Subjects -> PHYSICS (Total: 857 journals)
    - ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM (10 journals)
    - MECHANICS (22 journals)
    - NUCLEAR PHYSICS (53 journals)
    - OPTICS (92 journals)
    - PHYSICS (625 journals)
    - SOUND (25 journals)
    - THERMODYNAMICS (30 journals)

SOUND (25 journals)

Showing 1 - 22 of 22 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acoustical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Acoustics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acoustics Australia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Acoustics Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Acta Acustica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Acoustics and Vibration     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Applied Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Archives of Acoustics     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Australasian Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine (AJUM)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bioacoustics : The International Journal of Animal Sound and its Recording     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Bulletin de l'AFAS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Sound and Vibration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 161)
Journal of the Acoustical Society of America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58)
Journal of Ultrasonography     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Open Journal of Acoustics     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Phonica     Open Access  
Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Sonography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
SoundEffects - An Interdisciplinary Journal of Sound and Sound Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ultrasound International Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Building Acoustics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.215
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1351-010X - ISSN (Online) 2059-8025
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Numerical investigation on 2D metamaterial under normal incidence

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      Authors: Anil Pundir, Arpan Gupta, Umberto Berardi
      Abstract: Building Acoustics, Ahead of Print.
      Investigations in solid-state physics show that metamaterials, a kind of periodic material, can produce a band of frequency gap. When a sonic wave’s frequency falls into this frequency gap, it cannot propagate. Enlightened by the concept of frequency gap, researchers recently investigated various metamaterials. The search for bandgap(s) is critical in such innovations. The present letter presents the analysis of the band of frequency gap(s) for two and three-component systems as 2D period materials using the Finite Element Method. The investigation highlights the influence of geometrical parameters on the bandgap. Modelled metamaterial uses a core of aluminium, a coating of natural rubber and a matrix of air. For the lattice constant’s specified value, with the core’s increasing size, the bandgap shows to increase. The general effect of the coating leads to the flattening of the dispersion curve. For the square lattice and circular core, the bandgap appears around a net core size (with and without coating) of around 30%–32% of the lattice constant. Multiple frequency bandgaps appear of substantial sizes at the core’s threshold size, that is, when the core’s net radius is equal to half of the lattice constant. The softer material coating is found as a potential alternative to tune and control acoustic metamaterials. With a three-component system, bandgaps appear comparatively at significantly lower frequencies. Lower edge frequencies for such bandgaps are found to be independent of the core and coating size.
      Citation: Building Acoustics
      PubDate: 2023-01-26T03:55:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1351010X221147816
       
  • Analysis of the sound insulation performance of periodic wall structures
           by a virtual acoustic laboratory

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      Authors: Elias Perras, Marius Mellmann, Chuanzeng Zhang
      Abstract: Building Acoustics, Ahead of Print.
      The propagation of acoustic waves in periodic structures, also known as phononic crystals or PCs, is prohibited in certain frequency ranges, which are referred to as the frequency band-gaps. The existence, the location and the width of the frequency band-gaps are mainly determined by the geometrical parameters and the material properties of the PCs. In this work, a virtual acoustic laboratory based on a fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model is developed to determine the sound insulation capacity of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) periodic walls. The FSI model is discretized using the frequency-domain spectral element method (FDSEM), which is an advanced finite element method (FEM) using special high-order shape functions. Following the guidelines of the ISO10140, the setup of the developed FSI model allows us to take into account the essential physical phenomena, especially the interaction of the wall structure with the fluid domains (air). The FSI model based on the FDSEM increases the computational efficiency and accuracy in comparison with the standard FEM. Several numerical examples will be presented and discussed to show that the designed periodic walls in certain frequency ranges within the band-gaps may exhibit much better sound insulation capabilities than monolithic walls.
      Citation: Building Acoustics
      PubDate: 2023-01-26T03:52:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1351010X221136709
       
  • A model study of low-frequency noise exposure indoors due to road traffic

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      Authors: Jens Forssén, Georgios Zachos, Carmen Rosas Perez, Wolfgang Kropp
      Abstract: Building Acoustics, Ahead of Print.
      Indoor low-frequency noise levels due to road traffic has been modelled for facade examples consisting of a lightweight steel facade, a concrete facade and two types of windows. Possible audibility of heavy vehicles passing by has been investigated as well as the dependence of the exposure level on driving speed and distance to road. The results show that pass-by events may be audible at low frequencies for cases complying with building standards and noise guideline values exemplified by Swedish regulation. Moreover, the A-weighted levels may be dominated by low frequency noise, and the frequency of occurrence of pass-by traffic noise events may be sufficiently high to create disturbance for typical traffic situations. Furthermore, it is shown that the contribution of pass-by events to the equivalent level indoors may increase when the driving speed is lowered.
      Citation: Building Acoustics
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T07:20:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1351010X221143571
       
  • Just noticeable difference of loudness through building wall of masonry
           and drywall

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      Authors: Francisco Cerigliano, Shin-ichi Sato
      Abstract: Building Acoustics, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, the just noticeable difference (JND) of loudness with respect to sound transmission through walls corresponding to a weighted noise reduction index Rw of 43 dB is investigated. Two types of walls typically used in Argentina are evaluated. One is masonry composed of solid autoclaved aerated concrete bricks with a thickness of 25 cm, and the other is a drywall composed of two 12.5 mm plasterboards with a 25 cm air chamber in between them, filled with glass wool. The JND is determined using the method of constant stimuli for both ascending and descending variations. The source signals used are two types of vacuum-cleaner sounds and two music signals. Online tests are conducted owing to restrictions imposed by the COVID-19, and the presentation level of the stimuli is adjusted based on the sensation level of each individual. Responses from 148 different listeners show no significant difference in the subjective responses among the source signals. Regarding the masonry, the JND values are 3.02 and 1.62 cm for the ascending and descending variations, respectively (corresponding Rw difference of 2 and 1 dB), whereas they are 4.55 and 1.26 cm for the drywall, respectively (1 dB for both).
      Citation: Building Acoustics
      PubDate: 2023-01-11T07:04:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1351010X221140808
       
  • Single-number values versus subjective judgment of airborne sound
           insulation in dwellings

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      Authors: Thomas Rauscher, Reinhard O. Neubauer, Maria Zaglauer, Philip Leistner
      Abstract: Building Acoustics, Ahead of Print.
      There is a long history of adapting airborne sound insulation in buildings to the actual needs. A first pan-European work was published with COST Action TU0901: Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions in which the differences between the sound insulation measure and the standard sound level difference were documented. Furthermore, ISO 16283-1: Field measurement of sound insulation in buildings and of building elements—Part 1: Airborne sound insulation states: Compared to DnT, R’ has a weaker connection to the subjective impression of airborne sound insulation. To investigate this relationship a simplified listening test and a computer-simulated variation studies of a synthesized airborne sound insulation were carried out. A test sound was generated from a speech, a music, and a noise signal, each of which was filtered by six frequency responses of solid structures. In a paired comparison task, 16 participants judged the loudness of the resulting 18 sounds. The results of the listening test show that perceived loudness is significantly correlated to the single number quantity DnT,w but less to the single number quantity R’w. This finding was confirmed across all signal types. Thus, the results confirm the statement in ISO 16283-1, that the single number quantity DnT,w has a stronger connection to the subjective impression of airborne sound insulation as the quantity R’w.
      Citation: Building Acoustics
      PubDate: 2022-10-20T08:46:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1351010X221131390
       
  • Study of the acoustic performance of composites made from recycled
           cellulose acetate and polymer waste

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      Authors: Rubén Maderuelo-Sanz, Francisco José García-Cobos, Francisco José Sánchez-Delgado
      First page: 445
      Abstract: Building Acoustics, Ahead of Print.
      The main objective of this study is to evaluate the acoustic behaviour of composites made by mixing cellulose acetate, from recycled cigarette butts, with polymers such as polyethylene and polypropylene, from recycled plastic containers and surgical masks, respectively. For this purpose, the spectra of the measured sound absorption coefficients and the calculated NRC and SAA indices of samples with thicknesses of 1.5, 3, 4.5, 6 and 7.5 cm are analysed. The results of both experiments reveal that the studied composites present a sound absorption capacity comparable to that of fibre glass and rock wool, being even more efficient for thicknesses greater than 4.5 cm. Moreover, the acoustical properties of the composites are predicted using the Miki model over the frequency range from 100 to 6400 Hz, showing very accurate predictions of the sound absorption spectrum at normal incidence.
      Citation: Building Acoustics
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T12:34:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1351010X221103677
       
  • Acoustical optimization of mufflers hybridized with spiral perforated
           tubes using finite element method, Artificial Neural Network, and Genetic
           Algorithm

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      Authors: Min-Chie Chiu, Ying-Chun Chang
      First page: 459
      Abstract: Building Acoustics, Ahead of Print.
      Because venting noise emitted from high pressure valve often occurred in industry and is huge, the noise abatement of the venting noise to protect human’s hearing health is necessary. In order to depress the high speed noise, a muffler internally equipped with spiral perforated tube is presented. To mitigate this noise, a dissipative muffler with perforated spiral tube installed on the pipeline is proposed. To evaluate the acoustical performance, a finite element method using COMSOL software is adopted. Also, the sensitivity analyses of Transmission Loss (TL) of the proposed muffler with respect to (1) diameter of the spiral and perforated tube (D), (2) pitch of the spiral tube (L), (3) acoustical impedance of the dissipative acoustic material (R), and (4) perforation rate of a perforated tube (σ) has been carried out. For the optimization studies, both Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Genetic Algorithm (GA) to optimize the muffler parameters L and D are applied. Here, two high target frequencies (2000 and 3500 Hz) to optimize the proposed muffler are exemplified. Consequently, the hybrid design of perforated spiral tube optimized using ANN and GA will mitigate the high pressure valve noise efficiently.
      Citation: Building Acoustics
      PubDate: 2022-07-19T10:18:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1351010X221109995
       
  • Acoustical characterization of three Ottoman masjids built in Algeria

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      Authors: Mohamed Ladaoui Benferhat, Samira Debache Benzagouta, Abdelouahab Bouttout, Francesco Martellotta
      First page: 481
      Abstract: Building Acoustics, Ahead of Print.
      This paper aims at evaluating the acoustical quality of historical Ottoman masjids in Algeria. Measurements were carried out according to current international standards, allowing calculation of acoustical parameters including reverberation time, speech transmission index and Clarity. Three Ottoman masjids located in Algiers (Jedid, Ali-Bitchin, and Safir) were selected. The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the acoustics of the prayer hall in relation to its worship use, assuming as a reference studies of existing masjids. Results showed that two of three worship spaces are generally reverberant under unoccupied conditions (with mid frequency reverberation times of about 3 s), while the other has reverberation time of about 1 s at medium frequencies. Speech intelligibility under unoccupied conditions is between poor and fair for Jedid and Ali-Bitchin masjids, while in Safir masjid values were generally above 0.6. Presence of architectural elements made C50 values quite scattered and characterized by a clear non-symmetrical distribution. Calculations to consider the effect of occupancy were also performed, resulting in significantly drier acoustics with improved clarity.
      Citation: Building Acoustics
      PubDate: 2022-07-23T09:57:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1351010X221113000
       
  • Sound transmission loss of LC3-based mortars with barite and waste rubber

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      Authors: Begüm Söyek Abay, Leyla Tanaçan
      First page: 503
      Abstract: Building Acoustics, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates developing a single-layer composite material to provide acoustical comfort conditions due to sound transmission in a building. The aim of the study is to increase the sound transmission loss (STL) of mortars produced with LC3 (limestone calcined clay cements)1 ecological binder, barite, and rubber aggregates compared to Portland cement and river sand aggregate mortars. The flow and aggregate/binder ratios by volume in each mortar mixture were kept constant and compared. Instead of river sand aggregate, barite aggregate was used to provide weight, which is one of the most important parameters effective in sound insulation and waste rubber aggregate was used to control stiffness. Mortars were produced in 40 × 40 × 160 mm for experimental analyses that include unit weight, capillary of water absorption, open porosity, and compressive and flexural strengths, while in 90 mm thick cylindrical mortars were produced for sound transmission loss measurements. As a result of the experimental study, it is revealed that mortar with LC3 binder, two-part barite, and 1-part waste rubber aggregate by volume (LC3-2B1R-8) can be used as an acoustical material for sound insulation. Using combined aggregates (barite and rubber) for increasing the sound insulation properties of the mortar is very effective not only in high frequencies but also in low frequencies. The study also shows that increasing the weight of the mortars does not always increase the sound insulation properties of the material.
      Citation: Building Acoustics
      PubDate: 2022-10-20T08:43:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1351010X221129264
       
  • A scoping review of the effects of classroom acoustic conditions on
           primary school children’s mental wellbeing

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      Authors: Kiri Mealings
      First page: 529
      Abstract: Building Acoustics, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this scoping review was to systematically map research on the effect of classroom acoustic conditions on children’s mental wellbeing and identify existing gaps in knowledge to inform future research. This scoping review followed the PRISMA-ScR protocol. A comprehensive search of four online databases (ERIC, PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science) was conducted using the search term classroom AND (acoustic* OR noise OR reverb*) AND (“mental health” OR emotion OR wellbeing OR “quality of life” OR anxiety OR depression). Peer-reviewed papers were included if they were written in English, included children in the primary school age range (i.e. 5–12 years), and included a measure of children’s mental wellbeing. Six papers met the criteria to be included in the review. Overall, this review suggests that poor classroom acoustic conditions can negatively affect children’s mental wellbeing. Given the small number of studies, future research suggestions are proposed to fill current gaps in knowledge.
      Citation: Building Acoustics
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T11:53:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1351010X221117899
       
  • Classroom acoustic conditions and primary school children’s
           behaviour: A scoping review

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      Authors: Kiri Mealings
      First page: 543
      Abstract: Building Acoustics, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this scoping review was to determine what is known from the literature about the effect of different classroom acoustic conditions on different primary school children’s behaviour. A scoping review using the PRISMA-ScR protocol was conducted in March 2022. ERIC, PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science databases were searched using the search term classroom AND (acoustic* OR noise OR reverb*) AND (behav* OR motivat* OR attitude OR persist* OR flexib* OR engage* OR interpersonal). In all, 14 articles were relevant. The populations studied included children who were typically developing, had autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or were deaf or hard of hearing. Several behaviours including learning, externalising and internalising behaviours were investigated. The results suggested that poor classroom acoustic conditions can negatively impact children’s behaviour. However, due to heterogeneity of the methodologies used in this small number of studies, future research is proposed to better understand the relationship.
      Citation: Building Acoustics
      PubDate: 2022-10-15T06:26:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1351010X221126680
       
  • The influence of the acoustic performance in the certification of a school
           buildings according to the ITACA protocol

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      Authors: Samantha Di Loreto, Fabio Serpilli, Valter Lori, Costanzo Di Perna
      First page: 559
      Abstract: Building Acoustics, Ahead of Print.
      The study and analysis of the processes that determine environmental sustainability of buildings are nowadays topics of great interest for the sustainable, economic and social development of the cities. The international context presents guidelines and protocols for the energy-environmental sustainability, often aimed to assigning a sustainability label to the buildings. In Italy one of the most used rating systems is the ITACA Protocol, recently updated by the Italian Standard UNI/Pdr 2019, which through a series of criteria identifies global indicators of the sustainability of the building examined. This paper presents the potential of the ITACA protocol which could be a method for designing innovative and efficient architectures. In particular, the aspects related to the acoustic comfort are examined and how these criteria change the overall performance of a building. The evaluation of the sustainability performance was applied to a school building. Results show that an optimal acoustic quality improve over to 2 point of the final protocol score.
      Citation: Building Acoustics
      PubDate: 2022-07-07T11:10:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1351010X221109763
       
  • Enhancing the classroom acoustic environment in Badr University, Egypt: A
           case study

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      Authors: Ahmed M Selim, Doha M Saeed
      First page: 577
      Abstract: Building Acoustics, Ahead of Print.
      The acoustic environment of the classroom is deemed significant to enhance the learning quality and the learning outcomes. Noise exposure levels and reverberation are the main acoustic parameters to consider in the classroom because it affects speech intelligibility. As a result of the modern teaching methods especially in the practical faculties. Workgroup activities have become a common tool for learning, it has a higher noise level than independent work. Therefore, the specialists become face a great challenge to achieve acoustic comfort in classrooms. In spite of that, in Egypt, acoustic conditions are rarely implemented into classroom design practice. This study evaluated the acoustic performance of a typical classroom in Badr University, Egypt in unoccupied condition for four cases. Unoccupied ambient noise level (ANLs) and reverberation time (RTs) were measured by using Testo 815 device, and Ecotect software. Additionally, the measurements were compared with the standards and norms. Acoustic treatments using absorbent materials were suggested by simulation in Ecotect for three cases (four scenarios).
      Citation: Building Acoustics
      PubDate: 2022-08-20T05:49:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1351010X221119381
       
 
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