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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 100)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 347)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Ágora - studies in psychoanalytic theory     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ajayu Órgano de Difusión Científica del Departamento de Psicología UCBSP     Open Access  
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 66)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 267)
An-Nafs : Jurnal Fakultas Psikologi     Open Access  
Anales de Psicología / Annals of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access  
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analogías del Comportamiento     Open Access  
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 92)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 346)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Psicología     Open Access  
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 209)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aprender     Open Access  
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Archives of Depression and Anxiety     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal  
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 200)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 199)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 88)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Art Therapy : Research, Practice, and Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access  
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 89)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Couple and Family Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos Hispanoamericanos de Psicología     Open Access  
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Culture - Society - Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Culture and Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)

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Similar Journals
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American Behavioral Scientist
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.982
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 26  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0002-7642 - ISSN (Online) 1552-3381
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Critical Issues Facing Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in
           Organizations and Society

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eddy Ng, Winny Shen, Alexander Lewis, Robert Bonner
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      The discussion of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) in the context of the West is uniquely complex. AAPIs are often held up as “model minorities,” resulting in exclusion from many equity conversations. The lack of attention focusing on the experiences of AAPI communities in organizations and society suggests a need for us to remedy this. In this special issue, we curated a collection of eight papers that tackle a broad range of issues that advance conversations of AAPI communities and diasporas. We contend that it may be particularly beneficial to take a critical perspective (using Asian Critical Theory or AsianCrit) to bring to light and challenge systemic issues faced by AAPI communities in Western workplaces and societies. We also call for a post-model minority narrative, which has the potential to mitigate the adverse impacts that the notion of a model minority has on both intragroup and intergroup relations and well-being.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2024-02-24T05:53:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642241231317
       
  • Im/migrant Well-Being Part II: Race, Ethnicity, and Legal Challenges to
           Incorporation and Well-Being

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Elizabeth Vaquera, Thomas J. Rachko
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      In this introduction to the second issue of a two-part series on Im/migrant Well-being, we discuss examples of how race, ethnicity, and a patchwork of current and proposed state and federal laws contribute to the exclusion of and discrimination of immigrants, hindering their incorporation and having harmful effects on their well-being. Articles discussed in this introduction zoom in into these issues by analyzing in detail how the well-being of immigrants in the United States is threatened by current U.S. immigration laws and policies: from the racial construction of the invasive “100-mile border enforcement zone” to the precarious legal statuses of unaccompanied migrant children, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals recipients, and farmworkers. Together, these empirical studies produce robust evidence demonstrating how the racialization and liminal legality of im/migrant communities in the United States adversely affect their belonging, incorporation, and overall well-being. In line with the findings from these articles, and in the absence of federal action on immigration reform in the horizon, the opening commentary following this introduction highlights how immigrant communities and scholars have the power to perform critical acts of brokerage to prevent harm and promote collective well-being by sharing resources and produce collaborative research that contributes toward evidence-informed policymaking.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T08:21:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642241230920
       
  • Work Role Commitment and Interference of Work with Family Among Asian and
           White Americans: A Self-Verification Perspective

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      Authors: Yu-Shan Hsu, Mihaela Dimitrova, Margaret A. Shaffer, Gloria J. Miller
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Based on a sample of 168 Asian Americans and 248 White Americans, we found that Asian Americans were more prone to experience interference of work with family life when they were highly committed to their work role compared to White Americans. This difference was more pronounced for Asian Americans with low self-esteem, whereas there were no differences between the ethnic groups for those with high self-esteem. In sum, we find that examining the level of commitment of Asian Americans to a work role is insufficient for understanding how their work interferes with family life. Our findings reflect that, for Asian Americans, their cultural values, traditions, and heritage also play a significant role, especially for those individuals with low self-esteem. The article also addresses practical implications and future directions for research.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2024-02-21T12:34:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642241231312
       
  • Asian American Women’s Workplace Experiences: A Review and Application
           of Gendered Race Theory and the Intersectional Prototypicality Model

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nicholas P. Alt, Amy Wax, Olivia T. Brush, Joie Magalona
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Asian American women, who make up a growing proportion of the workforce, face unique intersectional forms of workplace discrimination and bias based on being both a racial and gender minority. In this review, we take an intersectional approach, applying social psychological research on gendered race theory and Wong and McCullough’s Intersectional Prototypicality Model, to document as well as explain how race and gender concomitantly inform the challenges and barriers Asian American women face in the workplace. Specifically, we review evidence that the category “Asian” is frequently associated with femininity, and that this in turn leads Asian American women to be viewed as hyper-prototypical or hypo-prototypical given the context of their work. We describe how this alignment or misalignment explains Asian American women’s workplace experiences across multiple domains including hiring, promotion, negotiation, and workplace harassment. By explicitly considering the intersection of race and gender, we conclude by articulating novel solutions and implications for creating better workplace environments for Asian American women.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2024-02-14T01:10:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642241231313
       
  • Precarious Multiculturalism: The Racialized Experience of Asian
           In/Exclusion in Australia

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      Authors: Helena Liu, Kyoung-Hee Yu, Chris F. Wright
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Within Australia’s reputation as a successful multicultural nation, we explore what it means to be Asian in Australia. We trace how this racialized group has been socially excluded under the White Australia Policy that existed for much of the 20th Century, included in the Asian Century adopted as government policy in 2012, re-excluded during the COVID-19 pandemic, and tentatively re-included in its aftermath. We examine the cursory and contingent nature of racial inclusion in Australia in light of the contention that surrounds the concept and practice of multiculturalism as a political program. The racialized experience of Asians in Australia demonstrates the pernicious nature of white supremacy, even while this settler-nation seeks to consolidate a glowing image of diversity to redeem its racist past. We conclude by proposing that Australia go beyond multiculturalism to adopt systemic inclusion as a basis for a more equitable and sustainable future.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T12:17:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642241231319
       
  • Doing Community and Institutionally Engaged Work and Promoting Immigrant
           Well-being While Building a Research Career

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Robert Courtney Smith
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This article offers reflections on doing community and publicly engaged research and scholarly work that promotes immigrant well-being while developing a research career in academic institutions which do not usually recognize or reward such work. I draw on my own career (as the editors asked me to do), and hope the advice or examples are helpful, especially to younger scholars. I write as a scholar who was not from the immigrant communities with which he worked, and who believes scholars should help create a society that respects the rights, dignity, and well-being of its members, especially immigrant families. I applaud the Im/migrant Well-being Scholar Collaborative initiative’s (IWSC or Collaborative) focus on immigrant well-being, which affirms not only work that seeks to make structural or policy change or to change debates (common foci of academic analysis), but also work that directly helps others, builds community capacity, or mentors broadly. I have tried to both promote well-being and to fight injustice and inequality.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T10:56:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642241229539
       
  • Structural Vulnerability and Human Suffering: Pesticides and Self-Reported
           Pain Among Farmworkers in the United States

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mario A. Aguilar Buenrostro, Daniel E. Martínez
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Few studies have examined how handling pesticides affects self-reported pain or discomfort, representing a critical yet under-examined dimension of farmworkers’ overall well-being. Guided by the social determinants of health framework, structural violence theory, and a “normalization of suffering” perspective, we ask: (1) what is the relationship between loading, mixing, or applying pesticides and self-reported musculoskeletal pain/discomfort' (2) When controlling for handling pesticides, what factors are associated with self-reported pain' We address these questions by drawing on the National Agricultural Workers Survey and find that handling pesticides within the past year increases the odds of self-reported pain. We also find that female and indigenous farmworkers have higher odds, net of handling pesticides and other occupational, health, and socioeconomic risk factors. Moreover, female farmworkers who handle pesticides report higher odds of pain relative to males who handle pesticides as well as females and males who do not. We conclude by discussing implications for the extant literature on farmworkers and by providing policy recommendations that may help researchers and policymakers better assess the health risks associated with handling pesticides.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2024-02-09T11:05:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642241229535
       
  • Protective Resources, Legal Status, and the Integration of U.S. Immigrants
           Entering as Unaccompanied Children

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Katharine M. Donato, Natalia Lopez
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Prior studies of U.S. immigrant integration and well-being assume that immigrants arrive as adults rather than as children. Drawing on in-depth interviews conducted in 2021 and 2022 with 77 immigrant adults who were living in Washington DC and Michigan, and entered the United States as unaccompanied children, we examine whether and how their integration and well-being depends on both legal status and access to protective resources such as teachers, peer mentors, and local youth organizations. Findings reveal that legality alone is not a sufficient explanation of integration and well-being. Access to protective resources enables integration, although those with temporary and undocumented status face more challenges and access fewer resources, affecting successful integration.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T07:07:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642241229959
       
  • Normalized Expendability: Navigating Immigrant Legal Status During A
           Global Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Elizabeth Aranda, Elizabeth Vaquera, Heide Castañeda, Melanie Escue
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Using longitudinal qualitative data, we examine how undocumented immigrants in Florida navigated the first year of the COVID pandemic. Building on the concepts of compounded vulnerability and legal violence, we demonstrate how heightened exposure to COVID shaped immigrants’ well-being by virtue of being overrepresented among frontline workers, underserved by the healthcare industry, and excluded from government pandemic aid. We demonstrate how immigrants’ anxieties overlay onto existing vulnerabilities facing those without legal status; although undocumented immigrants were often at even greater risk for negative outcomes related to the pandemic, access to mitigation efforts was denied to them because of policies and laws that allow for—and normalize—the unequal treatment of noncitizens. Findings demonstrate that undocumented immigrants and their families experienced legal violence through the mechanisms of restricted government aid, for which they were ineligible, in addition to bureaucratic delays in immigration paperwork renewals that resulted in expiring work permits for some with Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. These experiences further compounded their economic and social marginalization, rendering immigrants an expendable social group. We identify coping strategies that allowed immigrants to persevere in the face of uncertainty and distress and discuss how policies can diminish some of these vulnerabilities and improve their well-being.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T07:05:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642241229538
       
  • “I’m in a Good Position to Advocate Now”: Deferred Action for
           Childhood Arrivals Recipients’ Deployment of Navigational Capital and
           Brokerage in the D.C. Metropolitan Region

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      Authors: Christina M. Getrich, Ana Ortez-Rivera, Delmis Umanzor, Alaska Burdette
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      During its decade-plus of existence, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) has concretely changed recipients’ incorporation trajectories and facilitated their transition into adulthood. Because it was established by Executive Order, though, DACA has always had an uncertain future. Since 2017, DACA recipients have endured a rollercoaster of lawsuits and court decisions that have evoked profound psychological distress. Yet during this time, they have also developed strategies for negotiating ongoing uncertainty and promoting immigrants’ collective well-being. We present results from a longitudinal (2016–2021) study of DACA recipients in the D.C. Metropolitan region, which encompasses multiple jurisdictions with different local policies. Applying a community cultural wealth (CCW) framework, we demonstrate that DACA recipients have become adept at leveraging place-based navigational capital into everyday acts of brokerage performed for more legally precarious family and community members. DACA recipients promote collective well-being specifically by brokering access to services, promoting household security, and developing innovative advocacy strategies. Results underscore the importance of policies to address immigrants’ exclusion at multiple levels and to ensure that DACA recipients are able to continue performing these critical acts of brokerage.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642241229536
       
  • The Impact of the 100-mile Border Enforcement Zone on Mexican Americans in
           Arizona

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      Authors: Nilda Flores-Gonzalez, Emir Estrada, Michelle Tellez, Daniela Carreon, Brittany Romanello
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Based on qualitative interview data with Mexican American and White participants, this article examines the impact of immigration-related policies on the U.S.-born adult children of Mexican immigrants. Building on Dunn’s concept of a low-intensity conflict zone, we argue that the militarization of the border carries consequences for Mexican American border residents. Becoming collateral subjects to a system of racialized legal violence, they experience the suspension of constitutional rights through racially motivated arbitrary stops, interrogations, and searches. The frequency and intensity of these experiences lead to anxiety, frustration, and powerlessness, and chips away at their emotional well-being.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T06:59:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642241229532
       
  • Mobilization and Arenas of Opposition in Indonesia’s New Order
           (1966–1998)

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      Authors: Mirjam Künkler
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Theories of regime transition have highlighted the importance of moderate resistance movement leaders in negotiating the end of authoritarianism and multiparty democracies. Meanwhile, the specific context in which such moderate opposition leaders who believe in the virtues of peaceful conflict resolution emerge and gain sufficient influence to sideline more radical elements has received far less attention in the transitions to democracy literature. This article presents a classification of oppositional arenas during Indonesia’s New Order and analyzes the social sites from which moderate individuals emerge. It then traces their interactions with constituencies and the regime to specify the processes that put moderate Muslim leaders at center stage during the democratic transition. The article argues that integrating social movement analysis and regime-type approaches is necessary when examining dissent in authoritarian environments. While social movement analysis provides valuable tools for understanding the functioning of oppositional groups, it undertheorizes institutionally available space for opposition and dissent. Political opportunity structure theses typically only analyze ex-post whether such opportunities existed but are silent on which regime types tend to offer spaces for contention and when. Thus, the importance of regime-type analysis.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T09:56:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231195809
       
  • Introduction

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      Authors: Dorceta E. Taylor
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      The American Behavioral Scientist (ABS) was one of the first significant journals to publish a special issue on environmental justice (EJ). The influential volume, published in 2000, bore the title Advances in EJ: Research, Theory, and Methodology. The volume contained classic EJ theoretical essays such as Taylor’s “The rise of the EJ paradigm” and Pellow’s “Environmental inequality formation.” ABS has published other influential EJ scholarship since then.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T05:02:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231222745
       
  • Well-Being, Changes to Academic Behavior, and Resilience Among Families
           Experiencing Parental Immigration Imprisonment

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      Authors: Caitlin Patler, Gabriela Gonzalez
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      While the deleterious impacts of parental incarceration are well documented, we know less about the experiences of children with parents imprisoned by immigration authorities. We draw from 62 multigenerational and multiperspective interviews conducted in California with school-age children experiencing parental immigration imprisonment (PII), and their nondetained caregivers. We find that children experiencing PII report feelings and behaviors suggestive of significant psychological distress, which leads to changes in engagement and behavior at school. While some children access academic support and counseling, often following advocacy from nondetained parents or interventions by teachers, others do not receive such support. Many children conceal their family’s situation and withdraw from school-based programs—alarmingly, the very same structures that could support them through PII. These behaviors are rooted in compounded vulnerability, that is, children’s overlapping experiences of parents’ imprisonment and precarious immigration status. Our study provides strong descriptive evidence of the extensive harms of PII for children. These results should prompt immediate action from policymakers who can legislate an end to incarceration in immigration legal proceedings. Our findings can also inform efforts by educators and schools to better support children experiencing PII.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-12-22T06:29:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231215988
       
  • Publicly Engaged Sociological Research for Immigrant Well-Being

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      Authors: Cecilia Menjívar
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing inspiration from the long tradition of U.S. sociology and from Latin American sociology, I describe a few examples of how I have endeavored to make my scholarship available to the public and to inform policy to enhance immigrant well-being. I frame this piece within discussions around public, policy, critical, and professional sociology to underscore that these strands of the discipline do not conflict but draw strength from one another. Identifying urgent issues that need our research attention is key to doing this work effectively to contribute to social change.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-12-06T08:13:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231217626
       
  • Psychological Underpinnings of Terror Awareness: A Comprehensive Dive into
           Ukrainians’ Perception of Terrorist Threats Amidst War Tensions

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      Authors: Vitalii Lunov, Oleg Maltsev, Mykhailo Matiash, Vasyl Mosiichuk, Bohdan Tkach
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This article delves into the intricate dynamics of terrorist threat perceptions, particularly within the context of the Russian–Ukrainian war. By weaving together narrative understanding, cognitive and metacognitive styles, the challenges of information warfare, neuropsychological reactions, and resilience mechanisms, the research casts light on the complex interplay of psychological factors that shape Ukrainians’ perception of terrorist threats. Drawing from a diverse participant pool, the study identifies four major factors: “Comprehensive Threat Response and Socio-Psychological Terror Impact,” “Eco-Social Strain Perception and Cultural Identity and Societal Concerns,” “Physical and Societal Vulnerability and Intrinsic Fears and Moral Evolution,” and “Interpersonal Strains and Behavioral Indicators.” These elements offer an intricate understanding of how terrorist threats are perceived at both individual and societal levels. The findings underscore the importance of interdisciplinary and holistic approaches in comprehending and navigating the nuances of perceived threats amidst geopolitical unrest.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-12-04T04:55:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231214083
       
  • Im/migrant Well-Being Part I: The Impact of Immigration Laws and
           Enforcement Measures

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      Authors: Elizabeth Aranda
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This article introduces the first volume of a two-part series on im/migrant well-being. Stemming from the conference, Im/migrant Well-Being: A Nexus for Research & Policy, the author discusses the importance of studying im/migrant well-being, and why focusing on immigration policies and enforcement measures is of critical importance if scholars are interested in understanding the social factors that shape well-being among im/migrant populations. A brief review of the articles in this special issue is provided as the author argues for the importance of publicly engaged research that can provide policy-oriented solutions to the public and change-makers.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-12-04T04:53:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231216848
       
  • The Bureaucratic Waiting Tolls: Social Consequences of Uncertain and
           Prolonged Waiting in U.S. Lawful Permanent Residence Processing

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      Authors: Michelle S. Dromgold-Sermen
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This study expands existing sociological and immigration scholarship on waiting, governmentality, and U.S. immigration bureaucracies by introducing the concept of the bureaucratic waiting tolls. Research has identified costs of uncertainty and waiting within the enforcement, judicial, and legislative arms of federal immigration bureaucracies, particularly for vulnerable migrant groups. The consequences of prolonged waiting in U.S. federal immigration bureaucracies’ service branches are less well understood. I examine the consequences of waiting for an adjustment of legal status to lawful permanent residence (LPR) within the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) bureaucracy among temporary nonimmigrants in the United States on visas. While the outcome of waiting for an adjustment of status—receiving a green card—is typically framed as success, I question whether the process of waiting is also one that primes migrants for success. Drawing on qualitative textual analysis of posts on an online immigration forum between 2007 and 2021, I identify multifaceted tolls of waiting in the USCIS bureaucracy. Updates from USCIS toll unexpectedly and disrupt everyday lives, financial tolls and opportunity costs—particularly in employment—directly impact life trajectories, and waiting introduces every day and longer-term damage that marginalizes this immigrant group. Exacerbated by uncertain and prolonged bureaucratic waiting, these tolls are consequential for migrant well-being. I conclude with policy suggestions to reform existing immigration caps to reduce long wait times and thereby alleviate the consequences of waiting and strengthen integration pathways throughout and following the LPR process.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-12-04T04:49:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231216727
       
  • The Phenomenon of the Terrorist State in Contemporary Geopolitics:
           Attributive, Static, and Dynamic Characteristics

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      Authors: Maxim Lepskiy, Nataliia Lepska
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      The full-scale incursion by Russia into Ukraine in February 2022 starkly revealed the aggressive, manipulative, and deceitful nature of the Russian autocracy. This action effectively employed state terrorism and led to Russia being labeled as a terrorist state. This article undertakes a thorough examination of the emerging geopolitical concept known as the “terrorist state” within the broader context of the evolution and hybridization of terrorism. The authors employ a conceptual analysis of the “terrorist state” as a manifestation of destructive aggression, utilizing the instrumental axes methodology. They delve into the distinctive characteristics of state-sponsored terrorism and explore the static structural and dynamic processes leading an autocracy toward the designation of a terrorist state. In this discourse, the authors highlight the pressing necessity to broaden the research perspectives within the realms of terrorism theory and praxeology by introducing the novel concept of a “terrorist state” into the normative framework of international law and counter-terrorism strategies. This research holds significant practical relevance amid contemporary geopolitical tensions, providing a scholarly basis for proactive policies aimed at addressing autocratic dictatorships that challenge the global security apparatus. Additionally, it underscores the importance of strategic isolation measures directed at terrorist states.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-12-02T05:29:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231214080
       
  • An Expensive Pass to Freedom: Bond Amounts Trajectories in Immigration
           Court

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      Authors: Lorena Avila, David Ibañez
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Thousands of immigrants are in civil detention awaiting case adjudication in the United States. Unguaranteed legal representation and stringent access to bond hearings restrict the chances of release. Though the institutional purpose of civil detention and bonds in Immigration Court is to secure safety and the public good, we find contradictions in such purpose: increasingly high bonds are mandated regardless of individual circumstances, in a context of legal violence, or the loss and uncertainty experienced by a subclass of individuals scrutinized by the law, characterized by heightened criminalization, scarce legal protections, and broad judicial discretion. We use bond case administrative data from the Executive Office of Immigration Review between 1991 and 2020 in a multivariate analysis that centers on the influence of criminal records and legal representation to get lower bond amounts granted. We find that criminal records predict risk before 2001, but after, individuals with no records are also mandated to pay higher amounts to Immigration Courts. After 2001, legal representation’s influence on reducing bond amounts is subtle but relevant. We analyze these findings in light of policy changes and provide evidence on how increasingly high bonds fracture social and economic determinants of immigrants’ well-being by altering their economic stability while they and their communities also suffer the psychological and physical tolls of detention.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-12-01T08:57:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231215990
       
  • Immigration and Customs Enforcement Raids the Pillar of a Community:
           Student Achievement, Absenteeism, and Mobility Following a Large Worksite
           Enforcement Operation in North Texas

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      Authors: J. Jacob Kirksey, Carolyn Sattin-Bajaj
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      The scale and violence of workplace raids distinguish them from other interior enforcement actions, and they warrant careful scrutiny given their power to produce serious immediate and long-term consequences for entire communities with a single act. In this paper, we examine the short- and longer-run impacts of exposure to one large-scale workplace raid that occurred in Sumner, Texas, in August of 2018 on students’ academic and behavioral outcomes. We analyze student absenteeism, academic performance, and school mobility from the 2011–2012 to the 2021–2022 school year, which includes the period prior to and after the Load Trail raid. Our results indicate that there were large and direct consequences associated with the raid for Latinx and English learner students attending schools in four affected counties. In particular, student absenteeism increased markedly following the raid, reading and math test scores declined, and there were sharp increases in the number of students leaving their school districts. This study contributes to the growing body of evidence documenting how acts of community violence such as large-scale workplace raids can corrode institutional trust and severely impact the well-being of immigrants’, their children, and their communities.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T09:09:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231215992
       
  • Countering Terrorism: Sociopsychological and Geopolitical Aspects

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      Authors: Oleg Maltsev
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This article provides a comprehensive exploration of counterterrorism, focusing on its intricate sociopsychological and geopolitical dimensions. It draws its foundations from a scientific expedition to Egypt conducted in 2021, which forms the basis for understanding the interplay between civilized and uncivilized societies within the realm of political marketing. By analyzing historical precedents and contemporary cases, it elucidates how terrorism has seamlessly integrated into the fabric of global geopolitics, with private entities now adopting tactics previously exclusive to military and intelligence agencies. The central thesis posits that, despite public condemnation of terrorism, most nations are involved in various degrees of these clandestine activities. At the core of this discussion lies the concept of the “Third Force,” illustrating how territories have historically been manipulated into uncivilized territories to further geopolitical agendas. This concept challenges the conventional replication of counterterrorism strategies worldwide. By unveiling these intricate dynamics, this article not only challenges established norms but also offers a thought-provoking framework for comprehending the complexities of terrorism in the contemporary world.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T09:06:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231214089
       
  • The Impact of Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Surveillance
           Technology on the Well-being of the Children of Immigrants

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      Authors: Mirian G. Martinez-Aranda
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      While existing scholarship examines how Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) electronic monitors (EMs) harm immigrants, less is known about the effects of these surveillance technologies on their children. Based on interviews and ethnographic observations with 39 Latin American immigrant parents monitored via EM between 2015 and 2018 in Los Angeles, California, this study asks: How do ICE’s EMs operate as surveillance tools that spill over to impact parent–child relationships and children’s well-being as their parent’s experience criminalization, punishment, and exclusion' The findings demonstrate that this supposedly “humane” alternative to detention and deportation is responsible for distinct childhood distress. Specifically, EMs impact children’s well-being in two ways: by producing fear that parents will be apprehended and deported and by functioning as visual stigmas that signal criminality and engender shame and anger. EMs also deteriorate the quality of children’s relationships in two ways: by inflicting stress and fear upon parents and by contracting children’s social networks because parents shackled to EMs often become a liability to co-ethnic community members.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-11-25T08:31:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231216538
       
  • Terrorism and an Autoethnography of 9/11

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      Authors: Jerome Krase
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Most students of the subject of terrorism are greatly informed by the literature about the diverse causes and impacts of terrorism that is generally described as premeditated politically or ideologically motivated violent acts intended to instill fear in the civilian population to engender political or social change. These studies however, whether historical or theoretical, deal with terrorism at the societal level and provide limited insights into its harmful impacts on the lives of ordinary people at the ground level. In contrast, here the author offers an autoethnography and visual ethnography of his experience and interpretation of “9/11” to bring the experience of terror to a more local and personal level.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-11-25T08:28:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231214135
       
  • Editors’ Introduction: Terrorism Through A Different Lens

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      Authors: Harvey W. Kushner, Oleg Maltsev, Kanykei Tursunbaeva
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-11-25T08:25:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231214132
       
  • If It Looks Like Terrorism, Feels Like Terrorism, Acts Like Terrorism,
           Then It Probably is Terrorism

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      Authors: Harvey W. Kushner
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This article traces an academician’s transformation with respect to conceptualizing the concept of terrorism. The journey begins with a look back at the education necessary for entrance into the environment of academe. From inside its ivory tower walls, we see the ways that academia treats someone with real experiences gained from dealing directly with terrorism. The September 11, 2001 attacks unlike the 1979 Iranian Revolution bring new interest in the concept of terrorism. But within the academic community, old ways are hard to shake. This forces the academician to go outside the academy to make positions know. Armed with support from Polish and Ukrainian colleagues, the academician’s transformation in conceptualizing terrorism using abductive reasoning is finalized.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-11-25T08:23:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231214093
       
  • Terrorism Challenges and Its Distinct Manifestations in Kyrgyzstan

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      Authors: Idris Kadyrkulov
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Central Asia is confronted with an escalating menace of international terrorism and religious extremism, with the Kyrgyz Republic emerging as a significant focal point in this context. This article offers a concise historical perspective on terrorist incidents in the region, delving into the underlying causes and motivations driving the proliferation of terrorist and religious extremist ideologies within Kyrgyzstan. The article also underscores the distinct role played by disputed territories among the countries in this region. Furthermore, it examines the legal dimensions of state-level efforts to combat terrorism and extremism, along with the initiatives undertaken by international organizations in addressing this global predicament.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-11-25T08:21:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231214094
       
  • Revisiting Audio Observations to Collect Qualitative Data During the
           COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Nils S. Borchers, Mandy Badermann, Guido Zurstiege
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      With its physical distancing rules, the COVID-19 pandemic regulations urged researchers working in a qualitative paradigm to find pandemic-ready approaches to data collection. While many researchers turned to modern videoconferencing software, we explored an alternative route, and revisited audio observations. Audio observations replace the researcher as observer with audio recorders. Audio observations were pioneered in the 1960s, and continued to attract interest into the 1980s. Connecting with the methods literature from this earlier phase of interest, we evaluate a study design that combines audio observations with an interactive task that we applied to study active parental mediation of harmful media content. Drawing on a re-coding of data from two waves of data collection, we report on participants’ awareness of the observation episodes, issues with the recording quality, and the situational control during the observation episodes. We conclude that, although truly not a panacea, the combination of audio observations with interactive tasks not only helps to confront the challenges of physical distancing but also constitutes a serious alternative to more established qualitative data gathering approaches—even beyond pandemic restrictions. Thus, this article contributes to the extension of the methods repertoire in qualitative research.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-11-09T10:33:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231207074
       
  • Moving Behavioral Experimentation Online: A Tutorial and Some
           Recommendations for Drift Diffusion Modeling

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      Authors: Xuanjun Gong, Richard Huskey
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Behavioral science demands skillful experimentation and high-quality data that are typically gathered in person. However, the COVID-19 pandemic forced many behavioral research laboratories to close. Thankfully, new tools for conducting online experiments allow researchers to elicit psychological responses and gather behavioral data with unprecedented precision. It is now possible to quickly conduct large-scale high-quality behavioral experiments online, even for studies designed to generate data necessary for complex computational models. However, these techniques require new skills that might be unfamiliar to behavioral researchers who are more familiar with laboratory-based experimentation. We present a detailed tutorial introducing an end-to-end build of an online experimental pipeline and corresponding data analysis. We provide an example study investigating people’s media preferences using drift-diffusion modeling (DDM), paying particular attention to potential issues that come with online behavioral experimentation. This tutorial includes sample data and code for conducting and analyzing DDM data gathered in an online experiment, thereby mitigating the extent to which researchers must reinvent the wheel.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-11-07T07:34:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231207073
       
  • Framing the Pandemic on Persian Twitter: Gauging Networked Frames by Topic
           Modeling

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      Authors: Hossein Kermani
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This study makes a dual contribution to the current literature. First, it examines how Iranian Twitter users framed the COVID-19 crisis in collaborative practice, networked framing. Second, it explores the potential for topic modeling in automated frame identification. The study analyzes a dataset of 4,165,177 tweets collected from Iranian Twittersphere between January 21, 2020 and April 29, 2020. The results indicate that Iranians predominantly framed the pandemic through a political lens and utilized anti-regime networked frames to contest the political system in general and during the pandemic. Furthermore, the study finds that while Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) can accurately identify the most significant networked frames, it may overlook less prominent frames. The research also suggests that LDA performs better with larger datasets and lexical semantics. Lastly, the implications and limitations of the investigation are discussed.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-10-31T11:39:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231207078
       
  • Challenges in Remote Study Design: An Infrastructure Review of a Linkage
           Study

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      Authors: Tim Schatto-Eckrodt, Lena Clever, Lena Frischlich
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Planning and designing a study that links content analysis and panel data is a complex endeavor and managing a collaborative research project across multiple organizations involves many hurdles and challenges. Both, the complexity of a linkage design and the challenging nature of a collaborative research project are enhanced by the COVID-19 pandemic, demanding creative solutions for many issues and a lot of planning by the researchers involved. Especially the challenges involved in gathering, storing, analyzing, and accessing data are amplified by the lack of face-to-face contact and standardized technical infrastructure for digital collaborative research projects. This article aims at giving an overview of the technical infrastructure involved in the content analysis part of a large-scale linkage study, providing researchers with a blueprint of the many moving parts involved in the study’s implementation. This overview will be discussed with a reflective eye toward the challenges encountered and solutions found in the process, the added layer of complexity of a global pandemic, and potential learnings for future projects like this.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-10-31T05:43:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231205771
       
  • Moving from Offline to Online: How COVID-19 Affected Research in the
           Social and Behavioral Sciences

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      Authors: Alice Binder, Jörg Matthes, Emese Domahidi, Marko Bachl
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      During the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers have faced a lot of challenges related to their daily work. This article introduces a special issue of the American Behavioral Scientist, which particularly focuses on methodological challenges caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on a brief review of the literature as well as the studies in this issue, we argue that the pandemic has sparked significant methodological innovations with respect to design, data collection, study documentation, and scholarly collaboration. We distinguish two types of innovations, both conceptualized as the outcome of an unprecedented external shock. First, “methodological compromises” that enabled data collection during the pandemic, but are inferior to established approaches. These methodological compromises, therefore, may be abandoned in post-pandemic times. Second, there are also “methodological game changers” that are superior to classic approaches and thus may prevail in the long run. Regardless of the type, we call scholars in the social and behavioral sciences to systematically test, compare, and evaluate the methodological innovations brought to us as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-10-21T04:41:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231205761
       
  • The Remote Self-Confrontation Interview Method: Gaining Insights into
           Users’ Perceptions of Digital Media Content from a Distance

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      Authors: Ursula Kristin Schmid, Anna Sophie Kümpel, Diana Rieger
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      For researchers interested in studying users’ perceptions and immediate reactions to digital media content—even from a distance—this article introduces the remote self-confrontation interview method. This adapted version of the self-confrontation interview method uses videoconferencing software and combines four interrelated steps: First, participants are observed scrolling through/using a stimulus, which allows the assessment of attention, emotional reactions, and the intensity of participants’ engagement. Second, self-confrontation interviews are conducted, discussing and re-evaluating participants’ observed behavior. Third, further research aims are addressed in semi-structured interviews, and fourth, in problem-focused tasks. Weighting up advantages and challenges for participants and researchers, we discuss the method as an effective and broadly applicable approach to examine digital media users’ perceptions and evaluations.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-10-14T09:02:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231205768
       
  • Challenges and Opportunities to the Flow of Communication: Online Focus
           Groups with Parents of Young Children, Professional Caregivers, and
           Intermediaries

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      Authors: Paula Stehr, Doreen Reifegerste, Constanze Rossmann, Ann-Kathrin Lindemann, Annett Schulze
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      To explore the information behavior in the context of child injury prevention, we conducted online focus groups with parents, professional caregivers, and intermediaries as part of a larger project. In this paper, we discuss our qualitative interview design: audiovisual, synchronous online focus groups. To do so, we analyze a crucial methodological issue of focus group interviews: the flow of communication. In our study, three main topics emerged that influenced the flow of communication in online focus groups: (a) communication mode(s), (b) (co-)moderation, and (c) distractions and interjections of other people. We conclude that depending on the research topic and target group, audio-only communication may be advantageous compared to audiovisual communication because lay people may disclose more on sensitive topics. Moreover, the considerate composition of the focus group is essential for participants’ interaction, so that all participants feel they have an important part to contribute to the discussion. Skilled co-moderation is crucial to successfully integrating all participants and evolving communication threads, and dealing with disruptions.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-10-11T06:39:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231206326
       
  • Lessons Learned and Simple Hopes: Implications of the Pandemic for
           Communication Scholarship

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      Authors: David R. Ewoldsen
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Communication scholars demonstrated a remarkable level of methodological creativity to overcome the restrictions on conducting research necessitated by the pandemic. This methodological creativity allowed us to provide answers to many critical questions that arouse during the pandemic. Now the risk is that scholars will diminish data gathered during the pandemic as tainted by pandemic-related confounds. Certainly, the pandemic offered many threats to the internal validity of research, but this should be embraced as an opportunity to learn from these unique confounds to increase the specificity of our theories.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-10-11T06:34:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231205765
       
  • Studying U.S. Hispanics: Challenges and Opportunities

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      Authors: Laura Barberena
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This article argues for academic researchers to adopt new methodologies when studying the U.S. Hispanic population’s political participation and civic engagement. For decades scholars have used sound but limiting approaches to study this diverse and ever-growing population segment. As the number of Hispanics participating in U.S. electoral politics increases, so does the need to better understand their attitudes and behaviors. Hispanics now make up a significant portion of the population in battleground states with key Electoral College votes—most notably in states outside of the Southwest. Over the years, robust quantitative studies have provided great insight into the Hispanic electorate; qualitative studies have aided in this pursuit, though they are more limited in scope and number. The growth of technology has brought forth new forms of interpersonal communication and news consumption among citizens, U.S. Latinos included. Recent changes call for us to reexamine our current research methodologies and consider adopting a mixed methods approach.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-09-27T06:15:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231191747
       
  • Does a Negative Event Impact Legitimacy'

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      Authors: Luciana Carla Manfredi, Juan Tomas Sayago-Gomez, Pablo Cabanelas
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Legitimacy is a must for organizational success. Hence, those organizations able to gain legitimacy can increase effectiveness during periods of crisis or threats. Based on organizational perception management, which focuses its attention on those actions that aim to influence audiences’ perceptions of an organization. This paper presents multiple experiments to understand how different strategies executing verbal accounts can influence people’s perceptions of legitimacy. Results demonstrate that a threatening event will negatively affect legitimacy perception, whatever the response of the organization is. However, verbal accounts are also an important organizational perception management tactic to impact the perceptions of legitimacy during these threatening situations, as a defensive response will have a worse behavior on perceived legitimacy than the accommodative one. Furthermore, the type of event will also have a direct influence on certain dimensions of legitimacy, opening a wide range of actions to be taken depending on the characteristics of the event.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-09-16T11:00:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231191749
       
  • Making Migration Work: The Roles of Commercial Actors in Hong Kong’s
           Outmigration

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      Authors: Yvette To
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the roles of commercial agents in driving the wave of emigration from Hong Kong since 2019. Human outflows from Hong Kong in recent years have been supported by a booming migration industry involving property agents, education consultants, financial planners, and tax advisors—the “PEFTs”—whose activities and effects on migration processes have been underappreciated in public discourses. Drawing on interviews with PEFTs in Hong Kong, potential migrants and migrants who have moved to the United Kingdom, as well as field research on activities of the PEFTs, this article argues that the PEFTs, through the products, services, and advice they provide, have created new interest, discussions, and even anticipation and excitement about emigration in Hong Kong. This research has three main findings: first, the PEFTs assume the roles of promotors, facilitators, and problem solvers in migratory processes; second, the ways in which the PEFTs operate cannot be studied in isolation as they are linked to existing structural characteristics of the polity in which they operate; third, the PEFTs have helped create and sustain a migration environment in Hong Kong in which political forces account for only one of the many drivers of emigration.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-09-12T11:50:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231194196
       
  • Sources of Government Approval During the COVID-19 Pandemic in the MENA:
           Economic Security or Trust'

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      Authors: Alireza Raisi
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      The article examines the determinants of the government’s approval in responding to the COVID-19 outbreak in the MENA region. A preliminary examination of public opinion polls demonstrates that trust in the government is the major determinant of satisfaction with the government’s handling of the crisis. In addition, the government approval improved over time in some countries challenging the rallying around the flag explanation. The impact of economic insecurity is mixed and inconsistent across the countries of the MENA region. In countries with an economic crisis such as Lebanon, economic hardship resulting from the pandemic affected the government approval of the crisis. Yet, in other countries, economic insecurity does not impact the government’s approval of the crisis. The findings of the article have important implications for understanding what constitutes effective leadership in addressing the pandemic at the state and regional levels and how external shocks influence state–society relations in authoritarian regimes.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-09-07T08:49:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231195807
       
  • Charles Tilly’s Elegant Theories About the Origins of European
           Nation-States, Social Movements, Contentious Politics, and Democracy

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      Authors: Ernesto Castañeda
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      The oeuvre of Charles Tilly provides a helpful model of how to conduct social science. Nevertheless, most readers are familiar only with a subset of his works. Consequently, Tilly’s contributions are often understood as being limited to a few hypotheses or statements, often cited out of context or in an over-simplified manner. This article aims to provide a more extensive overview of Tilly’s work and its continued relevance. It introduces some of his key concepts, such as state formation, superior stories, relational realism, trust networks, categorical inequality, contentious politics, and democratization. This article makes a case for a broader application of these concepts in social sciences research, theorizing, and contemporary political analyses.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-08-31T05:26:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231194871
       
  • Comparative Sociology, Global History, and Contentious Politics: A Special
           Issue Celebrating the Work of Charles Tilly: Charles Tilly as a Social and
           Political Theorist: The Enduring Power of Tilly’s Theoretical Frameworks
           

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      Authors: Mirjam Künkler, Ernesto Castañeda
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Charles Tilly is a towering figure in the social sciences. His work has influenced generations of scholars across disciplines but younger generations may be less familiar with his work; this is a lost opportunity given the usefulness of his work. Much of Tilly’s work on areas outside of state formation and social movements remains underutilized. Many research agendas can be strengthened by building on his work and testing his many fascinating theories and hypotheses. This paper discusses examples of the application of some of Tilly’s works to contexts in Asia and the Middle East and North Africa, theory building, and contemporary issues by some scholars who were part of Tilly’s last generation of students.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-08-29T12:06:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231194862
       
  • Realism, Mechanism, Effect, and Comparative Contentious Politics

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      Authors: Chares Demetriou
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Charles Tilly was instrumental in launching the comparative study of contentious politics through key contributions delineating and defining the subject matter. But his input is epistemological as well as theoretical and substantive. What characterizes his epistemology is a realist mechanistic explanation rendering mechanisms tools of both explanation and comparison. Employing the realist perspective, this article examines Tilly’s focus on mechanisms and some of the ensuing challenges for comparative contentious politics. It argues that mechanisms can explain confidently the emergence of contention in given episodes and can enable the comparison of emergence across episodes but cannot generalize easily about them. This tension between the particular and the general characterizes also the task of conceptualization because the key concepts in this field of study refer to processes. What ameliorates this tension is to conceptually decouple the effect produced in mechanism operation from the modality of such operation and to assign epistemological weight to the effect. This move is discussed with reference to distinctions among mechanisms, to distinctions among concatenations of mechanisms, and to potentiality.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-08-25T05:08:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231194888
       
  • Back to Heraclitus: What Contentious Politics Looks Like When Everything
           Is in Flux

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      Authors: Nicholas Toloudis
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the Dynamics of Contention research program against the backdrop of political science’s emergent concern with institutions during the 1990s. By the time Charles Tilly had developed his mechanism-based explanatory framework for understanding contentious politics, the study of institutions had come to dominate political science. Although the contentious politics framework has some similarities with historical institutionalism, I argue that the two approaches are incompatible, precisely because of the latter’s focus on institutions. The contentious politics approach requires historicizing everything, including institutions, in such a way that anything analyzable becomes a process. Historical institutionalism relies on historical fixedness and some understanding of equilibrium, both of which Tilly came to reject for the study of contentious politics, in favor of open-ended political conflict and causal mechanisms as explanatory building blocks. To probe the tension between Tilly’s mechanism-based approach to understanding contentious politics and historical institutionalism, I conduct a close reading of two books that Tilly wrote using the contentious politics approach to explain matters of concern to historical institutionalists: European Revolutions, 1492–1992 on revolutions and Contention & Democracy in Europe, 1650–2000 on democratization.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-08-25T05:05:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231194885
       
  • In Search of a Greener Pasture' Post-2019 Migrations From Hong Kong

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      Authors: Yuk Wah Chan, Yvette To
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This Special Issue examines various issues concerning the outmigration waves of Hong Kong after 2019, the year when Hong Kong witnessed a series of social protests. In this introduction, we consider Hong Kong as a city of flows: not only because the city continues to receive immigrants and remigrants and produce emigrants, but also because of people’s common practice of sojourning between home bases in and beyond Hong Kong. We suggest that the governance and politics of migration often revolve around power relationships between state and non-state actors and the changing climate of global politics.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-08-25T05:02:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231194300
       
  • Hong Kong Migrants’ Divergent Experiences in Australia: A
           Multi-level Spatio-temporal Approach

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      Authors: Lake Lui, Man Yee Karen Lee
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This study compares the social field for recent Hong Kong immigrants in the Australian cities of Melbourne, Sydney, and Darwin. We explore how migrants’ experience differs in terms of their capital, migration trajectories, and interactions with Australians and in the workplace. Drawing on 31 in-depth interviews, this study features migrants’ precarious experience and (self-)selection to cities and regional areas which are shaped by the convertibility of migrants’ resources as well as state-based criteria of desirability. Compared to Melbourne and Sydney, the Northern Territory has a relatively more welcoming immigration policy. This lower bar offers a lower risk for Darwin’s immigrants seeking permanent residency. At the meso-level, Darwin’s transient population and its more multicultural ethnic composition facilitates opportunities for migrants from Hong Kong to both form social relationships outside their ethnic group and to enter standard employment. While the Australian government’s introduction of the “Hong Kong stream” migration could have attracted migrants whose permanent residency in Melbourne and Sydney would otherwise have been unobtainable, a sense of uncertainty mounted given the “incidental” nature and the paradigm of temporariness in migration policies. Our paper illuminates the interconnectedness of the macro, meso, and micro levels through a spatial-temporal understanding of divergent migration experience and strategies.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-08-22T05:18:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231192012
       
  • The Dynamics of Egyptian Politics

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      Authors: Mona El-Ghobashy
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      The political science scholarly consensus has long held up Egypt as a paradigm case of “authoritarian resilience.” Analysts emphasized the Mubarak regime’s shrewd manipulation of elections, strangling of NGOs, and instrumentalization of protest to shore up its power. This narrative was momentarily disrupted during Egypt’s 2011 to 2013 revolutionary situation, but reappeared unchanged after the July 2013 military coup. A Dynamics of Contention (DoC) perspective sees the political world through different lenses. Where “authoritarian resilience” sees stability, DoC sees dynamism. “Authoritarian resilience” and similar social science models start with pre-constituted political actors, whereas DoC investigates how new political actors emerge and interact during episodes of contention. This article identifies three sites of contention that developed over the 30-year span of the Mubarak regime—elections; street protests, and legal mobilization—sketching how changing dynamics within these sites help us make sense of Egyptian politics before and after 2011.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-08-19T08:47:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231194847
       
  • Same God but Different' Politico-Religious Dynamics and the New Hong Kong
           Christian Diaspora in the United Kingdom

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      Authors: Yvette To, Yuk Wah Chan
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the impacts of new Christian immigrants from Hong Kong on Chinese Christian churches in the United Kingdom. While the new arrivals have helped boost the vitality of Chinese immigrant churches, they also pose new challenges to the established Chinese Christian communities. Drawing on qualitative data from our fieldwork in different locations in the United Kingdom, we seek to delineate the intra-ethnic dynamics and dilemmas within the Chinese Christian communities formed by new and old Hong Kong immigrants, and immigrants from mainland China. While new immigrants from Hong Kong manifest a strong dedication to their Christian identity, many of them are also resolute in their uncompromising political stance and identity, which puts them at odds with other Chinese Christians in the United Kingdom. We argue that Christian immigrants from Hong Kong are creating a new landscape of Christianity and a distinctive religious diaspora in the United Kingdom.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-08-19T08:45:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231194189
       
  • Double Push and the Contingent Path: Migration and Remigration of South
           Asian Minorities in Post-2019 Hong Kong

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      Authors: Yuk Wah Chan, Kim Kwok
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Hong Kong (HK) is encountering a new wave of outmigration. Numerous recent surveys and news reports have been recording the escalating effects of migration. However, almost all of these are about HK’s majority group—the Chinese Hong Kongers. The city’s South Asian minorities are rarely mentioned or included in these records. This article examines South Asian minorities’ aspirations and frustration amid the continuous exodus of Hong Kongers, their views on the city’s recent migration waves due to its great social changes, and the conditions that could trigger these minorities’ (re)migration. By engaging with the literature on immigrant minorities' remigration and the expanding global South Asian diaspora, this research contributes to our understanding of the remigration of HK’s South Asian minorities—a subject heretofore glaringly understudied.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-08-17T08:29:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231194282
       
  • Generational Differences in Local Identities, Participation in Social
           Movements, and Migration Intention Among Hong Kong People

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      Authors: Man-Yee Kan, See Pok Loa, Lindsay Richards
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      We adopt and extend Hirschman’s (1970) Exit, Voice, and Loyalty framework to investigate the associations between local identities, participation in social movements, and migration intention in Hong Kong. Data are from random sampled surveys collected from February to April 2021, June to August 2021, and March to June 2022 (N = 3,003) from people in Hong Kong with the British National (Overseas) status. The findings show that the Hong Konger identity is associated with a higher level of participation in social movements and a stronger migration intention. There are few variations in these associations across the generations. Furthermore, participation in social movements is a strong push factor to migration, and no generational difference in the association is found.Overall, the findings imply that when political freedom is in decline, as in the case of Hong Kong, a local identity is associated with voicing for reforms. In the case of failed social movements, a local identity and previous experiences in voicing out are associated with a higher chance of exit to another country.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-08-14T06:06:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231192023
       
  • An “Unsettling” Journey' Hong Kong’s Exodus to Taiwan and Australia
           After the 2019 Protests

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      Authors: Yao-Tai Li, Bin-Jou Liao
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This article compares the considerations, expectations, and realizations of Hong Kongers migrating to Taiwan and Australia. Based on interviews with 22 Hong Konger migrants, we identified some key drivers for Hong Kongers who moved to Taiwan or Australia. The findings add insights into the spatial–temporal nexus of migration and extend the static push–pull model by including migrants’ changing perceptions about the sociopolitical conditions of different destinations. In addition to offering a more nuanced understanding of migrants’ perceptions of and adaptations to the sociopolitical environment of the host society, we highlight that, after moving to Taiwan or Australia, Hong Kong migrants experience a gap between what they imagined at the time of migrating and the reality (political, social, and/or cultural). The imagination of the sociopolitical community in the destination countries before they leave and the gap between pre- and post-migration experiences constitute the “unsettling” characteristic of the recent Hong Kong exodus after 2019.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-08-09T04:34:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231192025
       
  • Technology of Interaction Between School and Family in the Education of
           Primary School Age Children

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      Authors: Ainur Ansabayeva, Gulmira Mailybaeva, Daniyar Utegulov, Zhanna Temerbayeva, Farida Nugmanova
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Research on child-rearing technologies is always relevant in pedagogical science. The purpose of this study is to establish the relationship between the school and the family in the educational process of primary school age children. To investigate this issue, the study employed the following methods: comparative analysis, synthesis, logical analysis, modeling, deduction, analysis of scientific literature, and the study of student performance. The results of this study are the theoretical and practical foundations of the relationship between school and family in the course of raising a child, establishing common, and distinctive features in the approaches. The practical value of this study lies in the fact that the proposed means and methods of educating children of primary school age can be used by parents and teachers to improve the establishment of contact with the child and effectively influence on them, to form the student as a full-fledged participant in social relations.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-08-08T05:40:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231192019
       
  • What Have We Learned From COVID-19 in Business and Management and What Are
           the Future Challenges'

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      Authors: Sandra Escamilla-Solano, Francisco Diez-Martin, Alicia Blanco-González, César Fernández de las Peñas
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic has created a number of business challenges that have highlighted latent business problems. In the search for solutions, academics have produced over 3,000 research articles in the field of business and management research. This research focuses on what we have learned from COVID-19 in business and management and on the future challenges for researchers. To outline the research that has been generated on the impact of COVID-19 on companies, we developed a bibliometric analysis to describe the intellectual structure of the field, identifying the main challenges for companies (Supply Chain, Consumer Behavior, SMEs, Stock Market, Tourism, ICTs, Work Stress, Cyberchondria, Education, Social Challenge, Teleworking); the ways in which scholars are developing solutions to these challenges; the main sources of knowledge in the area; and the future research challenges.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-08-08T05:37:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231191752
       
  • The Making of a Crisis: Migration and Polarization in the French Press

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      Authors: Michelle Reddy, Hélène Thiollet
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Mass inflows of immigrants are believed to create moral panic which impacts attitudes and votes. However, few scholars systematically explore the discursive construction of migration as a crisis in relation to actual migration flows. When and how does migration become a crisis' To answer this question, we draw on mixed methods harnessing automated text analysis, linear regression, as well as qualitative analysis, to analyze “migration crisis” discourses in a corpus extracted from French newspapers between 2008 and 2020. We locate the emergence of “migration crisis” discourses in the summer of 2015, absent massive inflows of migrants or refugees in France contrary to other European countries. We show that conservative newspapers overwhelmingly contribute to framing the crisis as one of “migration or migrant” rather than one of asylum or refugees despite the humanitarian nature of inflows. Furthermore, conservative newspapers do not only mention the migration crisis more than liberal ones, but they also create a sense of slow-burning or creeping migration crisis, as an undercurrent in media topics. Our fine-grained analysis of the case of the migration crisis in the French media offers theoretical and methodological inputs for an empirically grounded and constructivist theory of political crises.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-07-31T05:19:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231183274
       
  • Migration as Crisis

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      Authors: Céline Cantat, Antoine Pécoud, Hélène Thiollet
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Over the past decades, and across different contexts worldwide, migration has become inseparable from a narrative of crisis. This article analyses the connection between migration and crisis. It proposes a migration as crisis framework, designed to understand and analyze the emergence of this specific perception of migration, on the basis of an interplay between social “subjective” constructions of reality and “objective” migration dynamics. Migration as crisis rests upon a fragmented, changing, and contested assemblage of events, representations, and practices, which in turn call for specific ways of governing migration. The link between migration and crisis can be activated or not, and may or may not be correlated with empirical realities. By engaging with migration as crisis (rather than migration crisis), the article denaturalizes and historicizes the relationship between migration and crisis, and unpacks the processes through which key actors (including media, policymakers, civil society, and academics) frame migration as such.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-07-07T04:48:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231182889
       
  • Migration as Crisis' German Migration Discourse at Critical Points of
           Nation-Building

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      Authors: Christiane Fröhlich
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This article enquires how the Federal Republic of Germany has governed migration at critical junctures of German nation-building within a growing European Union. Drawing on the documents on “Einwanderung” (immigration) from the archive of the German Bundestag from 1949 until 2022, and on secondary literature and media representations of (forced) migration, migrants, and refugees, this article traces different depictions of migration in German political discourse at critical moments of German nation-building to answer the question: Which role does the narrative of “migration as crisis” play for the German nation-building project' I argue that to answer this question, it is necessary to understand whether an incoming migrant group is considered beneficial or dangerous (“critical”) for the hegemonic articulations of an imagined German national identity.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-07-07T04:43:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231182886
       
  • Symbolic Rewards as Migration Diplomacy: Crisis and Containment in
           EU–Turkey Migration Cooperation

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      Authors: Shoshana Fine
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to understand why the Turkish state actors participated in the 2016 European Union (EU)–Turkey agreement in the name of managing the so-called migration crisis. At first glance, this move may seem contrary to its interests in a context where Turkey’s accession to the EU was no longer a probable political project. In explaining Turkish state actors’ enthusiasm for the 2016 agreement which led to the containment of migrants and refugees in Turkey, the literature often highlights the question of material gains, both economic and strategic. In this article, I argue that the symbolic dimension is critical for understanding why Turkish actors participated in migration containment away from EU borders. I offer the notion of symbolic rewards to make sense of this process. These rewards brought Turkey into a “good” migration governance in-group. This article argues that there was incremental consolidation of Turkey’s active role in European migration governance well before the crisis. My findings are based on ethnographic data comprising interviews as well as participant observation at the head office of an international migration organization.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-07-06T04:40:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231183271
       
  • Deterring Migration in Times of Crises: The Ethics of Behavioral Change in
           Migration Information Campaigns

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      Authors: Nassim Majidi
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      The European migration “crisis” has led to new policy and funding mechanisms, such as the European Trust Fund for Africa and funding from the UK Home Office that have in common a dual, and often contradictory, objective: to support migrant protection, while reinforcing a migration management or migration control agenda. They have given flexibility, in a context of “crisis response,” to a range of actors with different levels of responsibilities and of transparency when reaching out to migrants, at times to the detriment of one aspect (the respect for human rights) for the benefit of another (irregular migration control), and with questionable results. This article provides an analysis of one program implemented in Ethiopia and Afghanistan: an information campaign implemented between 2016 and 2019, with a focus on behavioral change among potential migrants. This case study reveals practices in migration information campaigns that go against existing standards in social and behavioral communications campaigns. Building on such standards, the article provides a critical lens through which to assess migration information campaigns, through the prism of three criteria outlined in the paper and used to evaluate the results of the program, and provides a way forward for setting standards in planning and implementating migration information campaigns.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-07-03T04:44:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231183268
       
  • Institutional Creation as a Local Governance Response to Syrian Refugees:
           The Case of Turkish Municipalities

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      Authors: Başak Yavçan, Fulya Memişoğlu
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      External shocks constitute ideal moments for exploring the creation of new institutions as well as changes within existing ones. This paper treats the influx of Syrian refugees into Turkish urban centers as a critical juncture and investigates the changes in the local governance bodies as a result. Based on interviews and focus group discussions with administrative and nongovernmental actors involved in the local response to refugees, we explore the factors that contributed to the emergence of new institutions within municipalities and their institutionalization as bodies able to resist changes of municipal mayors across elections. We investigate how the newly created institutions matter for refugee policy response in looking at various host cities before and after the 2019 local elections. We argue that actual change in the way institutions operate takes place in municipalities (and their respective departments within) that have managed to institutionalize their refugee response through innovative and sustainable policy initiatives that can spill over to areas of policymaking other than refugee response, which invest in building capacity and multilevel partnerships.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-07-03T04:42:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231182632
       
  • The Bosnian War and Refugee Policy: Crisis Management and Migration
           Control

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      Authors: Clara Lecadet
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Based on research in the United Nations high commissioner for refugees (UNHCR) archives in Geneva, this article aims to reflect, through an examination of UNHCR’s huge operation during the Bosnian war, on the major role played by the crisis paradigm in conflict management and related population movements, and on the construction and conceptualization over time of long-term forms of migration management. It analyses how the notion of “preventive protection” which emerges in the early 1990s illustrates a shift in the asylum regime, which concerns altogether the categories of its beneficiaries, the spaces, and the very nature of its application. The focus on humanitarian operations taking place as close as possible to the areas from which refugees are coming is at the origin of new patterns of emergency management which intend to contain and eventually hinder massive refugee flows and migration. This new approach of refugees flow was experimented during the Bosnian war; the UNHCR reflected on this experience and its learnings to build up long-term strategies for managing migration in a context of increased States’ hostility to the permanent welcoming of refugees. The continuity between wartime and peacetime for experimenting and enforcing new modes of migration management is emphasized, in order to show that the importance of the crisis paradigm symbolized by open conflicts and wars is thereafter used as a tool to manage migration flows in ordinary times.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-06-26T06:59:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231182631
       
  • Look Who’s Watching: Platform Labels and User Engagement on
           State-Backed Media Outlets

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      Authors: Samantha Bradshaw, Mona Elswah, Antonella Perini
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Recently, social media platforms have introduced several measures to counter misleading information. Among these measures are “state-media labels” which help users identify and evaluate the credibility of state-backed news. YouTube was the first platform to introduce labels that provide information about state-backed news channels. While previous work has examined the efficiency of information labels in controlled lab settings, few studies have examined how state-media labels affect users’ perceptions of content from state-backed outlets. This article proposes new methodological and theoretical approaches to investigate the effect of state-media labels on users’ engagement with content. Drawing on a content analysis of 8,071 YouTube comments posted before and after the labeling of five state-funded channels (Al Jazeera English [AJE], China Global Television Network, Russia Today [RT], TRT World, and Voice of America [VOA] News), this article analyses the effect that YouTube’s labels had on users’ engagement with state-backed media content. We found that the labels had no impact on the amount of likes that the videos received before and after the policy introduction, except for RT which received less likes after it was labeled. However, for RT, comments left by users were associated with 30% decrease in the likelihood of observing a critical comment following the policy implementation, and a 70% decrease in likelihood of observing a critical comment about RT as a media source. While other state-funded broadcasters, like AJE and VOA News, received fewer critical comments after YouTube introduced its policy; this relationship was associated with how political the video was, rather than the policy change. Our study contributes to the ongoing discussion on the efficacy of platform governance in relation to state-backed media, showing that audience preferences impact the effectiveness of labels.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-06-24T09:00:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231175639
       
  • Talking about Migration in Times of Crisis: A Textual Analysis of
           Narratives by IOM and UNHCR on Migrants and Refugees

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      Authors: Brandon Green, Antoine Pécoud
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      In the absence of a binding and coherent international migration regime, the global governance of migration relies on normative narratives produced by UN agencies and other intergovernmental forums, in line with the discursive legitimacy traditionally associated with international organizations. Such narratives impact migrants, asylum-seekers, and refugees because they support certain policy frameworks among member states. Yet, global migration governance remains fragmented, especially as far as the long-standing divide between the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) is concerned. This article contributes to this discussion by applying corpus-assisted critical discourse analysis to the narratives produced by these two organizations. The article identifies some of the dominant worldviews in the narratives of IOM and UNHCR. Results show that IOM and UNHCR have distinct worldviews, associated with different textual patterns, and that, while IOM’s textual productions seem to influence UNHCR’s discourses, the opposite is less true. This would support the view that IOM is currently the leading actor in terms of framing migration, thereby exerting a strong influence on global migration governance.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-06-24T08:57:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231182899
       
  • Justice in the Jungle: Litigation and Judicial Violence in Calais Refugee
           Camps at the French–UK Border

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      Authors: Annalisa Lendaro
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This contribution critically addresses the migration-as-crisis framework by focusing on litigation in the case of camp evictions in Calais, on the French–British border. Courts are spaces of confrontation between actors (judges, lawyers, activists, exiles, etc.) who have different conceptions of migration, of fundamental rights, and of the ways of guaranteeing them. Based on an ethnographic fieldwork methodology (interviews with judges, lawyers, and activist legal supporters of migrants; observations of hearings; and administrative and police archives and documents) and drawing upon socio-legal scholarship, this article underlines how the “migration-public order” nexus influences the way courts address migration by reducing the effectiveness of some basic legal principles and fundamental rights. In particular, I focus on the social construction of judicial decisions and the instrumentalization of justice resulting in creating judicial violence: I argue that this judicial violence at the border is paradigmatic of a “justice crisis” which has direct effects on the agency of legal supporters (lawyers and activist legal experts), who try to defend the rights of exiles through judicial tools, and ultimately on their (lack of) confidence in justice.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-06-21T09:27:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231182891
       
  • Sharing the Stage: Exploring Inequities in Resources for the Arts Across
           Funding Institutions

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      Authors: Wendy Chen, Douglas Noonan
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This paper examines and compares the funding distribution inequities in arts organizations across three different funding institutions—government grantmaking, charitable contributions, and crowdfunding—through different inequity measures. Based on three different datasets including the National Endowment for the Arts grants data, National Center for Charitable Statistics data, and Kickstarter crowdfunding data starting in 2009, we find that compared to non-arts funds on the same platforms, arts-related funds in these institutions are not more concentrated in the hands of a few, although the level of concentration is strikingly high. In addition, we find that nonprofit contributions are heavily concentrated, far more than government grants. However, contributions to arts nonprofits are not more concentrated than to other nonprofits. We also explore how the pandemic crisis impacted arts funding distributions.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-06-17T11:48:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231179923
       
  • Satellite Dependency: The Problem of Legitimating Structures for Localized
           Arts and Cultural Policy

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      Authors: Claire Burnill-Maier
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Against a backdrop of growing interest in localized cultural policy, this article explores the example of Oldham, an “overshadowed” town (Pike et al., 2016) situated on the edge of the Northern English city of Manchester (United Kingdom). While urban planning discourse has acknowledged the impact of large cities on neighboring satellite areas, finding that regeneration projects can result in a weak sense of place for [such] secondary towns (Turok, 2009), few have considered the extent to which arts organizations in secondary towns are able to sustain their work and create their own narratives. Drawing from the thought of Pierre Bourdieu and from theories of institutional logics, I adopt a relational approach to exploring the ways in which organizations within the local cultural ecology understand their operating environment. Although cultural policy endeavors to use local arts infrastructure to build local capacity, this case study reveals a situation in which those organizations in satellite towns remain unable to gain the status enjoyed by their metropolitan counterparts. Further, it examples a field that remains highly institutionalized, hierarchical, and increasingly professionalized. Institutional arrangements result in organizations in the satellite-town depending upon its city neighbor for crucial legitimating capitals. Just as stories of class reproduce patterns of inequality, this situation is similarly true for organizations. Organizations are found to be complicit in the production and reproduction of inequalities within the institutional field, with dominant organizations appearing more able to access legitimizing capital than others. Ultimately, I argue that organizations in satellite towns are heavily reliant on symbolic resources supplied by the institutional fields of greater scope in which they are nested. Organizations are required to harness the support of elite individuals and dominant “world-maker” organizations, which lie beyond their immediate local context to secure legitimacy for themselves and their activities. This situation I term “satellite dependency.”
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-06-17T11:41:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231178286
       
  • Conceptualizing Conspiratorial Thinking: Explicating Public Conspiracism
           for Effective Debiasing Strategy

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      Authors: Jeong-Nam Kim, Seungyoon Lee
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      We use the situational theory of problem solving to explicate how publics engage in conspiratorial thinking as a form of cognitive problem solving. In doing so, we develop a new typology of conspiracy theories and introduce conceptual definitions and operationalizations of conspiratorial thinking as both dispositional and situational. We conduct two survey studies which provide evidence of the measures’ reliability and validity. We also investigate the debiasing effects of relational and informational strategies employed by social institutions. Finally, we present institutional behavioral strategies, grounded in the strategic behavioral theory of communication management, that can reduce conspiratorial thinking. Our new concepts and measurement approaches describe the origins and processes of public conspiracism and provide a foundation for implementing ethical and effective interventions, ultimately contributing to a more informed and educated society.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-06-17T07:43:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231175637
       
  • In Pursuit of Cultural Equity: DEI Grantmaking Practices of U.S. Local
           Arts Agencies in Community Context

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      Authors: Daniel B. Cornfield, Chancey Herbolsheimer, Savannah Bastian
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      As grantmaking intermediary organizations, local arts agencies (LAAs) play an important but under-researched role in realizing cultural equity—the incorporation of underrepresented groups and counternarratives into democratic discourse—in thousands of local communities throughout the United States. In deploying their diversity, equity, and inclusion grantmaking practices, LAAs vary in the degree to which they proactively encourage the artistic expression of underrepresented groups, such as immigrants and racial-ethnic minorities. Little research has been directed at the relationship between the relative population size of underrepresented groups in an LAA service area and an LAA’s likelihood of having a formal “race-ethnic targeting” policy, the proactive channeling of arts economic resources toward underrepresented community groups. Framing our analysis in sociological race relations theories, we examine patterns of association between an LAA’s likelihood of having a formal race-ethnic targeting policy and the percentage foreign-born of the residential population in an LAA service area based on 462 LAAs of the 2018 Local Arts Agency Profile collected by Americans for the Arts, a national dataset of LAAs that we augmented with U.S. Census demographic data on LAA service-area populations. We conclude by deriving from the curvilinear pattern of findings a “representation thesis” on the community social contexts in which proactive LAAs tend to target race-ethnic minorities for distributing arts economic resources.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-06-14T06:14:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231177902
       
  • Editorial: Innovating Institutions and Inequities in the Arts

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      Authors: Joanna Woronkowicz, Douglas Noonan
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-06-13T06:19:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231178517
       
  • Assessing the Role of Sexual Orientation in the U.S. Labor Market for
           Artists and Arts Majors

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      Authors: Richard J. Paulsen, Neil Alper, Gregory Wassall
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Using American Community Survey data, we describe the labor market experiences of sexual minority artists and arts majors and explore the differences in their earnings and employment. We identify workers in cohabiting relationships as being either in same-sex or opposite-sex relationships. We find that artists are more than twice as likely to be in same-sex relationships when compared to the overall workforce, largely driven by higher shares of males in same-sex relationships. A similar pattern is observed for arts majors when compared to all college graduates. We find significant heterogeneity in the share of workers in same-sex relationships across individual artist occupations and individual arts majors. In testing for differences in earnings and employment, we use regression analysis, finding an increased likelihood of unemployment for male and female artists in same-sex relationships, earnings penalties for males in same-sex relationships, and earnings premiums for females in same-sex relationships. However, like other studies using coupled data, we hesitate in using causal language in interpreting the earnings regression results due to data limitations.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-06-13T06:16:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231178281
       
  • The Value of an Arts Degree: Career Success and Inequality

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      Authors: Joanna Woronkowicz
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the value of a college degree for artists, in addition to racial, sex, and ethnic differences. I use propensity score matching on data from the 2015–2019 American Community Survey to produce causal estimates of the effect of getting an arts degree and a non-arts bachelor’s degree on income, and the probability of unemployment, self-employment, and working in an arts industry. The results illustrate that degrees positively affect artists’ average incomes and, depending on the type of degree, the probability of working in an arts industry. The analyses also illustrate that degrees have differential effects on artists’ employment outcomes based on race, sex, and ethnicity, though not always in the direction we would expect. The results illustrate the often-delicate balance between building a career as an artist and maintaining a livelihood and that individual differences with respect to career aspirations and personal circumstances moderate employment outcomes that are often attributed to common educational trajectories.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-06-13T06:12:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231177659
       
  • Curated Misinformation: Liking Facebook Pages for Fake News Sites

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      Authors: Katherine Haenschen, Mia X. Shu, Jacob A. Gilliland
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Facebook was a major conduit to fake news exposure during the 2016 U.S. Presidential election. This article explores factors that predict liking pages for “fake news” websites on the Facebook platform. Leveraging paired survey and digital trace data from 806 American Facebook users, we determine that 18.4% of subjects liked at least one page for a website that published fake news. A substantial share of fake news page likes (23.9%) came from lifestyle sites that also published misinformation. Regression analyses determine that age, male sex, Trump support, and political participation are associated with liking fake news pages. A network analysis based on audience overlap finds three page clusters of fake news content—two right-leaning and one left-leaning—that also contain a majority of political and news pages. Results add nuance to our understanding of fake news by illustrating the role of non-political sources in providing potential exposure to misinformation on Facebook.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-06-13T06:08:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231175638
       
  • Talking to Our Citizens: National Health Organizations (Mis)
           communications in the United Kingdom and United States During the Time of
           COVID-19

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      Authors: Eileen Polat, Ava Gordley-Smith, Paul M.W. Hackett
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we discuss the ways in which the United Kingdom and the United States communicate health information to their respective citizens. While this article is not limited to the study of COVID-19 health communications, we look at the institutions that were tasked with communication responsibilities regarding the COVID-19 virus in the United States and United Kingdom. To highlight the possible repercussions on the general public of each nation, we present a review of the institutions of communication as a gateway for discussion and an opportunity to unveil discrepancies and inequitable forms of communication. These institutions are the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health in the United States, and the National Health Service in the United Kingdom. We consider the language and vocabulary used within these organizations’ mission statements, privacy policies, digital channels and platforms, regulations for advice and feedback from federal agents as well the general public, and accessibility. We use an intersectional lens to explore the nuanced and multifarious impacts of communication praxis and aim to discuss how these have led to limitations of passive and comprehensive communication influences in both nations and their relation to health infrastructure. By understanding the constraints of health infrastructure on the current disenfranchised citizens in both the United States and United Kingdom, we can register the adverse behavioral imprint on individuals as a result and finally call for further research into the impact of reconstructive governmental health communications.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-06-13T06:06:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231166874
       
  • Whether Live or Online, Participation is Unequal: Exploring Inequality in
           the Cultural Participation Patterns in the United States

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      Authors: Victoria Ateca-Amestoy, Juan Prieto-Rodriguez
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Cultural participation is an individual activity with relevant social dimensions. Democratic societies are concerned about the representation of social groups in cultural audiences and promote policies to increase participation focusing on planning aspects, such as in creative placemaking, or educational policies and social interventions targeted at some underrepresented social groups. Using the data derived from the 2017 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts from the United States, we estimate generalized entropy indexes to explore the more relevant dimensions to explain divides in cultural participation across the U.S. adult population, considering geographical and sociodemographic variables. Cultural engagement is characterized by the participation by highbrow, lowbrow, passive, active, live, and digital activities. Overall, we find that spatial and racial characteristics are not the most relevant, while education appears to be the most important source to explain access inequality. The pattern of digital participation is remarkably similar to the pattern of physical participation, thus showing some evidence that the divide and stratification of cultural practices in the real world translates to digital practices.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-06-13T06:04:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231177655
       
  • Localizing COVID-19 Public Health Department Outreach on Digital
           Platforms: The Role of Discoverability, Reach, and Moderation for
           Illinois’ COVID-19 Vaccination Rates

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      Authors: Nikki Usher, Adrian Tai Wong, Isaiah R. Raynal, Cabral Bigman-Galimore, Ewa Maslowska
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      The politicization of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the United States and abroad has received significant scholarly attention, particularly surrounding misinformation circulating on social media among millions of users. However there has been far less attention paid to how platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and others impact vaccine uptake within local, geographically specific communities. Local public health departments view platforms as critical communication infrastructure for outreach. Through a case study of Illinois, we examine how vaccine uptake is associated with county-level public health communication on Facebook, political regionalism, demographic variation, and digital access and reach. We ask about (a) discoverability: are individuals conducting digital searches able to find and access local public health information on their websites and social media' (b) reach: does growth in public health departments’ Facebook followers correlate to vaccination rate' and (c) practices: is there an association between discoverability, moderation policies/practices of local public health departments’ Facebook pages, and county-reported vaccination rates' We draw on original data about discoverability and local public health department’s Facebook pages in addition to secondary data on voting behavior and rurality. We find discoverability as well as moderation are positively associated with vaccination rates, while greater Facebook reach in rural Illinois is negatively correlated with vaccination rates.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-05-31T05:03:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231166884
       
  • Detecting COVID-19 Fake News on Twitter: Followers, Emotions,
           Relationships, and Uncertainty

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      Authors: Ming Ming Chiu, Alex Morakhovski, David Ebert, Audrey Reinert, Luke S. Snyder
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Fake news about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can discourage people from taking preventive measures (masks, social distancing), thereby increasing infections and deaths; thus, this study tests whether attributes of users or COVID-19 tweets can distinguish tweets of true news versus fake news. We analyzed 4,165 spell-checked English tweets with a link to 1 of 20 matched COVID-19 news stories (10 true and 10 fake), across the world during 1 year, via computational linguistics and advanced statistics. Tweets with common words, negative emotional valence, higher arousal, greater dominance, first person singular pronouns, third person pronouns or by users with more followers were more likely to be true news tweets. By contrast, tweets with second person pronouns, bald starts, or hedges were more likely to be fake news tweets. Accuracy (F1 score) was 95%. While some tweet attributes for detecting fake news might be universal (pronouns, politeness, followers), others might be topic specific (common words, emotions, hedges).
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-05-30T05:05:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231174329
       
  • Finding Self-Salvation for the Ill-Informed Society: A Summary of
           Empirical Studies

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      Authors: Jeong-Nam Kim, Homero Gil de Zúñiga
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      The internet was once seen as a beacon of hope for democratizing public access to information, but scholars argue that social media has led to frustration, isolation, and pseudo-information. This volume presents empirical studies exploring paths to potentially rebuild ideal communication situations, if ever, in the digital age and cope with digital information failure. Can we salvage an ill-informed society' These studies offer insights into addressing these issues.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-05-25T08:26:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231175636
       
  • The Influence of Fact-Checking Is Disputed! The Role of Party
           Identification in Processing and Sharing Fact-Checked Social Media Posts

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      Authors: Anne Oeldorf-Hirsch, Mike Schmierbach, Alyssa Appelman, Michael P. Boyle
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Social media play an important role in political communication, leading to growing concerns about the credibility of shared information. Attempts to slow the spread of misinformation by platforms such as Facebook and Twitter include adding fact-checking labels to social media posts, the effectiveness of which remains unclear. Using two experiments, we tested the credibility effects of fact-checking labels (confirmed vs. disputed) on graphical presentations of political (Democrat vs. Republican) quotes and social media news posts. Study 1 (N = 312) tested the effects of these labels on political social media posts with political quotes, and Study 2 (N = 356) replicated and extended this research to a news story post about a politician. Results indicate that the valence of verification labels on their own do not affect perceptions of the content. Instead, users find corrections of opposite-party political figures more credible and are more willing to share content when it negatively portrays opposite-party political figures. These results demonstrate potential limitations of fact-checking labels and highlight the importance of considering political ideology in correcting misinformation on social media sites.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-05-19T05:11:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231174335
       
  • This is Clearly Fake! Mis- and Disinformation Beliefs and the (Accurate)
           Recognition of Pseudo-Information—Evidence From the United States and
           the Netherlands

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      Authors: Michael Hameleers
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      To understand how beliefs about mis- and disinformation affect citizens’ (correct) classification of pseudo-information, this paper relies on an experimental survey study in the United States and the Netherlands in which we (a) measured mis- and disinformation attitudes, (b) exposed participants to a real versus fake article on immigration and criminality, and (c) compared classifications of mis- and disinformation in response to the real and fake news article. The main findings indicate that the veracity of information did not play a clear role in the attribution of mis- and disinformation. People with stronger mis- and disinformation beliefs, and people with incongruent prior attitudes, were most likely to classify information as false irrespective of the level of untruthfulness. These findings imply that beliefs about misinformation play a key role in the classification of information as false, whereas these beliefs do not contribute to the accuracy of veracity judgments.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-05-19T05:04:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231174334
       
  • User Perceptions of AI-Based Comment Filtering Technology

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      Authors: Yu Won Oh, Chong Hyun Park
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      As artificial intelligence (AI)-powered technology enables the efficient processing of large volumes of comments, more companies, including news publications, are experimenting with and adopting AI moderation to manage their commenting platforms. However, the resulting user experiences have been largely underexplored in relation to these technical advances in comments section management. This study used an experiment to examine the impact of AI filters on individuals’ perceptions about comments sections (i.e., bias, credibility, positive and negative affect, and use intention). The findings indicate that AI moderation had statistically significant impacts on perceived credibility and use intention. Beyond the main effects, priming with a deceptive comment issue moderated the impacts of comment filtering on user perceptions as well.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-05-19T04:58:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231174331
       
  • From Conspiracy Orientation to Conspiracy Attribution: The Effects of
           Institutional Trust and Demographic Differences

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      Authors: Lisa Tam, Hyelim Lee
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      The current post-truth era is characterized by the rapid spread of conspiracy theories which has been exacerbated by public’s lack of agreement on objective facts and presentation of unverified information without supportive evidence. Existing research has examined a myriad of factors which explain the causes of conspiratorial thinking. To extend current research, this study examines the effects of institutional trust and demographic factors (i.e., age, gender, political ideology, household income and education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics [STEM]) in explaining conspiracy orientation (i.e., the dispositional tendency to subscribe to different conspiracy theories) and conspiracy attribution (i.e., the situational tendency to subscribe to conspiracy theories about specific problematic situations). A survey dataset (N = 720) was collected in South Korea. The findings showed that institutional trust had greater effects than STEM education in explaining conspiracy orientation and attribution. On the other hand, different demographic factors had different effects on conspiracy orientation and attribution.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-05-19T04:54:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231174330
       
  • Selective Forfending on Controversial Issues Related to Large
           Corporations: An Exploration into the Public’s Acquisition and
           Transmission Characteristics by Conspiracy Orientation and Problem-Solving
           Situational Factors

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      Authors: Yuri Cha, Vishala J. Persad, SunHa Yeo
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Using the situational theory of problem solving (STOPS), this study examines the impact of closed-minded communication in the secondary digital information market in crisis situations where controversial issues about large corporations can unduly deteriorate the relationship between the business and publics. A combination model was constructed to examine the influence of the situational antecedents of STOPS and the conspiracy orientation on selective forfending. An analysis of online survey data (N = 700) revealed the influences of conspiracy orientation and factors other than problem recognition were significant among the factors for problem situations. Publics was subdivided into “non-conspiracy theorists,” “conspiracy theorists,” and “situational problem solvers” groups with the “conspiracy theorist” group performing selective forfending of business ethics issue information, engaging in the most prominent degree of acquisition and transmission of the information among the groups.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-05-19T04:53:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231174327
       
  • [De]Politicizing the Pandemic: Visually Communicating Digital Public
           Sociology

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      Authors: Laura Robinson, Juliana M. Trammel, Katia Moles
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      In the context of the COVID-19 “infodemic,” we explore discourse around a highly polarized health issue: mask wearing during the pandemic. Probing ideologically charged discourse from #masks on Twitter, we examine the potential for visual tools to promote digital citizen social science. Our case study reveals the promise of visualization to make ideological discourse on social media more easily identifiable by members of the general public. This leads us to argue that accessible visualization tools are needed for the public to ethically engage as digital citizen social scientists who actively analyze their own media consumption and outputs. Doing so would potentially awaken the sociological imagination by giving digital prosumers the agency to contextualize the social structure of debate around issues of public concern. In this way, visualizations of social media may ignite the sociological imagination in the tradition of digital public sociology.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-05-17T12:38:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231156769
       
  • Analyzing the Effect of Regional Modality in Polling Surveys: A Case Study
           of the 2020 U.S. Presidential Election Results in Florida

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      Authors: Eric Levy, ERIC Chiang, Ting Levy
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Pre-election polls have been conducted using different modes of data collection with varying degrees of accuracy. As media’s appetite for horserace polling increased, the demand for all types of data collection increased, raising the price of achieving a representative sample. Mixing modes of data collection have been popular due to the increased cost of polling using traditional methods such as face-to-face interviews, mail-in surveys, or live operator phone surveys. Due to technological advances in self-administered surveys, other forms of data collection provide more cost-effective solutions. Florida Atlantic University’s Business and Economics Polling Initiative conducted political polls throughout the fall of 2020 in anticipation of the general election for President of the United States. This unique dataset from polls conducted in September and October of 2020 showed interactive voice response (IVR) landline polling to be the most accurate statewide and across most regions of Florida. The survey data collected via opt-in online panels and via mobile phone text messaging exhibited results outside of the margin of error for certain regions. However, given the trend of declining landline phones and greater instances of exclusive mobile phone usage, polling by way of online and mobile phone surveys is becoming increasingly important.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-05-10T09:25:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231166879
       
  • COVID-19 Knowledge, Attitude, Practice, and Vaccine-Related Decision
           Making among Immigrants: A Cross-Sectional Exploratory Study

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      Authors: Parul Jain, Rukhsana Ahmed
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Immigrants are disproportionally impacted by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and of the reported positive cases and fatalities, many are from historically disadvantaged groups that face severe health inequities and suffer from health disparities. Therefore, in the current research, using cross-sectional survey of immigrants, we conduct an exploratory investigation to examine their Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice (KAP) regarding COVID-19 and the vaccine. In addition, we explore the role of subjective norms and response efficacy on vaccine-related decision making. The findings reveal that most participants were knowledgeable regarding the COVID-19 infection and the vaccine and practiced important safety behaviors to contain the spread. In addition, a significant effect of social norms and response efficacy on vaccine intentions were found suggesting the importance of integrating normative, culturally informed messaging while designing health campaigns for this hard-to-reach population. Given the small sample size, due to it being a hard-to-reach population, the findings should not be generalized, and future research should extend the study to draw broader conclusions. Implications of the findings are discussed.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-04-28T01:12:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231166880
       
  • The Role of Virtual Communication in Building an Intertwined Relation
           Between Business Resilience and Community Resilience during the COVID-19
           Pandemic

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      Authors: Paloma Bernal-Turnes, Ricardo Ernst, Enric Ordeix
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 outbreak that emerged in December 2019 has had a dramatic impact on the global economy in which consumption, trade, and service activities have been greatly disrupted. Businesses across many sectors have experienced a severe decline in sales and jobs. But the magnitude and distribution of the pandemic greatly affected small firms, due to them being more financially constrained. This article provides a comprehensive assessment of the short-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Algerian businesses. Based on a novel data set, the article shows how, beyond adjusting their labor costs and enforcing government-mandated lockdowns and social distancing, businesses could respond to the shock of COVID-19 thanks to the use of communication tools, such as the Internet and digital technologies, as well as the cooperation between companies. The article concludes that those firms that used Internet-based communication tools and those that built new ways of business cooperation and provided help to community during the lockdown showed higher survival rates after the lockdown.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-04-26T01:27:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231164043
       
  • News Sources, Partisanship, and Political Knowledge in COVID-19 Beliefs

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      Authors: Patrick Meirick
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This study analyzed data from a Pew survey (N = 5,681) to see how party identification, political knowledge, and use of different news sources related to two beliefs about COVID-19 promoted on the right early in the pandemic: that the virus was created in a laboratory and that a vaccine for it would be available within a few months. Republicans were more likely to hold these beliefs. The more that people used news outlets with right-leaning audiences, the more likely they were to hold those two beliefs. The more they used news with left-leaning audiences, the less likely they were to believe the virus was laboratory made, a relationship stronger among Democrats. Political knowledge appeared to discourage believing the virus was laboratory-made, again more so among Democrats. However, the more that Democrats (but not Republicans) used news with bipartisan audiences, the more likely they were to believe the virus was laboratory made. Similarly, the more that Democrats (but not Republicans) used social media for news, the more they believed a vaccine would be available soon, and right-leaning news use had a stronger relationship with the early vaccine belief among Democrats.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-04-21T08:52:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231164047
       
  • Exploring the Existential Implications of COVID-19 in Health Communication

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      Authors: Lindsey A Harvell-Bowman
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic provided an existential threat the world has rarely seen and forced Americans to make meaning in a world of uncertainty surrounding what most have taken for granted, being healthy. Reviewing data from several studies collected throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, this article uses COVID-19 as a case study to understand reasoning to follow (or not) the recommendations set forth by government agencies through understanding the effects of longitudinal death salience (i.e., long-term awareness of death). The Terror Management Health Model (TMHM) argues that death is a key component to the condition of human behavior to elongate life. If the TMHM is correct, then Americans should have widely followed government recommendations, but instead violence and a polarized America ensued. Implications for health communication and the TMHM are discussed, providing a path forward for health communication and existential psychology scholars.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-04-21T04:41:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231164052
       
  • How Motivation to Reduce Uncertainty Predicts COVID-19 Behavioral
           Responses: Strategic Health Communication Insights for Managing an Ongoing
           Pandemic

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      Authors: Sungsu Kim, Sung In Choi, Chiara Valentini, Mark Badham, Yan Jin
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      During highly uncertain times such as the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, it is vital to understand and predict individuals’ responses to governments’ crisis and risk communication. This study draws on the Orientation-Stimulus-Orientation-Response (O-S-O-R) model to examine (1) whether uncertainty reduction motivation (a pre-orientation factor) drove Americans to turn to traditional news media and/or social media (stimuli) to obtain COVID-19 information; (2) if these media preferences shaped their COVID-19 knowledge, cognitive information vetting, and trust in government communication (post-orientation factors); and finally (3) whether these factors contributed to their intended and actual behaviors (responses), such as getting vaccinated. Thus, this study explores how multiple communicative and cognitive mechanisms contribute to public compliance with government health recommendations during a pandemic. Mediation analyses showed positive indirect effects between uncertainty reduction motivation and behavioral outcomes via use of social media (in relation to traditional news media) and COVID-19 knowledge and cognitive information vetting. This study discusses theoretical and practical health communication implications of these findings.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-04-21T04:39:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231164051
       
  • Canada is No Exception: The 2022 Freedom Convoy, Political Entanglement,
           and Identity-Driven Protest

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      Authors: Jamie Gillies, Vincent Raynauld, Angela Wisniewski
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Canada has been relatively immune to grassroots-driven populist political forces in recent years despite global shifts toward a mainstreaming of nationalist identity-driven politics. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic coupled with other shifts in the Canadian and international political landscapes, have changed this dynamic. This article takes interest in the 2022 Freedom Convoy—also known as Convoi de la liberté in French—through the lens of Canadian political as well as science and health-based communication. The protesters’ actions, and the subsequent political response, suggest an increased political entanglement with both protest movements and identity-driven political communications and messaging.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-04-14T05:29:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231166885
       
  • Communicating Concerns, Emotional Expressions, and Disparities on Ethnic
           Communities on Social Media During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Structural
           Topic Modeling Approach

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      Authors: Jiahui Lu, Jun Liu
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Ethnic and racial disparities in the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic raise significant concerns. This study analyzes social media discourses toward four ethnic communities in the United States during the pandemic and reveals disparities in pandemic experiences among them. A total of 488,029 tweets mentioning one of the four ethnic communities, that is, Asians, Blacks, Hispanics, and Native Americans, were investigated by a structural topic modeling approach with emotional expressions and time as covariates in the topic model. The results demonstrate that discourses about Asian, Hispanics, and Native American communities were often induced by pandemic-related events, concerning topics beyond one’s community, and reflecting an experience of implicit racism and an adoption of technical supports from health systems. Meanwhile, discourses about Blacks were racially related, discussing topics within the community, and reflecting an experience of explicit racism and an adoption of psychological supports from ingroup. We discuss the implications of our findings on ethnic health disparities.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-04-13T10:47:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231164046
       
  • Predicting College Students’ Preventative Behavior During a Pandemic:
           The Role of the Health Belief Model, Source Credibility, and Health
           Literacy

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      Authors: Ifeoluwatobi Abiodun Odunsi, Kristen Leblanc Farris
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we examined the effects of perceived source credibility of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and college student health literacy in predicting the likelihood of enacting preventative behaviors related to mitigating COVID-19. Using the Health Belief Model (HBM) as an explanatory tool, we analyzed how perceived source credibility and health literacy levels predict college students’ likelihood to enact preventative behaviors during a public health crisis. Sample population entirely consisted of undergraduate students enrolled in a basic communication course at a large, southern university. The participants completed survey questionnaires about their perceived health literacy, health beliefs, trust in the CDC, perceptions of COVID-19, and demographic measures during the fall 2020 semester. A multiple regression analysis revealed that (a) HBM predictors, health literacy and CDC source credibility accounted for 44% of the variance in likelihood of enacting preventative health behaviors, and (b) health literacy, CDC source credibility, and perceived severity were all positive predictors of enacting preventative health behaviors, while (c) perceived barriers negatively predicted enactment of preventative health behaviors. Perceived susceptibility and perceived benefits were not significant predictors of college student risk mitigation. Our data suggests the importance of health literacy and source credibility in predicting college students’ likelihood to enact preventative behaviors during public health crises.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-04-12T08:40:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231164044
       
  • Visualizing the Pandemic: How the Front Pages of Local and National U.S.
           Media Used Images to Cover the Coronavirus Pandemic

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      Authors: Newly Paul
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This study explored how The New York Times and the Dallas Morning News used visuals on their front pages to frame the coronavirus pandemic in 2020 and 2021. Findings indicated that the Times was more likely to publish COVID-related images on the front page, use the threat frame in its images, and use photographs taken by staff photojournalists than sourced from wire services or freelancers. The two newspapers were equally likely to give prominence to COVID-related photos on their front pages, by publishing them above the fold. The implications of these trends are discussed.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-04-10T05:15:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231166871
       
  • Paying Attention to the Pandemic: Knowledge of COVID-19 Facts by News
           Source and Demographics

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      Authors: Molly M. King
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      The structured inequalities built into our sociotechnical institutions shape access to knowledge. During the COVID-19 pandemic, knowledge acquisition was shaped by news sources, class, and race. Through analysis of nationally representative data using logistic models, this study reveals how the use of different news sources differentially shapes access to accurate knowledge about COVID-19 topics for different demographics. Those who rely on informal and local news sources have the largest knowledge gaps about these topics, while those who seek information from national or international news outlets and politicians have the most accurate knowledge. Race and class influence knowledge of government operations, public health, and science of COVID-19. In particular, Black people, people with less education, and those with lower incomes are significantly less likely to have accurate knowledge about COVID-19, all else equal. These findings have implications for knowledge dissemination that impacts public health, as well as for how news media target different audiences in an increasingly fractured landscape.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-04-04T05:35:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231156784
       
  • “Sharing Is Caring”: Participatory Storytelling and Community Building
           on Social Media Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Jenny Zhengye Hou
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      While most health communication studies tend to adopt an information-based approach to unpacking the communication issues around COVID-19, scant attention has been paid to the emerging narratives from local communities as a way of sensemaking, self-representation, and creative responses to the pandemic. Especially locally driven narratives that convey positive emotions and exhibit remarkable resilience of the great majority are underexamined. To narrow this gap, this study analyzed a Facebook-based, participatory storytelling program to reveal how local communities (co-)construct humanized narrative accounts of lived experiences and context-specific knowledge about pandemic responses. Data collection involved qualitative content analysis of 245 user-generated stories, associated with comments and engagement from the group members, for a 6-month period. Results show that open and participatory storytelling on social media affords a pathway of performing togetherness even though individuals narrate their lived pandemic experiences differently. Such performing togetherness somewhat facilitated virtual community building. This study contributes to the health communication literature with a refreshing perspective of understanding the grounded, participatory storytelling as a vehicle of collective sensemaking and community spirit-lifting.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-04-01T05:05:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231164040
       
  • When Lockdowns Force “Everyone” to Work From Home: Inequalities in
           Telework During COVID-19 in Uruguay

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      Authors: Matías Dodel, María Julia Acosta
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Working from home (WFH) arrangements have been on the rise globally throughout the 21st century. Despite this trajectory, developing economies have trailed developed countries in adopting such arrangements. However, because of COVID-19 lockdowns and social distancing measures, countries such as Uruguay, where teleworking was scarce and unregulated, were forced to adopt this practice to ensure business continuity. Under such conditions, preexisting organizational and individual disparities stratified the likelihood of WFH during the pandemic. Conventional wisdom holds that the main determinants potential-to-telework stems almost exclusively from the nature of jobs themselves. This article expands the traditional understanding of telework determinants by showing that during the first stages of the pandemic, individual features of the worker, and organizational and managerial features of the employer, were both determinative of the likelihood that a given worker would work from home. We conducted a secondary data analysis of the March 2020 wave of the Work Monitor, a web-based survey of 847 employed Uruguayan adults. We fitted several multivariate regression models predicting (a) the odds of working for a company which adopted COVID-19-related teleworking policies at least for some workers and (b) the odds of WFH as a consequence of COVID-19. As the adoption of telework was largely unplanned and abrupt, results show that disparities on organizational adoption of teleworking policies were related to pre-pandemic differences across organizations in terms of preparedness, technological investment, and management practices. Results also show that employers’ willingness to enable WFH policies was the strongest predictor, at any level, of the likelihood of individuals to telework during the national emergency. Individual disparities in terms of human capital also have a great impact on the likelihood of teleworking during lockdowns, but their effect depends on the existence of organizational teleworking policies. Findings’ implications for the present and future of telework in developing countries are discussed.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-03-18T05:26:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231155370
       
  • The COVID-19 Pandemic and E-Learning: The Digital Divide and Educational
           Crises in Pakistan’s Universities

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      Authors: Sadia Jamil, Glenn Muschert
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Recent advances, in information and communication technology (ICT), have significantly impacted some critical sectors of societies (such as transport, health, business, and communication) across many developed and developing countries. Nevertheless, the Internet has proliferated unequally across the world, resulting in global digital inequalities. The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic led to the dependence on online education to prevent the interruption of academic progress in schools and universities worldwide. The global pandemic further worsened the situation for Pakistan, which is neither economically strong nor is the country’s ICT infrastructure well-established to facilitate the successful accomplishment of virtual courses and classes. Thus, this study aimed to analyze the level of Internet access among the Pakistani universities’ teachers and students, and their ICT skills as they applied to online education during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study used the qualitative method of email interviews and thematic analysis to present the study’s results. This study revealed that most Pakistani students, especially those from rural and remote areas, experienced challenges because they neither had proper Internet access, nor could they use laptops and virtual learning systems. Students, who belonged to the upper and middle classes of urban areas and enrolled in private-sector universities, were not as directly affected by Pakistan’s pervasive digital divide to carryout their education during the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-03-17T12:10:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231156779
       
  • Zooming Versus Slacking: Videoconferencing, Instant Messaging, and
           Work-from-Home Intentions in the Early Pandemic

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      Authors: Jeremy Schulz, Øyvind Wiborg, Laura Robinson
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores key determinants of the intention to work from home (WFH) among U.S. adults in the early phase of the pandemic. Leveraging nationally representative survey data collected in the initial stages of the pandemic, it explores the role of modalities of communication alongside the more frequently studied behavioral, occupational, and sociodemographic factors in shaping WFH intentions as reported by survey respondents. Venturing beyond prior studies of remote work and remote work intentions, the study finds that the frequency of text messaging platform (e.g., Slack) usage and the frequency of videoconferencing (e.g., Zoom) exhibit diametrically opposed effects on the intentions to WFH in the future. Whereas a higher frequency of text messaging platform usage is linked to a preference for more intensive future WFH, a higher frequency of videoconferencing platform usage is associated with the opposite preference. Additionally, the effect of the intensity of respondents’ engagement with these two communication modalities on their intentions is mediated by pre-pandemic WFH experience as well as the intensity of interruptions in their WFH environment. Intensive videoconferencers (Zoomers) who work in high-interruption environments are particularly averse to future WFH. Conversely, intensive messagers (Slackers) who work from home substantially prior to the pandemic report express a preference for more frequent WFH in the future.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-03-09T11:16:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231155364
       
  • The Perceived Impacts of COVID-19 on Users’ Acceptance of Virtual
           Reality Hardware: A Digital Divide Perspective

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      Authors: Kuo-Ting Huang, Christopher Ball, Jess Francis
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic has directly or indirectly impacted everyone around the globe. However, the pandemic and its long-term consequences have not been distributed evenly within societies. These disparities have in many cases intensified existing social and economic inequalities such as the uptake of novel digital technologies. This study investigates the influence of the pandemic on the acceptance of virtual reality (VR) hardware within the framework of the technology acceptance model (TAM) and the digital divide/inequality scholarship. A survey was designed to examine the perceived impact of COVID-19 on the potential adoption of VR hardware. Specifically, this study included variables related to perceived ease of using VR hardware (ease of use), perceived usefulness of VR hardware (usefulness), intention to use VR hardware (use intention), and intention to purchase VR hardware (purchase intention). The predictors included two digital divide variables (material access and VR experience) and two other variables (COVID-19 and demographic variables). A total of 298 participants were recruited from Amazon Mechanical Turk. The results suggest that the perceived impacts of COVID-19 positively predicted participants’ perceived usefulness of VR hardware as well as their intention to use and purchase VR hardware.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-03-02T04:56:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231156775
       
  • COVID-19 Communication and Media: The First Pandemic of the Digital Age

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      Authors: Jeremy Schulz, Laura Robinson, Massimo Ragnedda, Cara Chiaraluce, Oliver Kleinmann
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This issue of American Behavioral Scientist marshals case studies of online media platforms such as Zoom, YouTube, and Twitter and digital hardware systems such as virtual reality technology to assess the often unexpected interactions between the pandemic and digital technologies. The issue leads with a case study of Zoom to examine the laregely successful efforts which Zoom made in the wake of the pandemic to resolve unanticipated privacy and security problems afflicting the suddenly ubiquitous and indispensable platform. Subsequently, the issue charts the growing tensions between competing proprietary and open-source institutional logics during the pandemic. In the next section, articles consider the spread of covid-related information on YouTube and news outlets to take a comparative angle of vision both internationally and in terms of the dynamics of media production and reception in different cultural and societal environments. Variation is also key to the articles in the last section where research focuses on persistent digital usage gaps. Here the articles touch on the socioeconomic factors driving differentiated knowledge about the pandemic, as well as the relatively low uptake of digital technologies among older adults in housing facilities. Finally, we also learn about the effect of the social isolation and anxieties of the pandemic on the uptake of a new form of digital hardware, virtual reality equipment. Finally, the issue closes with an eye to visualization tools needed for the future to close this discussion of the digitization of the 100-year crisis occasioned by the COVID-19 pandemic. These contributions take the measure of how the pandemic intersected with digitized communications and media in varied and, at times, unequal ways, as well as lessons applicable to future crises.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-03-02T04:53:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231155381
       
  • Navigating Pandemic Crises: Encountering the Digital Commons

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      Authors: Sara Schoonmaker
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Since the 19th century, sociologists have grappled with understanding the dynamics of social change. In this article, I explore three key changes that emerged with the COVID-19 pandemic. First, professional workers, students, and others who could manage it used platforms like Zoom to shift their work and social activities online to minimize exposure to the virus. At the same time, this surge of online activity expanded the opportunities for corporations and governments to engage in surveillance by collecting user data. I call this the “pandemic surveillance paradox.” This paradox posed potential threats to civil liberties, and particularly the right to privacy, since many users were unaware of the nature and extent of this data collection process. Second, free software and other privacy advocates built on their prior work to educate software and Internet users about strategies to protect their privacy and encounter the digital commons. In the digital commons, all participants can access, use, modify, and share software, the Internet, scientific, educational, and cultural resources. Third, during the pandemic, open science and open education advocates made vital contributions to the digital commons. They accelerated the scientific research process to develop vaccines and treatments for the virus, and disseminated key public health information and other educational resources. Through these diverse activities, digital commoners navigated crises arising from the COVID-19 pandemic by forging alternatives to the dominant capitalist system rooted in profit and proprietary control.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-03-02T04:52:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231155360
       
  • U.S. Nonprofit Organizations Respond to the COVID-19 Crisis: The Influence
           of Communication, Crisis Experiences, Crisis Management, and
           Organizational Characteristics

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      Authors: Ryan P. Fuller, Ronald E. Rice, Andrew Pyle
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Nonprofit organizations (NPOs) are significant contributors culturally, socially, and economically, but little research has focused on their management of organizational crises. Research has been quickly documenting impacts of the COVID-19 crisis on different sectors, but again less so for NPOs. This is significant because research and recommendations developed in one sector (such as for-profit corporations) may not translate to others (such as NPOs). NPOs are particularly vulnerable due to their dependence on public financial support and demands on their resource during crises. We report on a unique and unfortunate opportunity to assess response dynamics from a half year before (2019) and a half year after (2020) the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. We draw on a unique dataset (combining surveys at two points in time, Twitter use data, and financial information, from 578 NPOs) to develop a general model (grounded in the discourse of renewal theory) of five sources of influence (communication, organizational resources, crisis experience, crisis management, crisis impacts) on three types of strategic responses by nonprofits (retrenchment, persevering, and innovating) to COVID-19. Higher levels of communication, crisis experience, and crisis management all predicted greater tendencies for persevering and innovating in response to COVID-19. The implications for research and practice include extending crisis communication research to the nonprofit sector and demonstrating how NPOs can strengthen themselves to recover from COVID-19 or the next crisis.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-02-27T11:24:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231155380
       
  • From Safety Net to Safety Trap: Informality and Telework During the
           Coronavirus Pandemic in Latin America

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      Authors: Daniela de los Santos, Inés Fynn
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      In Latin America, informality has historically operated as a safety net during economic crises, by absorbing unemployed workers and providing income. However, unlike past economic crises, the 2020 crisis unleashed by the outbreak of the new coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) is not only economic but has resulted from a health emergency that requires social distance and isolation. In this article we argue that, in the context of social distancing and confinement measures, informal work constitutes a safety trap instead of operating as a safety net. First, informality as an economic subsistence mechanism is limited given that working activities in the informal sector are less convertible to remote jobs. Second, even when telework may be a viable option, the home conditions of informal workers often hinder the feasibility of telework. In making this argument, we bring to bear a conceptualization of potential to telework which includes both occupational and household components, the latter an often-neglected piece of the telework puzzle. To evaluate our argument, we conduct a quantitative cross-country analysis of seven Latin American countries (Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, El Salvador, Mexico, Peru, and Uruguay). The empirical analysis consists of a descriptive assessment of the potential to telework of informal workers.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-02-27T11:17:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231155365
       
  • Prison, Material-Organizational Bricolage, and Precarious Frameworks of
           Normality in an Era of Disruption

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      Authors: Noah McClain
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Prison scholars have long noted prisoners’ improvisation with materials and resources at hand (or bricolage) in ways that defy the prison regime. Yet longstanding scholarly perspectives which cite such bricolage as evidence for themes like “prison culture” or “resistance” have often distracted scholars from accounting for the specific features of organizational materials and operations that prisoners leverage in their bricolage, and distracted from the rather mundane nature of the practices—like grooming, cleaning, and eating—they thus serve. Drawing from interviews with de-incarcerated persons from a U.S. state prison system, and from documents memorializing the disruption of prison routines during COVID-19 pandemic in that same state, this article investigates the specific resources prisoners enlist in bricolage projects related to making and sharing meals. Those resources, I argue, are the material and organizational products and byproducts of the complex prison undertaking. The practices prisoners achieve are precarious, with low degrees of equifinality–there are only so many ways to accomplish them in contexts of comprehensive restriction. The COVID-19 pandemic threatened those delicate arrangements not only through problems in the acquisition of raw food materials, but also through disrupted institutional routines which offer the resources necessary to coordinate, assemble, and transform those materials into meals. This pattern comes into focus when the “prison food system” is approached as a consumption system like any other, though one which operates in a strictly regulated context with minimal materials and deeply curtailed choice.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-02-27T11:12:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231155378
       
  • COVID-19, Creative Conflict, and the Seven Cs: A Social Diagnosis of
           Digital Communication Platforms for Gen Z/Gen T

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      Authors: Katia Moles, Laura Robinson, Lloyd Levine, Cara Chiaraluce
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Adding to the work on creative conflict management that has been the object of organizational and management studies for the last several decades, we focus on a subset of Gen Z or “Generation Tech” (Gen T). This generation will be the first to instinctively and reflexively bring a “technology first” approach to their work practices including conflict resolution. Scholars of organizational communication identify the management of creative conflict as a prosocial process with important ramifications for organizational well-being. Taking a social diagnosis approach, we contribute to this growing literature by bringing it into dialogue with digital sociology and Gen Ters who are well-suited to use digital communication platforms (DCPs) like Teams and Slack to engage in creative conflict that benefits the well-being of organizations and their members. Our analysis shows that DCPs can encourage prosocial behaviors, when they (1) include nonsynchronous functionality, (2) associate contributions with members’ real names, and (3) make all interactions visible to all team members. Our study reveals that when organizational DCPs are governed by these parameters, they can foster the Seven Cs of Creative Conflict that we identify as clarity, candor, contribution, cooperation, challenge, courage, and collegiality. The Seven Cs foster a growth mindset feedback loop in which members learn to self-reflectively apply a social diagnostic approach to their own digitally mediated well-being, thereby potentially improving organizational communication. Therefore, the Seven Cs form a core of communication competencies that will be increasingly important for organizational success as Gen Ters continue to mature and become colleagues in a variety of organizations.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-02-27T11:10:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231155372
       
  • Locked In and Locked Out: How COVID-19 Is Making the Case for Digital
           Inclusion of Incarcerated Populations

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      Authors: Bianca C. Reisdorf
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Digital inequalities have been exacerbated for many marginalized populations during the COVID-19 pandemic. This is no different for one of the most marginalized populations in the United States, incarcerated people. Due to the pandemic, in-person visitations as well as educational and vocational programming were, and in many cases remain, suspended across numerous correctional facilities, leaving incarcerated people even more socially isolated than before the pandemic. Although an increasing number of facilities provide prison tablets for entertainment and communication purposes, high prices for electronic messages, video visitations, books, and entertainment content leave incarcerated people and their families unable to pay for these services. As best practice examples from California, Maine, New York City, and Pennsylvania demonstrate, connecting prisons to the internet and allowing incarcerated people secure access to the internet is possible, and long overdue. The pandemic has highlighted these issues and provides an opportunity to overhaul outdated ideas about prison communication.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-02-27T11:08:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231155369
       
  • Why Zoom Is Not Doomed Yet: Privacy and Security Crisis Response in the
           COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Wenhong Chen, Yuan Zou
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic not only fueled the explosive growth of Zoom but also led to a major privacy and security crisis in March 2020. This research examines Zoom’s response to this privacy and security crisis with the aid of a producer’s perspective that aims to direct attention to institutional and organizational actors and draws on theories of privacy management and organizational crisis communication. We primarily use data from 14 weekly Ask Eric Anything webinars from April 8 to July 15, 2020, to illustrate the strategies of Zoom’s crisis response, especially organizational representation, the contours of its analytic account acknowledging and minimizing responsibility, and patterns of corrective and preventive action for user education and product improvement. Results demonstrate the usefulness of the producer’s perspective that sheds light on how Zoom navigated the privacy and security crisis. Special attention is paid to the mobilization of networks of executives, advisors, consultants, and clients for expertise, endorsement, and collaboration. It is argued that Zoom’s response strategies have contributed to Zoom’s organizational mission and culture and reframed the crisis from a growing pain to a growth opportunity relating to privacy and security. Zoom’s nimble, reasonable, collaborative, interactive yet curated organizational response to the privacy and security crisis can be seen as an unintended consequence of its sudden rise amid a global pandemic. It offers a useful model for tech firms’ crisis response at a crucial moment for the tech industry around the world.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-02-27T11:07:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231155367
       
  • Commercialization on “Sharing Platforms”: The Case of Airbnb
           Hosting

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      Authors: Mehmet Cansoy, Juliet Schor
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      An underdeveloped theme in scholars’ understanding of the personal services sector of the platform economy—also known as the “sharing economy”—is change. Most research on ride-hail, food delivery, accommodations, and other personal services has offered largely essentialist accounts. In this paper, we focus on how platforms have become increasingly “commercialized.” In labor-intensive services, commercialization occurs as a growing fraction of the work is done by a core of full-time, dedicated workers. However, platforms that rely primarily on capital may display similar dynamics, in which a small number of participants account for the majority of activity and capture the largest share of value. In this paper, we present the first comprehensive account of commercialization of a major platform. We analyze how Airbnb markets in the 10 largest short-term rental markets in the United States changed between 2015 and 2019. We find considerable evidence of commercialization, as a rising majority of properties are rented on a very frequent basis, and casual listings, while still present, are a small and falling percentage. Relying on an original database of regulations, we show that enactment of even the strictest regulations has not durably reduced the number of listings and has had limited success in altering the mix of commercialized and casual listings over this period. We also consider the impact of COVID-19 on this platform and the sharing sector. We conclude that the short-term rental market on Airbnb has become a fairly conventional one, with little of the peer-to-peer character of its earlier days.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-02-24T06:44:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231155366
       
  • A Cross-National Study of Fear Appeal Messages in YouTube Trending Videos
           About COVID-19

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      Authors: Yee Man Margaret Ng
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic has underlined the need for investigating the prevalence and nature of health communication on social media. Applying the Extended Parallel Process Model, this study analyzes the use of fear appeals in 2,152 YouTube trending videos across six countries (the United States, Brazil, Russia, Taiwan, Canada, and New Zealand) from January to May 2020. The findings reveal that, during the early stage of the outbreak, COVID-19-themed videos gained early attention in Taiwan but encountered a prolonged delay in the United States and Brazil. Specifically, COVID-19 videos featured the least in Brazil’s trending list. The results from a supervised machine learning coding approach further suggest that videos’ threat levels exceeded efficacy beliefs across all countries. This imbalance of threat–efficacy messages was most significant in hard-hit countries Brazil and Russia, which social media may run the risk of feeding fear to the public agenda. These findings alert content creators and social media platforms to create a threat–efficacy equilibrium, prioritizing content that promotes a sense of self- and community efficacy and increases people’s belief that effective protective actions are available.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-02-21T12:41:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231155363
       
  • Digital Distance in Times of Physical Distancing: ICT Infrastructure and
           Use in Long-Term Care Facilities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alexander Seifert, Shelia R. Cotten
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Although information and communication technologies (ICTs) such as smartphones, tablets, and the internet have all become increasingly important during the COVID-19 pandemic, we often forget that not everyone has access to the internet or uses ICT devices. Individuals on the wrong side of the digital divide are often older adults living in long-term care facilities (LTCFs), such as “old–old” adults, who often have various functional impairments. To shed light on the initial situation shortly before the pandemic, three data sources from Switzerland were used in this study to answer the following questions: (1) Do older adults want to have internet access if and/or when they move into a LTCF' (2) What form does ICT use take (specifically internet, smartphone, and tablet use) among LTCF residents, and what need do they have for ICT support' (3) What is the state of LTCFs’ ICT infrastructure and residents’ level of involvement in the decision-making process related to acquiring new technologies' Community-dwelling older adults in this study reported a desire to have internet access when moving into LTCFs, and 21% of LTCF residents reported using the internet just before the pandemic began. Internet access and ICT infrastructure in LTCFs, in general, are both limited, however, and LTCF managers seldom involve older adults in the ICT decision-making process. While modern ICT usage has reached the long-term care sector, the results of this study show that compensating for a lack of physical social contacts by relying on digital solutions during the COVID-19 pandemic cannot be the sole solution. The current pandemic has reminded us that a digital gap exists and that non-use of ICTs during the pandemic can produce additional feelings of social isolation.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-02-21T08:59:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231155361
       
  • Gig Work, Telework, Precarity, and the Pandemic

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      Authors: Jeremy Schulz, Laura Robinson, Noah McClain, Bianca C. Reisdorf
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This issue examines technology-driven economic developments during the global COVID-19 pandemic in Europe, Asia, and the Americas. Specifically, the articles cover the ways that gig work, the platform economy, and remote work have evolved during the course of the pandemic. The issue leads with articles that chart the interplay of the platform economy with various facets of the pandemic from the inequalities and risks faced by gig workers to market forces shaping the commercialization of hosting platforms. The following articles concentrate on the ways in which specific structural conditions—digital infrastructure as well as the structure of the economy—influence the unequal distribution of telework in Uruguay and the relationship between informality and remote work opportunities across Latin America. The last two articles explore remote work in Asia and North America. In the first of these two articles remote work in Japan is examined in order to investigate the cultural sources of resistance to the adoption of remote work. In the second and concluding article, the remote work preferences of U.S. adults are analyzed as a function of technology usage (videoconferencing versus instant messaging) as well as sociodemographic and occupational attributes.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-02-14T12:45:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231155371
       
  • Organizational and Institutional Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Jeremy Schulz, Laura Robinson, Maria Laura Ruiu, Apryl Williams
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This issue of American Behavioral Scientist deals with the various ways in which different kinds of organizations cope with the manifold challenges brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. Together, these articles map the challenges and opportunities encountered by a variety of organizations in a major public health crisis. The first section of the issue takes up the theme of adaptive crisis response in relation to two different kinds of organizations. This section begins with a comprehensive overview of U.S. nonprofit organizations’ responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. The second article expands on the theme of communication practices in organizations using digital communication platforms which facilitate constructive forms of disagreement or “creative conflict.” Both of these articles indicate the potential positive outcomes of entrepreneurial organizational response. In the next section, we turn to organizational responses hampered by digital inequalities. The first article addresses digital inequalities and eLearning during the pandemic in the country of Pakistan. The next article also uses a digital inequalities framework to probe infrastructural inadequacies faced by the criminal justice system in terms of hindrances to external communication for incarcerated populations during the pandemic. This pair of articles underscores the importance of infrastructure as a necessary element of successful crisis response. The third section of the issue continues with case studies of carceral institutions with the first article offering insight into strategies used by incarcerated people to generate a sense of normality despite pandemic disruptions. Finally, the issue closes with an article revealing the delicate balancing act which rural U.S. law enforcement carried out when competing imperatives made it extremely difficult to manage public health and public safety simultaneously.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-02-14T12:44:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642231155373
       
  • Ideological Presuppositions in Media Coverage of Corporation Tax Policy in
           the UK and Ireland: A Critical Discourse Analysis

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      Authors: Ciara Graham, Brendan K. O’Rourke
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This paper argues that the state’s capacity to tax corporations in order to fund itself is reaching crisis proportions. Following decades of trade liberalization, deregulation, and globalization, large multinational companies have been able to take advantage of tax competition between states in order to avoid taxation and offset their obligations. This crisis, arguably, has been facilitated by state actors and exacerbated by non-state actors: we explore the ways in which multi-national corporations (MNCs) manipulate their capital, assets, and supply chains to minimize their tax burdens; and we further consider the ways in which media narratives construct this issue and whether they challenge the practice or intensify it. Discourse surrounding taxation plays a huge part in what is considered acceptable. While the old adage that “death and taxes” cannot be avoided, it has become clear that large companies, helped by a tax avoidance industry do indeed manage to do just that. Discourse analysis reveals the ways in which ideology can be used to manage consensus around this potentially controversial subject and this paper seeks to explicate that by examining the frames, presuppositions and discursive formations present within the discourse structure. The argument is developed through a comparative case study research design demonstrating the different policy-based, economic and historical contexts of the two jurisdictions which offer some insight and explanation of the distinctive ideological discursive formations that are present within the discourses.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-02-14T12:41:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642221144830
       
  • A Qualitative Investigation of Professionals’ Perceptions of Working in
           Senior Care Organizations During the First Year of the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Katey A. Price
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Senior care organizations were some of the hardest hit by COVID-19 infections and deaths early in the pandemic, both for those receiving care as well as staff; 22% of COVID-19-related deaths through March, April, and May of 2020 occurred in the senior care facility population. Professionals in senior care are an important population to understand as they have had to navigate a constantly changing work environment, increasing workloads, less support to safely and effectively conduct their work, and an ever-evolving communication environment. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven professionals employed by a variety of senior care organizations across the United States. Inductive thematic analysis revealed four themes related to perceptions of organizational functioning in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The themes indicate that similar issues were encountered by professionals working in senior care, however, job type impacted the perceptions of those issues. Structuration theory is applied to the findings to explain how structure and agency are created and reinforced in the social systems of senior care organizations.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-01-18T09:14:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642221145028
       
  • Deep Conventionality, or, Tracing the Meanings of Conventional Rituals

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      Authors: Hizky Shoham
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Can conventional rituals be meaningful' When and how can conventionality be part of processes of meaning-making rather than a mere obstacle that the cultural analyst must overcome' The article traces the meanings of minor rituals that populate the world of modern industrial societies and seem to have universal appeal. The article applies a Blochian regressive method to ethnological history in order to re-create the gradual process in which conventions appear, are disseminated, popularized, turned into group icons, and ritualized, and only then—and only sometimes—acquire discursive meanings that are often contested. This sequential model reveals the power of conventionality—the lack of contemplation about social conventions—in the processes of popularizing, ritualizing, and iconizing conventional acts. In the terms of Alexander’s meaning-centered performance theory, this conventionality exemplifies a “perfect” or “effortless” fusion of performers and audience. The article thus argues that the meanings of conventional rituals—and perhaps also of conventional performances of more “sacred” rituals—often lie not in symbolic significance or semiotic thickness, but in deep conventionality: meaningfulness encoded in the convention itself.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-01-18T09:06:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642221145025
       
  • Events and Crises: Toward a Conceptual Clarification

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      Authors: Ioana Sendroiu
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims for a conceptual model of how crises and events function together and apart, starting from the view that the two are not interchangeable. I therefore define events as structural transformations that can be the object of empirical knowledge, but which are not self-evident or known to all as they take place. Crisis-claims, meanwhile, are performative judgments or demands for a different future. Given that structural transformations are not self-evident in the moment, a crisis-claim, in this sense, is a guess that an event is taking place. This distinction is elucidated through a computational text analysis of U.S. media reporting on shootings, focusing on the month before and the month after George Floyd’s death. Building on this conceptual distinction, I argue that events and crises can coincide, constitute, and even modify the other. But crises can occur without reference to events, and events can take place which are not deemed to be crises.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-01-18T08:58:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642221144843
       
  • Music Videos as Health Promotion: Juvenile’s “Vax That Thang Up” and
           the Promotion of the COVID-19 Vaccine in the Black Community

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      Authors: Deion Hawkins, Sharifa Simon-Roberts
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19 data reveals that the disease has disproportionately affected the Black community, yet the lowest vaccination rates can be found among this demographic. A myriad of factors can explain this health disparity, but structural barriers such as availability and vaccine apprehension amongst the Black community emerge as two primary reasons. Despite targeted outreach, traditional health campaigns directed at the Black community did not yield results; many argue this was due to the community’s history of medical exploitation and rightful distrust of the medical sector. Instead, the Black community turned to popular culture as a primary means of health information. In turn, Juvenile’s classic song “Back That Thang Up” was repurposed into a vaccine anthem—“Vax That Thang Up.” The PSA, which infuses hip-hop, health promotion, and the power of music videos, sparked controversy and has over 3 million views on YouTube. These considerations serve as the basis of this study, which will interrogate the intersection of health communication and pop culture, in relation to the music video—“Vax That Thang Up.” The researchers will employ the culture-centered approach to unpack how the music video disrupted traditional aspects of health communication campaigns.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T06:56:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642221145027
       
  • Prisons, Jails, and the Environment: Why Environmentalists Should Care
           About Mass Incarceration'

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      Authors: Dorceta E. Taylor
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the relationship between mass incarceration and environmental inequalities. The United States incarcerates more people than any other country, and incarceration is highly racialized. The article discusses how prisons are settler colonial ecosystems that produce injustice. Prisons are located close to hazardous sites and in areas prone to extreme weather events. Food insecurity is also commonplace in jails. The article introduces concepts such as carceral food justice and carceral food sovereignty to recognize the unique circumstances that inmates experience in their quest to acquire healthy, affordable, adequate, and culturally desirable food.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-01-06T04:53:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642221142206
       
  • A Vanishing Food Infrastructure: The Closure of Food Outlets in Flint in a
           Pandemic Era

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      Authors: Ashley Bell, Dorceta E. Taylor
      Abstract: American Behavioral Scientist, Ahead of Print.
      Most food access studies focus on large cities, examine traditional grocery stores, and only consider operational food outlets. This siloed approach exposes a gap in food access literature. Therefore, as a part of our assessment of Flint’s food landscape, we examined closed food outlets in the city and surrounding townships. We investigated the relationship between the racial composition of census tracts and the number and type of defunct food outlets identified. We used Data Axle to collect and verify data on open and closed food outlets between September 2020 and December 2021. We made a final verification of the food outlet closures in June 2022. We used ArcGIS 10.8.1 and SPSS Version 28 to map and analyze the data. We used negative binomial regression models to determine differences in the likelihood of having an additional closed food outlet in census tracts with low and high percentages of Black residents. We also investigated the relationship between a census tract’s median income and the likelihood of having an additional closed food outlet. There were 173 closed food outlets; 81 were in Flint, and 92 were in surrounding townships. The most frequently closed food outlets were restaurants; they accounted for 45.1% of the closures. The mean number of closed food venues in census tracts where less than 40% of the residents were Black was 1.5. The mean was similar in census tracts where 40% or more of the residents were Black; it was 1.6. This difference was not significant. However, the median income of a census tract was a significant predictor of the likelihood of having an additional closed food outlet. Every one-thousand-dollar increase in median income resulted in a 2% less likelihood of having an additional closed food outlet. The results of this study show that there is more to the food landscape of a city than its operational food outlets. Focusing exclusively on active food outlets does not accurately depict a city's food infrastructure.
      Citation: American Behavioral Scientist
      PubDate: 2023-01-06T04:47:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027642221142202
       
 
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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 100)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 347)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Ágora - studies in psychoanalytic theory     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ajayu Órgano de Difusión Científica del Departamento de Psicología UCBSP     Open Access  
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 66)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 267)
An-Nafs : Jurnal Fakultas Psikologi     Open Access  
Anales de Psicología / Annals of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access  
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analogías del Comportamiento     Open Access  
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 92)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 346)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Psicología     Open Access  
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 209)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aprender     Open Access  
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Archives of Depression and Anxiety     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal  
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 200)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 199)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 88)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Art Therapy : Research, Practice, and Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access  
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 89)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Couple and Family Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos Hispanoamericanos de Psicología     Open Access  
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Culture - Society - Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Culture and Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)

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