Subjects -> EARTH SCIENCES (Total: 771 journals)
    - EARTH SCIENCES (527 journals)
    - GEOLOGY (94 journals)
    - GEOPHYSICS (33 journals)
    - HYDROLOGY (29 journals)
    - OCEANOGRAPHY (88 journals)

OCEANOGRAPHY (88 journals)

Showing 1 - 79 of 79 Journals sorted by number of followers
Hydrobiology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Limnology and Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Estuaries and Coasts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Deep Sea Research Part I : Oceanographic Research Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Physical Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Frontiers in Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Progress in Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Marine Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Coastal Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Oceanography and Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Maritime Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Bulletin of Marine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Fisheries Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Physical Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Limnology and Oceanography: Fluids and Environments     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Oceanography and Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Oceanography : Open Access     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Limnology and Oceanography: Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Oceanology and Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Coastal Development     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Marine Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ocean Yearbook Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Limnology and Oceanography Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Journal of Marine Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Marine Science and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Oceanology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Operational Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ciencias Marinas     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Marine Energy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Limnology and Oceanography e-Lectures     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Development and Applications of Oceanic Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Geo-Marine Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Regional Studies in Marine Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Limnology and Oceanography: Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Limnology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Ocean University of China (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Scientia Marina     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Marine Technology Society Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ocean Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Aquatica : Aquatic Sciences Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Marine Systems & Ocean Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Marine Life Science & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Coastal Engineering Proceedings : Proceedings of the International Conference on Coastal Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Research     Open Access  
Thalassas : An International Journal of Marine Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
Oceans     Open Access  
Aquatic Research     Open Access  
Jurnal Kelautan Tropis     Open Access  
Depik Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Perairan, Pesisir dan Perikanan     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural and Marine Sciences     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Maritime and Marine Sciences     Open Access  
Arquivos de Ciências do Mar     Open Access  
Scientific Drilling     Open Access  
Jurnal Kelautan : Indonesian Journal of Marine Science and Technology     Open Access  
Oceanologia     Open Access  
Revista de Gestão Costeira Integrada     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias Marinas y Costeras     Open Access  
Egyptian Journal of Aquatic Research     Open Access  
China Ocean Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Revista de Biología Marina y Oceanografía     Open Access  
Latin American Journal of Aquatic Research     Open Access  
Acta Oceanologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Maritime Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.538
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 13  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1872-7859 - ISSN (Online) 2212-9790
Published by SpringerOpen Homepage  [229 journals]
  • Correction: What is the Blue Economy' A spatialised governmentality
           perspective

    • PubDate: 2024-06-05
       
  • Elevating labor concerns in small-scale fisheries: challenges to decent
           work in Peru’s jumbo flying squid fishery

    • Abstract: Abstract Despite growing attention on severe labor abuses in seafood production, questions remain about the broader range of challenges to decent work in the sector. Small-scale fisheries (SSFs) in particular have received relatively little attention from a labor-focused perspective. Motivated by this gap, this study elaborates a methodology to assess working conditions in SSFs across multiple dimensions of decent work, specifically through a case study of the artisanal jumbo squid fishery in Peru, a socially and economically important fishery in which working conditions are poorly understood. The findings highlight key decent work deficits in this fishery, including: inadequate coverage and lack of social protections; remuneration occasionally below the minimum wage; excessive working hours; increasingly longer trips in vessels that often lack adequate occupational safety and health features; informal employment relations and high turnover of crew, which are linked to safety issues (i.e., crew sometimes lack skills for this difficult work at sea); and fragmented fishing organizations with limited capacities for social dialogue. Many of the problems are rooted in or exacerbated by the broader governance context, especially widespread informality. The primary policy solutions being pursued are not labor-specific and are unlikely to address decent work deficits. Addressing these complex problems will require involving fishers—importantly, crew members—in efforts to drive improvements in the fishery and enhancing their capacities to lead in the development of solutions to the problems that affect them. More work is necessary to refine indicators and assess working conditions, but this work contributes towards advancing methodologies and highlighting the importance of studying labor in SSFs.
      PubDate: 2024-05-22
       
  • The representation of Aboriginal health and wellbeing values within
           coastal marine and fisheries policies of the Northern Territory of
           Australia

    • Abstract: Abstract Aboriginal Peoples in the Northern Territory (NT) of Australia have customary connections to seafood for cultural practices, nourishment, livelihoods, and social connections which have been linked to health and wellbeing outcomes. Global and national entities have called for health and self-determination principles to be considered across all public policies to continue to improve health and wellbeing outcomes. Specifically, there is a growing acknowledgement that the fisheries sector plays a crucial role in enhancing and supporting Indigenous health and wellbeing. However, there is limited understanding of how this can be achieved. This study applies a content analysis of ten NT fisheries policy documents to investigate: (1) the representation of Indigenous values; (2) Indigenous health and wellbeing outcomes and (3) the positioning of self-determination within NT coastal, marine and fishery policies. Findings reveal that policy focus is primarily concerned with the conservation and management of environments and resources, fisheries, management and sustainability, and fisheries-based economic development. The consideration of health and wellbeing outcomes are not explicitly represented, including fisheries as a source of food production. This is concerning considering the contribution of seafood to Indigenous Peoples diets and food security. Despite these limitations, self-determination principles were represented within the policies by recognising Aboriginal aspirations through, for example social, cultural, and environmental outcomes.
      PubDate: 2024-05-16
       
  • Coastal and maritime cultural heritage: from the European Union to East
           Asia and Latin America

    • Abstract: Abstract Introducing the Special Collection on Coastal and Maritime Cultural Heritage, this article focuses on the cultural heritage of coastal regions and maritime cultures and presents a summary of threats and topics found in recent cultural heritage research, especially around the themes of governance, resilience, transformation, and power (including gender and marginalization). Cultural heritage (CH) is a super-concept: it connects a wide diversity of heritage types (tangible and intangible), and cuts across a variety of public policies. Yet coastal and maritime cultural heritage (CMCH) faces risks from conflicts, environmental hazards, and from a neglect arising from lack of understanding and consideration of its value. Additional risks from governmental Blue Growth policies and economic factors put CH at even greater risk. As cultural heritage is increasingly being tapped for its economic importance in development and tourism– and neglected in maritime policy– greater scholarly understandings and conceptualization of CMCH are needed. This special collection is one step in the direction towards further understandings, protections, and utilization of CH for coastal societies and culture. As economic valuations increase, however, we should not forget that cultural heritage in and of itself holds intrinsic value. Looking across Europe and the world, coastal peoples’ cultural heritage tells us a story of generations of linkages and bonds with coastal environments. Such CH imparts a sense of place and belonging to people, and connects people to one another, their pasts, and their futures. We hope this Special Collection provides a sense of the beauty of CMCH and inspires further exploration and research around this super-concept.
      PubDate: 2024-05-16
       
  • A “watered-down” solution' Deconstructing the ecosystem approach in
           Swedish policy affecting fisheries management

    • Abstract: Abstract This study seeks to deconstruct an ecosystem approach in Swedish national policy pertaining to fisheries management, not least because fisheries are integral to the global agenda of improved marine environmental status. The ’ecosystem approach’ is identified across European Union (EU) policy as the pathway for sustainable management of natural resources, due to its ambition to balance a diversity of interests and account for social and ecological interdependencies within and across ecosystems. Yet an ambiguous and inconsistent representation of the ecosystem approach in policy makes it difficult to implement. In EU policy and many other contexts, the ecosystem approach is largely uncontested as the solution for sustainably managing resources yet can lead to unintended material consequences based on how it is implemented. It therefore becomes pertinent to critically analyze what the ‘ecosystem approach’ solution is represented to be across policy calling for its implementation. Using a poststructuralist approach to analyze three of Sweden’s national policy documents pertaining to fisheries, my study finds that the ecosystem approach in these policy documents is ‘watered-down’ in terms of its use as a solution for making fisheries management more sustainable. At a minimum, implementing an ecosystem approach in fisheries requires a consistent definition of what this entails. Yet differences between the documents in terms of whether they assume a systemic approach that accounts for intersectoral impacts, and the extent to which they prioritize industry, people, or nature, makes the implementation of an ecosystem approach in Swedish fisheries management improbable. Should policy pertaining to fisheries in Sweden wish to manage ecosystems sustainably, I suggest it needs to better account for land-sea interactions to incorporate the social and ecological impacts of the fishing sector more strategically.
      PubDate: 2024-04-26
       
  • Fisher experience on distant water fishing vessels: the implications of
           variation by vessel type for employment standards

    • Abstract: Abstract The paper explores variation by vessel type and target species in how fishers describe their daily work patterns and physical demands on distant water fishing vessels operated from Taiwan, and the implications for how labour standards might be created and enforced. The vessel types, species, and gears examined include squid jiggers that fish for both squid and pacific saury, and longliners that target large pelagic fish, including tuna. We find important variation in how fishers describe their working hours, the physical demands on their bodies, and risks. These variations occur over time, as well as between different kinds of vessels. Overall, fishers describe work on longliners as the most difficult, involving long hours of intense physical and dangerous work in ways that often violate basic standards such as those in the Work in Fishing Convention (ILO C188). Work on squid jiggers, while difficult, is less demanding in terms of working hours and physical demands on bodies. In addition, longliners go without visiting port for much longer periods than squid jiggers. These findings speak to the need for qualitative research to supplement and qualify models that try to predict likelihood of forced labour based on vessel tracking data. The findings also suggest that employment standards that do not account for variations among vessel types could be supplemented by standards that are specific to vessel type. We argue that that participation of fisher associations or unions in both the creation of standards, and in monitoring and enforcement, could move toward addressing these variations.
      PubDate: 2024-04-23
       
  • Building stewardship capacity through fishers’ knowledge and advocacy in
           fisheries management: a case study from Southeast Alaska

    • Abstract: Abstract Local environmental stewardship supports resilience of social-ecological systems through a wide range of actions that benefit both environmental and human wellbeing. Stewardship actions of harvesters have been recognized as an important component in building adaptive capacity of coastal fisheries undergoing change. In Southeast Alaska, where commercial fishing plays a key role in cultures and economies, concerns for local fisheries have arisen from declines in salmon returns, high price variability, and barriers to participation, among other issues. Here, we aimed to understand existing and potential pathways for stewardship actions of small-boat commercial fishers in Juneau, Alaska. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 22 commercial fishers, agency staff, and leaders of seafood associations to document fisher-led stewardship actions and ways that small-boat commercial fishers engage formally and informally with local management, explore the role of fishery management agencies in facilitating collaboration and communication with fishers in the Juneau area, and understand local perspectives on how the stewardship capacities of the fishery system can be better supported. We found that multiple pathways for stewardship exist in commercial salmon and shellfish fisheries, including formal and informal interactions with state fishery management staff and decision-makers, participation in fishing associations and advocacy organizations, knowledge sharing among fishers, and taking personal conservation actions to care for fisheries. We identified areas of relatively low social, financial, and institutional capital that may limit the effectiveness of these stewardship actions. Our findings highlight diverse perspectives of fishery participants on how these stewardship actions might be better supported through policy, advocacy, and collaboration.
      PubDate: 2024-04-19
       
  • Publisher Correction: Trapped in a gulf of hope and despair: the Wagher
           small scale fisheries on the Kutch coast of Gujarat, India

    • PubDate: 2024-04-18
       
  • Social network mechanisms of price formation in an artisanal fishing
           community in Chile

    • Abstract: Abstract Local fish markets play a crucial role in meeting local and regional demand for seafood. However, the underlying social and local processes determining price formation in these markets still need to be clarified. Through ethnographic research of an artisanal fishing community in central Chile focused on the common hake catching (Merluccius gayi gayi), we found that mutual observation and negotiation are the two key social processes of the local economic order. These processes produce two local structures: (a) the fishers’ maritime cliques in the sea and (b) the chain structure in the cove, which combines commercial and community relationships to determine market prices.
      PubDate: 2024-04-15
       
  • Charles, A. 2023. Sustainable fishery systems (second edition)

    • PubDate: 2024-04-08
       
  • Rediscovery of small-scale fisheries in the era of crises

    • Abstract: Abstract This article analyses the role of small-scale fisheries in the era of crises that increase fisheries’ vulnerability. Crises may also trigger a reconsideration of the value of small-scale fisheries. Thus, our main research questions are twofold: 1) How do the recent crises directly affect small-scale fisheries' and 2) What are the opportunities for reinventing the societal and environmental benefits of small-scale fisheries' Answers to the research questions are based on a selection of interviews, email inquiry, research articles and reports in the context of Finnish small-scale fisheries. By focusing on these fisheries, operated in a Northern European welfare state, we study the potential that the new turbulent and uncertain circumstances could lead to acknowledgement of the multifunctional character of small-scale fisheries. The results show that climate change, Covid-19 pandemic and Russian invasion of Ukraine have challenged the resilience of Finnish small-scale fishing livelihood, albeit moderately. The prospects for new policies triggered by these crises stem from acknowledgement of small-scale fisheries’ contribution to food security, environmental benefits and short supply chains. The best way to secure fish-based food security and sustainability during crises, is to keep the fishing sector and the production and distribution chains vital in normal conditions. We conclude that in a society like Finland the rediscovery of small-scale fisheries’ future necessitates wide societal and political discussion about the pros and cons of the livelihood, together with inclusive governance that recognizes the multifunctional roles of small-scale fisheries in the era of crises.
      PubDate: 2024-04-03
       
  • Responding to civil war: fisheries as a safety net and lootable resource
           on Lake Tanganyika, the Democratic Republic of Congo

    • Abstract: Abstract Research on conflict and fisheries has largely focused on conflict between resource users, rather than on how fisheries are affected by external conflict, including civil war. Knowledge that does exist does not fully engage with the specific characteristics of conflicts, how those characteristics affect fisheries, and how fishers respond. This article identifies how the characteristics of conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) affect the fisheries of the transboundary Lake Tanganyika and how those dependent on small-scale fisheries have responded to those characteristics. Data was collected at three fish landing sites through remote interviews in 2017 and 2018. The results show that the primary characteristic of the DRC conflict is the sporadic and unpredictable nature of the violence generating insecurity, loss of equipment and increase in fishing pressure. Increasing fishing pressure is associated with newcomers, who turn to fishing as a safety net, yet do not abide by local norms and beliefs. A reported increase in illegal fishing and corruption further present challenges to the weakly managed fisheries. The research concludes that the experience of civil war brings multiple and contrasting sources and experiences of vulnerability for fishers. The significant influence that conflict has on fisherfolk and fisheries supports calls for greater recognition of how the wider political and economic environment of natural resources affects how they are used and governed.
      PubDate: 2024-04-01
       
  • Trapped in a gulf of hope and despair: the Wagher small scale fisheries on
           the Kutch coast of Gujarat, India

    • Abstract: Abstract This paper discusses a case study located on the northern shore of the Gulf of Kutch in the western Indian state of Gujarat. Specifically the paper explores the major characteristics of small scale fisheries practiced by the Muslim Wagher community and investigate the challenges and dilemmas faced by them in their pursuit of a livelihood in fisheries. Wagher fishers have occupied the lowest rungs in local continuums of social and economic status historically. Their livelihoods and conditions of living have become particularly precarious since the early 2000s when the government of Gujarat embarked on an ambitious plan for port-based industrialisation and privatisation of vast tracts of wastelands, grasslands and coast line. Given this context, the paper focuses attention on the relations of exchange like market-tying informal credit contracts widely used by traders to consolidate their control over marketing processes and their impact on the lives and livelihoods of Wagher fishers. It is argued that the unfreedom that arises from the embeddedness of market transactions in social interactions constrains the ability of Wagher fishers to effectively resist ongoing processes of economic exploitation and coastal expropriation, or to advocate for their fair inclusion in social and economic development.
      PubDate: 2024-03-21
       
  • Recentering the commons: assessing citizen mapping as an environmental
           practice

    • Abstract: Abstract The last three decades have seen waves of coastal development paradigms, the most recent being that of ‘blue economy’ and ‘blue growth’ — terms used in conjunction with sustainable development. The blue economy paradigm has its share of discontents across Indian Ocean nations who resist further commodification of coastal spaces and its perverse outcomes in the garb of sustainability. Community-based conservation, citizen mapping of traditional tenure arrangements over coastal commons are emerging counter-strategies in India, to prevent land alienation, and coastal and oceanic ‘grab’. The paper does a reflexive assessment of a case of citizen mapping of coastal commons as a legal pluralistic conservation engagement from India. It examines the effectiveness of such localised collaborative civil society exercises against systemic shifts in coastal protection regimes. It details beneficial practices and knowledge generated by such citizen mapping exercises with reflexive insights for civil society actors. It also critically examines the limitations of such civil society efforts constrained by fixed coastal governance frameworks. The paper argues that Indian coastal regulation law’s built-in iniquities motivate as well as limit civil society efforts to democratise coastal governance. Local actors’ capabilities and social positions themselves further cramp the utility of legal options, making the alienation of the commons all too commonplace under neoliberal environmental governance.
      PubDate: 2024-03-13
       
  • Advancing ocean ecosystem conservation via property rights, rather than
           marine protected areas (MPAs)

    • Abstract: Abstract There is demand to protect at-risk fish species and ecosystems. Property rights regimes can be superior to spatial controls via Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) for doing so. Empirical cases from Australia and the US indicate that MPAs are inequitable, too large and restrictive, and controversial. These conditions lead to resistance and political pushback, threatening long-term budgets and conservation goals. A critique of MPAs is presented along with a range of property rights arrangements–common, community, private—and Coasean bargaining as alternatives. Outlined benefits are a.) Rights holders have a stake in conservation and are central in its design. They are more than respondents. b). Costs/benefits can be more equally distributed, including direct payments that include both costs of transition and contribution to public goods provision. c.) Spatial set-asides confront tradeoffs and hence, are more apt to be economically sited and designed. d.) Modifications can occur more smoothly through market exchange than through the political process. Durable global conservation efforts can be enhanced.
      PubDate: 2024-03-09
       
  • Gender-focused development interventions in small-scale fisheries: lessons
           learnt from a past project in Isabela Galapagos in Ecuador

    • Abstract: Abstract In 2001, one of the first initiatives in Galapagos promoting the sustainable use of marine resources with the participation of women in the fisheries sector was launched. This case study tells the story of Pescado Azul (‘Blue Fish’ in Spanish), an association formed by a group of women, mostly wives of fishers, from Isabela Island, Galapagos Archipelago. Pescado Azul was created as a development-focused intervention to market processed products such as smoked fish, croquettes and albacore pate from local small-scale, artisanal fisheries. This study illustrates the origin, development and management of the initiative within Isabela´s context, explores its achievements and limitations. Some of the lessons learned and pitfalls by individual members of the association and institutional actors linked to the initiative are presented and analysed. Main findings show four as key reasons for the discontinuity of Pescado Azul after some years of success: a) the different visions that were the driving forces of the initiative by both the members and supporting institutions, b) the potential negative consequences of an inadequate planning of welfare actions, c) the importance of promoting initiatives with bottom-up rather than top-down approaches, and d) the gender-based strategies, which were not adequately developed at the time the project was implemented. Our findings contribute to better understand gender-focused interventions within small-scale fisheries as a way to illustrate strengths and threats to these types of initiatives, including the need for improvement in the planning and execution of similar development projects in Galapagos or in other places with similar social contexts.
      PubDate: 2024-03-05
       
  • Seeing like an algorithm: the limits of using remote sensing to link
           vessel movements with worker abuse at sea

    • Abstract: Abstract The ship tracking and mapping capabilities that geospatial technology provides create an opportunity to observe fishing vessels as they move through established maritime boundaries. This paper connects data availability to ground-truthing research and explores the limits of vessel movement mapping in representing worker abuse at sea through three related themes. First, a conceptual background links the advancements in maritime remote sensing to critical GIS scholarship and provides a background on worker abuse aboard Taiwanese fishing vessels. Second, the paper examines the potential of machine learning algorithms to represent worker abuse at sea, arguing that more extensive ground-truthing research with workers could help address variations in the data and limited data sets. Third, I use remote sensing data to identify and unpack Taiwanese fishing across the three EEZs with the most concentrated Taiwanese fishing activity: starting with Taiwan, followed by the Falkland Islands, and Seychelles. I argue that fishing activity and the digital representation of vessel movements are governed by terrestrial geopolitics and subject to manipulation by ship captains. Finally, the conclusion offers recommendations for how future research can capitalize on the capabilities of AIS, particularly with respect to addressing problems of working conditions and abuse at sea.
      PubDate: 2024-03-04
       
  • Working seagrasses: emerging coastal ethics in the Mexican Caribbean

    • Abstract: Abstract The article explores the emergence of coastal ethics in the Anthropocene, focusing on the Riviera Maya in Mexico. In response to escalating challenges such as coastal degradation and Sargassum impact, the study shifts the focus from blame to the practices of marine biologists engaged in repairing ecosystems, particularly seagrasses. The concept of “working seagrasses” is introduced, emphasizing the functional, performative, and manipulative aspects of human-seagrass interactions. Through ethnographic fieldwork, the author observes a departure from blame-based approaches prevalent in the field towards marine biologists, who actively work to repair seagrass beds. Three empirical examples illustrate different dimensions of working seagrasses, shedding light on scientists’ curated interactions, ecological restoration practices, and the role of species recognition in coastal ethics. The study explores multi-species entanglements along Mexican coasts, emphasizing collaborative efforts between humans and non-humans. By addressing how marine biologists respond to coastal degradation and involving non-human actors, the study contributes to understanding evolving coastal ethics in the Anthropocene.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • To mine or not to mine the deep seabed'

    • Abstract: Abstract Several studies have noted that the International Seabed Authority (ISA) scores low on public participation. However, none have studied the efforts of non-governmental organizations to exert influence on the ISA’s rulemaking processes. I examine how environmental NGOs and private mining contractors attempt to sway one narrow, but existential, part of the ISA’s draft exploitation regulations between 2014 and 2019: the definition of “serious harm” to the marine environment. Although environmental NGOs appear to have been more successful in influencing that definition, the interests of private contractors may still prevail. Despite the efforts of environmental NGOs, the term “serious harm” remains largely undefined, allowing for more subjectivity and flexibility in interpretation. This challenge is exacerbated when combined with current institutional weaknesses and limited scientific expertise within the ISA. Ongoing negotiations and recent developments may, however, alter this outcome.
      PubDate: 2024-02-24
       
  • Bridging the gap: enhancing socio-ecological resilience by breaking the
           debt cycle among small-scale hilsa fishers in Bangladesh

    • Abstract: Abstract This study examines the plight of hilsa fishers in Bangladesh, grappling with challenges such as poor market access, scant capital, and shrinking fish stocks. This situation led to the seasonal dadon loan system, which provides immediate financial aid but often traps many fishers in a relentless debt cycle. We adopted a socio-ecological systems (SES) framework to examine the interconnected social and ecological dynamics of the hilsa fishery industry. Using a blend of quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews, we assessed the impact of the dadon loan system on small-scale fishers across four fishing locales in Bangladesh. The results indicate that the dadon loan system is a temporary financial prop for fishers but perpetuates debt cycles and curbs long-term financial security. Factors such as restricted access to formal credit, high fishing costs, and inadequate government support drive this system. This study identifies potential alternatives, such as government-backed loans, community finance schemes, and the promotion of alternative livelihoods, which could reduce reliance on the dadon loan system and improve fishers’ socioeconomic conditions. Implementing these strategies may dismantle the debt cycle, boost fishers’ welfare, and strengthen the socio-ecological resilience of fishing communities.
      PubDate: 2024-02-17
       
 
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  Subjects -> EARTH SCIENCES (Total: 771 journals)
    - EARTH SCIENCES (527 journals)
    - GEOLOGY (94 journals)
    - GEOPHYSICS (33 journals)
    - HYDROLOGY (29 journals)
    - OCEANOGRAPHY (88 journals)

OCEANOGRAPHY (88 journals)

Showing 1 - 79 of 79 Journals sorted by number of followers
Hydrobiology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Limnology and Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Estuaries and Coasts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Deep Sea Research Part I : Oceanographic Research Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Physical Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Frontiers in Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Progress in Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Marine Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Coastal Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Oceanography and Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Maritime Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Bulletin of Marine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Fisheries Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Physical Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Limnology and Oceanography: Fluids and Environments     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Oceanography and Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Oceanography : Open Access     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Limnology and Oceanography: Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Oceanology and Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Coastal Development     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Marine Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ocean Yearbook Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Limnology and Oceanography Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Journal of Marine Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Marine Science and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Oceanology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Operational Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ciencias Marinas     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Marine Energy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Limnology and Oceanography e-Lectures     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Development and Applications of Oceanic Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Geo-Marine Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Regional Studies in Marine Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Limnology and Oceanography: Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Limnology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Ocean University of China (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Scientia Marina     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Marine Technology Society Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ocean Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Aquatica : Aquatic Sciences Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Marine Systems & Ocean Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Marine Life Science & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Coastal Engineering Proceedings : Proceedings of the International Conference on Coastal Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Research     Open Access  
Thalassas : An International Journal of Marine Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
Oceans     Open Access  
Aquatic Research     Open Access  
Jurnal Kelautan Tropis     Open Access  
Depik Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Perairan, Pesisir dan Perikanan     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural and Marine Sciences     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Maritime and Marine Sciences     Open Access  
Arquivos de Ciências do Mar     Open Access  
Scientific Drilling     Open Access  
Jurnal Kelautan : Indonesian Journal of Marine Science and Technology     Open Access  
Oceanologia     Open Access  
Revista de Gestão Costeira Integrada     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias Marinas y Costeras     Open Access  
Egyptian Journal of Aquatic Research     Open Access  
China Ocean Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Revista de Biología Marina y Oceanografía     Open Access  
Latin American Journal of Aquatic Research     Open Access  
Acta Oceanologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal  
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