Subjects -> TRANSPORTATION (Total: 216 journals)
    - AIR TRANSPORT (9 journals)
    - AUTOMOBILES (26 journals)
    - RAILROADS (10 journals)
    - ROADS AND TRAFFIC (9 journals)
    - SHIPS AND SHIPPING (39 journals)
    - TRANSPORTATION (123 journals)

RAILROADS (10 journals)

Showing 1 - 9 of 9 Journals sorted alphabetically
International Journal of Rail Transportation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Jernbanehistorie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Rail Transport Planning & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers Part F: Journal of Rail and Rapid Transit     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Railway Engineering Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Railway Gazette International     Full-text available via subscription  
Science and Transport Progress. Bulletin of Dnipropetrovsk National University of Railway Transport     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Urban Rail Transit     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Електромагнітна сумісність та безпека на залізничному транспорті     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
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Journal of Rail Transport Planning & Management
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.996
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 28  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2210-9706 - ISSN (Online) 2210-9706
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3304 journals]
  • Improvement of timetable robustness by analysis of drivers' operation
           based on decision trees

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      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 March 2019Source: Journal of Rail Transport Planning & ManagementAuthor(s): Yasufumi Ochiai, Yoshiki Masuma, Norio Tomii In railways where trains are running densely, once there occurs a delay, even if it is small, the delay easily propagates to other trains. In order to make their timetables more robust, railway companies are making various kinds of efforts. But until now, they have not been interested in analysis of drivers’ operation, although there exists much difference in their manner of driving and the difference is closely related with robustness. Thus, it would be useful if we can know what is “good driving”, in other words, a driving which reduces a delay and what is “poor driving” meaning a driving which increases a delay. If we can know the difference between “good” and “poor” driving, we can give advice to drivers so that they can improve their driving. We have developed an algorithm to find the factors which differentiate between “good” and “poor” driving based on the decision tree, which is a commonly used technique in data mining. The inputs of our algorithm are track occupation records. The algorithm receives “good” examples and “poor” examples as input, then it produces a decision tree from which we can know the dominant factors to differentiate between the good examples and the poor examples. We have applied our algorithm to actual data and proved that the algorithm can find a pattern of driving which is common to poor drivers.
       
  • Optimization of handouts for rolling stock rotations

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      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 March 2019Source: Journal of Rail Transport Planning & ManagementAuthor(s): Ralf Borndörfer, Boris Grimm, Markus Reuther, Thomas Schlechte A railway operator creates (rolling stock) rotations in order to have a precise master plan for the operation of a timetable by railway vehicles. A rotation is considered as a cycle that multiply traverses a set of operational days while covering trips of the timetable. As it is well known, the proper creation of rolling stock rotations by, e.g., optimization algorithms is challenging and still a topical research subject. Nevertheless, we study a completely different but strongly related question in this paper, i.e.: How to visualize a rotation' For this purpose, we introduce a basic handout concept, which directly leads to the visualization, i.e., handout of a rotation. In our industrial application at DB Fernverkehr AG, the handout is exactly as important as the rotation itself. Moreover, it turns out that also other European railway operators use exactly the same methodology (but not terminology). Since a rotation can have many handouts of different quality, we show how to compute optimal ones through an integer program (IP) by standard software. In addition, a construction as well as an improvement heuristic are presented. Our computational results show that the heuristics are a very reliable standalone approach to quickly find near-optimal and even optimal handouts. The efficiency of the heuristics is shown via a computational comparison to the IP approach.
       
  • The indirect costs assessment of railway incidents and their relationship
           to human error - The case of Signals Passed at Danger

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      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2019Source: Journal of Rail Transport Planning & ManagementAuthor(s): Miltos Kyriakidis, Samuel Simanjuntak, Sarbjeet Singh, Arnab Majumdar The majority of railway incidents result neither in passenger nor operators harm, nor they lead to any severe damage on the rolling stock or the infrastructure. Nevertheless, such incidents result in financial loses, broadly known as indirect costs, which are difficult to identify, isolate, evaluate, and quantify. This paper introduces a framework to quantify the indirect costs in railway operations. Furthermore, as degraded human performance remains a major contributor to operational errors and railway incidents, this study explores for associations between the indirect costs and the factors that affect and contribute to degraded human performance. The framework was implemented in the calculation of the Category A1 Signals Passed at Danger (SPADs) indirect costs. Data was obtained from two UK train operators, while the associated human performance was analysed using the Railway-Performance Shaping Factors (R-PSFs) taxonomy. Employing Spearman's rank order correlation and Fisher's exact statistical tests the associations between R-PSFs and indirect costs were reviewed. Results show significant correlations between the R-PSFs and indirect costs, but only if the importance and severity of every individual R-PSFs is considered. We expect our findings to aid the relevant stakeholders on their efforts to make better decisions on improving safety performance of railway operations.
       
  • The influence of buffer time distributions in delay propagation modelling
           of railway networks

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      Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Rail Transport Planning & Management, Volume 8, Issues 3–4Author(s): Stephan Zieger, Norman Weik, Nils Nießen Buffer times are an important factor in railway timetable design preventing the propagation of delays and ensuring timetable robustness. Determining the required amount of buffer times, such that a certain level of service quality is achieved, falls within the responsibility of railway capacity analysis. This is why capacity analysis is intrinsically linked to delay propagation modelling. Currently, delay propagation modelling in this context relies on the assumption of random, exponentially distributed or deterministic buffer times. Real-world timetables tend to deviate from this behaviour, such that a more general modelling of buffer time distributions is desirable. In this paper the impact of different buffer time distributions on the build-up of knock-on delays in delay propagation modelling is analysed using a Monte-Carlo simulation approach. It is shown that the choice of distribution has a significant impact on performance metrics. In a sensitivity analysis line capacity is observed to vary by as much as 17% as a function of the underlying buffer time statistics in the investigated scenarios.
       
  • A bilevel programming model for operative decisions on special trains: An
           Indian Railways perspective

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      Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Rail Transport Planning & Management, Volume 8, Issues 3–4Author(s): Akhilesh Kumar, Anjana Gupta, Aparna Mehra This research develops decision support for railways on operational decisions of running special trains to tackle higher demand on specific routes during seasons of festivals and holidays. These operational decisions comprise of utilizing rolling-stocks and determining optimal fare-price structure in a competitive environment coerced by other travelling service providers. The influence on the demand-shares by the competitors of railways is incorporated in decision making to utilize the rolling-stock accordingly. A novel mixed integer bilevel programming model is proposed in which the railways is considered a leader and a group of all competitors to railways is a follower. The leader has to maximize the expected revenue by deciding on routes, rolling-stock assembly planning and fare-pricing for special trains subject to constraints on resources and the anticipated demand arising out of Nash-equilibrium fares of the follower. A diversified-elitist genetic algorithm is introduced to solve the proposed model. The proposed methodology is illustrated by taking a test situation from Indian Railways. The empirical analysis demonstrates the success of the proposed model in strategically addressing the fare-price competition and preparing the operational plan for running the special trains.
       
  • Periodic railway timetabling with sequential decomposition in the PESP
           model

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      Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Rail Transport Planning & Management, Volume 8, Issues 3–4Author(s): Sabrina Herrigel, Marco Laumanns, Jacint Szabo, Ulrich Weidmann With continuously increasing capacity utilization of railway networks as well as growing requirements on service quality and reliability, railway timetabling is becoming increasingly difficult. Although most timetables are still constructed manually in practice, the demand for advanced automatic timetabling techniques is evident. Long computation times, however, are a major impediment for the use of optimization-based timetabling tools within today's planning process. Focusing on the construction of periodic timetables via the periodic event scheduling problem (PESP), the paper introduces a new decomposition technique to speed up automatic timetabling. The approach is based on solving a sequence of smaller subproblems and can be parameterized to reach a suitable compromise between the two extremes of either simultaneous or sequential planning. Computational results on large timetabling instances for Switzerland's railway network show very promising results. In particular, finding feasible as well as near optimal timetables can be considerably accelerated compared to solving the PESP using the standard MILP formulation.
       
  • Editorial for Volume 8/3-4

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      Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Rail Transport Planning & Management, Volume 8, Issues 3–4Author(s):
       
  • A new operations approach for Bangkok Metro Green Line using short turn
           operation patterns

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      Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Rail Transport Planning & Management, Volume 8, Issues 3–4Author(s): Waressara Weerawat, Karnnapat Chumkad The two Green Lines, Sukhumvit Green Line and Silom Green Line, are part of the first modern electric Metro system in Thailand. They were established in 1999 with 26 stations and a total distance of 25.5 km. It is expected that the Sukhumvit Green Line will be extended to serve 31 stations with a total distance of about 35 km in 2019. Taking into account of the non-aligned operation plans from the existing mass transit lines when commissioning the new service, the operation patterns for the extended Sukhumvit Green line should be reevaluated systematically. This research paper applies simulation modeling to study the critical points of operations, and revises the train operation patterns under different scenarios. The prospective passenger imbalance problem between the existing and the extended line has been addressed. Ten key operations performance measures (KPIs) have been considered and analyzed. Seventeen different scenarios have been developed using different headways, turning points and alternative routes. A short turn operation is proposed to solve the passenger imbalance problem. When applying the short turn operation, different headway schemes should be considered to prevent possible delays due to the high frequency in certain line sections especially the starting and turnaround station areas.
       
  • The structural and spatial properties of the high-speed railway network in
           China: A complex network perspective

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      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 October 2018Source: Journal of Rail Transport Planning & ManagementAuthor(s): Weiwei Cao, Xiangnan Feng, Hong Zhang High-speed railway (HSR) has been one of the most important transport modes for developing cities. The development and achievement of HSR in China has attracted attention from around the world. Previous studies on HSR primarily focused on its impacts on regional development, the environment and the socio-economy. The structural and spatial properties of the HSR network have been neglected if not all. This article takes China's high-speed railway network (CHSRN) as an example and converted it into a weighted network using a P-space approach. The structural and spatial properties of CHSRN at the node and network levels are explored. The degree, strength and betweenness centralities of cities in CHSRN are calculated and analyzed. An integrated indicator based on the centrality measures is proposed to quantify the overall role of each city in CHSRN. The small-world property of CHSRN is examined, and the scale-free, spatial heterogeneity and hierarchical properties of CHSRN are examined in terms of train flow intensity. Possible factors affecting the structure and spatial properties of CHSRN are also explored.
       
  • A rolling horizon optimisation model for consolidated hump yard
           operational planning

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      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 October 2018Source: Journal of Rail Transport Planning & ManagementAuthor(s): Sumit Raut, Sudhir Kumar Sinha, Harshad Khadilkar, Shripad Salsingikar This paper presents an optimisation formulation for consolidated planning of railway hump yard operations. The objective is to minimise the average dwell time of railway cars in the yard, while satisfying constraints related to (i) incoming (outgoing) train arrival (departure) times and composition, (ii) car movement sequencing, and (iii) the limited capacity and number of classification tracks. We present a mixed-integer linear programming formulation that combines three stages of decision making; inbound train humping, railcar classification and outbound train construction. The consolidated approach enables a natural linking between capacity constraints at various stages of the system. However, the scale and complexity of the resulting problem requires some relaxation, with the optimisation model providing a high-level plan, and a low-level heuristic handling the detailed implementation. The high-level optimiser determines hump schedule of the inbound trains, block-to-classification track assignment, and pull-out schedule at coarse level by dividing the planning horizon into discrete time intervals and trains into groups of consecutive cars (segments). The low-level heuristic converts the resulting instructions into fine-grained decisions spatially (at the individual car level) and temporally (the actual duration required for each action). The proposed approach is implemented on a rolling horizon basis, and is used to solve a 42-day, 52246-car example.
       
  • Editorial for Volume 8_2

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      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018Source: Journal of Rail Transport Planning & Management, Volume 8, Issue 2Author(s):
       
  • Computation of practical capacity in single-track railway lines based on
           computing the minimum buffer times

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      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018Source: Journal of Rail Transport Planning & Management, Volume 8, Issue 2Author(s): A. Jamili Defining the exact amount of capacity in main line railway lines is a key strategic criterion in selection of railway development alternatives. The method of computation of capacity in single-track railway lines is different from double or more track ones. The UIC 406 leaflet defined an invaluable method to compute the capacity on the basis of compressing the actual timetables. In this paper, some new methods are proposed to define the exact amount of practical capacity based on computing the minimum required buffer times during compression process in single-track railway lines. Finally, a bottleneck in Iran mainline railway network is analysed as the case study.
       
  • Use of mobile phone data for analysis of number of train travellers

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      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018Source: Journal of Rail Transport Planning & Management, Volume 8, Issue 2Author(s): Anette Østbø Sørensen, Johannes Bjelland, Heidi Bull-Berg, Andreas Dypvik Landmark, Muhammad Mohsin Akhtar, Nils O.E. Olsson Several studies have pointed to the difficulties of obtaining good data on train ridership. There are at least two challenges regarding these data. First, train operators consider such data confidential business information, especially in high resolution. Second, the data that actually are available vary in quality and coverage. This paper studies mobile phone data as an alternative measure to obtain data about train ridership.Handset counts were obtained from one telecom operator for selected mobile phone base stations and compared with timetable data and APC. The selected base stations are located so that it is likely that a large share of the mobile phone traffic is generated by train passengers. The number of units connected to a base station is found to correspond relatively well with the trains that pass close to the base stations. A ratio between the handset count and APC data appear as promising in utilizing handset count to calculate train ridership, with ratios around one in the rush hours. We discuss preliminary results as well as methodological and technical challenges.To make sure that we do not violate privacy concerns, the data used in the study have been approved by personal privacy representatives.
       
  • Correlation between heterogeneity and vulnerability of subway networks
           based on passenger flow

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      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018Source: Journal of Rail Transport Planning & Management, Volume 8, Issue 2Author(s): Xue-mei Xiao, Li-min Jia, Yan-hui Wang In this paper, we represent a subway network as a dynamic, directed and weighted graph, where vertices represent subway stations and edge weights represent passenger volume passing between two stations. Static and dynamic metrics which can represent vertices and edges' local and global attributes are proposed. Then dynamic properties of subway network in heterogeneity and vulnerability are further analyzed by standard deviation. Through a detailed analysis of Beijing subway network, we illustrate that the heterogeneity and vulnerability of Beijing subway network vary over time when passenger flow is taken into consideration. In addition, the vulnerability of the network is correlated with its heterogeneity based on local dynamic metric's distribution when passenger flow is taken into account, instead of the global dynamic metric's distribution, and the important station with higher flow degrees are identified.
       
  • Impact of railway disruption predictions and rescheduling on passenger
           delays

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      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018Source: Journal of Rail Transport Planning & Management, Volume 8, Issue 2Author(s): Nadjla Ghaemi, Aurelius A. Zilko, Fei Yan, Oded Cats, Dorota Kurowicka, Rob M.P. Goverde Disruptions such as rolling stock breakdown, signal failures, and accidents are recurrent events during daily railway operation. Such events disrupt the deployment of resources and cause delay to passengers. Obtaining a reliable disruption length estimation can potentially reduce the negative impact caused by the disruption. Different factors such as the location, cause of disruption, traffic density, etc. can determine the disruption length. The uncertainty inherent to the variability of each factor and the unavailability of sufficient data results in a wide distribution of disruption lengths from which a certain value should be selected as the length prediction. The rescheduling measure considered in this research is short-turning the trains that are heading to the disrupted area. To investigate the impact of the disruption length estimates on the rescheduling strategy and the resulting passengers delays, this research presents a framework consisting of three models: a disruption length model, short-turning model and passenger assignment model. The framework is applied to a part of the Dutch railway network. The results show the effects of short (optimistic) and long (pessimistic) estimates on the number of affected passengers, generalized travel time and number of passengers rerouting and transferring.
       
 
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