/ASL that I attended in 2019.1 Comparing the responses of hearing audiences to my own as a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Affective Appeal of Violence and the Violent Appeal of Affect: Titus
           Andronicus, Lucy Bailey, and Shakespeare’s Globe

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      Abstract: When the actor Flora Spencer-Longhurst made her act one, scene four re-entrance in Lucy Bailey’s 2014 staging of Titus Andronicus, the effect was immediate and palpable. Spencer-Longhurst’s Lavinia bore little resemblance to her former self: she was covered from head to toe in dried, caked-on stage blood; her arms were raggedly bandaged to suggest the violent removal of her hands; and she stood mutely jerking about in a spasmodic series of movements, depicting her character’s experience of trauma after rape and mutilation. Such an image served as stark contrast to the happy, animated young woman from earlier scenes. The ultimate coup de théâtre, however, came when she opened her mouth and globs of red viscous ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “Amantes del Barrio Franklin”: Reading Chilean Shakespeare Through
           Cultural Anthropophagy

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      Abstract: It’s a Friday evening in March 1987. Summer is ending, and students have started back to school. Crowds gather outside the Teatro Huemul in Barrio Franklin, a neighborhood in Santiago, Chile, and floodlights illuminate the plaza where La Compañía Escuela Teatro “Q’s” street production of Romeo y Julieta is about to begin. A reviewer describes the first moments:Anochece. Sonido de tambores, mandolinas y panderetas, desde el fondo de una calle. Los niños corren al encuentro del cortejo y los mayores—expectantes y atentos—observan y escuchan. Candelas y luces, como para un funeral al atardecer; música [. . .] triste acompaña a Capuletos y Montescos. Sobre un féretro, Julieta y su Romeo.1[The sun sets. The sound of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Tracing Julie Taymor’s “Rough Magic” in Her Three Screen
           Shakespeares

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      Abstract: Prospero’s announcement “But this rough magic/I here abjure” (5.1.50–1) has led several scholars to wonder how and why he comes to deem his conjuring “rough.” Many critics have appropriated the phrase for book and paper titles, or to conceive of the workings of theater beyond The Tempest.1 It is also the term chosen by Julie Taymor for the title of her introduction to the published screenplay of her film of The Tempest (2010). Taymor uses “rough magic” to encapsulate her complex aesthetic of storytelling as a practitioner in theater and film. In a lucid explanation of her approach, Taymor writes of the differences and points of contention she finds while working in the two mediums:Revealing the mechanics of the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Hamlet (review)

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      Abstract: Neil Coppen’s Hamlet was born out of the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa, which necessitated several lengthy national lockdowns that saw many of the country’s cultural institutions, like those in other parts of the world, deprived of social and financial support. The Klein Karoo National Arts Festival (KKNK) website, on which this one-off online reading was hosted, explains that Hamlet was due to run at the Fugard Theatre in Cape Town in 2020, but with the onset of the pandemic and the resultant closure of the Fugard—a devastating loss to the South African theater world which broke the hearts of many—the production turned into an online reading. As a pandemic-influenced online production of Shakespeare in South ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Gallathea (review)

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      Abstract: Andy Kesson has attributed the “joy” of John Lyly’s Gallathea to the fact that “the queerness is already there” (Frankland and Kesson 291). There is no need to “queer” Gallathea as it’s already a celebration of queer love. The Show Must Go Online’s production of Gallathea captured this joy perfectly. Gallathea (1588) centers on a small village in Lincolnshire that must sacrifice a virgin to Neptune every five years. Tityrus and Melibeus are both worried their daughters Gallathea and Phillida will be sacrificed, and ask them to disguise themselves as boys and hide in the woods, where they meet and fall in love.Simone Chess, professor at Wayne State University, introduced Gallathea as the “queerest play in the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Romeo and Juliet (review)

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      Abstract: While plague lent itself to a variety of metaphorical uses across early modern English drama, it was rarely employed as an occasion for action or plot. Ben Jonson’s The Alchemist is a notable outlier, focused on the racketeering enabled when disease comes to an urban center. Romeo and Juliet is another. The familiar line, “a plague a’ both your houses,” is incantatory, uttered by Mercutio three times to make sure no one mistakes his meaning: both Capulets and Montagues, both Tybalt and Romeo, are to blame for his death (3.1.101–2). Plague is not only metaphorical, however; Friar John is kept from Mantua just on the chance of carrying “the infectious pestilence,” having needed to find a fellow friar from the town in ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Merry Wives (review)

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      Abstract: “The Public Theater,” promotional material announced, “is theater of, by, and for all people.” On public transit to the Delacorte Theater I encountered a man walking the subway A-train selling tasers and stunguns, another entering in a hospital gown, and a third wearing a track suit, reading Karl Marx’s Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, and smirking (he wasn’t wearing a mask despite official mandates). Are these minor spectacles relevant or merely remarkable' After some eighteen months of drastically reduced time witnessing the New York City public, it can be difficult to distinguish.The Public Theater’s staging of Merry Wives (July–September 2021) was the first production of Shakespeare at the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Seize the King (review)

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      Abstract: New York has another Shakespeare in the Park, and its passion, intensity, and innovation rival that of the Public Theater’s summer stage in Joe Papp’s heyday. The Classical Theatre of Harlem has presented free theater each summer since 2013 at the Richard Rodgers Amphitheater, mounting such productions as Romeo and Juliet, The Tempest, and The Bacchae. This venue, a bandshell in Marcus Garvey Park in Harlem, underwent a renovation completed in 2011; it gained state-of-the-art lighting, sound hookups, and a wider stage that promoted a more intimate and direct relationship between performers and audience members. The Classical Theatre of Harlem is helmed by Producing Artistic Director Ty Jones, the Obie-award-winning ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • All’s Well That Ends Well and Macbeth (review)

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      Abstract: Notwithstanding thematic elements that have marked All’s Well That Ends Well as “problematic”—including a prominent bed trick—the play has a fundamentally comedic arc, driving towards resolution in marriage. In this light, it stands far removed from Macbeth, one of Shakespeare’s bloodiest and bleakest tragedies, which ends with the main character and his wife dead after leaving Scotland in ruins. Yet the American Shakespeare Center (ASC) productions of these two plays that I saw on back-to-back nights shared a great deal in common. They coursed with comparable energy, both reflecting the now characteristic approach of the company, which has extended its formerly seasonal “Actors’ Renaissance” throughout the year. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Henry V (review)

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      Abstract: After a break necessitated by the COVID-19 virus, the actors of the American Shakespeare Center (ASC) returned to the stage to present the 2021 “Actors’ Renaissance” season, featuring productions of Macbeth, All’s Well that Ends Well, and Henry V. The ASC has passed through a difficult time recently. The virus forced an extended closure, and artistic director Ethan McSweeny left, amidst controversy and complaints, in February 2020. The ASC announced it would move forward under a new artistic/directorial model, with four veteran actors (Brandon Carter, John Harrell, Chris Johnston, and Zoe Speas) serving as actor-managers. The actor-manager scheme is new, but it grows out of the company’s staging practices during ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Twelfth Night (review)

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      Abstract: After a dark pandemic year, outdoor Shakespeare returned to the boreal forest with an upbeat Twelfth Night by Fairbanks Shakespeare Theatre (FST). Producing Artistic Director Tom Robenolt cut the script to emphasize its festive mood and downplay its loose ends. Most notably, at least for me, Duke Orsino did not speak the line in which he offers an olive branch to Malvolio at the play’s end: “Pursue him, and entreat him to a peace” (5.1.373). This omission erased any hint that Malvolio either deserved an apology or might somehow be included in what Orsino calls the play’s “most happy wreck” (5.1.262).The Folio text of Twelfth Night gestures only fitfully at comic resolution. Jack shall have Jill, but some things go ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Comedy of Errors (review)

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      Abstract: After seventeen long months of government-mandated restrictions on large gatherings due to the COVID-19 pandemic, outdoor theater productions were allowed to reopen in New Jersey in the summer of 2021. Director Brian Crowe wisely selected The Comedy of Errors to welcome audiences back to the Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey’s Outdoor Stage at the Greek Theatre on the campus of St. Elizabeth University in Convent Station, New Jersey. With the theme of reuniting people after a long separation, this play was the perfect offering to all who missed attending in-person performances, and who yearned for that magical connection between actors and audience that can only occur within a live theater setting. The performance ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Tempest (review)

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      Abstract: The Globe Touring Ensemble’s 2021 production of The Tempest opened with a collision of styles, as a swinging jazz number performed by the entire cast segued into the plaintive tones of two recorders. These mournful notes built to a shrill pitch, as the storm scene began in earnest. The mingling of moods in these first moments prefigured how this production would balance anxiety against the irreverent joy of community—an apt emotional palette amid the easing COVID-19 restrictions of summer 2021.Of course, a bifurcated structure has always been embedded in the play-text itself. This production emphasized, rather than complicated, the very different moods of the plot and sub-plot. Trinculo and Stephano’s drinking ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Unfixable Forms: Disability, Performance, and the Early Modern English
           Theater by Katherine Schaap Williams (review)

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      Abstract: Unfixable Forms: Disability, Performance, and Early Modern English Theater by Katherine Schaap Williams is an ambitious book with two competing aims. Firstly, the project examines how representations of disability in early modern theater point us at social formations and cultural issues that are ostensibly not about disability. Secondly, the book aims to think about how scripted disability draws attention to both the theatricality of performance and the body of the actor, therefore enabling Williams “to theorize theatricality itself as a medium” (3). The result is a rich examination of early modern drama that destabilizes notions of disability, unfixing them, as the title suggests, from biological essentialist ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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