Subjects -> EARTH SCIENCES (Total: 771 journals)
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    - OCEANOGRAPHY (88 journals)

OCEANOGRAPHY (88 journals)

Showing 1 - 64 of 64 Journals sorted by number of followers
Hydrobiology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Limnology and Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Estuaries and Coasts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Deep Sea Research Part I : Oceanographic Research Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Physical Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Progress in Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Coastal Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Oceanography and Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Maritime Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Bulletin of Marine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Fisheries Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Physical Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Limnology and Oceanography: Fluids and Environments     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Oceanography and Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Oceanography : Open Access     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Limnology and Oceanography: Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Oceanology and Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Coastal Development     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Marine Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ocean Yearbook Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Limnology and Oceanography Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Journal of Marine Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Marine Science and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Oceanology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Operational Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Marine Energy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Limnology and Oceanography e-Lectures     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Development and Applications of Oceanic Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Regional Studies in Marine Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Limnology and Oceanography: Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Ocean University of China (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Scientia Marina     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ocean Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Aquatica : Aquatic Sciences Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Marine Systems & Ocean Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Marine Life Science & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Research     Open Access  
Thalassas : An International Journal of Marine Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
Oceans     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural and Marine Sciences     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Maritime and Marine Sciences     Open Access  
Scientific Drilling     Open Access  
Oceanologia     Open Access  
Revista de Gestão Costeira Integrada     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias Marinas y Costeras     Open Access  
Egyptian Journal of Aquatic Research     Open Access  
China Ocean Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Revista de Biología Marina y Oceanografía     Open Access  
Latin American Journal of Aquatic Research     Open Access  
Acta Oceanologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Oceanography
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.989
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-868X - ISSN (Online) 0916-8370
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Variations in the Central Mode Water in the North Pacific as a
           manifestation of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation

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      Abstract: Abstract The North Pacific Central Mode Water (CMW) is examined from the viewpoint of its volume variations. The volume of the CMW layers thicker than \(150 m\) is used as an index of CMW variations, which successfully represents the year-to-year and decadal variations in the CMW volume. The CMW index shows the variation close to that of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The CMW variation is strongly tied with large-scale, dominant variations in sea surface temperature (SST), surface dynamic height (SDH), and sea surface height (SSH) anomalies in the North Pacific, with a significant correlation with the PDO. Year-to-year and decadal variations of CMW volume in May to July are significantly correlated with the wintertime Aleutian Low and 500 \(hPa\) geopotential height variations, which indicates that the Aleutian Low induces the eastward extension/retreat of the strong winter westerlies and resultant net surface heat flux anomaly over the CMW distribution region. Thus, the CMW volume variation can be regarded as a significant manifestation of the PDO. The SST, SDH, and SSH anomalies are associated with the surface cooling in the northern sector of the CMW distribution region. On the other hand, the SDH and SSH anomalies throughout a year and the SST anomaly in the cold season in the southeastern sector of the CMW region are formed due to the heaving of isopycnal surfaces in the subsurface layer above the CMW in response to its volume variations.
      PubDate: 2024-07-03
       
  • Long-term observation of the Soya Warm Current using HF ocean radars:
           relationship between the Soya Warm Current variability and the sea level
           anomalies in the Soya/La Perouse Strait

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      Abstract: Abstract Three high-frequency (HF) ocean radars were installed at the Soya/La Perouse Strait to monitor the surface current fields of the Soya Warm Current (SWC), which flows through the strait from the Sea of Japan to the Sea of Okhotsk. These ocean radars were operated for 19 years, from August 2003 to March 2022. In this paper, seasonal to interannual variations in the SWC were investigated using surface current fields obtained by the HF ocean radars combined with coastal tide gauge records and sea level anomaly from satellite altimetry. The HF ocean radars clearly captured the seasonal and interannual variations in the SWC. The alongshore surface velocity of SWC showed a high correlation with the alongshore sea level difference (SLD) between the Sea of Japan and the Sea of Okhotsk if seasonal variations were included. However, anomalies of the SLD and SWC alongshore velocity exhibited a lower correlation, especially in summer. This suggests that different mechanisms may be involved in summer and winter. The alongshore SLD between Wakkanai and Abashiri, which has been utilized in previous studies as an indicator of SWC intensity, may not be appropriate for representing interannual variations in the SWC intensity in summer, when the SWC reaches the maximum current velocity. Instead, it was demonstrated that the offshore SLD anomaly estimated using satellite altimetry with the coastal tide gauge record at Wakkanai could be a better index for representing the interannual variations throughout the year.
      PubDate: 2024-05-23
       
  • Role of Japan Sea Throughflow in the spatial variability of the long-term
           sea surface temperature trend

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      Abstract: Abstract The Japan Sea shows a much stronger warming of long-term sea surface temperature (SST) than surrounding oceans. The warming trend possesses a meridionally alternating zonal band pattern, with weak trends along the paths of the Japan Sea Throughflow and strong trends in the remaining interior region. Using idealized models of the Japan Sea Throughflow and atmospheric heating, this study examines the process behind the formation of such spatial patterns in the SST trend. We find that zonal band structures form in a flat rectangular coastline model, and heat budget analysis shows that horizontal heat transport, due to throughflow, reduces the warming effect created by the surface heat flux. A weak SST trend appears around the jet, while a strong SST trend appears elsewhere. Bathymetric effects are also examined using a model with realistic coastline settings. The location of the western boundary current stabilizes, and the coastal branch begins to disconnect from the Japanese coastline toward the north, allowing a more stable SST warming region to form in the southern interior region. Lagrangian particle tracking experiments confirm that a weak (strong) SST trend corresponds to a short (long) residence time, and eddies in the Japan Sea prolong the residence time in interior regions. The model results suggest that the accumulation time of surface heating is essential to the spatial distribution of the long-term SST warming trend.
      PubDate: 2024-05-23
       
  • Sea ice-melt amount estimated from spring hydrography in the Sea of
           Okhotsk: spatial and interannual variabilities

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      Abstract: Abstract This study provides the first estimation of sea ice-melt amount in the Sea of Okhotsk based on spring hydrographic data accumulated for nearly a hundred years. Just after sea ice melts completely, a low-salinity layer appears on the ocean surface, overlying the layer of Winter Water at the freezing point. The integration of the salinity decrease from Winter Water should correspond to the total ice-melt amount. We developed an algorithm to extract the profiles that clearly show the salinity deficit and converted the salinity deficit to the ice-melt amount from all available data. The climatological map shows that ice-melt amount decreases toward the ice edge and exhibits large values around the northern Sakhalin Island, reflecting the ice thickness distribution. In the southern area (south of 48°N), where sea ice is transported from the north, the average ice-melt amount is estimated to be ~ 71 cm in thickness. It is clearly shown that the ice-melt amount has decreased by ~ 30% in the southern area since the 1990s. These changes possibly affect the regional climate through the decreased latent heat of sea ice and potentially affect biological production through weakened stratification caused by decreased ice melt. We also suggested that ice-melt amount did not show a significant trend during the 1930s–1970s, implying that our methodology could extract information on sea ice before the era of satellite observations.
      PubDate: 2024-05-11
       
  • Temporal variation of the 2017 Kuroshio large meander based on repeated
           surveys along 138°E

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      Abstract: Abstract During August 2017, the Kuroshio began to follow its large meander (LM) path, and this was 12 years after the last LM event. Such LM events lead to the formation of an inshore cyclonic eddy (ICE) within the Kuroshio inshore region between the Kuroshio and the southern coast of Japan. We analyzed data from repeated seasonal surveys along a transect that followed 138°E, and from additional surveys, satellite observations, Argo floats, and a high-resolution reanalysis dataset to describe the temporal variation of the LM and ICE between 2017 and 2021. Cross sections from the repeated surveys highlighted the variations in the water mass structures. The time series of the indicators of the ICE intensity such as the Kuroshio volume transport and the planetary contribution of potential vorticity (Q) in the ICE revealed a maintenance trend in their intensity during the observation period. High-Q water was distributed in the ICE during the LM period compared to the non-LM period, and showed a clear seasonality within the shallower layers, suggesting the injection of Q via the advection from the upstream region in summer. Additional surveys captured an eddy that became detached from the ICE during summer 2020. This detached eddy had a Q value greater than the ICE and velocity similar to the Kuroshio, suggesting that the main stream had become temporarily separated. The structures and volume transport of warm water intrusions into the inshore region were also examined, and centrifugal instability was considered to be one of their generation mechanism.
      PubDate: 2024-05-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s10872-024-00718-8
       
  • Correction: The behaviour of aluminium, manganese, iron, cobalt, and lead
           in the subarctic Pacific Ocean: boundary scavenging and temporal changes

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      PubDate: 2024-04-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s10872-024-00720-0
       
  • Journal of oceanography most cited paper award 2024

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      PubDate: 2024-04-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s10872-024-00722-y
       
  • Seasonal variation in pore water nutrients and their fluxes from the
           bottom sediments in Harima Nada, Seto Inland Sea

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      Abstract: Abstract The nutrients essential for primary production are inorganic salts and it is important to fully understand nutrient dynamics in coastal oceans. There are three major sources of nutrients in the Seto Inland Sea: loadings from terrestrial run-off, advection from the open sea, and release from bottom sediments. Among these sources, information concerning release from bottom sediments has been limited due to infrequent observations. In this study, we took monthly samples over a two-year period, measuring nutrient concentrations in pore water from 0 to 12 cm at a sampling station in Harima Nada (depth 43 m), with the aim of clarifying the variation of nutrient concentrations in, and fluxes from, the sediment. Nutrient concentrations in the pore water were characterized by high concentrations of dissolved ammonium, dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) and dissolved silicate (DSi), with minor amounts of nitrate and nitrite. The daily nutrient supply to the water column was 8.7 ± 4.6 mg-N m−2 day−1 for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), 2.5 ± 3.0 mg-P m−2 day−1 for DIP and 65.1 ± 36.7 mg-Si m−2 day−1 for DSi. DIN and DIP fluxes from sediments were compared to those of terrestrial loadings into Harima Nada, which were estimated to be comparable to or about two times higher than river loadings for DIN and more than ten times higher than terrestrial loading for DIP. Overall, the results of this study provide important basic information on nutrient dynamics from sediments and their management in Harima Nada.
      PubDate: 2024-04-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s10872-024-00719-7
       
  • Primary productivity impacts community structure of euphausiids in the
           low-latitude Indian and Pacific Oceans

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      Abstract: Abstract Euphausiids are a vital component of global marine micronekton. To reveal the primary environmental factors influencing euphausiid distribution patterns in the previously overlooked low-latitude ecosystems, we investigated a large-scale community structure of euphausiids covering the North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG) and low-latitude eastern Indian (EI), and South Pacific Oceans (SP). A total of 41 euphausiid species from six genera were identified. Integrated primary production (PP) correlated significantly with the euphausiid abundance and species diversity and displayed the most critical influence on the variations in euphausiid community structure in low latitudes. Dissolved oxygen (DO) was the second significant environmental driver. Due to the distinct distribution patterns of euphausiid species in response to different PP and DO levels, the low-latitude euphausiid assemblages were mainly distinguished into subtropical and tropical communities. The subtropical euphausiid community associated with lower PP and higher DO demonstrated significantly lower euphausiid abundance but higher diversity than the tropical community. Euphausia brevis, E. mutica, and Stylocheiron abbreviatum, which characterize the subtropical community, appear to depend less on the phytoplanktonic prey. Euphausia diomedeae and Hansarsia gracilis, typifying the tropical population, showed stronger hypoxia tolerance. Additionally, each community was further divided into three subgroups under the influence of surface PP (subtropical: marginal NPSG, central NPSG, and austral EI-SP subgroups; tropical: the Bay of Bengal, equatorial EI, and equatorial EI-SP subgroups). These results suggested that food resource is the most important in shaping euphausiids’ community structure in an oligotrophic ecosystem with subtle hydrography gradients.
      PubDate: 2024-02-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s10872-024-00713-z
       
  • Correction to: Estimate of turbulent energy dissipation rate using
           free-fall and CTD-attached fast-response thermistors in weak ocean
           turbulence

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      PubDate: 2024-02-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s10872-024-00717-9
       
  • Seasonal variation in the current field and development of bottom cold
           water in Harima-Nada

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      Abstract: Abstract We investigated the seasonal variation in the current field in Harima-Nada using a high-resolution three-dimensional numerical model. The model showed sufficiently good performance at recreating its spatial and seasonal variation. Additionally, the model successfully reproduced the observed temperature and salinity patterns and values, as well as the observed surface current fields. The seasonal variation was consistent with previous studies, showing downwind circulation in winter induced by northwesterly winds and cyclonic circulation in summer induced by density-driven circulation. The water was well-mixed during winter and stratified in summer. During summer, a bottom cold water (BCW) dome develops beneath the thermocline in the central basin, where a surface cyclonic eddy occurs. Cold water from the previous winter is trapped at the bottom in topographic depressions after the onset of spring, forming BCW in the Harima-Nada (HNBCW). Meanwhile, pressure gradients associated with the density difference across the BCW drive geostrophic flow and form a cyclonic eddy at the surface above the HNBCW. HNBCW experiences a temperature increase of approximately 12.8 °C from spring to summer, which is associated with vertical diffusion and horizontal advection processes. Air–sea heat flux is the main factor influencing water temperature and its changes in the HNBCW. In addition, topographic features and river discharge factors affected water circulations as well as the formation and variation in the HNBCW. Harima-Nada is a small, shallow semi-enclosed coastal sea, and therefore any small change in these dynamic factors can affect water characteristics.
      PubDate: 2024-02-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10872-023-00702-8
       
  • Correction to: Synchronized interdecadal variations behind regime shifts
           in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation

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      PubDate: 2024-01-31
      DOI: 10.1007/s10872-024-00716-w
       
  • Future changes in marine heatwaves based on high-resolution ensemble
           projections for the northwestern Pacific Ocean

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      Abstract: Abstract Marine heatwaves (MHWs) are oceanic conditions characterized by extremely high sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies that last for several days to years. Because MHWs have devastating effects on marine ecosystems and significant impacts on fisheries, understanding future MHWs is important for adapting to upcoming climate changes. In this study, we examined future changes in MHWs in the northwestern Pacific Ocean (18–53ºN, 117ºE–170ºW) under two CO2 emission scenarios using a high-resolution ensemble (four members for each scenario) simulation product using a high-resolution ocean model that satisfactorily resolves the Kuroshio, Kuroshio Extension, and SST fronts. Following global warming, MHWs based on a threshold in the historical period (1981–2005) will increase and intensify (i.e., occur with higher SST anomalies than before). In the historical period, the annual MHW days ranged from 20 to 34 days. Annual MHW days increase to 63–313 days (188 days–all year round) depending on the region under the high CO2 mitigation (emission) scenario at the end of the twenty-first century of 2076–2100. Furthermore, we investigated the spatial details of future MHWs. Future MHWs reflect the magnitude of SST variability in addition to that of sea surface warming in the twenty-first century; future MHWs are less frequent and more intense in the subtropical–subarctic frontal zone with large SST variability than in other regions.
      PubDate: 2024-01-31
      DOI: 10.1007/s10872-024-00714-y
       
  • Spatial variability in wave characteristics along the eastern Arabian Sea

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      Abstract: Abstract We utilized data from the numerical wave model WAVEWATCH-III and examined the spatial variability of waves considering 30 nearshore locations in the eastern Arabian Sea. The wave parameters from the model compare well with the buoy data (correlation coefficient ~ 0.98 and bias ~ 0.17 m). During monsoon, wave heights in the central-eastern Arabian Sea are higher than those in the southern and northern parts due to the influence of the Findlater jet and intermediate-period waves are dominating the entire area. The significant wave height is less than 1.5 m in non-monsoon and reaches 5 m in July. Variation in wave height between two nearby locations is highest in the northeastern Arabian Sea along the Gujarat coast. For a distance of 388 km from central Kerala to Karnataka, there is no significant spatial variability in wave height. Eastern Arabian Sea experiences a higher peak period in the non-monsoon due to reduction in the local wind speed. The integral period does not show significant spatial variability similar to wave height. The maximum (minimum) wave heights were found in 2013 (2015) and the variations are linked to the monsoon intensity.
      PubDate: 2024-01-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s10872-024-00715-x
       
  • Dependence of drag coefficient on the spectral width of ocean waves

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      Abstract: Abstract The sea-surface roughness or drag coefficient is ascribed to the effect of various components of ocean waves. Many studies have been focused on the investigation of the dependence of drag coefficient on sea states that are usually denoted by wave age. However, no universally accepted relationship has been obtained up to now and the results are significantly scattered or even contradicted. We reviewed the parameterizations of sea-surface roughness as a function of wave age, and found that the phase speed at spectral peak cp is an important parameter to characterize the drag coefficient. For the same wave age, drag coefficient increases with increasing cp. Contrary to the traditional concept, the older waves with greater cp possesses higher sea-surface roughness for the same wind speed because more wave components participate the air–sea interaction and intensify the wind stress. With the buoy meansurements and the theory of equilibrium range of wind waves, we estimated fricition velocity and proposed that the frequency bandwidth and spectral width of the wave spectrum are more suitable parameters than the traditional wind speed and wave age to be used to parameterize drag coefficient. This study provides a new way to estimate wind stress through the reliable spectra of ocean waves.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s10872-023-00712-6
       
  • The behaviour of aluminium, manganese, iron, cobalt, and lead in the
           subarctic Pacific Ocean: boundary scavenging and temporal changes

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      Abstract: Abstract Aluminium (Al), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), cobalt (Co), and lead (Pb) are trace metals that exhibit significant scavenging tendencies in the oceans. This study presents the full-depth distributions of the dissolved (d) and labile particulate (lp) fractions of these five elements in the subarctic Pacific Ocean, obtained during the GEOTRACES Japan KH-17-3 cruise. Along the 145° W meridional transect, the d and lp species of Al, Mn, Fe, and Co reflected fluvial supply from Alaska and benthic input from the continental shelf. We estimated that the boundary-scavenging zone has a width of approximately 250 km off Alaska. Along the 47° N zonal transect (GEOTRACES GP02 Line), we found input of trace metals from the Okhotsk and Bering Seas in the west, contrasting to the limited input of trace metals due to boundary scavenging in the east. The hydrothermal activity of the Juan de Fuca Ridge influenced the distribution of deep-water trace metals at the easternmost station, CL-21. Temporal change in the vertical profiles of dPb in the middle of the subarctic gyre highlighted a decline in anthropogenic Pb emissions from 2005 to 2017. Temporal change of the vertical profiles of Al, Mn, and Fe at 47° N, 160° E from 2011 to 2017 indicates the influence of the Great East Japan Earthquake. In particular, lp trace metals were brought by tsunami and ocean circulation in 2011, and decreased over time through scavenging.
      PubDate: 2024-01-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s10872-023-00710-8
       
  • Temporal variation in vitamin B12 concentration and their impact on
           phytoplankton composition of surface waters of a coastal ocean off Japan
           (Ariake Sea)

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      Abstract: Abstract Most phytoplankton, including harmful algal bloom (HAB)-forming species, have an absolute requirement for vitamin B12 (cobalamin). However, the cycling of vitamin B12 in the ocean is still poorly understood. For example, in the Ariake Sea, where local fisheries have been affected by HABs, the impact of vitamin B12 on phytoplankton dynamics has never been evaluated. This study reports the surface distribution of cyanocobalamin (CN-B12, a type of vitamin B12) in the Ariake Sea and its adjacent areas. The field measurements were complemented with an additional onboard CN-B12 incubation experiment to elucidate the importance of the coenzyme on the growth of natural phytoplankton communities. Dissolved CN-B12 behaved dynamically and was often depleted in surface waters. Dominant phytoplankton in the Ariake Sea changed seasonally; all these taxa include vitamin B12 auxotrophs. The distribution of CN-B12 was controlled by dynamic production and consumption by natural phytoplankton and bacterial communities. We attempted to measure the concentration of particulate CN-B12; it was undetectable suggesting that CN-B12 form of vitamin B12 is not dominant inside the cell. No clear relationship existed between CN-B12 and any oceanographic parameters, suggesting that river discharge is unlikely a major source of CN-B12 in this area. Bottle incubation experiments showed that CN-B12 and nitrate additions promoted the growth of diatom Chaetoceros spp., implying that some phytoplankton groups are co-limited by them. These preliminary results suggest that vitamin B12 may affect the composition of the phytoplankton community in the Ariake Sea.
      PubDate: 2024-01-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s10872-023-00711-7
       
  • Vortex pairs formed by tidal currents in the Naruto Strait: effects of
           bottom topography, density stratification, and coastline geometry

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      Abstract: Abstract Vortex pairs formed at a strait outlet by tidal flow effectively induce water exchange and material transport in coastal areas. However, the effects of complex bottom topography and density stratification remain unclear. Here, we investigated the development and propagation of vortex pairs in the Naruto Strait, which has complex topography. Satellite observations indicated that the vortex pairs formed on the northern side of the strait continue to move away from the strait after the reversal of tidal flow, shifting their propagation from northward to westward. Numerical experiments revealed that: (1) changes in depth affect the propagation speed and overall size of vortex pairs; (2) density stratification reduces the effects of depth changes; (3) coastline geometry affects the propagation direction of vortex pairs. Furthermore, experiments with idealized topography showed that in a region where depth increases with vortex-pair propagation, the jet decelerates, and the vortex pair shrinks in size. Conversely, in a region where depth decreases, the jet widens, and the vortex pair expands. The changes in jet flow speed can be attributed to flow continuity and depth change, as the latter alters the cross-sectional area. Meanwhile, the changes in vortex pair size and jet width can be explained by vortex propagation on a slope due to potential vorticity conservation. These effects of topography and density stratification may also be significant in other coastal areas and potentially influence the Strouhal number threshold below which vortex pairs leave an outlet.
      PubDate: 2023-12-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s10872-023-00709-1
       
  • Sources and dynamics of dissolved black carbon in the Pearl River Estuary
           and Shelf, Northern South China Sea

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      Abstract: Abstract Estuarine processes regulate the transport of dissolved black carbon (DBC) and associated contaminants to the ocean. However, there is limited understanding of the geochemical behavior of DBC in estuaries. In this study, DBC in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) and the northern shelf of the South China Sea were examined using the benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA) method. DBC, bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) exhibited distinct behaviors during their transport from the PRE to the sea. DOC and CDOM decreased during the initial mixing of river water and seawater but increased at the lower PRE. In contrast, high aromaticity DBC inputs were observed throughout the PRE, likely originating from local terrestrial sources, such as runoff from nearby islands, as indicated by the high RH/L values (i.e., the ratio of BPCA containing 5 and 6 carboxyl groups to that containing 3 and 4 carboxyl groups; 2.03–2.30). In the Pearl River-plume zone (salinity < 33.0), DOC, CDOM, and DBC showed quasi-conservative behaviors against salinity, indicating that their geochemical behaviors were primarily governed by physical mixing between plume water and seawater. Using a flux model, it was estimated that the discharge of riverine DBC from the Pearl River Delta ranged from 11.2 to 16.3 Gg year−1, representing an important source of bio-resistant DOC to the northern South China Sea.
      PubDate: 2023-12-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s10872-023-00708-2
       
  • Average coastal residence time distribution estimated by a 2-km resolution
           Japanese coastal model

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      Abstract: Abstract The average coastal residence time, \(T_r\) , which indicates how long water parcels or substances stay in coastal areas, is one of the useful indicators of coastal-offshore water exchange, and has been estimated for some semi-enclosed regions around Japan. We attempted to obtain a spatial distribution of \(T_r\) as a first step to comprehend the whole picture of water exchange in the coastal seas of Japan. For this purpose, we devised a new method for both demarcating the coastal retention area and estimating objectively \(T_r\) based on a particle-tracking model experiment. Unlike existing methods, this method does not need to assume the retention area in advance, so it can provide the distribution over the entire coastal seas, including semi-enclosed and open regions, rather than targeting a specific region. Appling this method to our coastal ocean model with a horizontal resolution of approximately 2 km, we estimated a spatial distribution of \(T_r\) . We were able to differentiate semi-enclosed and open regions around Japan quantitatively. There are 10 semi-enclosed regions, where \(T_r\) reached 50–400 days. On the other hand, it was less than 10 days along the coasts exposed to the Kuroshio Current and strong coastal currents. In other coastal regions, it ranged from 10 to several tens of days. In addition, we estimated another timescale of water exchange based on an age-tracer advection–diffusion experiment, and obtained results that are consistent with our particle-tracking estimate. This suggests the validity of the above estimation method for \(T_r\) .
      PubDate: 2023-09-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s10872-023-00704-6
       
 
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  Subjects -> EARTH SCIENCES (Total: 771 journals)
    - EARTH SCIENCES (527 journals)
    - GEOLOGY (94 journals)
    - GEOPHYSICS (33 journals)
    - HYDROLOGY (29 journals)
    - OCEANOGRAPHY (88 journals)

OCEANOGRAPHY (88 journals)

Showing 1 - 64 of 64 Journals sorted by number of followers
Hydrobiology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Limnology and Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Estuaries and Coasts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Deep Sea Research Part I : Oceanographic Research Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Physical Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Progress in Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Coastal Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Oceanography and Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Maritime Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Bulletin of Marine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Fisheries Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Physical Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Limnology and Oceanography: Fluids and Environments     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Oceanography and Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Oceanography : Open Access     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Limnology and Oceanography: Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Oceanology and Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Coastal Development     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Marine Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ocean Yearbook Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Limnology and Oceanography Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Journal of Marine Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Marine Science and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Oceanology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Operational Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Marine Energy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Limnology and Oceanography e-Lectures     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Development and Applications of Oceanic Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Regional Studies in Marine Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Limnology and Oceanography: Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Ocean University of China (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Scientia Marina     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ocean Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Aquatica : Aquatic Sciences Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Marine Systems & Ocean Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Marine Life Science & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Research     Open Access  
Thalassas : An International Journal of Marine Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
Oceans     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural and Marine Sciences     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Maritime and Marine Sciences     Open Access  
Scientific Drilling     Open Access  
Oceanologia     Open Access  
Revista de Gestão Costeira Integrada     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias Marinas y Costeras     Open Access  
Egyptian Journal of Aquatic Research     Open Access  
China Ocean Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Revista de Biología Marina y Oceanografía     Open Access  
Latin American Journal of Aquatic Research     Open Access  
Acta Oceanologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal  
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