Subjects -> EARTH SCIENCES (Total: 771 journals)
    - EARTH SCIENCES (527 journals)
    - GEOLOGY (94 journals)
    - GEOPHYSICS (33 journals)
    - HYDROLOGY (29 journals)
    - OCEANOGRAPHY (88 journals)

OCEANOGRAPHY (88 journals)

Showing 1 - 79 of 79 Journals sorted by number of followers
Hydrobiology     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Limnology and Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Estuaries and Coasts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Deep Sea Research Part I : Oceanographic Research Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Physical Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Frontiers in Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Progress in Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Marine Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Coastal Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Oceanography and Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Maritime Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Bulletin of Marine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Fisheries Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Physical Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Limnology and Oceanography: Fluids and Environments     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Oceanography and Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Oceanography : Open Access     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Limnology and Oceanography: Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Oceanology and Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Marine Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ocean Yearbook Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Limnology and Oceanography Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Journal of Marine Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Marine Science and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Oceanology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Operational Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Coastal Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ciencias Marinas     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Marine Energy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Limnology and Oceanography e-Lectures     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Development and Applications of Oceanic Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Geo-Marine Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Regional Studies in Marine Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Limnology and Oceanography: Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Limnology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Ocean University of China (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Scientia Marina     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Marine Technology Society Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ocean Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Aquatica : Aquatic Sciences Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Marine Systems & Ocean Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Marine Life Science & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Coastal Engineering Proceedings : Proceedings of the International Conference on Coastal Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Research     Open Access  
Thalassas : An International Journal of Marine Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
Oceans     Open Access  
Aquatic Research     Open Access  
Jurnal Kelautan Tropis     Open Access  
Depik Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Perairan, Pesisir dan Perikanan     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural and Marine Sciences     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Maritime and Marine Sciences     Open Access  
Arquivos de Ciências do Mar     Open Access  
Scientific Drilling     Open Access  
Jurnal Kelautan : Indonesian Journal of Marine Science and Technology     Open Access  
Oceanologia     Open Access  
Revista de Gestão Costeira Integrada     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias Marinas y Costeras     Open Access  
Egyptian Journal of Aquatic Research     Open Access  
China Ocean Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Revista de Biología Marina y Oceanografía     Open Access  
Latin American Journal of Aquatic Research     Open Access  
Acta Oceanologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Estuaries and Coasts
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.187
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 25  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1559-2723 - ISSN (Online) 1559-2731
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Etiology of a Fish Kill, Including the Endangered Tidewater Goby
           (Eucyclogobius newberryi), in a Northeastern Pacific Coastal Lagoon

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      Abstract: Abstract Ecological disturbances such as fish kills can negatively impact ecosystem processes in coastal lagoons. To gain an understanding of factors causing fish kills, we examined conditions associated with a summertime fish kill in a northeastern Pacific coastal lagoon (Rodeo Lagoon, CA, USA). Examination of available data indicated the fish kill was likely caused by hypoxia involving the following etiology: (1) strong onshore winds (up to 12 m/s) mixed a stratified water column, (2) water column mixing transported nutrients from near the bed into the photic zone, (3) increased nutrient concentrations in the photic zone (> 200%) together with high solar irradiance fueled a phytoplankton bloom, (4) death and decomposition of phytoplankton (72% decrease in abundance) contributed to biological oxygen demand that led to (5) hypoxic conditions (as low as 0.6 mg/L) that caused the fish kill. The event resulted in the death of an estimated 3677 Tidewater Goby (Eucyclogobius newberryi), a species listed as endangered under the US Endangered Species Act, and numerous (but not enumerated) Threespine Stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), unidentified sculpins (Cottidae), and macroinvertebrates (primarily Amphipoda). The processes contributing to the event are likely re-occurring phenomena responsible for observed periodic fish kills. Coastal lagoons with limited freshwater inflows and connection to the Pacific Ocean may retain nutrients and be susceptible to similar events.
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • Coastal Upwelling and Estuarine Gravitational Circulation: A Feedback
           System in a Tropical Estuary in the South Atlantic

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      Abstract: Abstract This study examines the effects of coastal upwelling on the longitudinal water density gradient within the estuary of Baía de Todos os Santos (BTS), its effect on the gravitational circulation at the estuary entrance, and the reverse effect of gravitational circulation on the coastal upwelling. This investigation was based on a 1-year dataset of observed water temperature, mean velocities, and river discharge, as well as 2 years of numerical simulation of the estuarine flow. The results show that the upwelling regulates the thermohaline field in front of the BTS, decreasing water temperature (up to 3 °C), and increasing density (up to 0.3 kg/m3), and have sufficient intensity to more than double the speed, or even establish, the gravitational circulation. It was frequently observed that the water temperature falls after an increase in the subtidal flow shear, suggesting that the estuarine gravitational circulation acts as a facilitator to the upwelling process. Numerical simulations indicate that the coastal upwelling events are also capable of reestablishing the gravitational circulation at times with weak longitudinal density gradient, a scenario that tends to become more frequent and intense in the near future due to the ongoing climate changes.
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • Effect of Salinity on the Development and Dormancy of Cladonema digitatum

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      Abstract: Abstract Some hydrozoan species are known for their high adaptability and dormancy ability, e.g., Cladonema species, which are also promising model organisms. Since salinity affects the development and distribution of hydrozoan species, it is important to get further understanding of salinity tolerance and dormancy ability of Cladonema species. Cladonema digitatum is a cryptic species and is discovered only in artificial environments. In this study, multiple experiments have been conducted to determine how salinity affects the development of C. digitatum polyps and medusae, to describe the dormancy and recovery of the C. digitatum polyps, and to find the possible prevention and disposal protocol for the occurrence of Cladonema in artificial environments. As results, salinity range of 35–40 ppt was optimal for C. digitatum polyps, while C. digitatum medusae lived best in 30–35 ppt; C. digitatum would form menonts at 15, 50–60 ppt, revive and change their survival strategies after salinity upturned to 35 ppt, which could enhance their tolerance and adaptability. Cladonema digitatum medusae also showed different death rates when faced with sharp hypersaline and hyposaline stress. In summary, this research provided ecological information about salinity range and dormancy ability of C. digitatum, which not only facilitated tracing the wild habitats of the C. digitatum, but also provided the theoretical basic of elimination and prevention of Cladonema species intrusion and breeding conservation in the laboratory.
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • Imaging Sonar Reveals Diel Movement of Fish Throughout a Developed
           Australian Estuary

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      Abstract: Estuaries present a unique interface between ocean and freshwater systems and support key fish habitats. While the role of estuaries for juvenile fish has been studied extensively, the daily movement patterns of large fish and the exchange of fishes between estuary and ocean are less understood, particularly in developed estuaries. This study examines the quantity of fish biomass transiting through an important commercial fishing estuary in New South Wales, Australia, over 4 months, at four sites, and across diel periods. We used an imaging sonar across diurnal and nocturnal sampling events to reveal the size of fish, their movement patterns, and the biomass flux occurring throughout the estuary. Across ~ 60 h of footage, > 66,200 fish were counted and measured. Fish activity was the greatest at night, with 77% of fish biomass flux (kg h−1) occurring during nocturnal sampling. The total observed fish biomass over the 60 h amounted to ~ 15,500 kg, with the highest activity recorded at the estuary mouth at night (736 ± 463 kg h−1). Overall, mean fish length was the greatest at night (25.2 ± 2.0 cm); however, fish observed during the day at the estuary mouth had the highest mean length (27.8 ± 6.9 cm). Extrapolated across the width of the estuary, total fish movement ranged to a maximum of 47 Tons h−1 in the lower estuary (Stockton) and a minimum of 0.4 Tons h−1 in the upper estuary (Throsby Creek Lower). These results demonstrate the importance of estuaries, despite their level of development, in supporting the daily movement patterns of fish biomass between habitats, estuary, and ocean. Graphical
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • Recovery of Eelgrass Zostera marina Following Conversion of Conventional
           Chain Moorings to Conservation Mooring Systems in Massachusetts:
           Context-Dependence, Challenges, and Management

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      Abstract: Abstract Eelgrass (Zostera marina) meadows and boat mooring fields co-occur in nearshore, relatively sheltered embayments. Traditional chain moorings create denuded scars in eelgrass meadows due to repeated and chronic scour of the seafloor by the chain, impacting meadow contiguity and quality. This study assessed the recovery of eelgrass into mooring scars following the conversion of traditional chain moorings to floating rode conservation mooring systems (CMS) in three Massachusetts harbors. The magnitude of eelgrass recovery following the conversion of 21 moorings to floating rode CMS was contingent on the location and positively correlated with the size of the scar associated with the mooring. While most scars started to revegetate following mooring conversion, few experienced complete recoveries and had a persistent denuded halo averaging 2 m in radius around the mooring anchors 5 years post-conversion. We observed CMS gear dragging on the bottom and impacting eelgrass when it was oversized for the depth of the site, and when it was not maintained or cleaned of fouling organisms. Overall, we show that floating rode CMS can be an important tool for eelgrass conservation; however, eelgrass recoveries following mooring conversion to floating rode CMS are variable and incomplete, and challenges pertaining to proper installation and long-term maintenance must be addressed to fully realize this potential.
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • Reproductive Functionality of Fish in Hypersaline Lagoons: Araruama
           Lagoon, Brazil

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      Abstract: Araruama Lagoon is one of the world’s largest permanent hypersaline lagoons, and knowledge about the reproduction of fish assemblages is very scarce. This study aimed to evaluate the reproductive functionality of fishes of the Araruama Lagoon in the seasons of 2011, using functional diversity metrics. We also assessed the influence of abiotic factors (salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and pH) on the distribution of sexes and reproductive stages of fish assemblages. Gonads were analyzed in 709 fish across 18 species, mainly females and juveniles. In winter, when there was a lower abundance of species, the highest reproductive incidence (gonadal development/maturation) and high salinity occurred. Summer and spring corresponded with the highest percentage of juveniles. Salinity was the abiotic factor behind the structuring of the community, while the temperature set off the start of the reproductive cycle in autumn. Thus, Araruama Lagoon played a crucial role as a nursery and reproductive area for the fish assemblage. Graphical Reproduction in Araruama Lagoon (2011). The vertical arrows indicate the main abiotic variables: temperature and salinity, which structure the fish community. Colors indicate larger (darker) and smaller (lighter) numerical values. The graphs show the percentage of juveniles, males and females, in the seasons corresponding to each season: spring (green), summer (yellow), autumn (orange), and winter (gray). The number of fish next to each graph indicates fish abundance in season, and fish colors indicate diversity.
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • DNA Barcoding for Identification and Discovery of Fish Species in the
           Protected Mangroves of Hormozgan, Iran

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      Abstract: Abstract The Persian Gulf is a semi-enclosed marginal sea with a subtropical climate in southern Iran. One of the most productive coastal habitats in this region is the mangrove forests which support rich biodiversity and play an essential role in sustainable fisheries. Because of the fish’s dependence on this ecosystem as a nursery habitat and its vulnerability to various natural and anthropogenic stresses and disturbances, it seems critical to identify and classify the fish species in this region and screen biodiversity. A segment (593 bp) of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene was used to identify the fish in the largest mangrove area of the Persian Gulf. In the present study, we created a comprehensive fish barcoding database for 53 species belonging to 39 genera, 32 families, and 17 orders. For six species, novel DNA barcodes to the global gene databases of GenBank and BOLD were introduced (Ilisha megaloptera, Pseudosynanceia melanostigma, Sillago sp., Hyporhamphus sindensis, Johnius sp., Strongylura sp.). Congeneric genetic distances were 46-fold higher than conspecific distances, and a DNA barcoding gap was observed. The tree constructed using maximum likelihood clearly displayed phylogenetic signals at different taxonomic levels. Our results indicated that DNA barcodes served as a valuable tool for studying fish diversity and also for the identification and discovery of fish species in the Persian Gulf. The database developed during this study will contribute to assessing fish biodiversity, conservation, and fisheries management.
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • Sea Turtle Eggs and Hatchlings are a Seasonally Important Food Source for
           the Generalist Feeding Golden Ghost Crab (Ocypode convexa)

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      Abstract: Abstract Ghost crabs can be abundant at beaches where sea turtles nest, but the food web dynamics are poorly understood. Using multiple dietary methods, our research aimed to characterise the diet of the golden ghost crab Ocypode convexa at rookeries of the loggerhead turtle Caretta caretta on the west coast of Australia, with a focus on determining the importance of sea turtle eggs and hatchlings to its diet. We achieved this through combining complementary methods: gut content analysis (GCA); DNA analysis of gut contents; stable isotope analysis (SIA); and controlled feeding experiments. GCA showed that O. convexa is a facultative scavenger with an omnivorous diet comprising high contributions (> 55%) of abundant beach-cast leafy brown algae. However, DNA analysis identified C. caretta in ≥ 20% of crab guts, and stable isotope mixing models suggested that sea turtle contributed 40–62% of assimilated C and N for male and 21–40% for female ghost crabs during the nesting season, while other animal and algal sources were also likely to be consumed when sea turtle eggs and hatchlings were absent or present. Aquarium-based feeding assays showed that ghost crabs prefer sea turtle and fish carrion over leafy brown algae (0.81 vs 0.10 vs 0.03 g/h consumed). Sea turtles provide large amounts of nutrients to consumers in the form of eggs and hatchlings, and golden ghost crabs benefit substantially from this pulsed resource along the Ningaloo coast, a World Heritage Area. Through the combined use of SIA, GCA, DNA, and feeding trials, this study highlights the important roles of both sea turtles and ghost crabs in energy fluxes and nutrient cycling at generally nutrient-poor sandy beach ecosystems. However, high consumption rates in the region can possibly put the long-term survival of the C. caretta population at risk.
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • Identifying and Constraining Marsh-Type Transitions in Response to
           Increasing Erosion over the Past Century

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      Abstract: Abstract Marsh environments, characterized by their flora and fauna, change laterally in response to shoreline erosion, water levels and inundation, and anthropogenic activities. The Grand Bay coastal system (USA) has undergone multiple large-scale geomorphic and hydrologic changes resulting in altered sediment supply, depositional patterns, and degraded barrier islands, leaving wetland salt marshes vulnerable to increased wave activity. Two shore-perpendicular transect sites, one along a low-activity shoreline and the other in a high activity area of the same bay-marsh complex, were sampled to investigate how the marshes within 50 m of the modern shoreline have responded to different levels of increased wave activity over the past century. Surface sediments graded finer and more organic with increased distance from the shoreline while cores generally exhibited a coarsening upwards grain-size trend; all cores contained multiple large sedimentological shifts. 210Pb-based mass accumulation rates over the last two decades were greater than the long-term (centurial) average at each site with the fastest accumulation rates of 7.81 ± 1.58 and 7.79 ± 1.63 kg/m2/year at the sites nearest the shoreline. A shoreline change analysis of three time-slices (1848–2017, 1957–2017, 2016–2017) shows increased erosion at both sites since 1848 with modern rates of −0.95 and −0.88 m/year. Downcore sedimentology, mass accumulation rates, and shoreline change rates paired with foraminiferal biofacies and identification of local estuarine indicator species, Paratrochammina simplissima, aided in identifying paleo marsh types, their relative proximity to the shoreline, and sediment provenance. The high-energy marsh site transitioned from middle marsh to low marsh in the 1960s, and the low-energy marsh site transitioned later, at the end of the twentieth and early twenty-first century, due to its more protected location. Marsh type transition corresponds chronologically with the coarsening upwards grain-size trend observed and the degradation of Grand Batture Island; since its submergence, signatures of multiple storm event have been preserved downcore.
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • Influence of the Hydrological Variability on Water Quality and Benthic
           Macroinvertebrates in a Chilean Estuary During a Megadrought

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      Abstract: Abstract The climate crisis has accelerated the frequency and intensity of droughts in the Mediterranean areas, impacting the hydrology and the ecology of their basins. Maule River is the largest watershed in the Chilean Mediterranean Zone. The growing anthropic and environmental pressure has led to changes in the structure and function of its terrestrial ecosystem. However, little is known about its influence on aquatic ecosystems. The effect of the recent extreme drought on the streamflow and its influence on water quality and the benthic macroinvertebrate community structure were evaluated in the Maule River’s lower section. Beyond temporal and spatial fluctuations, healthy and permanently well-oxygenated waters prevailed in the study area. However, during the megadrought period, evidenced by a significant decrease in both precipitation and river streamflow, a greater salt wedge influence was observed, at least, in the last 7 km of the river. Although with certain asynchrony, a change in the structure of the benthic macroinvertebrate community was observed in the upstream stations. This marinization reveals an increase in the domain of marine taxa associated with the Polychaeta group and a clear decrease in typical freshwater Oligochaeta individuals. This modification in the structure of the benthic community is expected to affect the function of this estuarine system. The results presented here highlight the importance of considering the variability associated with biological components for the management of water resources and related ecosystem services, considering that one of the main problems associated with changes in land use and the pressures caused by the climate crisis is the decrease in the quality and availability of water in this and other Mediterranean basins globally.
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • Contributions of Perennial Pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium) Invasion to
           Rarity of the Endangered Suisun Thistle (Cirsium hydrophilum var.
           hydrophilum)

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      Abstract: Abstract Invasive species exert disproportionate impacts in wetlands and pose particular challenges for rare species persisting at small spatial scales. In the urbanized San Francisco Estuary (SFE), which contains 90% of California’s remaining coastal wetlands, invasive and rare species often co-occur. One narrow endemic taxon, the federally listed Suisun thistle (Cirsium hydrophilum var. hydrophilum) is restricted to two or three locations where the invasive perennial pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium) has an increasing presence. Perennial pepperweed has invaded salt, brackish, and freshwater wetlands around the SFE, leading to high management concern. In this study, we investigated how perennial pepperweed may contribute to further rarity of the Suisun thistle, by conducting a removal experiment and surveying soil-plant relationships. Removing pepperweed led to a doubling of native species relative cover and an increase in native species richness by an average of one species per plot, positive effects on Suisun thistle cover, number, and reproductive output, and shifts in soil properties. Combined with survey data inside and outside of pepperweed stands, we conclude that pepperweed competes with Suisun thistle via competition for space, nutrients, and light, interferes with the Suisun thistle’s reproductive success, and alters brackish marsh soil physicochemical characteristics to further favor pepperweed. We recommend local control of pepperweed to prevent further loss of Suisun thistle. Further, the wide range of mechanisms by which this invasion may proceed if unchecked should be considered in other settings where rare or uncommon species are at risk from invaders.
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • Coastal Blue Holes in a Large and Shallow Tropical Estuary: Geomorphometry
           and Temporal Variability of the Physicochemical Properties

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      Abstract: Abstract Blue holes are part of complex water systems formed by tropical wetlands, karst aquifers, and different coastal environments. In the southeastern Yucatán Peninsula, three submerged blue holes (i.e., Lool ja’, Ch’och-ja’, and Taam-ja’) are located in the shallow tropical estuary of Chetumal Bay. This study examines the morphological features of the three blue holes and explores the seasonal variability of their physicochemical parameters through quarterly field measurements taken between 2021 and 2022. Additionally, this study represents the first documentation of the Lool-ja’ blue hole, which has the largest surface area and volume of the karst structures analyzed. Temperature and salinity profiles along the water column were measured together with surface pH and DO at the blue hole center and within its vicinity (~ 500 m apart). Time series of water temperature, conductivity, and water level were also measured between June and December 2021. Morphological features of the blue holes were explored through georeferenced echo-sounding and 3D-modelling. Seasonal variations were observed on the mixed water layer depth (MLD). During the rainy (dry) season, the surficial mixed water mass became deeper (shallower). Variability in the MLD was proportional to the area occupied by the mouth of the blue hole (r = 0.813). Further homogenized layers accompanied by density interfaces were observed at different depths inside the blue holes. Finally, temperature and salinity diagrams revealed the possible interseasonal exchange of water in the Lool-ja’ and Ch’och-ja’ blue holes with possible intrusion from marine sources.
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • Juvenile Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) Movement and Residency in a
           Northern Temperate Estuary

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      Abstract: Abstract Information on juvenile alewife use of estuaries is limited on the east coast of North America. In this study, we collected juvenile alewife from the Penobscot River estuary, Maine, and measured stable isotope values from their muscle and liver tissues, which have a low and high turnover rate (respectively). These values were compared to the stable isotope values of preferred prey taxa collected from three distinctly different isotopic habitats within the Penobscot River watershed to estimate the amount of time fish had spent in the estuary. Fish were collected in spring, summer, and autumn in 2013 and 2014 at seven fixed collection sites in the estuary, from four freshwater lakes, and from five bay locations. Based on the δ13C values of muscle and liver tissue, estuarine caught juvenile alewife were assigned to one of  the following distinctly different isotopic habitat groups: freshwater transient (recently from freshwater), bay transient (recently from the bay), or estuarine occupant (spent extended time in the estuary). Stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (for all samples) and sulfur (in muscle tissues of a subset of 17 samples) were analyzed to confirm habitat group designations. Bay transients had 37% and 15% higher sulfur and nitrogen isotope ratio values than estuarine occupants and five times more sulfur and almost two times more nitrogen isotope ratio values than freshwater transients. Of 88 juvenile alewife analyzed for carbon isotopes, 32% were identified as estuarine occupants that had spent extended time periods in the estuary, whereas 68% of juvenile alewife had recently moved from bay or freshwater habitats. Mean number of days that juvenile alewife spent in the estuary was highest in spring and declined over time, with more movement occurring in autumn. This result suggests that movement of juvenile alewife between bay and estuary occurs frequently from May to October. Juvenile alewife may use estuarine and nearshore habitats for extended time periods, and migration between estuarine and bay habitats may not follow typical life history strategies.
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • Consequences of Juvenile Fish Movement and Seascape Connectivity: Does the
           Concept of Nursery Habitat Need a Rethink'

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      Abstract: Abstract Estuarine and adjacent inshore habitats have long been recognised as important nursery areas for fishes before they disperse to coastal habitats. Assessing nursery function supports spatial and fisheries management, yet work commonly focusses on singular habitat types. Re-considering how juvenile fish connect habitats may improve our understanding of nursery function and the scales that recruits are supplied to coastal fisheries. This study quantified the juvenile movements of two harvested fishes in south-eastern Australia, luderick (Girella tricuspidata) and yellowfin bream (Acanthopagrus australis). Acoustic tags were used to track 33 luderick and 20 yellowfin bream from seagrass meadows for up to ~400 days in Jervis Bay Marine Park. Both species had relatively small home ranges (< 7 km2) and exhibited site attachment to seagrass meadows where they were released. Most luderick and yellowfin bream were detected moving 100’s metres to kilometres to reefs adjacent to seagrass, although these movements were not habitat shifts. Rather, reef-ward movements represented repeated visits that lasted days to months before fish returned to seagrass, suggesting that these movements may be explorations in search of suitable adult habitat. Strong retention within an existing marine reserve was observed, with only five of 33 fish tagged within reserves crossing the boundary into fished waters. Overall, our results demonstrate that juvenile fish use and connect multiple habitat types during their movements. These findings support the broadening of the nursery concept from single habitats to a mosaic of functionally connected habitat patches (dubbed ‘seascape nurseries’).
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • Comparing Shallow Seagrass Versus Fringing Marsh Habitat Use by Nekton
           Juvenile Recruits with “Incomparable” Fishing Gear in the Northern
           Gulf of Mexico

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      Abstract: Abstract Shallow coastal systems act as nursery habitat for many species of fish and macroinvertebrates. Juveniles of these species may show selective use of certain habitat types over others, but the degree of such selectivity is not well studied for many species. Analysis of habitat selectivity is often hindered by inherently different gear types used in the habitats examined, which may not allow for direct comparison between the habitats. Here, we carry out nekton catches in the fringing marsh, using fyke nets, and in the adjacent seagrass habitat, using trawls, in the northern Gulf of Mexico to assess the relative use of the two habitats by the juveniles of six widespread important species. To resolve issues of gear comparability between fyke nets and trawls, we develop a habitat use index \(({HUI}_{S})\) . The results reveal a consistent trend where, in relation to pinfish, speckled sea trout shows slightly higher (from 8.4 to 66.9 times); American silver perch and brown shrimp show moderately higher (from 2.3 to 369.4 times); and blue crab and white shrimp show greatly higher (from 90.6 to 2366.4 times) use of marsh over seagrass habitat. Thus, while similar in direction, differences in the use of marsh over seagrass habitat in relation to pinfish were more pronounced in some sites. We propose an index that can resolve issues of gear comparability and improve our understanding of coastal habitat selectivity by fish and macroinvertebrates.
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • Increased Frequency of Sediment Heatwaves in a Virginia Seagrass Meadow

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      Abstract: Abstract Coastal marine heatwaves have destructive and lasting impacts on foundational species and are increasing in frequency, duration, and magnitude. High atmospheric temperatures are often associated with marine heatwaves (MHW) which are defined as 5 days of water temperatures above a seasonally varying 90th percentile threshold. In this study, we consider the prevalence of MHW propagation into surficial sediments to cause sediment heatwaves (SHW). Within a shallow, subtidal seagrass meadow in Virginia, USA, sediment temperature was measured at hourly intervals at a depth of 5 cm between June 2020 and October 2022 at the meadow edge and central meadow interior. The observed sediment temperature along with a 29-year record of water temperature and water level was used to develop a sediment temperature model for each location. Modeled sediment temperatures were used to identify sediment heatwaves that may thermally stress belowground seagrass. At both meadow locations, sediment heatwave frequency increased at a rate twice that of MHWs in the average global open ocean, coinciding with a 172% increase in the annual number of SHW days, from 11 to 30 days year−1 between 1994 and 2022. Sediment heatwaves at both meadow locations co-occurred with a MHW 79–81% of the time, with nearly all SHWs having a zero day lag. The top 10% most extreme MHWs and SHWs occurred between November and April when thermal stress to seagrass was unlikely. In June 2015, a SHW co-occurred with an anomalously long duration MHW that was associated with a 90% decline in seagrass from this system, suggesting that SHWs may have contributed to the observed seagrass loss. These results document heatwave propagation across the pelagic-sediment interface which likely occur broadly in shallow systems with impacts to critical coastal ecosystem processes and species dynamics.
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • Transformative Impacts of Sea-Level Rise, Storm Surge, and Wetland
           Migration on Intertidal Native Shell-Bearing Sites in Florida’s Largest
           Open-Water Estuary, Tampa Bay, Florida, USA

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      Abstract: Abstract Although shell middens and mounds often occupy the same intertidal spaces as coastal wetlands, biophysical interactions between these cultural features and wetlands are under-investigated. To this end, our geoarchaeological and zooarchaeological research at three coastal archaeological sites within the Tampa Bay Estuary, USA, sought to understand the interactions between shell-bearing sites, sea-level rise, storms, and migrating wetland habitats. Percussion core transects document the accretion of mangrove peat atop intact shell midden, illustrating the ability of mangrove forests to encroach shell midden and preserve cultural material below. Landward wetland deposits are thicker and muddier than those along the seaward margin of the sites, suggesting that shell-bearing sites attenuate wave energy much like other shoreline stabilization structures. Differences in sedimentology, stratigraphy, and invertebrate species compositions highlight the variability in storm impacts between sites. Storm-driven depositional events are identified by medium-to-fine sand beds with high densities of fragmented shell and small intertidal zone snails. Geospatial analyses indicate that wetland encroachment is already occurring at 247 archaeological sites within the Tampa Bay Estuary. Approximately 100 additional archaeological sites currently located in upland habitats may provide topographic relief for migrating coastal wetlands in the future. We contend that shell middens and mounds constructed by Indigenous peoples are important components within estuarine mosaics, as they have been for millennia. We advocate for further collaboration between archaeologists and estuary managers and the inclusion of descendant communities to co-manage the future of their past.
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • Seasonal Feeding Behavior of Aquaculture Eastern Oysters (Crassostrea
           virginica) in the Mid-Atlantic

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      Abstract: Abstract The Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) is a commercially important aquaculture species and food resource along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the USA. In addition to its economic value, oyster aquaculture provides ecological value such as water quality improvement. Oyster filtration is highly variable as filtration behavior is influenced by environmental conditions, oyster size, and oyster energetic demands. However, average rates generated in laboratory experiments are often used to estimate the ecological impact of oyster filtration, and there is a need for field-based, farm-specific estimates of filtration that account for this variation. In this study, field experiments were conducted between September 2020 and September 2021 to estimate seasonal oyster filtration physiology at oyster farms in three different bays in the Mid-Atlantic (Barnegat Bay and Delaware Bay in New Jersey and Rehoboth Bay in Delaware). The physiological activity of oysters at each farm varied such that oysters at Barnegat Bay were the most active and oysters at Rehoboth Bay were the least active. Seasonal physiological trends were observed such that filtration behavior generally increased in warmer months. An increase in physiological activity across all farms was associated with an increase in salinity and temperature, but physiological activity at each farm was associated with a different suite of environmental variables including total particulate matter and the organic content of seston. This study provides a robust dataset which can be incorporated into models estimating ecological filtration rates in the Mid-Atlantic and adds to the growing body of evidence supporting bivalve aquaculture as a nutrient reduction strategy.
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • Long-Term Climate Impacts on the Phenology of Southern Flounder Spawning
           Migrations

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      Abstract: Abstract The Southern Flounder is a marine flatfish occurring throughout neritic zones of the northwest Atlantic and is the target of important commercial and recreational fisheries throughout its range. Recent work in the Gulf of Mexico demonstrated that the timing of hatch in this species may impact the survival of larvae, with increased survival in individuals that hatch early, ostensibly exposing them to cooler temperatures in early development in warmer years. However, hatch timing is influenced by the timing of spawning, which itself is associated with adult offshore migrations that are driven by fall and winter cold fronts. We assessed whether increasing fall temperatures in estuarine systems where Southern Flounder reside might be impacting the timing of spawning migrations. We used a machine learning approach to elicit the impact of temperature and other factors on estuarine catch in fishery-independent samples during the spawning season. Key findings of this work were as follows: (1) mean fall water temperatures in estuaries of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico have risen steadily since 1980 in accordance with broader oceanic trends, and (2) annual Southern Flounder migratory activity has shifted towards later Julian calendar dates. Temperature was an important seasonal environmental cue and is likely a key driver of spawning migrations, confirming findings from previous studies. A later shift in spawning phenology is at odds with the timing of the “survival window” for larval Southern Flounder, and this uncoupling of ideal spawning versus hatch timing could be a contributing factor to observed population declines across the range of the species.
      PubDate: 2024-05-01
       
  • Eutrophication Saturates Surface Elevation Change Potential in Tidal
           Mangrove Forests

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      Abstract: Abstract Coastal mangrove forests are at risk of being submerged due to sea-level rise (SLR). However, mangroves have persisted with changing sea levels due to a variety of biotic and physical feedback mechanisms that allow them to gain and maintain relative soil surface elevation. Therefore, mangrove’s resilience to SLR is dependent upon their ability to build soil elevation at a rate that tracks with SLR, or well-enough to migrate inland. Anthropogenic disturbances, such as altered hydrology and eutrophication, can degrade mangrove forest health and compromise this land building process, placing mangroves at greater risk. Much of Florida’s mangroves are adjacent to highly urbanized areas that produce nutrient-loaded runoff. This study assesses how experimental nutrient inputs in the eutrophic Caloosahatchee Estuary influence the soil surface elevation change (SEC) in two distinct mangrove zones. Annual rates of SEC were reduced by phosphorus additions and differed by mangrove zone, ranging from 0.67 ± 0.59 to 2.13 ± 0.61 and 4.21 ± 0.58 to 6.39 ± 0.59 mm year−1 in the fringe and basin zone, respectively. This suggests that eutrophication can reduce the maximum potential SEC response to SLR and that a mangrove forest’s vulnerability to SLR is not uniform throughout forest but can differ by mangrove zone.
      PubDate: 2024-04-06
       
 
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  Subjects -> EARTH SCIENCES (Total: 771 journals)
    - EARTH SCIENCES (527 journals)
    - GEOLOGY (94 journals)
    - GEOPHYSICS (33 journals)
    - HYDROLOGY (29 journals)
    - OCEANOGRAPHY (88 journals)

OCEANOGRAPHY (88 journals)

Showing 1 - 79 of 79 Journals sorted by number of followers
Hydrobiology     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Limnology and Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Estuaries and Coasts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Deep Sea Research Part I : Oceanographic Research Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Physical Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Frontiers in Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Progress in Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Marine Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Coastal Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Oceanography and Limnology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Maritime Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Bulletin of Marine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Fisheries Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Physical Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Limnology and Oceanography: Fluids and Environments     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Oceanography and Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Oceanography : Open Access     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Limnology and Oceanography: Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Oceanology and Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Marine Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ocean Yearbook Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Limnology and Oceanography Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Journal of Marine Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Marine Science and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Oceanology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Operational Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Coastal Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ciencias Marinas     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Marine Energy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Limnology and Oceanography e-Lectures     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Development and Applications of Oceanic Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Geo-Marine Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Regional Studies in Marine Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Limnology and Oceanography: Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Limnology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Ocean University of China (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Scientia Marina     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Marine Technology Society Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ocean Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Aquatica : Aquatic Sciences Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Marine Systems & Ocean Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Marine Life Science & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Coastal Engineering Proceedings : Proceedings of the International Conference on Coastal Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Research     Open Access  
Thalassas : An International Journal of Marine Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
Oceans     Open Access  
Aquatic Research     Open Access  
Jurnal Kelautan Tropis     Open Access  
Depik Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Perairan, Pesisir dan Perikanan     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural and Marine Sciences     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Maritime and Marine Sciences     Open Access  
Arquivos de Ciências do Mar     Open Access  
Scientific Drilling     Open Access  
Jurnal Kelautan : Indonesian Journal of Marine Science and Technology     Open Access  
Oceanologia     Open Access  
Revista de Gestão Costeira Integrada     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias Marinas y Costeras     Open Access  
Egyptian Journal of Aquatic Research     Open Access  
China Ocean Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Revista de Biología Marina y Oceanografía     Open Access  
Latin American Journal of Aquatic Research     Open Access  
Acta Oceanologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal  
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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
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Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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