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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted by number of followers
Psychiatry, Psychology and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 364)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 356)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 351)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 341)
Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 340)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 269)
Psychological Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 262)
Psychological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 240)
Journal of Applied Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 233)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 213)
Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 205)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 204)
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 201)
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 195)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 93)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 89)
Current Directions In Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 87)
Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 85)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Journal of Experimental Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Mind     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Personnel Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 57)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Perspectives On Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Political Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Educational Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Clinical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Neuropsychologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Journal of Applied Sport Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Neuropsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Neuropsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Depression and Anxiety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Traumatic Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Motivation and Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Environmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
International Journal for the Psychology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Psychology of Music     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Psychotherapy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Developmental Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Evidence-Based Communication Assessment and Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Neuropsychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Personality Disorders     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Psychological Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Philosophical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Psychological Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Psychological Science In the Public Interest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 19)
Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Development and Psychopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Individual Differences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Research in Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Trauma & Dissociation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Perception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Journal of Psychotherapy & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Experimental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Anxiety Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychoneuroendocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Applied School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Psychogeriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Personality Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Psychology of Learning and Motivation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Psychosomatic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Methodology: European Journal of Research Methods for the Behavioral and Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Developmental Psychobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Humanistic Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Mathematical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Media Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Psychophysiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ethics & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Family Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychology of Women Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychometrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Pediatric Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Multivariate Behavioral Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Physiology & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Psychosomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
European Neuropsychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Psychological Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Review The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Imagination, Cognition and Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Forum of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Group Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Psychophysiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
New Ideas in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Reading Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Nonverbal Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Trauma Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Diagnostica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Analytical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Constructivist Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Phenomenological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychotherapeut     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychotherapy and Politics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Human Psychopharmacology Clinical and Experimental     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Black Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Pastoral Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Forum der Psychoanalyse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Forum Psychotherapeutische Praxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Japanese Psychological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Russian & East European Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychologische Rundschau     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Dialectica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Estudios de Psicología     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pacific Rim Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Measurement Interdisciplinary Research and Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psicologia USP     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychogeriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychology and Developing Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychologie Française     Full-text available via subscription  
Pratiques Psychologiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Mentálhigiéné es Pszichoszomatika     Full-text available via subscription  
Magyar Pszichológiai Szemle     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive-Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.848
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0265-4075 - ISSN (Online) 1460-3608
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • How dating apps fail sexual minorities: Hyperpersonal failure as a
           framework for understanding challenges in developing long-term
           relationships

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lik Sam Chan, Don Lok Tung Chui
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Online dating and dating apps are meant to help sexual minorities find romantic partners, but they have also presented challenges and obstacles. Based on 27 in-depth interviews with lesbian, gay, and bisexual dating app users living in Taiwan, this exploratory study proposes the concept of hyperpersonal failure as a holistic framework for understanding these challenges. This framework specifies four types of failure, each corresponding to one element in the original hyperpersonal communication model: the failure to present oneself (online daters as the sender), the failure to meet conversational expectations (the channel), the failure to develop positive impressions of the targets (online daters as the receiver), and the failure to obtain responses (the feedback). The study also discusses how the affordances of online environments contribute to hyperpersonal failure. Overall, the framework has the potential to shed light on online dating in general, extending beyond the experiences of sexual minorities.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-07-02T01:00:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241244482
       
  • Longitudinal pathways from harsh parenting to adolescent depression via
           internal working models: The moderating role of adolescent trait
           mindfulness

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mingzhong Wang, Qiuping Chen, Xueli Deng
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Theoretical and empirical research indicates that insecure attachment with parents may function as a mediator between aversive parenting and adolescent depression. However, no longitudinal research has differentiated the roles of internal representations of parental attachment, especially the roles of the two internal working models (i.e., the self-model and the other model) in the longitudinal relation from harsh parenting to adolescent depression and whether adolescent mindfulness can play a moderating role in such relationships. Six hundred and forty-five school children completed a paper-and-pencil questionnaire in school three times with two eight-month intervals (338 girls and 307 boys, mean age = 13.45), and data on harsh parenting, internal working models, and depression were collected at three time points, and mindfulness were collected only at Time 1. Results demonstrated that among adolescents low in mindfulness, harsh parenting could undermine positivity of the self-model, which could further elevate the risk of adolescent depression. In comparison, these predictive relations did not exist among highly mindful adolescents. To our knowledge, this study is the first one to differentiate the roles of the two elements of internal working models in a longitudinal research design, which highlights the significant role of the impaired self-model in the development of adolescent depression in the context of aversive parenting.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-06-24T04:32:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241263873
       
  • Social ties and social identification: Influences on well-being in young
           adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anahita Mehrpour, Adar Hoffman, Eric D. Widmer, Christian Staerklé
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Research highlights the positive impact of social connectedness on subjective well-being. In this paper, we test a model in which an identity-based mechanism links a structural form of connectedness (significant social ties) with two psychological well-being outcomes, life satisfaction and self-esteem. Using data from the LIVES Longitudinal Lausanne Youth Study (LIVES-LOLYS, N = 422), a longitudinal mediation path model tests direct and indirect effects, via the strength of social identification, of the number of significant social ties in two life domains (friends and family) on life satisfaction and self-esteem. Results showed positive associations between the number of significant ties and social identification in the concordant domain, empirically linking the structural and subjective forms of social connectedness. Moreover, our model displays significant indirect effects in the friend domain, but not in the family domain. Having more friends as significant social ties predicted higher social identification with friends, and this was longitudinally associated with higher life satisfaction and self-esteem. Findings show a new mechanism linking structural and subjective forms of social connectedness, unpacking their concerted impact in protecting well-being. The differences between the friend and family domains are discussed in the framework of both life-course and social identity perspectives.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-06-21T07:57:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241263239
       
  • Sibling transmission of relationship breakup: Does partnership type
           matter'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yu-Chin Her, Jorik Vergauwen, Dimitri Mortelmans
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research has highlighted the impact of social network partners on individuals’ attitudes and behaviors and the significant role that siblings often play in providing lifelong support, especially in times of important life events. However, a few studies have examined the intragenerational transmission of divorce risks. Given the increasing prevalence of unmarried cohabitation, however, no study has yet unraveled the link between siblings’ relationship breakups in general, and neither has the impact of siblings’ partnership type and demographic characteristics been investigated. This study aims to understand cross-sibling influence on relationship breakup, including both divorce and separation, and whether sibling similarity in partnership type and demographic traits explain the social influence processes. We used longitudinal data from the Belgian population register and family fixed-effects event history analysis. Partnered individuals (N = 67,113) and their siblings were followed between 1998 and 2018. The results revealed that an individual’s likelihood of experiencing a union dissolution was lower following that of a sibling. This was particularly pronounced among siblings belonging to the same partnership type (both married or both cohabiting) and close-in-age siblings. For instance, after a sibling’s separation from a cohabitation, cohabiters were at lower odds of dissolving their union than the married, especially when they had a small age gap. The findings indicate that accounting for the time-constant factors originating from the family context, a sibling’s breakup might have a protective impact on one’s own relationship status and duration. The study contributes to the growing knowledge on intragenerational transmission of partnership dissolution.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-06-21T01:59:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241261740
       
  • How parental phubbing decreases adolescent core self-evaluation through
           basic psychological need satisfaction: Evidence from longitudinal
           mediation analysis and longitudinal network analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Xinyuan Shen, Xiaochun Xie
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Parental phubbing refers to the phenomenon where parents ignore their children due to mobile phone use during parent-child interactions. This study examined the longitudinal mediating role of basic psychological need satisfaction in the relations between parental phubbing and adolescents’ core self-evaluation. We recruited 629 adolescents (Mage = 15.20 years, SDage = 1.62 years) to participate in our longitudinal survey. Longitudinal mediation analyses revealed that parental phubbing negatively predicted adolescents' core self-evaluation by diminishing their basic psychological need satisfaction. Additionally, longitudinal network analyses identified two significant parental phubbing behaviors that impact adolescents' core self-evaluation: parents keeping mobile phones in hand during interactions with their adolescents and checking mobile phone information during mealtime. Our work provides a novel understanding on how parental phubbing decreases adolescent core self-evaluation.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-06-20T09:55:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241262536
       
  • The role of country-level characteristics for the association between
           loneliness and neighborhood cohesion – A multi-level analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Langenkamp Alexander, Mund Marcus, Hawkley Louise
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      The prevalence of loneliness varies widely across Western societies. However, the underlying sources of these cross-national disparities are still the subject of debate. In particular, recent advances in the literature put emphasis on exploring the moderating role of country-level characteristics for a better understanding under which condition individual-level factors predict loneliness. One such predictor for loneliness is neighborhood cohesion as perceiving the community as reciprocal and supportive has a large protective potential against loneliness. The present study links these lines of research and explores how three country-level characteristics (i.e. norms of cultural pluralism, welfare spending, and internet penetration rates) explain cross-national disparities in loneliness and whether they exert a moderating influence on the relationship between neighborhood cohesion and loneliness. By running linear multilevel models using data from the European Social Survey (N = 45042) as well as Eurostat Data, we find that all three country-level characteristics explain national disparities in loneliness as well as neighborhood cohesion. However, only norms of cultural pluralism moderate the association between neighborhood cohesion and loneliness on the individual level. This suggests that the potential of interventions aiming at fostering neighborhood cohesion to prevent loneliness varies depending on the cultural context.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-06-20T09:33:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241262321
       
  • The longitudinal correlates of breakup distress in early young adulthood:
           Future distress and future benefits

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shmuel Shulman, Refael Yonatan-Leus
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives: Existing research on romantic breakups focused on the predictors of breakup, or on its emotional and behavioral sequelae. The current study examines the longitudinal correlates of a breakup experience over a period of eight years, and questions whether breakup experiences may also have negative and positive outcomes. Methods: Data were collected from 124 Israeli emerging adults (mean age 20.22 years; 79 females). Participants were approached again at ages 23, 25, and 28. Breakup distress was assessed at each wave. At age 28, participants’ well-being, as well as their romantic capacities, were evaluated. Results: The intensity of breakup distress at age 20 was not found to be associated with future well-being. However, increased accumulating distress explained a greater number of depressive and anxiety symptoms, and reports of feeling insecure about a partner’s availability and responsiveness, at age 28. In-depth interviews with participants about their romantic relationships at age 28 showed that breakup distress at age 20 was associated with greater romantic competence at age 28, explaining better capacity to learn from past romantic experiences and draw lessons for future behavior. In addition, earlier breakup distress was associated with more coherent accounts of romantic relationships at age 28. Conclusions: Findings suggest that young adults are likely to experience a number of breakup events during their twenties, and the accumulating breakup experiences can affect future well-being. The experience of a breakup might not necessarily associate with negative future outcomes, while an earlier breakup experience could also serve as a positive learning arena for future relationships. Social policy: Perception of romantic dissolution in a comprehensive manner could be helpful for understanding that breakups are probably part of the normative development of romantic relationships among young adults, and should not be perceived only from a deficit perspective.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-06-10T07:13:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241260358
       
  • A longitudinal investigation of PTSD symptoms, hazardous drinking, and
           relationship satisfaction in college student dating relationships

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chelsea D. Mackey, Megan E. Schultz, Kristina H. Nguyen, Kayne D. Mettert, Almira Mae Bernabe, Melissa Garcia, Anna E. Jaffe, Mary E. Larimer
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and hazardous drinking have been linked to lower relationship satisfaction; however, few studies have evaluated these associations over time in a college sample. The current study aimed to examine within-person and between-person longitudinal main and interactive effects of self-reported PTSD symptoms and hazardous drinking on relationship satisfaction in a college sample. We further examined whether individual PTSD symptom clusters (i.e., re-experiencing, avoidance, hyperarousal, and emotional numbing) uniquely predicted relationship satisfaction. College students in current dating relationships (N = 307; 71% cisgender women) completed online self-report measures assessing relationship satisfaction, PTSD symptoms, and hazardous alcohol use on four occasions across 12 months. Multilevel models revealed that students with more severe PTSD symptoms than average had lower relationship satisfaction (i.e., at the between-person level). Additionally, higher hazardous drinking at the between-person and within-person levels was associated with lower relationship satisfaction. When examining specific PTSD symptom clusters, results indicated only emotional numbing symptoms were negatively associated with relationship satisfaction at the between-person and within-person levels after controlling for other PTSD symptom clusters. Collectively, these results underscore the impact of within- and between-person individual differences in PTSD symptoms and hazardous drinking on romantic relationships in college student populations.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-06-08T02:52:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241259106
       
  • Extradyadic stress as a barrier to sexual activity in couples' A Dyadic
           Response Surface Analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Selina A. Landolt, Emily A. Impett, Katharina Weitkamp, Michelle Roth, Katharina Bernecker, Guy Bodenmann
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Sexuality is integral to most romantic relationships. Through stress spillover, however, factors such as individually experienced stress outside of the relationship (i.e., extradyadic stress) can negatively impact sexuality. In this study, we explored how a possible (mis)matching of both partners' levels of extradyadic stress is related to sexual activity and tested for gender differences. Analyzing 316 mixed-gender couples from Switzerland, we employed Dyadic Response Surface Analysis to assess how extradyadic stress is associated with sexual activity. Our results showed that extradyadic stress was positively linked to sexual activity for women (in general) and men (in the case of matching stress levels). As this result was surprising, we conducted additional exploratory analyses and split the measure of sexual activity into (1) exchange of affection and (2) eroticism (petting, oral sex, and intercourse) and controlled for age. Results from this second set of analyses showed that for women, matching stress levels were associated with higher exchange of affection, whereas men’s exchange of affection was higher if men reported higher stress levels than women. Notably, after accounting for age, the link between stress and eroticism dissipated. Our findings suggest that exchange of affection may serve as a coping mechanism for stress, with gender influencing this dynamic. However, future research investigating stress and sexual activity should consider additional factors such as age, relationship satisfaction, stressor type, and stress severity.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-06-06T12:57:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241255910
       
  • The more useful, the more close: Instrumental deliberation boosts
           closeness with non-close others

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      Authors: Jingyan Wang, Hong Zhang, Ruoyin Cui
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Three studies examined whether contemplating the usefulness that non-close and close others may provide for one’s personal goals would promote or hinder interpersonal closeness. The results consistently demonstrated that such instrumental deliberation increased people’s closeness with distant others (Studies 1–3); and the effect lasted until the next day (Study 2). For close others, however, the evidence was weaker. Moreover, perceived instrumentality, as a product of such elaboration, was more strongly related to the increase in closeness with non-close than with close others. Study 3 further showed that instrumental deliberation enhanced humanness perceptions of non-close others and reduced unethical behavior towards them. We discussed the potential implications of these findings for the understanding of instrumentality, objectification and interpersonal relationships.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-06-04T11:32:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241259507
       
  • Social relationships in adults who were adopted following institutional
           deprivation

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      Authors: Mark Kennedy, Christopher Edwards, Jana Kreppner, Nicky Knights, Hanna Kovshoff, Barbara Maughan, Edmund J. S. Sonuga-Barke
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Research examining the effects of severe, prolonged early deprivation has shown elevated rates of neurodevelopmental symptoms, which frequently persist into adulthood and are associated with functional and social relationship difficulties, as well as elevated rates of mental health problems. The behavioural manifestations of these symptoms closely resemble those of ADHD and also ASD. Here, we used qualitative methods to explore and characterise the social experiences and difficulties encountered by young adults exposed to profound early deprivation, in part to highlight any apparent parallels between the experiences in this group and those identified in typically developing samples with ADHD or ASD. To do so, we interviewed young adults and their adoptive parents (N = 18) from the English and Romanian Adoptees study, about their social lives. Participants were keen to describe not only the challenges they faced but also adaptive responses. A semantic/descriptive thematic analysis revealed that the young adults strongly desired social relationships but struggled to navigate social norms, resulting in frustration and frequent loss of relationships. This was accompanied by strong feelings of loss and rejection, all of which were perceived to have a negative impact upon self-esteem and mental health. Adaptive strategies included the fostering of casual friendships with older individuals and seeking employment with strong social components. Similarities and differences between our findings and the social difficulties experienced by typically developing groups with neurodevelopmental problems, and adopted individuals more generally, are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-06-03T05:00:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241259116
       
  • Is getting hitched on the horizon' Examining predictors of cohabitation
           and early marriage in emerging adulthood

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      Authors: Carson R. Dover, Brian J. Willoughby
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      This study analyzes different factors predicting both cohabitation and early marriage among emerging adults. Using a large (n = 1,510), national, longitudinal sample of emerging adults in the United States, predictors of cohabitation and early marriage were examined. Predictors included marital paradigms (marital salience and expected age of marriage) and sociodemographic characteristics (religious attendance, parents’ marital status, parents’ education, college attendance, income, gender, and race). We utilized a Cox proportional hazards model to run the analyses. Results showed that marital paradigms were the most consistent predictors of early marriage, while few sociodemographic factors were significant. On the other hand, cohabitation was most consistently predicted by sociodemographic factors, with no associations being significant with marital paradigms. These findings suggest that decisions to marry and cohabit may not be as closely interconnected as previously conceptualized. Future directions and limitations are also discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-05-31T07:47:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241258492
       
  • Effects of regulating emotional expression on authenticity and likeability
           in stranger dyads

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      Authors: Jessica A. Birg, Tammy English
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      The present study compares effects of expressive suppression to a less researched form of expression-focused emotion regulation (namely, amplification) in terms of impact on authenticity and socioemotional outcomes. We expected amplification to result in more positive outcomes than suppression because of its role in facilitating communication. Participants (N = 306) formed 153 previously unacquainted dyads and were randomly assigned to a suppression of expression, amplification of expression, or control condition. After discussing recent personal negative events, participants reported their subjective authenticity, emotional experience, and impressions of their partner. Results revealed that suppressors felt less authentic compared to amplifiers and participants in the control condition. Partners’ perceptions of authenticity, however, did not differ across conditions, and only suppressors were rated as less likeable than those in the control condition. Consistent with prior work, amplification was unrelated to change in emotional experience, while suppression predicted decreased positive emotions from before to after the interaction. Building on prior work, these findings support the notion that expressive suppression can lead to interpersonal costs that hinder relationship formation, even though the inauthenticity suppression creates may largely go undetected by others. In contrast, amplification may serve as a relatively more adaptive expression-based strategy, at least in the context of non-close interactions.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-05-30T01:40:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241256676
       
  • “It comes in waves”: A relational dialectics approach to exploring
           living grief in U.S. emerging adults with invisible illness

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      Authors: Cassidy Taladay-Carter, Jacqueline N. Gunning
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Experiencing the onset of (invisible) chronic illness in emerging adulthood prompts a unique grieving process that is disenfranchised due to social discourses that sanction grief to death-related loss. Guided by relational dialectics theory, the present study analyzes the retrospective narratives of 57 emerging adults with acquired invisible illness (e.g., chronic overlapping pain conditions, autoimmune disease) about their meanings of grief. We interrogate competing discourses of grief to illustrate how participants make meaning of invisible, chronic illness and its resulting losses. Contrapuntal analysis led to the identification of a dominant Discourse of Grief as a Tsunami (DGAT) and marginalized Discourse of Grief as Waves (DGAW). The interplay of these discourses constructed meaning through dialogically contractive practices, synchronic interplay, and dialogic transformation. We offer implications for critical interpersonal and health communication theorizing and practical applications for individuals wading through the unique grief of chronic illness. Limitations and future directions are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-05-25T02:11:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241257189
       
  • Are there cross-cultural differences in the transformation of motivation
           process in close relationships'

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      Authors: Po-Heng Chen, Phakkanun Chittam, Hannah C. Williamson
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      When faced with an undesirable behavior by one’s partner, theories of relationship maintenance indicate that individuals must undergo a transformation of motivation in order to set aside their initial impulse to respond in a self-centered manner, and instead choose to respond in a pro-relationship manner. However, the cultural psychology literature indicates that a primary focus on one’s own needs and goals is predominantly a feature of individualistic cultures, such as those in the Unites States and Western Europe which have been the setting for the vast majority of close relationships research. Thus, it is possible that people from less individualistic cultural contexts do not experience this same transformation of motivation process when faced with an undesirable behavior by their partner, because their initial impulse is less self-centered and more other- or relationship-centered. To test this hypothesis we conducted pre-registered replications of two classic studies documenting the transformation of motivation process (Yovetich & Rusbult, 1994) using a cross-cultural sample of participants from the U.S. and Thailand. The extent to which people in both cultural settings engaged in the transformation of motivation process was assessed in a correlational study (N = 187) and an experimental study (N = 328) of partnered individuals. Results indicate that participants in both cultural contexts experience a transformation of motivation process, and the magnitude of the transformation did not differ between the two countries. Exploratory analyses indicate that Thai participants engaged in more passive behaviors than U.S. participants, and U.S. participants thought passive behaviors were more harmful than active behaviors. Overall, when faced with an unpleasant behavior by one’s partner, the need to set aside one’s initial impulse in order to respond in a more pro-relationship manner appears universal, but the exact behaviors that are the endpoint of that process differ across cultures.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T07:29:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241255389
       
  • Is unit cohesion a double-edged sword' A moderated mediation model of
           combat exposure, work stressors, and marital satisfaction

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      Authors: Nick Frye-Cox, Mallory Lucier-Greer, Catherine Walker O’Neal, Evin Winkleman Richardson
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Guided by the stress process perspective, this study examined if combat exposure was indirectly associated with marital satisfaction through work performance stress. Additionally, we tested whether unit cohesion served as a moderator of this indirect effect. Data were drawn from 1,122 married Soldiers who participated in the All-Army Study component of the Army STARRS study, a probabilistic sample of Army Soldiers. Indicative of stress proliferation and spillover, our results showed that combat exposure may negatively impact marital satisfaction through work performance stress, but the pathways of this indirect effect varied as a function of unit cohesion. Consistent with the stress buffering hypothesis, unit cohesion buffered the positive association between combat exposure and work performance stress for Soldiers reporting higher levels unit cohesion, such that this association was no longer statistically significant. However, for Soldiers reporting higher levels of unit cohesion, the negative association between work performance stress and martial satisfaction was exacerbated but was not statistically significant for those reporting lower levels of unit cohesion. The results underscore the importance of understanding the contextual nature of relational resources within the stress process framework.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-05-21T12:30:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241255391
       
  • Joint trajectories of self-esteem and neuroticism among newlywed couples:
           Associations with marital quality

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      Authors: Ziyuan Chen, Qingyin Li, Xinzhu Song, Xiaoyi Fang
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      The present longitudinal study investigates the development of both positive and negative personal traits (i.e., self-esteem and neuroticism, respectively) among newlywed couples. The aim is to identify distinct joint trajectories of self-esteem and neuroticism and then compare marital quality across different trajectory classes. A sample of 268 Chinese newlyweds completed self-esteem, neuroticism, and marital quality questionnaires at three time points. Dyadic Latent Class Growth Analyses were used to examine the joint trajectory of self-esteem and neuroticism. The study identified three trajectory groups: the adaptive couples group (c1), the stable couples and husbands more adaptive than wives group (c2), and the stable husbands and wives more adaptive than husbands group (c3). The adaptive couples group had the highest level of initial marital quality. The two other groups, characterized by initial differences between partners in self-esteem and neuroticism, had relatively lower baseline marital quality. In comparison, wives in the c3 group initially displayed higher levels of marital quality than those in the c2 group. This research improves our understanding of personal development in couples and sheds light on the complex associations between personal and relational development in the context of marriage.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-05-21T12:14:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241254861
       
  • Perceived quality of peer relationships and position in peer network from
           late childhood to early adolescence: A three-wave longitudinal study with
           cross-lagged panel model

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      Authors: Paweł Grygiel, Roman Dolata, Grzegorz Humenny
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: The main aim of this study was to investigate the mutual relationship between perceptions of peer relationship quality and position in positive and negative peer networks among young people from late childhood to early adolescence. Method: A cross-lagged panel model of three waves of data was conducted using a large representative sample of Polish students from third grade to sixth grade (N = 4 673). Results: The results proved a reciprocal relationship between position in positive (Like) and negative (DisLike) peer networks and the perceived quality of peer relationships (PPI). The effect found of position on the perceived quality of peer relationships is in line with the existing state of knowledge. Since previous research has yielded divergent results, this demonstration of the prospective impact of perceived relationship quality on peer network position fills an important cognitive gap. The study also revealed the following: (1) in the first (W1→W2) and second period (W2→W3) the strength of the prospective effects of position in the peer network on its perceived quality (Like→PPI and DisLike→PPI), and the strength of the prospective effects of perceived quality on position (PPI→Like and PPI→DisLike), were not statistically significantly different; (2) the effect size of the cross-lagged coefficients ranged from small to medium; (3) all constructs showed greater stability in the second period than in the first; (4) in both periods stability of PPI was lower than the stability of sociometric indicators. Conclusion: This research confirms the presence of a self-reinforcing loop: a low position in peer networks→poor perceived quality of relations→decrease of position in peer networks. The findings are discussed in relation to the evolutionary theory of loneliness (ETL), which assumes a potentially active role of the perception of peer relationships in forming a position in a peer network. Practical implications of the results are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-05-17T03:45:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241255392
       
  • Acknowledging dementia as an actor in the relationship: A facilitating
           mechanism promoting dementia family caregiver resilience

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      Authors: R. Amanda Cooper, Chris Segrin
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the incredible challenges of caring for a family member with Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia, many dementia family caregivers exhibit resilience. Framed by the communication theory of resilience, this study examines how resilience processes unfold within dementia caregivers’ relationships with their family member, and dementia caregivers’ experiences of resilience. Analysis of 27 interviews with adult children and spousal caregivers revealed acknowledging dementia as an actor in the relationship as a central facilitating mechanism that enabled caregivers to enact other communicative resilience processes within their relationship. Resilience processes were enacted through shifting blame to dementia, accommodating dementia, and relying on memories. Caregivers experienced resilience through personal growth, enhanced relational closeness, and ambivalent resilience. We discuss implications for dementia caregiver resilience and forward facilitating mechanisms as an extension of communication resilience theorizing.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-05-16T11:19:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241254860
       
  • Fighting the good fight: Relating warmth and dominance across romantic
           conflict to resolution

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      Authors: Sidney Gibson, Erica B. Slotter, Patrick M. Markey
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Research on romantic conflict has persuasively documented that the way partners communicate with one another during disagreements is a driving factor in predicting how they perceive the conflicts in their relationships. The current research added to this literature by differentiating couples who resolve conflicts more, versus less, successfully. Specifically, the current work examined how couples’ behavioral trajectories across the course of conflict related to their perceptions of conflict resolution. To this end, we coded warmth and dominance behaviors exhibited by 173 couple members (346 individuals) over the course of an eight-minute conflict discussion. We examined how participants’, and their partners’, perceptions of conflict resolution were related to their interpersonal behaviors. In line with predictions, less average interpersonal warmth was associated with worse perceptions of resolution, and declining warmth over time was also associated with worse perceptions of resolution. Dominance behaviors were not associated with conflict resolution perceptions.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-05-09T05:44:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241253627
       
  • Subjective orgasm experience in different-sex and same-sex couples: A
           dyadic approach

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      Authors: Carlos Pérez-Amorós, Juan Carlos Sierra, Pablo Mangas
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      The subjective orgasm experience (SOE) refers to the perception, sensation and/or evaluation of orgasm from a psychological point of view, representing an important construct of sexual functioning rarely studied under a dyadic approach. This study analyzed SOE in the contexts of sexual relationships and solitary masturbation in 179 different-sex and same-sex couples. The results indicated the absence of differences in intradyadic discrepancies in SOE dimensions in both sexual contexts, varying according to the type of couple. Besides, the study also highlights the influence of some of these discrepancies of SOE in solitary masturbation on SOE discrepancies in sexual relationships among the members of male-female and female-female couples. Furthermore, the study revealed that the intensity of partners' orgasm experience during solitary masturbation influences the intensity of SOE during sexual relationships, with variations observed based on the type of couple. These findings highlight the importance of considering SOE from a dyadic approach, with the association of orgasmic experience in both sexual contexts gaining relevance, differing according to the couple type. The results also point to the clinical implications of the dyadic effects of such an individual practice as solitary masturbation on shared sexual experiences.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-05-03T09:01:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241251860
       
  • The effects of gratitude and affection journaling interventions on
           relationship quality and gratitude for Chinese adolescent – mother dyads
           

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      Authors: Li Chen-Bouck, Bixi Qiao, Meagan M. Patterson
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the effects of journaling-based interventions on perceived relationship quality (i.e., mother-adolescent interactions and conflict) and gratitude among Chinese adolescents (ages 12–14 years) and their mothers (N = 339 dyads). Mother-adolescent dyads were randomly assigned to one of three conditions (i.e., gratitude, affection, and control), and kept a daily journal on assigned topics for 21 days. Participants’ mother-adolescent relationship quality and level of gratitude were measured before and after the 21-day period. The findings showed that both the gratitude and affection interventions had positive impacts on mother-adolescent relationship quality (i.e., more positive mother-adolescent interactions and less conflict) with a small to medium effect size for adolescents but no impact for mothers. Gratitude did not change from pre-to post-intervention. The current study provides some preliminary support for implementing gratitude and affection interventions with Chinese adolescents to promote relationship quality, but suggests that the intervention works better for adolescents than mothers.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-04-29T06:21:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241250330
       
  • Mexican-origin siblings’ unique and shared perspectives of sibling
           Conflict: Links with adjustment

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      Authors: Jenny Padilla, Justin Jager, Kimberly A. Updegraff, Adriana J. Umaña-Taylor
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Siblings are ubiquitous in the lives of youth, but sibling conflict is linked to adjustment problems and risky behaviors. To advance understanding of older and younger siblings’ unique and shared perspectives of conflict in Mexican-origin families, our study addressed two goals. First, using Multitrait-Multimethod Confirmatory Factor Analysis (MTMM-CFA; Kenny & Kashy, 1992), we estimated the variance accounted for by older and younger siblings’ unique and shared experiences of the frequency of their conflict. A shared viewpoint indicates commonality in siblings’ reported experiences, whereas a unique perspective encompasses each sibling’s distinct perceptions of their conflict. Second, we examined links between older and younger siblings’ unique and shared conflict factors and each sibling’s depressive symptoms and risky behavior. Participants were two siblings (Mage = 15.48 years for older and Mage = 12.55 years for younger siblings) from 246 Mexican-origin families who were interviewed in their homes. Results indicated that the shared conflict factor accounted for most of the variance in older siblings’ reports of conflict frequency, whereas the unique factor accounted for the largest portion of the variance in younger siblings’ reports. Further, for older siblings, the shared conflict factor was linked to their individual adjustment, whereas for younger siblings, the unique factor predicted their adjustment. Parsing siblings’ reports of the frequency of their relational conflict, specifically the extent to which perspectives overlap versus are distinctive, provides novel insights about the role of siblings’ conflict experiences in youth adjustment. Additionally, it offers directions for future research and has the potential to inform existing sibling conflict programs.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-04-29T03:24:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241249961
       
  • Do different sources of sexuality education contribute differently to
           sexual health and well-being outcomes' Examining sexuality education in
           Spain and Portugal

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      Authors: David L. Rodrigues, A. Catarina Carvalho, Richard O. de Visser, Diniz Lopes, Maria-João Alvarez
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Sexuality education (SE) can be acquired through different sources. In a cross-sectional online study with Spanish and Portuguese participants (N = 595), we examined differences between formal traditional sources (i.e., mandatory SE received in schools), formal modern sources (e.g., SE received in courses), informal traditional sources (e.g., talks with friends and family), and informal modern sources (e.g., pornography and online content) and their contribution to sexual health and well-being outcomes. Results showed that sexual and reproductive health were among the most addressed topics across all sources. Nearly all participants received SE from informal sources, whereas more than two-thirds received SE from formal traditional sources. Results of a linear regression model showed that participants who perceived more influence from formal traditional sources reported using condoms more often, were more focused on disease prevention, and enacted more sexual health communication, but were also less sex-positive. Participants who perceived more influence from both types of informal sources attributed more importance to SE topics but reported having condomless sex more frequently and were more focused on pleasure promotion. Still, participants who perceived more influence from informal traditional sources also endorsed more internal/external consent, were more sexually satisfied, were more sex-positive, and enacted more sexual health practices. Lastly, participants who perceived more influence from informal modern sources were also more likely to have been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection. Only a small proportion of participants received SE from formal modern sources and had to be excluded from this analysis. Some differences between Spain and Portugal are discussed. Taken together, our findings highlight the need to consider different sources for a more comprehensive and inclusive SE, in articulation with sociocultural and political contexts.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-04-25T06:17:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241249172
       
  • Romantic partner communication, familism values, and Latine young
           adults’ relationship maintenance

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      Authors: Dawson E. Boron, Sarah E. Killoren, J. Kale Monk, Avelina Rivero, Jeremy B. Kanter, Christine M. Proulx
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Negative communication between partners can impede the enactment of prosocial, relationship maintenance behaviors. These processes are especially critical to consider for Latine young adults who hold cultural values, like familism, which emphasize the great importance of personal relationships. Using a sample of 475 Latine young adults (M = 24.8 years, SD = 3.22), we examined the moderating role of familism on the association between negative communication (e.g., partners’ propensity to withdraw or criticize during interactions) and relationship maintenance (e.g., affectionate and supportive efforts to sustain the relationship). We found that negative communication was inversely associated with individuals’ own relationship maintenance enactment. However, familism buffered the association between negative communication and relationship maintenance; under conditions of high familism, the association between negative communication and relationship maintenance remained negative, but with a weaker effect than under conditions of low familism. Findings reinforce the negative effects of maladaptive communication in relationships more broadly and highlight the protective role of relationally oriented cultural values.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-04-25T04:17:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241249176
       
  • Examining short-term and long-term effects of self-esteem on relationship
           satisfaction using a dyadic response surface analysis

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      Authors: Zehua Jiang, Liang Xu, Xiuying Qian
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      The present study investigates the relationship between self-esteem, its interactive patterns within couples, and relationship satisfaction. We employed dyadic response surface analysis (DRSA), an advanced method for examining the links between dyadic interaction patterns and outcome variables. Analyzing data from 731 Dutch heterosexual couples from the Longitudinal internet Studies for the Social Sciences data set across short-term (two-month) and long-term (two-year) timeframes, our findings align with previous research. Both actor and partner self-esteem had significant positive effects on relationship satisfaction, indicating that one’s self-esteem is positively associated with outcomes for both oneself and one’s partner. Additionally, we observed an additive effect where the combined self-esteem of a couple was positively associated with satisfaction. However, an actor superiority effect was noted, where individuals were most satisfied when self-reporting higher self-esteem than their partners, suggesting that one’s own self-esteem plays a more crucial role in their relationship perceptions than their partner’s and that self-esteem may not act as a shared resource. We did not find a significant self-esteem similarity effect on relationship satisfaction. These results were consistent in both timeframe analyses, with and without covariate controls. This study contributes to bridging the gap between existing theoretical models by providing novel insights into how self-esteem patterns within couples relates to relationship wellbeing.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-04-24T07:40:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241248829
       
  • The role of mutually responsive orientation in promoting relationship
           satisfaction for first-time and experienced parents: An investigation from
           pregnancy to toddlerhood

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      Authors: Erin L. Ramsdell, Frances C. Calkins, Rebecca L. Brock
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      The transition to parenthood creates a context for family reorganization that can place couples at risk for declining relationship satisfaction; however, few studies have examined the experiences of parents navigating this transition while parenting other children in the home. Further, there is a critical need to identify factors explaining unique trajectories of relationship satisfaction and determine whether these factors serve similar functions for first-time versus experienced parents. The goal of the present study was to examine relationship satisfaction across the pregnancy-postpartum transition for not only first-time, but also experienced parents, and identify prenatal couple dynamics and contextual factors that explain individual differences in these trajectories across parenting groups. We pursued these aims in a sample of 152 mixed-sex couples, across five waves of data spanning pregnancy to 2 years postpartum. First-time and experienced parents demonstrated unique trajectories of relationship satisfaction across the transition to parenthood. Greater mutually responsive orientation (i.e., MRO; an established system of attunement, reciprocity, cooperation, and warmth) between partners during pregnancy was associated with higher overall levels of relationship satisfaction spanning pregnancy to 2 years postpartum for first-time mothers and low-income experienced mothers and less relationship satisfaction decline over time for low-income experienced fathers. The present study replicates past work suggesting that experienced parents are also at risk for relationship discord across the pregnancy-postpartum transition and identifies prenatal MRO as a dyadic relationship quality that maintains and promotes satisfaction across this transition, warranting closer attention in future research and interventions.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-04-23T12:37:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241243030
       
  • Parenting a child with a disability: Fathers’ perceptions of the
           couple relationship

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      Authors: Erica Zahl, Sigurd Skjeggestad Dale, Krister Westlye Fjermestad, Torun Marie Vatne
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Parents of children with a disability experience elevated levels of stress compared to parents of typically developing children, which represents a risk for their couple relationship. Research on families where a child has a disability is principally based on mothers. More knowledge is needed about the paternal perspective. We conducted semi-structured interviews with seven fathers (aged 36–54 years) of children with a disability (primary school age to early twenties). We analyzed the material using qualitative conventional content analysis, focusing on participants’ descriptions of couple relationships. We categorized the participants’ descriptions in two main categories: Couplehood and Co-parenting. Throughout the material, partners were described as romantic partners, co-parents, and collaborators. Participants described that couple communication and emotional expression within couples were affected by parenting a child with a disability. Moreover, participants described influence by cultural masculinity norms on their involvement as partners and parents, and on the dynamic within their couple relationships. An uneven division of labor was described. A practice implication is that communication and emotional expression styles within the parental couple should be a key focus when working with families of children with a disability. The findings also suggest more active involvement of fathers in children’s health care.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-04-18T04:06:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241248387
       
  • Did relationship quality during the COVID-19 pandemic vary across cultural
           contexts'

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      Authors: Paula R. Pietromonaco, Matthew D. Hammond, Nickola C. Overall, Giulia Zoppolat, Rhonda N. Balzarini, Richard B. Slatcher
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      We examined whether the impact of the pandemic on couple relationships varied across cultural contexts. Following from studies showing better outcomes (lower disease risk, greater well-being) within cultures higher in tightness (having strong norms promoting conformity) or collectivism (vs. individualism), we predicted that tighter and more collectivistic contexts would be associated with better relationship functioning. Preregistered analyses using existing data collected during the pandemic (N = 2510; 12 countries), indicated, counter to predictions, that individuals from countries higher in tightness or collectivism evidenced greater relationship conflict. Cultural context was unrelated to relationship quality. Stress, attachment insecurity, and perceived partner responsiveness predicted relationship quality during the pandemic, but cultural context generally did not moderate these links. Perceived partner responsiveness, however, predicted relationship quality more strongly within more collectivistic (vs. more individualistic) countries. We discuss possible explanations for these findings, limitations of the data, and the need for larger studies including a broader range of countries, individuals, and cultural contexts.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-04-18T03:30:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241248394
       
  • Cumulative childhood interpersonal trauma and parental stress: The role of
           partner support

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      Authors: Gaëlle Bakhos, Élise Villeneuve, Claude Bélanger, Alison Paradis, Audrey Brassard, Sophie Bergeron, Natacha Godbout
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Parents who have experienced cumulative childhood interpersonal trauma (CCIT, i.e., an accumulation of different types of abuse) tend to experience higher parental stress following the birth of a child. As CCIT is associated with lower levels of partner support, which is linked to increased parental stress, partner support could explain the link between CCIT and parental stress. Yet, these variables have never been studied using a dyadic approach. This study examined the role of received and provided partner support in the association between CCIT and parental stress. A randomly selected sample of 1119 couples with infants completed online questionnaires assessing CCIT, partner support, and parental stress. An actor-partner interdependence model path analysis showed that both parents’ CCIT were associated with increased paternal stress through fathers’ lower received and provided support, and with increased maternal stress through mothers’ received and provided support. Overall, the findings highlight the significance of examining the interdependence between both parents’ experience and the role of partner support as a key factor explaining the link between CCIT and parental stress, thereby emphasizing its importance as an intervention target.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-04-15T07:38:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241246794
       
  • Peer social support moderates the impact of ethnoracial discrimination on
           mental health among young sexual minority men of color

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      Authors: Gabriel Robles, Yong Gun Lee, Joseph Hillesheim, Daniel Brusche, Jonathan Lopez-Matos, Demetria Cain, Tyrel J. Starks
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Few studies have examined developmentally relevant sources of resilience, such as peer social support, among young sexual minority men (SMM) of color experiencing discrimination and mental health distress. To address this gap in the literature, we examined the role of peer social support in the association between discrimination and mental health distress in a sample of young SMM of color. Ninety-four cisgender young SMM of color (aged 16–29) were recruited through community-based organizations in the New York City metropolitan area as part of an effectiveness trial of a tailored Motivational Interviewing intervention. Participants completed a baseline survey that included measures of school/workplace ethnoracial discrimination, sexual orientation discrimination, peer social support, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Results of multivariable models indicated some evidence of the stress-buffering effects of peer social support. School/workplace ethnoracial discrimination was negatively associated with symptoms of anxiety (B = −0.12, SE = 0.03, p < .001) and depression (B = 0.44, SE = 0.15, p = .005) among young SMM of color with lower levels of peer social support. Peer social support did not moderate the association between sexual orientation discrimination and either depression or anxiety. Findings provide some evidence of the protective role of peer social support. We discuss the implications of the results for practice with young SMM of color with mental health distress.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-04-10T04:02:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241245735
       
  • “I one-hundred thousand percent blame it on QAnon”: The impact of
           QAnon belief on interpersonal relationships

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      Authors: Lauren Mastroni, Robyn Mooney
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Conspiracy beliefs have been found to have negative real-world consequences that can impact interpersonal relationships; however, this remains an under-researched area. With the current popularity of conspiracy movements such as QAnon, more research into these phenomena is necessary. The present research therefore aimed to explore the impact of QAnon belief on interpersonal relationships. Fifteen participants aged 21–54 (M = 41) with a QAnon-affiliated loved one were interviewed about how QAnon has changed their relationship. Using thematic analysis, four main themes were identified: Malignant Q, Distance, Qonflict, and Attempts at Healing. Participants characterized QAnon as a malignant force in their relationships and communicated with their loved ones less as a result. Although QAnon was a source of conflict and tension for all participants, they were motivated to understand their loved ones. Most participants who still had relationships with their loved ones were motivated to heal or maintain their relationships, while those who no longer did had previously tried many different strategies to save their relationships. These findings provide greater insight into how QAnon can impact relationships, offering fruitful directions for future research examining how individuals can heal from QAnon-afflicted relationships.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-04-09T11:49:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241246124
       
  • Vulnerable self-disclosure co-develops in adolescent friendships:
           Developmental foundations of emotional intimacy

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      Authors: Meghan A. Costello, Natasha A. Bailey, Jessica A. Stern, Joseph P. Allen
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the development of vulnerable self-disclosure in supportive interactions from ages 13 to 29. A diverse community sample (N = 184; 85 boys 99 girls; 58% white, 29% Black, 13% other identity groups) participated in annual observed interactions with close friends and romantic partners. Participants were observed as they sought and provided support to their best friends each year from age 13 to 18, and as they sought support from their romantic partners from age 19 to 29. Random intercept cross-lagged panel models were used to parse markers of within-individual change in vulnerable self-disclosure observed annually across ages 13 to 18. A follow-up regression model also investigated cascading associations from vulnerable self-disclosure in adolescent friendships to vulnerable self-disclosure in adult romantic relationships. When adolescents sought support, they demonstrated greater-than-expected increases in self-disclosure each year when their best friends demonstrated relatively high self-disclosure. For girls in this sample, when providing support, they demonstrated greater-than-expected decreases in self-disclosure each year when their best friends demonstrated relatively high self-disclosure. Adolescents whose friends disclosed highly to them also tended to express more vulnerability with romantic partners in adulthood. Post-hoc analyses investigate the role of friendship stability and gender as potential moderators of self-disclosure development. The best friendship, a key source of emotional support, serves as a foundational context for learning appropriate use of vulnerable self-disclosure when seeking and providing emotional support, which persists across time and relationships.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-04-09T10:45:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241244821
       
  • Corrigendum to “Technically in love: Individual differences relating to
           sexual and platonic relationships with robots”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-04-08T03:33:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241246043
       
  • How do you build the perfect friend' Evidence from two forced-choice
           decision-making experiments

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      Authors: Jessica D. Ayers, Jaimie Arona Krems, Athena Aktipis
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Friendship is a unique and underexplored area of human sociality. Research suggests that humans have preferences for characteristics in their friends that maximize the benefits of these relationships. Yet, whereas more friends might increase friendship benefits, humans also have limited time, resources, and energy to invest in finding high-quality friends, making it likely that the nature of these preferences differs depending on the resources an individual has available to invest in this goal. Across two studies (total N = 693), we investigated how this trade-off may function by investigating the nature of friendship preferences. In Study 1, we utilized the budget paradigm method from behavioral economics to investigate the necessities and luxuries in friendship preferences. In Study 2, we replicated these preferences with a novel method and extended our investigation into understanding the hierarchical nature of these preferences. Taken together, our results provide a promising starting point for research investigating trade-offs between necessities and luxuries in friendship preferences.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-04-01T07:55:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241243341
       
  • Couples’ empathy and sensitive responsiveness to a crying baby
           simulator

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      Authors: Maria Kaźmierczak, Paulina Pawlicka, Paulina Anikiej-Wiczenbach, Ariadna Łada-Maśko, Marinus H. van IJzendoorn, Marian J. Bakermans-Kranenburg
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Emotional empathy has been linked to prosocial behaviors and is deemed crucial for parenting and caring for infants. This study examined whether emotional empathy (dispositional and in response to infant crying) is associated with sensitive responsiveness, as observed in 221 heterosexual couples (half of whom were expecting their first child) during a standardized caregiving situation. Simulators resembling real infants were used. Caregiving performed by each partner individually and as a couple was observed using the Ainsworth sensitivity scale. The partners rated their own empathy and their perceived partner’s empathy toward the infant simulator. The Polish version of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index was used to measure dispositional emotional empathy (empathic concern, EC; personal distress, PD). Multilevel modeling showed that self-reported and partner-reported empathy elicited by the infant simulator mediated the association between dispositional empathic concern and sensitive responsiveness during caretaking. Women were more empathic and responsive while caring for the infant simulator, and couple sensitive responsiveness was predicted by higher dispositional EC and lower PD in women but not in men. Our findings suggest that dispositional empathy and empathic reactions toward an infant simulator might translate into better adjustment to parenthood and more responsive parenting and coparenting.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-04-01T01:47:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241240078
       
  • Why now' Late-life divorce timing process: Dyadic and individual
           perspectives

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      Authors: Yafit Cohen, Naor Demeter, Chaya Koren
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Late-life divorce is increasing in the Western world, including among family-oriented societies like Israel in which the most common family status for older adults (age 60 years and older) is being in a heterosexual long-term marriage with adult children. Within a life-course framework, we use both dyadic and individual interview analysis to explore the process that led to the timing of late-life divorce. Understanding this process from dyadic and individual perspectives could strengthen knowledge regarding this expanding phenomenon in family-oriented societies and could contribute to developing targeted interventions and policies for such couples. Semi-structured interviews were conducted separately with 44 heterosexual ex-spouses comprised of 10 dyads (n = 20) and 24 individuals (n = 13 women; n = 11 men). The divorces were mostly after age 60 and followed a long-term marriage with children. Two themes emerged from the analysis: the long-term phase of divorce delay despite longstanding motivations, and the moment of final decision with its various background accelerators. The discussion addresses intersections between personal time, family time, and social/cultural time related to divorce, and between intrapersonal and interpersonal aspects. Implications for family gerontology are presented.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-03-30T04:26:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241243032
       
  • Associations between sexual assault and romantic relationship functioning:
           A mixed-methods analysis

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      Authors: Abby I. Person, Patricia A. Frazier, Alicia M. Selvey-Bouyack, Samantha L. Anders, Sandra L. Shallcross, Jeffry A. Simpson
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Research on the relation between sexual assault (SA) and romantic functioning has yielded inconsistent results. The goals of the current studies were to examine this association while addressing limitations of past research; assessing revictimization, multiple victimization, and assault timing; and examining whether this association was moderated by neuroticism, attachment orientations, or perceived partner responsiveness. Design and Methods: College students (Study 1; N = 437) and community members (Study 2; N = 566) completed measures assessing SA, romantic functioning, attachment, neuroticism, and partner responsiveness. Study 2 used a mixed-methods approach. Data were collected via online surveys in psychology courses (Study 1) and on Prolific (Study 2). Results: In Study 1, SA was not associated with romantic functioning and this association was not moderated by attachment or neuroticism. In Study 2, SA survivors reported significantly poorer relationship quality and less partner trust, but not less sexual satisfaction. However, significant effects were small. Partner responsiveness did not moderate these associations, and revictimization, multiple victimizations, and assault recency were not related to poorer functioning. In qualitative data, the most common response was that the SA had not affected participants’ relationships. Conclusions: Relationships may be one area in which SA survivors demonstrate resilience.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-03-27T05:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241241496
       
  • Does attachment in adolescence predict neural responses to handholding in
           adulthood' A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

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      Authors: Jingrun Lin, Jessica A. Stern, Joseph P. Allen, James A. Coan
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: Early life experiences, including attachment-related experiences, inform internal working models that guide adult relationship behaviors. Few studies have examined the association between adolescent attachment and adult relationship behavior on a neural level. The current study examined attachment in adolescence and its associations with neural correlates of relationship behaviors in adulthood. Method: 85 participants completed the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) at age 14. Ten years later, at age 24, participants underwent functional brain image when participants were under the threat of electric shock alone, holding the hand of a stranger, or their partner. Results: We found that adolescents who were securely attached at age 14 showed increased activation in regions commonly associated with cognitive, affective, and reward processing when they held the hand of their partner and stranger compared to being alone. Adolescents with higher preoccupied attachment scores showed decreased activation in similar regions only during the stranger handholding condition compared to being alone. Conclusions: These findings suggest that adolescent attachment predicts adult social relationship behaviors on a neural level, in regions largely consistent with previous literature. Broadly, this study has implications for understanding long-term links between attachment and adult relationship behaviors and has potential for informing intervention.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-03-22T05:33:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241239604
       
  • Ninety years after Lewin: The role of familism and attachment style in
           social networks characteristics across 21 nations/areas

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      Authors: Xian Zhao, Omri Gillath, Itziar Alonso-Arbiol, Amina Abubakar, Byron G. Adams, Frédérique Autin, Audrey Brassard, Rodrigo J. Carcedo, Or Catz, Cecilia Cheng, Tamlin S. Conner, Tasuku Igarashi, Konstantinos Kafetsios, Shanmukh Kamble, Gery Karantzas, Rafael Emilio Mendía-Monterroso, João M. Moreira, Tobias Nolte, Willibald Ruch, Sandra Sebre, Angela Suryani, Semira Tagliabue, Qi Xu, Fang Zhang
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on the literature on person-culture fit, we investigated how culture (assessed as national-level familism), personality (tapped by attachment styles) and their interactions predicted social network characteristics in 21 nations/areas (N = 2977). Multilevel mixed modeling showed that familism predicted smaller network size but greater density, tie strength, and multiplexity. Attachment avoidance predicted smaller network size, and lower density, tie strength, and multiplexity. Attachment anxiety was related to lower density and tie strength. Familism enhanced avoidance’s association with network size and reduced its association with density, tie strength, and multiplexity. Familism also enhanced anxiety’s association with network size, tie strength, and multiplexity. These findings contribute to theory building on attachment and culture, highlight the significance of culture by personality interaction for the understanding of social networks, and call attention to the importance of sampling multiple countries.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-03-19T11:59:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241237939
       
  • A systematic review of the benefits and mechanisms of family-based
           mind-body therapy programs targeting families of children and adolescents
           with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

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      Authors: Yuan Fang, Jing Liu, Borui Zhang, Man Lau, Ying Fung Ho, Yaxi Yang, Yan Shi, Eric Tsz Chun Poon, Andy Choi Yeung Tse, Fenghua Sun
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Growing evidence indicates that family-based mind-body therapy programs (FMBTs) act as an important alternative for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treatment in the youth with minimal side-effects. Moreover, FMBTs contribute to improving the family functioning of those affected by ADHD. To summarize and analyze the benefits and mechanisms, an extensive literature search of the EBSCOhost, PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus databases was conducted to identify eligible studies. Fifteen studies published between 2010–2023 were reviewed. The included FMBTs were implemented with 850 children/adolescents and 996 parents/caregivers, of whom 201 parent couples attended the programs together with their children. All included FMBTs adopted mindfulness/meditation as the core practice to enhance the participants’ mental focus and attention, and were designed for long-term engagement, with six including parent–child joint session(s). Positive changes were observed in both children and adolescents, including improvements in ADHD symptoms, behavioral problems, executive function, and school performance. Additionally, parents experienced positive changes in ADHD traits/symptoms, mental health, and parenting behaviors. Furthermore, FMBTs were found to enhance family functioning by delivering mindful strategies to family, restoring psychological capacity and interpersonal skills in family members, and improving parent–child relationships. The reviewed FMBTs demonstrated high levels of feasibility and participant satisfaction. The factors and issues potentially influencing the effectiveness and feasibility of FMBTs are also discussed. The findings indicate that FMBT holds promise as an ADHD treatment option in home settings. Future efforts may focus on optimizing the design of FMBTs to better address the diverse needs of families in varying circumstances.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-03-18T03:12:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241239878
       
  • Childhood maltreatment is longitudinally associated with cardiometabolic
           biomarkers through marital quality: Do health locus of control and eating
           habits matter'

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      Authors: Michael Fitzgerald, Viktoria Papp
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Childhood maltreatment influences adult physical health through cascading effects over the life course and it is critical to identify intervening processes. Marital quality has significant implications for adult physical health via cognitive, emotional, and behavioral pathways and may be a viable pathway. Given that cardiometabolic biomarkers are associated with the leading causes of death in the United States, the current study longitudinally investigated marital quality, health locus of control, and eating habits in a serial mediation model linking childhood maltreatment to high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL). Using a sample of 352 adults from the study of Midlife Development in the United States, we used three waves of data to test our hypotheses. Results of structural equation models indicate that although all the hypothesized direct effects were statistically significant, the serial indirect effects were non-significant. Childhood maltreatment was associated with a lower quality marriage, marital quality was associated with higher levels of health locus of control which, in turn, was associated with healthier eating habits. Finally, healthier eating habits were associated with greater HDL, but not lower LDL. Additionally, marital quality exerted a direct effect on LDL and mediated the relationship between maltreatment and LDL, but not HDL. For researchers, marital quality appears to be a mechanism linking childhood maltreatment to cardiometabolic biomarkers, yet health locus of control and eating habits do not appear to have strong effects. For clinicians, strengthening the couple relationship among survivors of maltreatment appears to have health promotive effects over time.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-03-04T08:56:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241235966
       
  • Examining the effects of reciprocal emoji use on interpersonal and
           communication outcomes

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      Authors: Bernardo P. Cavalheiro, Marília Prada, David L. Rodrigues
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Research has shown that emoji can determine how interlocutors who use emoji are perceived (e.g., warmer) and can help complement written communication (e.g., clarify the meaning of a message). We argue that reciprocal emoji use may be particularly beneficial for user perceptions and communication outcomes. In two experiments (N = 568), we examined if using emoji, and reciprocating emoji use, in a work context (i.e., message between colleagues) influenced inferences about interlocutors and communication outcomes (Study 1), and if such effects differed according to the level of conflict between interlocutors (Study 2). Study 1 showed that using (vs. ) resulted in higher perceptions of warmth, playfulness, and message’s positivity, whereas no benefits of using (vs. ) were observed. Likewise, reciprocating emoji use ( vs. no emoji) resulted in higher perceptions of warmth, playfulness, and communication positivity. Study 2 showed only an effect of conflict in the scenario, such that, regardless of reciprocal emoji use, in the lower (vs. higher) conflict situation, perceptions of the interlocutor (e.g., warmer, more competent, more playful), and the conversation (e.g., messages more positive, less confrontational) were more favorable. Overall, our results reinforce the importance of emoji valence for person perception and communication outcomes, while also suggesting some emoji may not impact communication under specific circumstances (e.g., during situations of conflict).
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-03-04T03:31:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231219032
       
  • Providing emotional support and daily emotional well-being among
           undergraduate students during the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Danny Rahal, Armaan Singh
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Receiving emotional support can improve one’s emotional well-being, but findings have been mixed regarding whether providing emotional support to friends and family can also improve the provider’s emotional well-being. Providing emotional support could be impactful during the COVID-19 pandemic, when individuals may be particularly in need of emotional support and social connection. Therefore, the present study assessed whether providing emotional support was related to role fulfillment and enhanced emotional well-being on a day-to-day basis during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants (N = 167; Mage = 20.42, SD = 2.30; 73.1% female; 40.1% Asian, 18. 6% Latinx, 16.8% white) completed up to eight daily checklists (Mchecklists = 6.54, SD = 2.10) in which they reported whether they provided emotional support to their friends and to their parents, their role fulfillment (i.e., the extent to which they felt like a good son/daughter and friend), and the degree of positive and negative emotion they were feeling. Participants reported higher positive emotion and lower negative emotion on days when they provided emotional support to friends, but not to parents, with potentially stronger associations in-person than virtually. Participants also reported higher role fulfillment as a good son/daughter and a good friend on days when they provided emotional support, and role fulfillment significantly mediated associations between providing emotional support and daily emotion. Taken together, results suggested that providing emotional support to friends—particularly in-person—was related to better emotional well-being by promoting a sense of role fulfillment as a good friend. Providing emotional support may provide one means for reinforcing social relationships and promoting emotional well-being during times of social isolation.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-28T03:02:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241234823
       
  • How remembering positive and negative events affects intimacy in romantic
           relationships

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      Authors: Tabea Wolf, Lisa Nusser
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Previous studies provide some evidence that recalling positive autobiographical memories can foster feelings of intimacy in social relationships. The present research aimed to extend this finding by examining the effects of negative relationship memories on current feelings of intimacy. In Study 1, 71 adults recalled either two positive or two negative events experienced with their partner. Intimacy (feelings of warmth, relationship closeness) was measured before and after remembering. Relationship closeness increased after recalling positive relationship memories, whereas feelings of warmth were reduced after the recall of negative relationship memories. In Study 2, 187 adults recalled two relationship conflicts and rated intimacy toward their partner (feelings of warmth, relationship closeness) before and after remembering. Replicating the findings of Study 1, we found feelings of warmth to be reduced after the recall of relationship conflicts. Relationship closeness was likely to decrease the more conflicts were considered personally significant and the more a person had used self-distraction to regulate their emotions during the conflict. Future research may identify personal characteristics that could explain why, for some people, the recall of negative relationship memories is hurtful, whereas it brings others closer to their partner.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-27T06:44:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241235962
       
  • Attachment anxiety in daily experiences of romantic relationships: An
           expansion of the mutual cyclical growth model

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      Authors: Lindsey A. Beck, Edward P. Lemay, Celeste S. Witting
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      This research provides a conceptual replication and theoretical extension of the mutual cyclical growth model. This model proposes that dependence promotes relationship commitment, which promotes pro-relationship behavior, which—when detected by partners—promotes partners’ trust, which promotes partners’ willingness to depend on the relationship. Prior research supports these links on a month-to-month basis, but romantic partners’ thoughts, feelings, and behaviors may change on a day-to-day basis. The present research sought to replicate the model on a daily level, and to extend the model with an important potential moderator: individuals’ attachment orientations. Results from a dyadic daily-report study of romantic couples replicated the links in the mutual cyclical growth model at the level of day-to-day fluctuations in partners’ experiences; the links were especially strong for individuals high in attachment anxiety. This research provides insight into mechanisms through which close relationships develop and strengthen.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-24T06:53:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241235335
       
  • Technically in love: Individual differences relating to sexual and
           platonic relationships with robots

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      Authors: Connor E. Leshner, Jessica R. Johnson
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Incremental advancements in technology present researchers with opportunities to examine and predict human behavior before the integration of technology into daily life. Previous studies have identified trends in both the design and reception of current social robotic technologies, including gender biases and social “othering”, which may affect how humans interact with more advanced robotic technologies in the future. The aim of the current study was to explore whether preconceived beliefs about gender inequality, interest in casual sex, and social hierarchies would relate individuals’ interest in engaging in platonic friendships (“robofriendship”) or sexual relationships (“robosexuality”) with hypothetical human-like robots. Two-hundred and twelve participants completed an online survey measuring gender, ambivalent sexism, social dominance orientation, and sociosexual orientation in relation to individuals’ interest in both robofriendship and robosexuality. It was found that hostile sexism positively predicted interest in robosexuality, particularly for men (β = .16, b = .27, 95% CI [.03, .30], t(209) = 2.364, p = .019). Conversely, hostile sexism negatively predicted robofriendship, and significant interactions effects were found in that at lower levels of SDO, women maintained greater interest in robofriendship than men (β = .26, b = .54, 95% CI [.09, .99], t(208) = −2.235, p = .02). The current study provides preliminary evidence to suggest that preconceived beliefs about social hierarchy and gender inequality may impact romantic and platonic interactions between humans and robots. Limitations and future directions are also discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-19T03:23:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241234377
       
  • A model of personal relationships and cyberbullying perpetration among
           adolescents: A person*environment model

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      Authors: Jennifer L. Doty, Christopher P. Barlett, Joy Gabrielli, Jacqlyn L. Yourell, Yi-Wen Su, Tracy E. Waasdorp
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Although cyberbullying is relational by nature, prior models focused on individual explanations for cyberbullying rather than integrating contextual processes. We present the Relational Model of Cyberbullying Motivation and Regulation (RMC). This model applies the concepts of proximal processes (e.g., interactions with parents, teachers, peers) from ecological systems theory and the concepts of psychological resources (e.g., autonomy, competency, and relatedness) from self determination theory to explain youth motivation and self-regulation of cyberbullying. First, we review theoretical foundations for the theories involved and outline postulates for youths’ proximal influences, motivations for, and regulation against cyberbullying perpetration. Then, we present a pathway by which the most proximal social influences on youth impact the development of psychological resources, which then may impact cyberbullying. We also present pathways by which autonomy, competence, and relatedness have an indirect impact on cyberbullying via motivation and self-regulation. The RMC informs intervention efforts by identifying proximal contexts and leverage points to disrupt processes that lead to competence and/or autonomy to cyberbully others.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-13T07:36:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241227394
       
  • Adolescents’ experiences of discrimination, disclosure of
           discrimination, and well-being

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      Authors: Aryn M. Dotterer, Melissa Ferguson, Shawn D. Whiteman
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Discrimination because of one’s stigmatized identities and personal characteristics can thwart healthy adolescent development. Little is known about the role of disclosure, including whether adolescents talk about their discrimination experiences with close relational partners (i.e., parents, siblings, friends) and whether disclosure mitigates the negative effects of discrimination. Addressing this gap, this study investigated links between adolescents’ perceptions of discrimination in multiple settings (from teachers at school, from peers at school, and online) and indicators of adolescent well-being (i.e., depressive symptoms, positive identity/values, school trouble, and school bonding), and tested whether disclosure of discrimination experiences moderated these associations. Survey data from 395 parent-adolescent dyads (33% African American/Black, Hispanic/Latinx, and White, respectively) were analyzed using mixed model ANOVAs and multiple regression. Perceived discrimination was generally associated with less positive identity/values, more trouble at school and less school bonding; however, disclosure of discrimination mitigated some of these deleterious links. Adolescents’ close relationships that promote disclosure therefore represent an important context that can provide protective benefits and ensure youth garner the resources and support they need for optimal development.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-13T04:33:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241233486
       
  • Connecting through touch: Attitudes toward touch in pregnancy are
           associated with couples’ sexual and affectionate behaviors across the
           transition to parenthood

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      Authors: Inês M. Tavares, Yvonne N. Brandelli, Samantha J. Dawson, Emily Impett, Anik Debrot, Natalie O. Rosen
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Touch is a universal nonverbal action often used by romantic partners to demonstrate affection and care for each other. Attitudes toward touch might be particularly relevant across periods of relational strain—such as the transition to parenthood—when couples face many novel stressors and shifting priorities which can interfere with their sexual and affectionate experiences. New parent couples (N = 203) completed self-report measures online across six time-points (two prenatal). We tested whether couples’ attitudes toward touch (touch aversion, touch for affection, touch for emotion regulation) at baseline (20 weeks mid-pregnancy) predicted their frequency of sexual and affectionate behaviors from mid-pregnancy through 12-month postpartum. Both partners’ more positive attitudes toward touch (i.e., for affection and emotion regulation) and lower aversive attitudes toward touch, as measured in mid-pregnancy, predicted couples’ higher frequency and variety of sexual and affectionate behaviors at 3-month postpartum. Touch attitudes generally did not predict the degree of change in the frequency or variety of sexual or affectionate behaviors, with one exception: non-birthing parents’ more positive attitudes toward touch for emotion regulation in mid-pregnancy predicted a slower decline in couples’ affectionate behaviors across pregnancy. Findings underscore a link between new parents’ attitudes toward touch and their subsequent sexual and affectionate behaviors, particularly in the early postpartum period. New parents need to navigate novel sexual changes and a nonverbal strategy such as touch might be useful to promote intimacy and care.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-13T04:16:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241232704
       
  • Need for closure is linked with traumatic bonding among victims of
           intimate partner violence (A mediatory approach)

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      Authors: Uwemedimo S. Isaiah, James E. Effiong, Innih Udokang, Samson Ogwuche, Emekubong N. Udoukok, Steven Kator Iorfa
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Intimate partner violence (IPV) is an increasingly prevalent problem in most parts of the world, including Nigeria. Very little is known about why persons who experience IPV sometimes decide to remain in the abusive relationships. In this study, we investigate whether the need for closure (NFC) may play significant roles in the association of IPV and the decision to stay in abusive relationships (traumatic bonding). Specifically, we tested if NFC would mediate the relationship between IPV and traumatic bonding (TB) among victims of IPV in Nigeria. Participants were 345 women, purposively selected from female clients who visited the Sexual Assault Referral Centre (SART) in Awka, Anambra State (n = 145) and the Lagos State Domestic and Sexual Violence Response Team, Lagos (n = 200). Their age ranged from 18–61 years (M = 35.79; SD = 8.6 years). They responded to the Composite Abuse Scale, the Need for Closure Scale, and the Stockholm Syndrome Scale. Results of data analysis using the Hayes regression-based PROCESS macro showed that IPV was not significantly associated with traumatic bonding while NFC was positively associated with increased traumatic bonding. Estimates of indirect effects indicated that NFC mediated the relationship of IPV and TB serving as a pathway through which IPV was linked to dimensions of TB. This shows that NFC may engender tendencies that increase the likelihood of traumatic bonding. The implications of these findings were discussed across policy, research and psychotherapeutic practice.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T05:46:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241234074
       
  • Parent empathy and adolescent disclosure in the context of type 1 diabetes
           management

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      Authors: Alexandra Main, Deborah J. Wiebe, Maritza Miramontes, Janice Disla, Erica Hanes, Nedim Cakan, Jennifer K. Raymond
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Adolescent disclosure to parents is a key aspect of positive parent-adolescent relationships and youth adjustment. We leveraged a study of diverse families with an adolescent with type 1 diabetes to examine how observed parental empathy during parent-adolescent conflict discussions about diabetes management was associated with observed adolescent disclosure and adolescent self-reported disclosure to parents. Adolescents with type 1 diabetes and the parent most involved in their diabetes care (N = 67 dyads) participated in the study. Parent empathy, adolescent disclosure, and parent positive affect during parent-adolescent conversations were rated by trained coders. Parents reported on their own empathy and adolescents reported on their own disclosure, parental knowledge of their diabetes management, and parental acceptance. Results indicated that observed parental empathy was associated with both observed and self-reported disclosure. This association remained after covarying other parent-adolescent relationship and parent dispositional, demographic, and diabetes variables. This study holds implications for promoting greater parental communication of empathy to encourage adolescent disclosure in the context of chronic illness management.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-06T10:46:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241231613
       
  • Childhood maltreatment and the quality of marital relationships: Examining
           mediating pathways and gender differences

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      Authors: Shireen Sokar
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Childhood maltreatment (CM) is considered a traumatic experience with long-term adverse effects on the quality of adult intimate relationships. Research on the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon among Arab societies is scarce. Objective: This study investigated the impact of childhood physical abuse (PA) and emotional abuse (EA) on the quality of marital relationships. Additionally, it examined the mediating roles of two dimensions of insecure adult attachment (i.e., avoidant and anxious) to a romantic partner and psychological distress within gender-specific models. Method: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among a representative sample of 604 married Arab adults (M age = 33.5, SD = 6.52; 50.1% women) in Israel using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Childhood PA was significantly related to low levels of relationship quality among men and women. For men, childhood PA was positively related to psychological distress and both patterns of romantic attachment styles, which in turn were negatively associated with relationship quality. For women, childhood PA was positively associated with psychological distress and avoidant attachment, correlating with low levels of relationship quality. Conclusion: A retrospective assessment of childhood PA is associated with decreased levels of marital relationship quality for men and women. This association is mediated by psychological distress and romantic attachment styles. Implications: Implementing interventions focused on improving mental health and promoting a secure romantic attachment style can enhance the quality of marital relationships for adults with CM experiences.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-06T01:37:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241232168
       
  • Social support and perceived partner responsiveness have complex
           associations with salivary cortisol in married couples

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      Authors: Hayley C. Fivecoat, Richard E. Mattson, Nicole Cameron, Matthew D. Johnson
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Spousal support may help ameliorate the health consequences of stressful situations by downregulating cortisol. To examine how cortisol levels change in conjunction with spousal social support during discussions of a stressful situation, 191 married couples engaged in two 10-minute interactions addressing a personal (i.e., non-marital) problem. We coded for positive and negative social support provision and receipt, assessed the perception of received support, and collected salivary cortisol samples. We found that wives’ display of more negative behaviors while receiving support was associated with an increase in wives’ cortisol levels via an indirect (mediated) effect of perceived partner responsiveness. Overall, results suggest a link between support behaviors, changes in cortisol and perceived partner responsiveness, with more consistent links between support behaviors and responsiveness ratings relative to other paths, and cortisol effects found more often in wives than husbands. Exploratory analyses also suggest that cortisol levels coming into an interaction may impact elements of support interactions. The implications of the role of cortisol and partner responsiveness to the provision of spousal support are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T09:18:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241229755
       
  • Accounts of interpersonal touch in female victims of intimate partner
           violence: A qualitative study

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      Authors: Anik Debrot, Shékina Rochat, María del Río Carral, Prisca Gerber, Oriane Sarrasin, Fabrice Brodard
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Crucial for human development and functioning, affectionate touch predicts well-being. However, most research on affectionate touch in romantic relationship is conducted with samples in high quality relationships and relies on quantitative methods. We thus know little to nothing about how touch is experienced in low-quality relationships, namely those characterized by intimate partner violence (IPV). To fill this gap, victims of physical and/or sexual IPV who had received psychological support at one association supporting victims of IPV were invited to participate in the present study. The thematic analysis conducted upon the qualitative data revealed five main themes: (1) the definition of identity by touch, (2) the presence of “undesired” touch, (3) the absence of “desired” touch, (4) the memories and flashbacks triggered by touch, and (5) the self-reconstruction allowed by touch. Analyses are discussed in terms of their link with previous research on affectionate touch and on interpersonal violence. The results suggest that this constitute a meaningful topic of investigation to be further analyzed, as well as a possible therapeutic channel.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T04:41:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241231302
       
  • Characteristics of parent-child separation related to bullying involvement
           among left-behind children in China

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      Authors: Jiayao Xu, Shi Guo, Jingjing Lu, Guanlan Zhao, Hailati Akezhuoli, Menmen Wang, Feng Wang, Xudong Zhou
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Parent-child separation due to internal migration is prevalent in China. However, few studies have focused on the associations between different characteristics of parent-child separation and children’s involvement in bullying. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 2,355 fifth-to eighth-grade students in China, using self-reported questionnaires to investigate the associations between children’s bullying involvement (i.e., bullies, victims, bully-victims) and different characteristics of parent-child separation resulting from parental migration. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to explore these associations. Among all respondents, 17.3% reported being victims of bullying, 3.8% reported being bullies, and 2.7% reported being bully-victims. Compared to children with no left-behind experiences, those with current left-behind experiences were more likely to be victims and bully-victims. Children left behind by parent(s) at the age of three years or younger were more likely to be victims (aOR = 1.66, 95% CI [1.22, 2.25], p = .001), bullies (aOR = 1.88, 95% CI [1.02, 3.52]), and bully-victims (aOR = 2.17, 95% CI [1.04, 4.71]). Children left behind for seven years or longer were more likely to be victims (aOR = 1.49, 95% CI [1.12, 2.00], p = .007), bullies (aOR = 2.03, 95% CI [1.15, 3.69]), and bully-victims (aOR = 2.13, 95% CI [1.06, 4.50]). The identified characteristics of parent-child separation associated with bullying involvement hold implications for parental decisions regarding internal migration, interventions, and policymaking for preventing bullying among left-behind children.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-02T08:23:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241230115
       
  • Bidirectional longitudinal relationships between parents’ positive
           co-parenting, marital satisfaction, and parental involvement

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      Authors: Ye Zhang, Ruibo Xie, Ru Yan, Die Wang, Wan Ding, Binghai Sun
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Numerous studies have shown that co-parenting plays an important role in marital and parent-child interactions. However, little is known about the bidirectional associations between positive co-parenting and marital and parent-child factors, as well as the dynamic underlying mechanisms. This study used cross-lagged panel model (CLPM) to explore the bidirectional longitudinal relationship between positive co-parenting, marital satisfaction, and parental involvement among Chinese parents from a positive family multiple systems perspective. A sample of 668 father-mother dyads (father’s Mage = 36.47, SDage = 5.34; mother’s Mage = 35.45, SDage = 5.07) completed a series of questionnaires at three time points (approximately spaced 1 year between each time point). The results showed that positive co-parenting positively predicted marital satisfaction and parental involvement and that marital satisfaction positively influenced parents’ positive co-parenting, whereas the effect of parental involvement on positive co-parenting was significant among fathers. Additionally, fathers’ marital satisfaction can affect their involvement, but this effect is negligible among mothers. Finally, parental marital satisfaction mediated the relationship between positive co-parenting and the next stage of positive co-parenting. This study provided new ideas and interventions to strengthen family cohesion and harmony.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T09:42:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241231010
       
  • Exploring social networks in foster caring: The mockingbird family in
           Australia

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      Authors: Michelle Jones, Emi Patmisari, Helen McLaren, Simone Mather, Chris Skinner
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      In their care of children and young people, foster carers report experiencing social isolation and a lack of support. This study examines the social network experiences of Australian foster carers who are members of Mockingbird Family. While well established in the United States and United Kingdom, Mockingbird Family was introduced to Australia offering a new approach to address the unique challenges of foster caring for vulnerable children and young people. The model geographically networks 6–10 foster care households in a ‘constellation’ with a central ‘hub home provider’ tasked with providing information, support, and respite care. This study employed a cross-sectional explanatory sequential mixed methods approach to investigate social connections and supports in the first four Australian Mockingbird Family constellations. A social network tool was used to survey participants (n = 27) and two focus groups (n = 20) to gather their experiences. Analysis found the highest mean social network connections with people from within their own Mockingbird Family constellations. Three measures of centrality were used indegree, betweenness and closeness, to report the connections and role of members within each constellation. Comparing constellations at different stages of maturity, the hub home provider was consistently ranked with high betweenness centrality as the bridge. In the longer-running constellations, the hub home provider was ranked with high indegree centrality or the primary source of advice or expert support. This indicated micro-network evolution that may potentially result in reduced reliance on statutory and other formal system supports over time. Changes to micro-dynamics in social support within constellations were explained qualitatively through three themes: leadership and expertise, information diffusion and communication, and trust and familiarity. Mockingbird Family was found to provide social connections and support networks amongst foster carers, indicating the model’s capacity to strengthen supports to carers thereby strengthening the immediate environment of children and young people in care.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T05:36:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241230455
       
  • The great reconnection: Examining motives for relational reconnection and
           investigating social penetration as a predictor of well-being

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      Authors: Nicholas Brody, Kate Blackburn, Leah LeFebvre
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      This study employs multiple methods to examine why individuals engage in relational reconnection and how self-disclosure during the re-initiation process relates to well-being during a time of acute stress. We apply Social Penetration Theory to examine individuals’ motivation to reconnect with dormant contacts, which channels they selected, the extent to which partners engaged in various levels of self-disclosure during relational reconnection, and how self-disclosure related to psychosocial and relational outcomes. Participants (N = 254) were recruited from Amazon Mechanical Turk to answer a series of open- and closed-ended questions relating to the most important person they reconnected with during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. Qualitative thematic analysis identified ten themes driving individuals to reconnect, including relational dormancy, health checks, and reminiscing. Quantitative results showed that depth and breadth of self-disclosure in reconnected relationships were each negatively related to depression and loneliness. Breadth and depth of self-disclosure were also each positively associated with anticipation of future interaction. The ability to re-engage with former social connections showed clear associations with people’s psychological and emotional well-being during the pandemic, and the findings demonstrate the central role of continued self-disclosure during relational reconnection.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T07:09:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231222945
       
  • Daily and longitudinal associations between relationship catastrophizing
           and sexual well-being in the postpartum period

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      Authors: Grace A. Wang, Samantha J. Dawson, Jackie S. Huberman, Natalie O. Rosen
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      New parent couples report heightened relationship conflicts and challenges; how romantic partners regulate their emotions in response can have key implications for their sexual relationship. One way people might respond to these emotional challenges is through relationship catastrophizing, which refers to magnifying negative cognitions, ruminating on relationship problems, and adopting a helpless orientation toward coping with these problems. Relationship catastrophizing may orient new parents’ attention toward challenges in their relationship, such as sexual difficulties, with negative implications for sexual well-being. The current study examined how relationship catastrophizing relates to one’s own and a partner’s sexual well-being. Birthing parents and their partners completed a novel measure of relationship catastrophizing and measures of sexual well-being at 3 and 9 months postpartum (n = 184 couples) and brief versions of these measures for 21 days between 3 and 4 months postpartum (n = 229 couples). On days when birthing parents employed greater relationship catastrophizing, they also reported greater sexual distress and both partners reported lower sexual satisfaction and desire. Partners’ daily relationship catastrophizing was associated with their own lower sexual satisfaction and desire, and both partners’ greater sexual distress. Longitudinal analyses, however, provided minimal evidence that the costs of relationship catastrophizing persist over time when accounting for other stressors (e.g., depressive symptoms, stress, fatigue) characteristic of the postpartum period. Findings support the potential for relationship catastrophizing as a novel target for psychoeducation and interventions aimed at promoting the day-to-day sexual well-being of new parents.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-29T11:41:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231224327
       
  • Multiracial identity and social support: Navigating the monoracial
           paradigm of race

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      Authors: Megan E. Cardwell
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Following a racialized encounter, especially one that is racist or discriminatory, individuals often turn to those in their racial ingroup for social support. However, ingroup racial membership lines may be blurred for those with one Black parent and one White parent. The purpose of this study is to examine Black-White multiracial individuals’ experiences navigating the monoracial paradigm of race when seeking racialized support. Guided by Critical Multiracial Theory, I take a self-reflexive Interpretative Phenomenology Approach to explore the racialized support-seeking experiences of 15 Black-White biracial adults in the U.S. Results reveal a unique support seeking process that is influenced by the monoracial paradigm of race. Implications and opportunities for future research are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T07:16:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241228790
       
  • Phone presence and relationship quality: Examining the role of emotion
           accuracy and bias

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      Authors: Jennifer L. Heyman, Lauren J. Human
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Does phone presence during romantic couple conversations influence the accuracy and bias of emotion perceptions' This two-part study examined whether phone presence – experimentally-manipulated in the lab (Part 1: N = 383) and assessed naturalistically in daily diaries (Part 2: N = 342) – relates to emotion perceptions, and, in turn, relationship quality. In Part 1, participants randomly assigned to have their phone present (vs. absent) with their romantic partner exhibited more positive emotion perceptions, indirectly contributing to greater relationship quality. In Part 2, on days when participants reported having their phone present with their romantic partner, they exhibited greater assumed similarity, indirectly contributing to greater relationship quality. Overall, phone presence when with a romantic partner may be beneficial, as it could contribute to more biased partner impressions and, in turn, greater relationship quality.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T07:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241227591
       
  • Attachment to parental figures in emerging adults from Brazil, India, and
           Nigeria: Associations with anxiety and depressive symptoms

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      Authors: Alannah Shelby Rivers, Payne Winston-Lindeboom, Guy Weissinger, Nicole K. Watkins, Linda Ruan-Iu
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Attachment theory suggests that experiences with parents and other caregivers are relevant for psychological functioning into adulthood, especially in relation to anxiety and depressive symptoms. However, this work has largely focused on Western countries and has often neglected relationships with paternal figures. The goal of the current study was to test four competing models of parental figure attachment (monotropy, only one attachment relates to symptoms; hierarchical, one attachment is more strongly related to symptoms; independence, both attachments are uniquely important in different ways; and integration, both attachments are uniquely important and interactive) in emerging adults from three countries with different cultures and family structures. We recruited 324 Brazilian, 309 Indian, and 319 Nigerian emerging adults using the online survey platform BeSample. Participants reported attachment to parental figures (maternal and/or paternal), anxiety symptoms, and depressive symptoms. Response surface analyses were tested in each country separately. In general, the results supported an integration model with significant interactions between parental figures. However, the direction of this interaction, as well as the presence of non-linear effects, differed by country. Our results suggest caregiver attachment remains relevant for individuals during the transition to young adulthood but with cultural variations.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T05:59:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241230453
       
  • Social support in the urban safety net: Assessing tie activation among
           individuals with complex care needs

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      Authors: Emily A. Ekl, Tessa M. Nápoles, Irene H. Yen, Laura E. Pathak, Jeff Nicklas, Janet K. Shim, Brea L. Perry
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Activating social ties is a critical mechanism for satisfying individuals’ social, emotional, and material needs. Researchers have offered a number of hypotheses around tie activation about when and why particular supporters step in to help, ranging from strategic activation via functional specificity to opportunistic mobilization. To date, few studies have examined multiple tie activation strategies in tandem. This project focuses on people facing complex, compounding health and social problems, who may have to rely on multiple forms of activation to get their support needs met. We draw on a sample of 92 participants who are affiliated with one of two Care Management programs in the Western United States. Using name generators in a survey, we elicit participants’ social networks and find they utilize a number of methods to secure critical support needs, including calling on kin ties to borrow money and help with daily tasks, relying on strong and proximal ties for almost all types of support, and using functional specificity for health support. We then draw on qualitative interviews to gain a deeper understanding of the ways alters provide support and why egos elicit support from some alters and not others. Future research should continue assessing this population’s social networks with the aim of leveraging social support to help manage chronic conditions, provide access to resources, and increase their sense of belonging.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T11:11:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241229748
       
  • Mate preference dissimilarity predicts friendship attraction at
           zero-acquaintance for men, not women

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      Authors: Kelly Campbell, Benjamin R. Meagher, Cari D. Goetz, Nuttacha Vaitayavijit
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      We hypothesized that dissimilar mate preferences would augment friendship attraction in zero-acquaintance interactions whereas similar mate preferences would hinder friendship attraction. Heterosexual participants completed an online survey to assess their mate preferences. They also rated the attractiveness of opposite-sex photos. Next, they attended a 3-hr speed-friending session in which they interacted with same-sex others for 3-min each. After each interaction, they completed a 2-min assessment about the person they just met. Two sessions were held, one for women (N = 20) and one for men (N = 18). The social relations model was used to regress unique feelings of friendship attraction on similarity in terms of mate preferences while controlling for perceiver and target variance. Our hypothesis was supported among men: Interactions in which two people differed in mate preferences were rated more positively than those in which participants had similar mate preferences. These results are consistent with Parental Investment Theory and highlight the importance of mate preferences in friendship attraction among men.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T08:06:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241230457
       
  • Associated factors of loneliness among primary school students

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      Authors: Wenyue Wang, Jiawen Liang, Dexing Zhang, Zijun Xu, Dicken C. C. Chan, Grace Yaojie Xie, Yang Gao, Lu Niu, Elsa Lau, Samuel Y. S. Wong
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Loneliness is associated with various negative mental and physical health outcomes. Studies on factors associated with loneliness can inform its early screening and prevention. However, little is known about what factors are associated with loneliness among Chinese young children. The present study aimed to identify the various loneliness-associated factors (demographic, personal, school-related, and family-related) among primary school students in Hong Kong. A total of 258 students and their parents from six primary schools in Hong Kong completed an online anonymous survey from June to October 2020. Loneliness (i.e., UCLA Loneliness Scale 3 total score ≥ 3) was reported by 14% of the students. Multivariable mixed effects logistic regression suggested loneliness was positively associated with a lower happiness level at school, poorer independence skills, a lower level of satisfaction with parents, and lower child-rearing expenditure. There was no clustering effect of school on the associations. The current study found important demographic, personal, school-related, and family-related factors of loneliness among school-age children, with caution suggested in their interpretation considering the cross-sectional nature of this study. Future studies with a larger sample, preferably longitudinal ones, are needed to substantiate these associations and uncover their underlying mechanisms.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T11:32:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241228798
       
 
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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted by number of followers
Psychiatry, Psychology and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 364)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 356)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 351)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 341)
Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 340)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 269)
Psychological Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 262)
Psychological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 240)
Journal of Applied Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 233)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 213)
Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 205)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 204)
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 201)
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 195)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 93)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 89)
Current Directions In Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 87)
Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 85)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Journal of Experimental Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Mind     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Personnel Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 57)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Perspectives On Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Political Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Educational Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Clinical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Neuropsychologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Journal of Applied Sport Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Neuropsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Neuropsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Depression and Anxiety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Traumatic Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Motivation and Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Environmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
International Journal for the Psychology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Psychology of Music     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Psychotherapy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Developmental Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Evidence-Based Communication Assessment and Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Neuropsychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Personality Disorders     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Psychological Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Philosophical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Psychological Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Psychological Science In the Public Interest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 19)
Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Development and Psychopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Individual Differences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Research in Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Trauma & Dissociation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Perception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Journal of Psychotherapy & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Experimental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Anxiety Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychoneuroendocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Applied School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Psychogeriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Personality Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Psychology of Learning and Motivation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Psychosomatic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Methodology: European Journal of Research Methods for the Behavioral and Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Developmental Psychobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Humanistic Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Mathematical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Media Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Psychophysiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ethics & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Family Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychology of Women Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychometrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Pediatric Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Multivariate Behavioral Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Physiology & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Psychosomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
European Neuropsychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Psychological Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Review The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Imagination, Cognition and Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Forum of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Group Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Psychophysiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
New Ideas in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Reading Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Nonverbal Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Trauma Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Diagnostica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Analytical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Constructivist Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Phenomenological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychotherapeut     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychotherapy and Politics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Human Psychopharmacology Clinical and Experimental     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Black Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Pastoral Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Forum der Psychoanalyse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Forum Psychotherapeutische Praxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Japanese Psychological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Russian & East European Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychologische Rundschau     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Dialectica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Estudios de Psicología     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pacific Rim Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Measurement Interdisciplinary Research and Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psicologia USP     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychogeriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychology and Developing Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychologie Française     Full-text available via subscription  
Pratiques Psychologiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Mentálhigiéné es Pszichoszomatika     Full-text available via subscription  
Magyar Pszichológiai Szemle     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive-Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal  

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